Sample records for lighting measures sensors

  1. ERROR MODELS FOR LIGHT SENSORS BY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF RAW SENSOR MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    silicon solar cell that converts light impulses directly into electrical charges that can easily-based systems including calibration, sensor fusion and power management. We developed a system of statistical the standard procedure is to use error models to enable calibration, in a variant of our approach, we use

  2. Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

  3. Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    Wireless sensor networks for measuring traffic University of California, Berkeley Sing Yiu Cheung, Sinem Coleri, and Pravin Varaiya 2 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle wireless sensor networks compete? 7 Outline · Traffic measurement · Wireless Sensor Networks · Vehicle

  4. Light and Energy -Daylight measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light and Energy - Daylight measurements #12;Light and Energy - Daylight measurements Authors: Jens;3 Title Light and Energy Subtitle Daylight measurements Authors Jens Christoffersen, Ásta Logadóttir ........................................................................................................ 5 Daylight quantity

  5. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  6. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  7. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 4 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each

  8. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 3 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: "Dimmability." Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light

  9. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 5 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each area 3. Shut

  10. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION 5 Additions and Alterations Any alteration that increases the connected lighting load must meet all No measures required OUTDOOR LIGHTING11/20/2014 #12;SECTION 5 BACKLIGHT, UPLIGHT, AND GLARE (BUG) RATINGS

  11. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION level of each multi-tier garage. · General lighting must have occupant sensing controls with at least one control step between 20% and 50% of design lighting power · No more than 500 watts of rated

  12. Sensors & Measurement | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Electronics Systems Research Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Sensors &...

  13. Sensors & Measurement | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    elements. The nexus of sensors, signal processing and analysis, modeling, and advanced control algorithms and architectures underpin this important field of technology at ORNL....

  14. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohler, Stewart M.; Allen, James J.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator for drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows, for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  15. Inertial measurement unit using rotatable MEMS sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MEM inertial sensor (e.g. accelerometer, gyroscope) having integral rotational means for providing static and dynamic bias compensation is disclosed. A bias compensated MEM inertial sensor is described comprising a MEM inertial sense element disposed on a rotatable MEM stage. A MEM actuator drives the rotation of the stage between at least two predetermined rotational positions. Measuring and comparing the output of the MEM inertial sensor in the at least two rotational positions allows for both static and dynamic bias compensation in inertial calculations based on the sensor's output. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising a plurality of independently rotatable MEM inertial sensors and methods for making bias compensated inertial measurements are disclosed.

  16. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  17. Lighting Controls/Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design Jump to: navigation, search

  18. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks Byungkun, MA 02139, USA ABSTRACT The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting ­ united with the rich details offered by sensor networks ­ prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we

  19. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    EXTERIOR SPACES COMPLY WITH TITLE 24 There are two major steps for exterior spaces to comply with Title 24 for exterior space. A space complies with these requirements if the actual lighting power used in the space. Backlight Backlight includes all illumination that is in the space between the ground and 80 degrees above

  20. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network Matthew in smart lighting, energy efficiency, and ubiquitous sensing, we present the design of polychromatic solid-state energy. Keywords: Solid state lighting, energy efficiency, sensor networks, optimization, spectral

  1. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  2. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paradiso, Joseph A.

    Motivated by opportunities in smart lighting, energy efficiency, and ubiquitous sensing, we present the design of polychromatic solid-state lighting controlled using a sensor network. We developed both a spectrally tunable ...

  3. NIST Measurement Services: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Measurement Services: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration NIST Special Publication 250-65 Benjamin K Special Publication 250-65 NIST MEASUREMENT SERVICES: Heat-Flux Sensor Calibration Benjamin K. Tsai GAITHERSBURG, MD: 2004 #12;iii PREFACE The calibration and related measurement services of the National

  4. Using Simple Light Sensors to Achieve Smart Daylight Harvesting Jiakang Lu, Dagnachew Birru, Kamin Whitehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Using Simple Light Sensors to Achieve Smart Daylight Harvesting Jiakang Lu, Dagnachew Birru, Kamin demonstrate how to improve the effectiveness of daylight harvesting with a sin- gle light sensor on each sky to predict the incoming daylight and set window transparency accordingly. We evaluate our system

  5. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  6. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  7. Spatially distributed temperatures at the base of two mountain snowpacks measured with fiber-optic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selker, John

    Spatially distributed temperatures at the base of two mountain snowpacks measured with fiber-optic sensors Scott W. TYLER,1 Susan A. BURAK,2 James P. MCNAMARA,3 Aurele LAMONTAGNE,3 John S. SELKER,4 Jeff, which use the scattered light in a standard telecommunications fiber-optic cable to infer absolute

  8. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  9. Congestion Avoidance based on Light-Weight Buffer Management in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shigang

    , congestion may occur as data packets converge toward a sink. Congestion causes energy waste, throughput1 Congestion Avoidance based on Light-Weight Buffer Management in Sensor Networks Shigang Chen, and above all, energy supply. When a critical event triggers a surge of data generated by the sensors

  10. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, William D. (Laramie, WY); Naughton, Jonathan (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  11. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  12. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

  13. Recovery of signals measured by inaccurate sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Lijin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . [26] F. Natterer, "EAicient evaluation of oversampled functions, " Journal of Computation and Applied Mathematics, vol. 14, pp. 303-309, 1986. 51 [27] L. Rutkowski, "Identification of MISO nonlinear regression in the presence of a wide class.... Lindner, G. A. Zvonar, W. T. Baumann and P. L. Delos, "Nonlinearity effects of a model domain optical fiber sensor in a vibration suppression control loop for a flexible structure, " Journal of Vibration, Acoustics, Stress, and Reliability in Design...

  14. Sensors & Measurement | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is TakingDepartmentSensitivities ofSensors and

  15. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  16. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

  17. Sensors & Measurement | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook TwitterSearch-CommentsSolid-State lighting Electrical and

  18. Tactile measurement with a GelSight sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenzhen, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis introduces a method of measuring contact force with GelSight. GelSight is an optical-based tactile sensor that uses a piece of coated elastomer as the contact medium. A camera records the distortion of the ...

  19. Surface Plasmon Sensor Based on the Enhanced Light Transmission through Arrays of Nanoholes in Gold Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    Surface Plasmon Sensor Based on the Enhanced Light Transmission through Arrays of Nanoholes in Gold upon the resonant surface plasmon enhanced transmission through the array of nanoholes. The sensitivity was found to be 400 nm per refractive index unit, which is comparable to other grating-based surface plasmon

  20. Measurement of Dynamic Light Scattering Intensity in Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochas, Cyrille

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the scientific literature little attention has been given to the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS) as a tool for extracting the thermodynamic information contained in the absolute intensity of light scattered by gels. In this article we show that DLS yields reliable measurements of the intensity of light scattered by the thermodynamic fluctuations, not only in aqueous polymer solutions, but also in hydrogels. In hydrogels, light scattered by osmotic fluctuations is heterodyned by that from static or slowly varying inhomogeneities. The two components are separable owing to their different time scales, giving good experimental agreement with macroscopic measurements of the osmotic pressure. DLS measurements in gels are, however, tributary to depolarised light scattering from the network as well as to multiple light scattering. The paper examines these effects, as well as the instrumental corrections required to determine the osmotic modulus. For guest polymers trapped in a hydrogel the measured intensity...

  1. Comparison of fingerprint quality measures using an optical and a capacitive sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    Comparison of fingerprint quality measures using an optical and a capacitive sensor Fernando Alonso of Cagliari images are expected to be different for optical and capacitive sensors. For example, the effect measure computation. In our opinion, some measures could be suitable for the optical sensor

  2. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  3. Lightweight Integrated Optical Sensor for Atmospheric Measurements on Mobile Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parameswaran, Krishnan R. [Physical Sciences Inc.

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Phase I program was to develop a novel open path sensor platform technology based on integration of semiconductor waveguides with efficient optoelectronic components on a monolithic platform. The successful Phase I effort resulted in demonstration of a novel optical resonator structure based on semiconductor high contrast gratings (HCGs) that will enable implementation of an ultra-compact, low-power gas sensor suitable for use on mobile platforms. Extensive numerical modeling was performed to design a device optimized for measuring CO2 at a wavelength for which a laser was available for proof of concept. Devices were fabricated and tested to match the target wavelength, angle, and operating temperature. This demonstration is the first implementation of HCGs at the wavelengths of interest and shows the flexibility of the proposed architecture for gas sensing applications. The measured cavity Q was lower than anticipated due to fabrication process challenges. The PSI and UC Berkeley team has identified solutions to these challenges and will produce optimized devices in a Phase II program where a prototype sensor will be fabricated and tested.

  4. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byungkun

    The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting - united with the rich details offered by sensor networks - prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we propose several techniques for ...

  5. A Bayesian Network for Autonomous Sensor Control during Polar Ice Sheet Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    of environmental and sensor- related factors. The PRISM sensors are placed on autonomous robotic vehicles ("roversA Bayesian Network for Autonomous Sensor Control during Polar Ice Sheet Measurements Sudha sheets. An important component of PRISM is an intelligent, autonomous Synthetic Aperture Radar that can

  6. Non-Invasive Measurement of Heartbeat with a Hydraulic Bed Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    Non-Invasive Measurement of Heartbeat with a Hydraulic Bed Sensor Progress, Challenges}@mail.missouri.edu, SkubicM@missouri.edu Abstract--A hydraulic bed sensor has been developed to non and development of the system. Keywords--hydraulic bed sensor; eldercare monitoring; ballistocardiography I

  7. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G. (8544 Electric Ave., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  8. Infrared Spectroscope for Electron Bunch-length Measurement: Heat Sensor Parameters Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domgmo-Momo, Gilles; /Towson U. /SLAC

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is used for many experiments. Taking advantage of the free electron laser (FEL) process, scientists of various fields perform experiments of all kind. Some for example study protein folding; other experiments are more interested in the way electrons interact with the molecules before they are destroyed. These experiments among many others have very little information about the electrons x-ray produced by the FEL, except that the FEL is using bunches less than 10 femtoseconds long. To be able to interpret the data collected from those experiments, more accurate information is needed about the electron's bunch-length. Existing bunch length measurement techniques are not suitable for the measurement of such small time scales. Hence the need to design a device that will provide more precise information about the electron bunch length. This paper investigates the use of a pyreoelectric heat sensor that has a sensitivity of about 1.34 micro amps per watt for the single cell detector. Such sensitivity, added to the fact that the detector is an array sensor, makes the detector studied the primary candidate to be integrated to an infrared spectrometer designed to better measure the LCLS electron bunch length.

  9. Precision Measurement of Transition Matrix Elements via Light Shift Cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Herold; V. D. Vaidya; X. Li; S. L. Rolston; J. V. Porto; M. S. Safronova

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for accurate determination of atomic transition matrix elements at the 10^{-3} level. Measurements of the ac Stark (light) shift around "magic-zero" wavelengths, where the light shift vanishes, provide precise constraints on the matrix elements. We make the first measurement of the 5s-6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 nm and 423 nm zeros with a sequence of standing wave pulses. In conjunction with existing theoretical and experimental data, we find 0.3236(9) e a_0 and 0.5230(8) e a_0 for the 5s-6p_{1/2} and 5s-6p_{3/2} elements, respectively, an order of magnitude more accurate than the best theoretical values. This technique can provide needed, accurate matrix elements for many atoms, including those used in atomic clocks, tests of fundamental symmetries, and quantum information.

  10. Measurement strategy for rectangular electrical capacitance tomography sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Jiamin; Ge, Ruihuan; Qiu, Guizhi; Wang, Haigang [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the influence of the measurement strategy for the rectangular electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor, a Finite Element Method (FEM) is utilized to create the model for simulation. The simulation was carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics(trade mark, serif) and Matlab(trade mark, serif). The length-width ratio of the rectangular sensing area is 5. Twelve electrodes are evenly arranged surrounding the pipe. The covering ratio of the electrodes is 90%. The capacitances between different electrode pairs are calculated for a bar distribution. The air of the relative permittivity 1.0 and the material of the permittivity 3.0 are used for the calibration. The relative permittivity of the second phase is 3.0. The noise free and noise data are used for the image reconstruction using the Linear Back Projection (LBP). The measurement strategies with 1-, 2- and 4- electrode excitation are compared using the correlation coefficient. Preliminary results show that the measurement strategy with 2-electrode excitation outperforms other measurement strategies with 1- or 4-electrode excitation.

  11. Efficiency and stray light measurements and calculations of diffraction gratings for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, W.R.; Mossessian, D. (Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Gullikson, E. (Materials Sciences Division, Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Heimann, P. (Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-cooled gratings manufactured for spherical grating monochromators of the Advanced Light Source beamlines 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 were measured with the laser plasma source and reflectometer in the Center for X-ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The square-wave gratings are ion milled into the polished electroless nickel surface after patterning by holographic photolithography. Absolute efficiency data are compared with exact electromagnetic theory calculation. Interorder stray light and groove depths can be estimated from the measurements.

  12. Elastomeric optical fiber sensors and method for detecting and measuring events occurring in elastic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Capps, Gary J. (Knoxville, TN); Smith, David B. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Clifford P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber optic sensing means for the detection and measurement of events such as dynamic loadings imposed upon elastic materials including cementitious materials, elastomers, and animal body components and/or the attrition of such elastic materials are provided. One or more optical fibers each having a deformable core and cladding formed of an elastomeric material such as silicone rubber are embedded in the elastic material. Changes in light transmission through any of the optical fibers due the deformation of the optical fiber by the application of dynamic loads such as compression, tension, or bending loadings imposed on the elastic material or by the attrition of the elastic material such as by cracking, deterioration, aggregate break-up, and muscle, tendon, or organ atrophy provide a measurement of the dynamic loadings and attrition. The fiber optic sensors can be embedded in elastomers subject to dynamic loadings and attrition such as commonly used automobiles and in shoes for determining the amount and frequency of the dynamic loadings and the extent of attrition. The fiber optic sensors are also useable in cementitious material for determining the maturation thereof.

  13. Method of validating measurement data of a process parameter from a plurality of individual sensor inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating a validated measurement of a process parameter at a point in time by using a plurality of individual sensor inputs from a scan of said sensors at said point in time. The sensor inputs from said scan are stored and a first validation pass is initiated by computing an initial average of all stored sensor inputs. Each sensor input is deviation checked by comparing each input including a preset tolerance against the initial average input. If the first deviation check is unsatisfactory, the sensor which produced the unsatisfactory input is flagged as suspect. It is then determined whether at least two of the inputs have not been flagged as suspect and are therefore considered good inputs. If two or more inputs are good, a second validation pass is initiated by computing a second average of all the good sensor inputs, and deviation checking the good inputs by comparing each good input including a present tolerance against the second average. If the second deviation check is satisfactory, the second average is displayed as the validated measurement and the suspect sensor as flagged as bad. A validation fault occurs if at least two inputs are not considered good, or if the second deviation check is not satisfactory. In the latter situation the inputs from each of all the sensors are compared against the last validated measurement and the value from the sensor input that deviates the least from the last valid measurement is displayed.

  14. Efficient Electromechanical (E/M) Impedance Measuring Method for Active Sensor Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Efficient Electromechanical (E/M) Impedance Measuring Method for Active Sensor Structural Health an impedance analyzer that reads the in-situ E/M impedance of the piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS an improved algorithm for efficient measurement of the E/M impedance using PWAS transducers. Instead of using

  15. Forward-illumination light-extinction technique for soot measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Yi; Lee, Chiafon F

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A forward-illumination light-extinction (FILE) soot volume fraction measurement technique was developed and tested. By using a camera and a point light source in front of the flame and a diffuser behind the flame, with this technique one can achieve a two-dimensional soot concentration measurement with only one window when one is studying confined combustion. The line-of-sight quantitative soot volume fraction is obtained by calculation of the reflected light intensity with or without the presence of soot cloud. Verification of this technique was accomplished by measurement of an axisymmetric ethylene diffusion flame. The field distribution obtained by Abel inversion is presented and matched well with previous point measurements. The FILE technique has high time resolution when a high-speed camera and a copper vapor laser are adopted. All these advantages of FILE make it suitable for line-of-sight integrated, two-dimensional soot distribution of transient combustion, e.g., in the case of in-cylinder Diesel combustion.

  16. Structural vibration measurement and analysis using a novel digital sensor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minier, Elizabeth Altagracia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the sensors into the laminae of a composite material. The primary uses of these sensors include providing feedback signals to active vibration dampers and reporting the occurance of damage. It is the purview of the conceptual designer to exploit new.../QB = BN3903 NPN Transistor Figure 8. Schematic diagram of digital sensor circuit 24 will snap "high". Similarly as the signal falls below the reference level, the outputs will snap "low". The resulting signals are near-square wave outputs at two logic...

  17. Silicon micromachined sensors and sensor arrays for shear-stress measurements in aerodynamic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Aravind

    In this thesis we report on a new micromachined floating-element shear-stress sensor for turbulent boundary layer research. Applications in low shear-stress environments such as turbulent boundary layers require extremely ...

  18. New measurements of the EMC effect in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Daniel

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications of structure functions in nuclei (EMC effect) suggest that the nuclear quark distribution function is not just the incoherent sum of the proton and neutron distributions, and made clear the importance of nuclear effects even in high energy measurements. Jefferson Lab experiment E03-103 made precise measurements of the EMC effect in few-body and heavy nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect.

  19. New measurements of the EMC effect in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens OH 45701 (United States)

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications of structure functions in nuclei (EMC effect) suggest that the nuclear quark distribution function is not just the incoherent sum of the proton and neutron distributions, and made clear the importance of nuclear effects even in high energy measurements. Jefferson Lab experiment E03-103 made precise measurements of the EMC effect in few-body and heavy nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect.

  20. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS) and OLED-based structurally integrated optical sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yuankun

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    General introduction to OLED basics and OLED-based structurally integrated sensors was provided in chapter 1 and chapter 2. As discussed in chapter 3, OLEDs were developed or improved using novel engineering methods for better charge injection (increased by over 1 order of magnitude) and efficiency. As the excitation sources, these OLEDs have preferred characteristics for sensor applications, including narrowed emission, emission at desired wavelength, and enhanced output for reduced EL background, higher absorption and improved device lifetime. In addition to OLEDs with desired performance, sensor integration requires oxidase immobilization with the sensor film for O{sub 2}-based biological and chemical sensing. Nanoparticles such as ZnO have large surface area and high isoelectric point ({approx}9.5), which favors enzyme immobilization via physical adsorption as well as Coulombic bonding. In chapter 4, it was demonstrated that ZnO could be used for this purpose, although future work is needed to further bond the ZnO to the sensor film. In chapter 5, single unit sensor was extended to multianalyte parallel sensing based on an OLED platform, which is compact and integrated with silicon photodiodes and electronics. Lactate and glucose were simultaneously monitored with a low limit of detection 0.02 mM, fast response time ({approx} 1 minute) and dynamic range from 0-8.6 ppm of dissolved oxygen. As discovered in previous work, the dynamic range covers 0-100% gas phase O{sub 2} or 0-40 ppm dissolved oxygen at room temperature. PL decay curve, which is used to extract the decay time, is usually not a simple exponential at high O{sub 2} concentration, which indicates that O{sub 2} is not equally accessible for different luminescent sites. This creates a challenge for data analysis, which however was successfully processed by stretched exponential as shown in chapter 6. This also provides an insight about the distribution of O{sub 2}:dye collisional quenching rate due to microheterogeneity. Effect of TiO{sub 2} doping was also discussed. Stretched exponential analysis also generates calibration curves with higher sensitivity, which is preferred from the operational point of view. The work of enhanced integration was shown in chapter 7 with a polymer photodetector, which enables the preferred operation mode, decay time measurement, due to fast reponse (<20 {mu}s). Device thickness was enlarged for maximum absorption of the PL, which was realized by slow spincoating rate and shorter spincoating time. Film prepared this way shows more crystalline order by Raman spectra, probably due to slow evaporation. This also ensures charge transport is not affected even with a thick film as indicated in the response time. Combination of OLEDs and polymer photodetectors present opportunities for solution processed all-organic sensors, which enables cheap processing at large scale. Future development can focus on monolithically integration of OLEDs and organic photodetectors (OPD) on the same substrate at a small scale, which could be enabled by inkjet printing. As OLED and OPD technologies continue to advance, small-sized, flexible and all-organic structurally integrated sensor platforms will become true in the near future.

  1. Paper area density measurement from forward transmitted scattered light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method whereby the average paper fiber area density (weight per unit area) can be directly calculated from the intensity of transmitted, scattered light at two different wavelengths, one being a non-absorpted wavelength. Also, the method makes it possible to derive the water percentage per fiber area density from a two-wavelength measurement. In the optical measuring technique optical transmitted intensity, for example, at 2.1 microns cellulose absorption line is measured and compared with another scattered, optical transmitted intensity reference in the nearby spectrum region, such as 1.68 microns, where there is no absorption. From the ratio of these two intensities, one can calculate the scattering absorption coefficient at 2.1 microns. This absorption coefficient at this wavelength is, then, experimentally correlated to the paper fiber area density. The water percentage per fiber area density can be derived from this two-wavelength measurement approach.

  2. Design of an ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy oil concentration sensor for online HVAC measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luz, Roman M. (Roman Manuel), 1979-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in the modeling and control of the vapor compression cycle has developed the need for a real time oil concentration rate (OCR) sensor. Because of its ability to give the most accurate online measurements ...

  3. Pervasive Monitoring - An Intelligent Sensor Pod Approach for Standardised Measurement Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resch, Bernd

    Geo-sensor networks have traditionally been built up in closed monolithic systems, thus limiting trans-domain usage of real-time measurements. This paper presents the technical infrastructure of a standardised embedded ...

  4. regulation. Buoys and ship-based sensors are normally used to measure the amount of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    regulation. Buoys and ship-based sensors are normally used to measure the amount of water of many neurons at once. But researchers based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, have painstakingly mapped

  5. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature. 5 figs.

  6. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Ericson, M. Nance (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature.

  7. RealTime SpatioTemporal Query Processing in Mobile AdHoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo­ tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes,

  8. Experimental Measurements of the Power Consumption for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Javier

    consumption. Therefore, in order to give some recommendations to de- velopers and optimize the energy spent of the energy consumption should be performed for the most common operations in a sensor node. This knowledge common operations: (i) CPU change state and (ii) data transfer radio. CPU change state. The consumption

  9. A new sensor concept for simultaneous measurement of pressure, temperature and thickness of plate structures using modified wave propagation theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Tzu-Wei

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a multi-purpose sensor concept viable for the simultaneous measurement of pressure, temperature and thickness of plate structures. It also establishes the knowledge base necessary for future sensor ...

  10. Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Specter of Fuel-Based Lighting," Science 308:1263-1264.Mills. 2008. "Solid-State Lighting on a Shoestring Budget:The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for Small Businesses in

  11. THE NEW VME-BASED SYSTEM FOR MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS WITH HALL SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    requirements to such systems. Note also, that for controlling the peripheral equipment like power supplies. ELECTRONICS OF HALL-SENSOR MEASURING SYSTEM The Figure 1 demonstrates the structure of measuring system CABLES CANBUS Figure 1: The structure of Hall measuring system. Carriage and its Thermostabilization

  12. SociAL Sensor Analytics: Measuring Phenomenology at Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Courtney D.; Dowling, Chase P.; Rose, Stuart J.; McKenzie, Taylor K.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present a system for interrogating immense social media streams through analytical methodologies that characterize topics and events critical to tactical and strategic planning. First, we propose a conceptual framework for interpreting social media as a sensor network. Time-series models and topic clustering algorithms are used to implement this concept into a functioning analytical system. Next, we address two scientific challenges: 1) to understand, quantify, and baseline phenomenology of social media at scale, and 2) to develop analytical methodologies to detect and investigate events of interest. This paper then documents computational methods and reports experimental findings that address these challenges. Ultimately, the ability to process billions of social media posts per week over a period of years enables the identification of patterns and predictors of tactical and strategic concerns at an unprecedented rate through SociAL Sensor Analytics (SALSA).

  13. Sensors Synergistic With Nature For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To be able to evolve fuel and structural microstructure within a nuclear power reactor in an engineered manner, an effective extreme environment sensor must exist. The development of sensor technology for nondestructive and nonintrusive measurements in harsh environments is a very active field. However most of the effort has been in adapting existing sensing technology to meet the harsh environmental requirements. A different approach is being presented. The fundamental question that we are trying to answer is how do we take advantage of the harsh environment and maintain synergy between the sensor and the environment. This paper will discuss the synergistic senor being developed that takes advantage of the harsh environments.

  14. A Model for Evaluation of Life-Cycle Energy Savings of Occupancy Sensors for Control of Lighting and Ventilation in Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, L. O.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used...

  15. A Model for Evaluation of Life-Cycle Energy Savings of Occupancy Sensors for Control of Lighting and Ventilation in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, L. O.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used...

  16. Research options for the development of sensors to measure the thermal state of solid steel bodies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaspar, T.A.; Lownie, H.W. Jr.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study reported here is to assist Battelle's Pcacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in planning a research and development program to develop temperature sensors for metal and ceramic industries. This study focuses on sensors to measure internal temperatures within bodies of hot steel. A series of literature surveys, interviews, field visits, and meetings with steel-industry organizations was conducted in seeking answers to questions posed by PNL. These questions, with responses, are summarized.

  17. An estimation algorithm for 3-D pose measurement using redundant ultrasonic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branum, Brian Howell

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precise precise but expensive sensing equipment to attain range measuring instruments to triangulate an accurate 3-D more sensors than are necessary for a single 3-D pose measurement. If the pose by including expected errors could be modeled with a...

  18. Model Based Sensor System for Temperature Measurement in R744 Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitz, Sven; Schneider, Peter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal is the development of a novel principle for the temperature acquisition of refrigerants in CO2 air conditioning systems. The new approach is based on measuring the temperature inside a pressure sensor, which is also needed in the system. On the basis of simulative investigations of different mounting conditions functional relations between measured and medium temperature will be derived.

  19. Structural vibration measurement and analysis using a novel digital sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minier, Elizabeth Altagracia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the light emitting diodes (LEDs) to the phototransistors when the beam and housing are at or are passing through the zero reference. By having two LED-phototransistor pairs, and therefore two 12 LEDs A Phototransistors Beam (b) Figure 2...

  20. Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granderson, Jessica

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Budget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for SmallA. Jacobson. 2007. "The Off-Grid Lighting Market in WesternTesting for Emerging Off-grid White-LED Illumination Systems

  1. Design Techniques for Sensor Appliances: Foundations and Light Compass Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    sensors of the appliance, and (2) error minimization-based sensor data interpretation middleware. We have University of California, Los Angeles jwong@cs.ucla.edu Seapahn Megerian University of California, Los Angeles seapahn@cs.ucla.edu Miodrag Potkonjak University of California, Los Angeles miodrag

  2. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  3. Standard Measurement and Verification Plan for Lighting Retrofit Projects for Buildings and Building Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a framework for standard measurement and verification (M&V) of lighting retrofit and replacement projects. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. It includes details on all aspects of effectively measuring light levels of existing and post-retrofit projects, conducting power measurement, and developing cost-effectiveness analysis. This framework M&V plan also enables consistent comparison among similar lighting projects, and may be used to develop M&V plans for non--lighting-technology retrofits and new installations.

  4. An Optical Backscatter Sensor for Particulate Matter Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel engines are prone to emit particulate matter (PM) emissions under certain operation conditions. In-cylinder production of PM from diesel combustion control can occur under a wide variety of operating conditions, and in some cases, operation of a multi-cylinder engine can further complicate PM emissions due to variations in air or fuel charge due to manifold mixing effects. In this study, a probe for detecting PM in diesel exhaust was evaluated on a light-duty diesel engine. The probe is based on an optical backscattering effect. Due to the optical nature of the probe, PM sensing can occur at high rates. The feasibility of the probe for examining PM emissions in the exhaust manifold will be discussed.

  5. The IEE Measurement,Sensors, Instrumentationand NDT m ProfessionalNetwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    The IEE Measurement,Sensors, Instrumentationand NDT m ProfessionalNetwork m Transmission Lines, Michael Faraday House, Six Hills Way, Stevenage,Herts SG12AY, UK #12;1/I TRANSMISSION LINES -BASIC the basic principles of transmission lines in preparation for many of the lectures, which follow

  6. * The IEE Measurement,Sensors, Instrumentationand NDT ProfessionalNetwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    and Properties of Transmission Lines Richard Collier, University of Cambridge 0 TheIEE Printed and publishedby exception, most microwave measurement equipment has remained with the same i output transmission lines coaxial and waveguide ports to numerous transmission lines that now exist in modern circuits. In the case

  7. Integration of Sensors with Embedded Data Acquisition for Automation of Lighting Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrill, T. J.; Bay, C. J.; Rasmussen, B. P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Overview -Overview of Energy Assessments -Autonomous Energy Audits -Lighting Assessment Identify and Analyze Lighting Lighting Simulation ESL-IE-14-05-41 Proceedings... Simple, Time- consuming Tasks Initial Capital Cost ESL-IE-14-05-41 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Autonomous Energy Auditors Ground and aerial vehicles autonomously navigate...

  8. Real-world Quantum Sensors: Evaluating Resources for Precision Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Thomas-Peter; Brian J Smith; Animesh Datta; Lijian Zhang; Uwe Dorner; Ian A Walmsley

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum physics holds the promise of enabling certain tasks with better performance than possible when only classical resources are employed. The quantum phenomena present in many experiments signify nonclassical behavior, but do not always imply superior performance. Quantifying the enhancement achieved from quantum behavior requires careful analysis of the resources involved. We analyze the specific case of parameter estimation using an optical interferometer, where increased precision can be achieved using quantum probe states. Common performance measures are examined and it is shown that some overestimate the improvement. For the simplest experimental case we compare the different measures and show this overestimate explicitly. We give the preferred analysis of real-world experiments and calculate benchmark values for experimental parameters necessary to realize a precision enhancement.

  9. Systems and methods for measuring a parameter of a landfill including a barrier cap and wireless sensor systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Svoboda, John M.; Johnson, James T.

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a parameter of a landfill including a cap, without passing wires through the cap, includes burying a sensor apparatus in the landfill prior to closing the landfill with the cap; providing a reader capable of communicating with the sensor apparatus via radio frequency (RF); placing an antenna above the barrier, spaced apart from the sensor apparatus; coupling the antenna to the reader either before or after placing the antenna above the barrier; providing power to the sensor apparatus, via the antenna, by generating a field using the reader; accumulating and storing power in the sensor apparatus; sensing a parameter of the landfill using the sensor apparatus while using power; and transmitting the sensed parameter to the reader via a wireless response signal. A system for measuring a parameter of a landfill is also provided.

  10. iLamp: A Sensor-Enhanced Lamp with Surface-Tracking Capability Based on Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    . The lamp has a robot arm and some LEDs as light sources. When finding that the sensed light intensity robot arm, to a better location and then adjust its LEDs to satisfy the bookmark's need. Central to our interface. This lamp is composed of a ZigBee module, a microprocessor, and a robot arm holding four sets

  11. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (Tijeras, NM); Michie, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems.

  12. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Michie, R.B.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems. 8 figs.

  13. Method for measuring changes in light absorption of highly scattering media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM); Johnson, Tamara M. (Los Alamos, NM); Mourant, Judith R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The noninvasive measurement of variations in absorption that are due to changes in concentrations of biochemically relevant compounds in tissue is important in many clinical settings. One problem with such measurements is that the pathlength traveled by the collected light through the tissue depends on the scattering properties of the tissue. It is demonstrated, using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, that for an appropriate separation between light-delivery and light-collection fibers, the pathlength of the collected photons is insensitive to scattering parameters for the range of parameters typically found in tissue. This is important for developing rapid, noninvasive, inexpensive, and accurate methods for measuring absorption changes in tissue.

  14. Manufacturers of light sensitive devices need to measure the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    and calibrating simultaneously Compared to a traditional solar simulator this new system is in control of output of light sensitive devices. The Solar cells testing system has won the Dutch Cleantech Challenge 2014 in the process of production, as it is time consuming to check each produced cell. A team of TU Delft scientists

  15. On measurement of the isotropy of the speed of light

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [JLAB

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three experimental concepts investigating possible anisotropy of the speed of light are presented. They are based on i) beam deflection in a 180 degree magnetic arc, ii) narrow resonance production in an electron-positron collider, and iii) the ratio of magnetic moments of an electron and a positron moving in opposite directions.

  16. Hybrid sensor for metal grade measurement of a falling stream of solid waste particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdur Rahman, Md., E-mail: rahman@tudelft.nl; Bakker, M.C.M., E-mail: m.c.m.bakker@tudelft.nl

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new sensor system is developed for metal grade measurement of falling bottom ash particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system is hybrid, consisting of an optical and an electromagnetic sensor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grade of ECS concentrated bottom ash in 1-6 mm sieve size accurately measured up to 143 p/s feed rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accuracy reached was 2.4% with respect to manual analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measures for elimination of both stationary and stochastic errors are discussed. - Abstract: A hybrid sensor system for accurate detection of the metal grade of a stream of falling solid waste particles is investigated and experimentally verified. The system holds an infrared and an electromagnetic unit around a central tube and counts all the particles and only the metal particles, respectively. The count ratio together with the measured average particle mass ratio (k) of non-metal and metal particles is sufficient for calculation of grade. The performance of the system is accurately verified using synthetic mixtures of sand and metal particles. Towards an application a case study is performed using municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in size fractions 1-6 mm, which presents a major challenge for nonferrous metal recovery. The particle count ratio was inherently accurate for particle feed rates up to 13 per second. The average value and spread of k for bottom ash was determined as 0.49 {+-} 0.07 and used to calculate grade within 2.4% from the manually analysed grade. At higher feed rates the sensors start missing particles which fall simultaneously through the central tube, but the hybrid system still counted highly repeatable. This allowed for implementation of a count correction ratio to eliminate the stationary error. In combination with averaging in measurement intervals for suppression of stochastic variations the hybrid system regained its accuracy for particle feed rates up to 143 per second. This performance and its special design, intended to render it insensitive to external interference and noise when applied in an eddy current separator, make the hybrid sensor suitable for applications such as quality control and sensor controlled separation.

  17. Measurement of fracture aperture fields using transmitted light: An evaluation of measurement errors and their influence on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detwiler, Russell

    Scott E. Pringle and Robert J. Glass Flow Visualization and Processes Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico Abstract. Understanding of single-phase and multiphase flow and transport light transmission techniques yield quantitative measurements of aperture, solute concentration

  18. Application of piezoelectric sensors for stress-related measurements in wellbores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moras, Vijay Roshan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC SENSORS FOR STRESS-RELATED MEASUREMENTS IN WELLBORES A Thesis by VIJAY ROSHAN MORAS Submitted to the Once of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree..., for their support, and for their encouragement during my studies at Texas A&M University. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. iv vi i LIST OF TABLES. INTRODUCTION. LITERATURE REVIEW. 2. 1 Piezoelectricity...

  19. Time-Multiplexed Measurements of Nonclassical Light at Telecom Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Harder; C. Silberhorn; J. Rehacek; Z. Hradil; L. Motka; B. Stoklasa; L. L. Sanchez-Soto

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the experimental reconstruction of the statistical properties of an ultrafast pulsed type-II parametric down conversion source in a periodically poled KTP waveguide at telecom wavelengths, with almost perfect photon-number correlations. We used a photon-number-resolving time-multiplexed detector based on a fiber-optical setup and a pair of avalanche photodiodes. By resorting to a germane data-pattern tomography, we assess the properties of the nonclassical light states states with unprecedented precision.

  20. Standard Measurement & Verification Plan for Lighting Equipment Retrofit or Replacement Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a framework for a standard Measurement and Verification (M&V) plan for lighting projects. It was developed to support cost-effective retrofits (partial and complete replacements) of lighting systems and is intended to provide a foundation for an M&V plan for a lighting retrofit utilizing a "best practice" approach, and to provide guidance to site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations on what is essential for a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. This document provides examples of appropriate elements of an M&V plan, including the calculation of expected energy savings. The standard M&V plan, as provided, also allows for consistent comparison with other similar lighting projects. Although intended for lighting retrofit applications, M&V plans developed per this framework document may also be used for other non-lighting technology retrofits and new installations.

  1. Development of an Acoustic Sensor On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Ariessohn

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. Following the completion of the initial 3 year project, several continuations were awarded by the Department of Energy to allow Enertechnix to conduct extended testing of the sensor at the Wabash River facility. In February, 2008 the sensor was installed on the gasifier in preparation for a long-term test. During the initial testing of the sensor a stainless steel tube on the sensor failed and allowed syngas to escape. The syngas self-ignited and the ensuing small fire damaged some of the components on the sensor. There was no damage to the gasifier or other equipment and no injuries resulted from this incident. Two meetings were held to identify the root causes of the incident-one at Wabash River and one at Enertechnix. A list of recommended improvements that would have addressed the causes of the incident was created and presented to the Department of Energy on May 2, 2008. However, the DOE decided not to pursue these improvements and terminated the project. This report describes all of the activities conducted during the project and reports the findings of each activity in detail. The investigation of potential sound generation and coupling methods led to the selection of a reflected shock method which has been developed into a functioning prototype device. The principles of operation of this device and its performance characteristics are described in the report. Modeling of the attenuation of sound by suspended particles and by interaction of the sound pulses with the high temperature syngas inside the gasifier was conducted and the predictions of those models were used to determine the required sound pulse intensity to allow the sound pulses to be detected after passage through the gasifier environment. These modeling results are presented in this report. A study of the likely spatial and temporal variability of gas composition inside the gasifier was performed and the results of that study was used to predict the impact of that variability on the accuracy of the acoustic temperature method. These results are reported here. A design for a port rodding mechanism was developed to deal with potential slagging issues and was incorporated i

  2. Use of low power EM radar sensors for speech articulator measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Burnett, G.C.

    1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Very low power electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors are being used to measure speech articulator motions such as the vocal fold oscillations, jaw, tongue, and the soft palate. Data on vocal fold motions, that correlate well with established laboratory techniques, as well as data on the jaw, tongue, and soft palate are shown. The vocal fold measurements together with a volume air flow model are being used to perform pitch synchronous estimates of the voiced transfer functions using ARMA (autoregressive moving average) techniques. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Improving Control System Cyber-State Awareness using Known Secure Sensor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Miles McQueen

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—This paper presents design and simulation of a low cost and low false alarm rate method for improved cyber-state awareness of critical control systems - the Known Secure Sensor Measurements (KSSM) method. The KSSM concept relies on physical measurements to detect malicious falsification of the control systems state. The KSSM method can be incrementally integrated with already installed control systems for enhanced resilience. This paper reviews the previously developed theoretical KSSM concept and then describes a simulation of the KSSM system. A simulated control system network is integrated with the KSSM components. The effectiveness of detection of various intrusion scenarios is demonstrated on several control system network topologies.

  4. Measuring the fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei at and below the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    of the crust, the Coulomb barrier is too high for thermonuclear fusion of carbon. A heat source, other thanMeasuring the fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei at and below the Coulomb barrier SYLVIE HUDAN August , 2012 #12;Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei at and below the Coulomb barrierSylvie Hudan

  5. EOF-based constrained sensor placement and field reconstruction from noisy ocean measurements: Application to Nantucket Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chryssostomidis, Chryssostomos

    Sensor placement at the extrema of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) is efficient and leads to accurate reconstruction of the ocean state from a limited number of measurements. In this paper, we develop important new ...

  6. Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Galvin, James; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Clear, Robert; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a product of our ongoing effort to support the development of high-quality yet affordable products for off-grid lighting in the developing world that have good potential to succeed in the market. The effort includes work to develop low-cost testing procedures, to identify useful performance metrics, and to facilitate the development of industry standards and product rating protocols. We conducted laboratory testing of nine distinct product lines. In some cases we also tested multiple generations of a single product line and/or operating modes for a product. The resultsare summarized in Table 1. We found that power consumption and light output varied by nearly a factor of 12, with efficacy varying by a factor of more than six. Of particular note, overall luminous efficacy varied from 8.2 to 53.1 lumens per watt. Color quality indices variedmaterially, especially for correlated color temperature. Maximum illuminance, beamcandlepower, and luminance varied by 8x, 32x, and 61x respectively, suggesting considerable differences among products in terms of service levels and visual comfort. Glare varied by1.4x, and was above acceptable thresholds in most cases. Optical losses play a role in overall performance, varying by a factor of 3.2 and ranging as high as 24percent. These findings collectively indicate considerable potential for improved product design.

  7. Spark-plug-mounted fiber optic sensor for measuring in-cylinder pressure in engines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , with an optoelectronic signal conditioning unit containing a chirped distributed feedback laser used to interrogate the sensor. The response of the fiber sensor was compared with that of a piezoelectric pressure sensor used as a reference transducer. Tests were carried...

  8. 'Known Secure Sensor Measurements' for Critical Infrastructure Systems: Detecting Falsification of System State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles McQueen; Annarita Giani

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a first investigation on a low cost and low false alarm, reliable mechanism for detecting manipulation of critical physical processes and falsification of system state. We call this novel mechanism Known Secure Sensor Measurements (KSSM). The method moves beyond analysis of network traffic and host based state information, in fact it uses physical measurements of the process being controlled to detect falsification of state. KSSM is intended to be incorporated into the design of new, resilient, cost effective critical infrastructure control systems. It can also be included in incremental upgrades of already in- stalled systems for enhanced resilience. KSSM is based on known secure physical measurements for assessing the likelihood of an attack and will demonstrate a practical approach to creating, transmitting, and using the known secure measurements for detection.

  9. An ECT/ERT dual-modality sensor for oil-water two-phase flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Pitao [School of Electronic Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, 300072 and School of Electronic Engineering, University of Jinan (China); Wang, Huaxiang; Sun, Benyuan; Cui, Ziqiang [School of Electronic Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, 300072 (China); Huang, Wenrui [HuaDian Heavy Industries Co. Ltd, Beijing, 100077 (China)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new sensor for ECT/ERT dual-modality system which can simultaneously obtain the permittivity and conductivity of the materials in the pipeline. Quasi-static electromagnetic fields are produced by the inner electrodes array sensor of electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system. The results of simulation show that the data of permittivity and conductivity can be simultaneously obtained from the same measurement electrode and the fusion of two kinds of data may improve the quality of the reconstructed images. For uniform oil-water mixtures, the performance of designed dual-modality sensor for measuring the various oil fractions has been tested on representative data and the results of experiments show that the designed sensor broadens the measurement range compared to single modality.

  10. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow StraightenersSensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straightenersprobes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver

  11. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Query Processing in Mobile Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo- tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes, and pa

  12. Measuring barometric pressure with a manifold pressure sensor in a microprocessor based engine control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauwels, M.A.; Wright, D.O.

    1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microprocessor based electronic engine control system is described for an internal combustion engine, a method for updating the stored ambient pressure signal by measuring the ambient barometric pressure during engine operation using a manifold pressure sensor. The method consists of: generating timing signals indicating the rotational position of an engine member and including a signal indicating a predetermined rotational position in the rotation of the engine member; generating a pressure signal from the manifold pressure sensor representing the pressure surrounding the sensor in response to the predetermined rotational position; reading the value of ambient barometric pressure stored in the memory of the microprocessor; comparing the value of the barometric pressure stored in the memory of the microprocessor and the value of the pressure signal; increasing the value of the barometric pressure by one unit to generate a new barometric pressure value when the value of the pressure signal is greater than the value of the barometric pressure; comparing the new barometric pressure value with a predetermined fixed constant representing the maximum barometric pressure; and storing in the memory of the microprocessor either the new barometric pressure value if equal to or less than the fixed constant or the value of the maximum barometric pressure if the new barometric pressure value is greater than the fixed constant.

  13. New measurements of the EMC effect in very light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J; Gaskell, D; Arrington, J; Fomin, N; Solvignon, P; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Boillat, B; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M.H.S.; Christy, M E; Clasie, B; Connell, S; Dalton, M; Day, D; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Gao, H; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Hungerford, E; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lee, C; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Meekins, D G; Mertens, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Nomura, H; Okayasu, Y; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio $\\mu G_{\\mathrm{E}}/G_{\\mathrm{M}}$ in the range of $Q^2$=0.3 - 0.7~GeV/$c^2$ has been made using recoil polarimetry method in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low $Q^2$ range, previous data (Bates, LEDEX) along with many fits and calculations indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity, and continue to suggest that structures might be present in the individual form factors, and in the ratio. In E08-007, with 80\\% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve $\\sim 0.5\\%$ statistical uncertainty. This high precision result will confirm or reute all existing suggestions of few percent structures in the form factors ratio. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and for parity violation experiments.

  14. Development Of An Acoustice Sensor For On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement In Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Ariessohn; Hans Hornung

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. This report describes all of the activities conducted during the project and reports the findings of each activity in detail. The investigation of potential sound generation and coupling methods led to the selection of a reflected shock method which has been developed into a functioning prototype device. The principles of operation of this device and its performance characteristics are described in the report. Modeling of the attenuation of sound by suspended particles and by interaction of the sound pulses with the high temperature syngas inside the gasifier was conducted and the predictions of those models were used to determine the required sound pulse intensity to allow the sound pulses to be detected after passage through the gasifier environment. These modeling results are presented in this report. A study of the likely spatial and temporal variability of gas composition inside the gasifier was performed and the results of that study was used to predict the impact of that variability on the accuracy of the acoustic temperature method. These results are reported here. A design for a port rodding mechanism was developed to deal with potential slagging issues and was incorporated into the prototype sensor. This port rodding mechanism operated flawlessly during the field testing, but because these tests were performed in a region of the gasifier that experiences little slagging, the effectiveness of the rodding mechanism in dealing with highly slagging conditions was not fully demonstrated. This report describes the design and operation of the automated Gasifier Acoustic Pyrometer (autoGAP) which was tested at the Wabash River facility. The results of the tests are reported and analyzed in detail. All of the objectives of the project have been achieved. A field prototype acoustic pyrometer sensor has been successfully tested at the Wabash River gasifier plant. Acoustic signals were propagated through the gases inside the gasifier and were detected by the receiver unit, the times of flight of these sound pulses were measured and these propagation times were converted into temperatures which agreed very well with thermocouple measurements m

  15. New measurements of the EMC effect in very light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seely, J; Gaskell, D; Arrington, J; Fomin, N; Solvignon, P; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Boillat, B; Bosted, P; Brüll, A; Bukhari, M H S; Christy, M E; Clasie, B; Connell, S; Dalton, M; Day, D; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; Fassi, L El; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Gao, H; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Hungerford, E; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lee, C; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Meekins, D G; Mertens, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Nomura, H; Okayasu, Y; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A; Wright, J; Yuan, L; Zheng, X

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Jefferson Lab data are presented on the nuclear dependence of the inclusive cross section from 2H, 3He, 4He, 9Be and 12C for 0.3measurement of the EMC effect for 3He at large x and a significant improvement for 4He. The data do not support previous A-dependent or density-dependent fits to the EMC effect and suggest that the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions may depend on the local nuclear environment.

  16. New measurements of the EMC effect in very light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Seely; A. Daniel; D. Gaskell; J. Arrington; N. Fomin; P. Solvignon; R. Asaturyan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Boeglin; B. Boillat; P. Bosted; A. Bruell; M. H. S. Bukhari; M. E. Christy; B. Clasie; S. Connell; M. Dalton; D. Day; J. Dunne; D. Dutta; L. El Fassi; R. Ent; H. Fenker; B. W. Filippone; H. Gao; C. Hill; R. J. Holt; T. Horn; E. Hungerford; M. K. Jones; J. Jourdan; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; D. Kiselev; M. Kotulla; C. Lee; A. F. Lung; S. Malace; D. G. Meekins; T. Mertens; H. Mkrtchyan; T. Navasardyan; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; H. Nomura; Y. Okayasu; A. K. Opper; C. Perdrisat; D. H. Potterveld; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; P. E. Reimer; J. Roche; V. M. Rodriguez; O. Rondon; E. Schulte; E. Segbefia; K. Slifer; G. R. Smith; V. Tadevosyan; S. Tajima; L. Tang; G. Testa; R. Trojer; V. Tvaskis; W. F. Vulcan; F. R. Wesselmann; S. A. Wood; J. Wright; L. Yuan; X. Zheng

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    New Jefferson Lab data are presented on the nuclear dependence of the inclusive cross section from 2H, 3He, 4He, 9Be and 12C for 0.3measurement of the EMC effect for 3He at large x and a significant improvement for 4He. The data do not support previous A-dependent or density-dependent fits to the EMC effect and suggest that the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions may depend on the local nuclear environment.

  17. New measurements of the EMC effect in very light nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J; Gaskell, D; Arrington, J; Fomin, N; Solvignon, P; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Boillat, B; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M.H.S.; Christy, M E; Clasie, B; Connell, S; Dalton, M; Day, D; Dunne, J; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Gao, H; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Hungerford, E; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, K; Lee, C; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Meekins, D G; Mertens, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Nomura, H; Okayasu, Y; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Jefferson Lab data are presented on the nuclear dependence of the inclusive cross section from 2H, 3He, 4He, 9Be and 12C for 0.3measurement of the EMC effect for 3He at large x and a significant improvement for 4He. The data do not support previous A-dependent or density-dependent fits to the EMC effect and suggest that the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions may depend on the local nuclear environment.

  18. The measurement and analysis of the magnetic field of a synchrotron light source magnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graf, Udo Werner

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis a unique system is used to measure the magnetic field of a superconducting synchrotron light source magnet. The magnet measured is a superferric dipole C-magnet designed to produce a magnetic field up to 3 Tesla in magnitude. Its...

  19. Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-based Optical Sensors for Fossil Fuel Derived Gases Measurement at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kevin

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report details research works performed supported by a Department of Energy grant (DE-FE0003859), which was awarded under the University Coal Research Program administrated by National Energy Technology Laboratory. This research program studied high temperature fiber sensor for harsh environment applications. It developed two fiber optical sensor platform technology including regenerative fiber Bragg grating sensors and distributed fiber optical sensing based on Rayleigh backscattering optical frequency domain reflectometry. Through the studies of chemical and thermal regenerative techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fabrication, high-temperature stable FBG sensors were successfully developed and fabricated in air-hole microstructured fibers, high-attenuation fibers, rare-earth doped fibers, and standard telecommunication fibers. By optimizing the laser processing and thermal annealing procedures, fiber grating sensors with stable performance up to 1100oC have been developed. Using these temperature-stable FBG gratings as sensor platform, fiber optical flow, temperature, pressure, and chemical sensors have been developed to operate at high temperatures up to 800oC. Through the integration of on-fiber functional coating, the use of application-specific air-hole microstructural fiber, and application of active fiber sensing scheme, distributed fiber sensor for temperature, pressure, flow, liquid level, and chemical sensing have been demonstrated with high spatial resolution (1-cm or better) with wide temperature ranges. These include the demonstration of 1) liquid level sensing from 77K to the room temperature, pressure/temperature sensing from the room temperature to 800C and from the 15psi to 2000 psi, and hydrogen concentration measurement from 0.2% to 10% with temperature ranges from the room temperature to 700C. Optical sensors developed by this program has broken several technical records including flow sensors with the highest operation temperature up to 750oC, first distributed chemical measurements at the record high temperature up to 700oC, first distributed pressure measurement at the record high temperature up to 800oC, and the fiber laser sensors with the record high operation temperature up to 700oC. The research performed by this program dramatically expand the functionality, adaptability, and applicability of distributed fiber optical sensors with potential applications in a number of high-temperature energy systems such as fossil-fuel power generation, high-temperature fuel cell applications, and potential for nuclear energy systems.

  20. Exclusive light particle measurements for the system $^{19}$F + $^{12}$C at 96 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bandyopadhyay; C. Bhattacharya; K. Krishan; S. Bhattacharya; S. K. Basu; A. Chatterjee; S. Kailas; A. Shrivastava; K. Mahata

    2001-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Decay sequence of hot ${31}^$P nucleus has been investigated through exclusive light charged particle measurements in coincidence with individual evaporation residues using the reaction ${19}^$F (96 MeV) + ${12}^$C. Information on the sequential decay chain have been extracted by confronting the data with the predictions of the statistical model. It is observed from the present analysis that such exclusive light charged particle data may be used as a powerful tool to probe the decay sequence of the hot light compound systems.

  1. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  2. Efficiency and stray light measurements and calculations of diffraction gratings for the ALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, W.R.; Mossessian, D.; Gullikson, E.; Heimann, P.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water cooled gratings manufactured for spherical grating monochromators of the Advanced Light Source beamlines 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 were measured with the laser plasma source and reflectometer in the Center for X-ray Optics at LBL. The square-wave gratings are ion-milled into the polished electroless nickel surface after patterning by holographic photolithography. Absolute efficiency data are compared with exact electromagnetic theory calculation. Inter-order stray light and groove depths can be estimated from the measurements.

  3. Characterization of highly scattering media by measurement of diffusely backscattered polarized light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hielscher, Andreas H. (Brooklyn, NY); Mourant, Judith R. (Los Alamos, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for recording spatially dependent intensity patterns of polarized light that is diffusely backscattered from highly scattering media are described. These intensity patterns can be used to differentiate different turbid media, such as polystyrene-sphere and biological-cell suspensions. Polarized light from a He-Ne laser (.lambda.=543 nm) is focused onto the surface of the scattering medium, and a surface area of approximately 4.times.4 cm centered on the light input point is imaged through polarization analysis optics onto a CCD camera. A variety of intensity patterns may be observed by varying the polarization state of the incident laser light and changing the analyzer configuration to detect different polarization components of the backscattered light. Experimental results for polystyrene-sphere and Intralipid suspensions demonstrate that the radial and azimuthal variations of the observed pattern depend on the concentration, size, and anisotropy factor, g, of the particles constituting the scattering medium. Measurements performed on biological cell suspensions show that intensity patterns can be used to differentiate between suspensions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Introduction of the Mueller-matrix for diffusely backscattered light, permits the selection of a subset of measurements which comprehensively describes the optical properties of backscattering media.

  4. Pressure sensor and Telemetry methods for measurement while drilling in geothermal wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Develop telemetry electronics and pressure sensor system for operation at 300ºC and demonstrate the operation of multiple pressure sensor systems at 300ºC.

  5. Spark-plug-mounted fiber optic sensor for measuring in-cylinder pressure in engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new design for an in-cylinder fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) pressure sensor suitable for automotive engines has been investigated experimentally. The FFPI sensor consists of a single mode fiber containing two internal mirrors which form...

  6. Design and analysis of fingernail sensors for measurement of fingertip touch fouce and finger posture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Stephen A. (Stephen Austin)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of wearable sensor for detecting fingertip touch force and finger posture is presented. Unlike traditional electronic gloves, in which sensors are embedded along the finger and on the fingerpads, this new device ...

  7. Method and apparatus for the measurement of signals from radiation sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The preferred embodiments of the present invention include a device for measuring an ionizing event in a radiation sensor. The device can include a charge amplifier and a timing shaper. The charge amplifier receives a cathode signal and is configured to output an amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is operatively connected to the charge amplifier to receive the amplified cathode signal. The timing shaper is configured to generate a first pulse in response to a beginning of the ionizing event and a second pulse in response to an end of the ionizing event. The first and second pulses are associated with a depth of interaction of the ionizing event and are generated in response to a slope of the amplified cathode signal changing.

  8. Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Sign In About | Careers |

  9. Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chason, E.H.; Floro, J.A.; Seager, C.H.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is disclosed for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through a means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90[degree] about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90[degree] relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen. 5 figs.

  10. Measurement of the curvature of a surface using parallel light beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chason, Eric H. (Sandia Park, NM); Floro, Jerrold A. (Edgewood, NM); Seager, Carleton H. (Albuquerque, NM); Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for measuring curvature of a surface wherein a beam of collimated light is passed through means for producing a plurality of parallel light beams each separated by a common distance which then reflect off the surface to fall upon a detector that measures the separation of the reflected beams of light. This means can be an etalon and the combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens. The curvature of the surface along the line onto which the multiple beams fall can be calculated from this information. A two-dimensional map of the curvature can be obtained by adding a second etalon (or a second combination of a diffractive element and a converging lens) which is rotated 90.degree. about the optical axis relative to the first etalon and inclined at the same angle. The second etalon creates an individual set of parallel light beams from each of the individual beams created by the first etalon with the sets of parallel light beams from the second etalon rotated 90.degree. relative to the line onto which the single set of parallel beams from the first etalon would have fallen.

  11. Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisholoy Goswami

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

  12. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilgrim, C. C. [Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK and Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Heyes, A. L. [Energy Technology and Innovation Initiative, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Feist, J. P. [Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  13. 3/10/06 R.P.W. Duin 1 Structural inference of sensor-based measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    3/10/06 R.P.W. Duin 1 Structural inference of sensor-based measurements Hong Kong, August 2006 by means of logic All men are mortal Socrates is a man Socrates is mortal Statistical Inference: Infer knowledge by means of logic All men are mortal Socrates is a man Socrates is mortal Statistical Inference

  14. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  15. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  16. An optical fan for light beams for high-precision optical measurements and optical switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Yuan Zhou; Yan Li; Dong-Sheng Ding; Yun-Kun Jiang; Wei Zhang; Shuai Shi; Bao-Sen Shi; Guang-Can Guo

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The polarization and orbital angular momentum properties of light are of great importance in optical science and technology in the fields of high precision optical measurements and high capacity and high speed optical communications. Here we show, a totally new method, based on a combination of these two properties and using the thermal dispersion and electro-optical effect of birefringent crystals, the construction of a simple and robust scheme to rotate a light beam like a fan. Using a computer-based digital image processing technique, we determine the temperature and the thermal dispersion difference of the crystal with high resolution. We also use the rotation phenomenon to realize thermo-optic and electro-optic switches. The basic operating principles for measurement and switching processes are presented in detail. The methods developed here will have wide practical applicability in various fields, including remote sensing, materials science and optical communication networks.

  17. Comment on "Measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation of free-fall absolute gravimeters"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper (Rothleitner et al. 2014 Metrologia 51, L9) reports on the measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation in absolute gravimeters. The conclusion that the perturbation reaches only 2/3 of the commonly accepted value violates the fundamental limitation on the maximum speed of information transfer. The conclusion was deluded by unaccounted parasitic perturbations, some of which are obvious from the report.

  18. Gravitational bending of light by planetary multipoles and its measurement with microarcsecond astronomical interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Makarov, Valeri V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Michelson Science Center, California Technology Institute, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    General-relativistic deflection of light by mass, dipole, and quadrupole moments of the gravitational field of a moving massive planet in the solar system is derived in the approximation of the linearized Einstein equations. All terms of order 1 {mu}as are taken into account, parametrized, and classified in accordance with their physical origin. The monopolar light-ray deflection, modulated by the radial Doppler effect, is associated with the total mass and radial velocity of the gravitating body. It displaces the apparent positions of stars in the sky plane radially away from the origin of the celestial coordinates associated with the planet. The dipolar deflection of light is due to a translational mismatch of the center of mass of the planet and the origin of the planetary coordinates caused by the inaccuracy of planetary ephemeris. It can also originate from the difference between the null cone for light and that for gravity that is not allowed in general relativity but can exist in some of the alternative theories of gravity. The dipolar gravity field pulls the apparent position of a star in the plane of the sky in both radial and orthoradial directions with respect to the origin of the coordinates. The quadrupolar deflection of light is caused by the physical oblateness, J{sub 2}, of the planet, but in any practical experiment it will have an admixture of the translation-dependent quadrupole due to inaccuracy of planetary ephemeris. This leads to a bias in the estimated value of J{sub 2} that should be minimized by applying an iterative data reduction method designed to disentangle the different multipole moments and to fit out the translation-dependent dipolar and quadrupolar components of light deflection. The method of microarcsecond interferometric astrometry has the potential of greatly improving the planetary ephemerides, getting unbiased measurements of planetary quadrupoles, and of thoroughly testing the null-cone structure of the gravitational field and the speed of its propagation in the near-zone of the solar system. We calculate the instantaneous patterns of the light-ray deflections caused by the monopole, the dipole, and the quadrupole moments, and derive equations describing apparent motion of the deflected position of the star in the sky plane as the impact parameter of the light ray with respect to the planet changes due to its orbital motion. We discuss the observational capabilities of the near-future optical (SIM) and radio (SKA) interferometers for detecting the Doppler modulation of the radial deflection, and the dipolar and quadrupolar light-ray bendings by Jupiter and Saturn.

  19. Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Dong, Junhang

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for the program “Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High Temperature and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments”, funded by NETL, and performed by Missouri University of Science and Technology, Clemson University and University of Cincinnati from October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2014. Securing a sustainable energy economy by developing affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels is a central element to the mission of The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of novel sensor technologies that can function under the extreme operating conditions often found in advanced power systems. The main objective of this research program is to conduct fundamental and applied research that will lead to successful development and demonstration of robust, multiplexed, microstructured silica and single-crystal sapphire fiber sensors to be deployed into the hot zones of advanced power and fuel systems for simultaneous measurements of high temperature and gas pressure. The specific objectives of this research program include: 1) Design, fabrication and demonstration of multiplexed, robust silica and sapphire fiber temperature and dynamic gas pressure sensors that can survive and maintain fully operational in high-temperature harsh environments. 2) Development and demonstration of a novel method to demodulate the multiplexed interferograms for simultaneous measurements of temperature and gas pressure in harsh environments. 3) Development and demonstration of novel sapphire fiber cladding and low numerical aperture (NA) excitation techniques to assure high signal integrity and sensor robustness.

  20. Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers incentives for non-residential customers to install energy efficient lights and sensors in existing facilities. In addition to rebates for the...

  1. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  2. Light trapping in thin-film solar cells measured by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledinský, M., E-mail: ledinsky@fzu.cz [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., Cukrovarnická 10, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Moulin, E.; Bugnon, G.; Meillaud, F.; Ballif, C. [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Ganzerová, K.; Vetushka, A.; Fejfar, A. [Laboratory of Nanostructures and Nanomaterials, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., Cukrovarnická 10, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, Raman spectroscopy is used as a tool to determine the light-trapping capability of textured ZnO front electrodes implemented in microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si:H) solar cells. Microcrystalline silicon films deposited on superstrates of various roughnesses are characterized by Raman micro-spectroscopy at excitation wavelengths of 442?nm, 514?nm, 633?nm, and 785?nm, respectively. The way to measure quantitatively and with a high level of reproducibility the Raman intensity is described in details. By varying the superstrate texture and with it the light trapping in the ?c-Si:H absorber layer, we find significant differences in the absolute Raman intensity measured in the near infrared wavelength region (where light trapping is relevant). A good agreement between the absolute Raman intensity and the external quantum efficiency of the ?c-Si:H solar cells is obtained, demonstrating the validity of the introduced method. Applications to thin-film solar cells, in general, and other optoelectronic devices are discussed.

  3. Collaborative Data Gathering in Wireless Sensor Networks using Measurement Co-Occurrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    activity of many WSN applica- tions. We focus on applications in which each sensor con- tinuously monitors the targets of interests in a field, and the base station is interested in getting every (discrete enumer

  4. Considerations for Possible Light Impact of Spent Nuclear Fuel for Safeguards Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K. Castle; Kelly D. Ellis

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This effort is designed to be a preliminary study to determine the appropriateness of lightly contacting SNF with zirconium-based cladding, in wet storage, for the purpose of taking safeguards measurements. Contact will likely consist of an initial impact followed by a light tensile load on the exterior surface of the SNF cladding. In the past, concerns have been raised that contacting SNF cladding could result in a loss of long-term mechanical integrity due to crack initiation, uncontrolled crack propagation, and a mechanical exfoliation of the protective oxide layer. The mechanical integrity concerns are addressed with an analytic model that evaluates the threshold impact limits for degraded, but undamaged SNF cladding. Aqueous corrosion concerns, associated with exfoliation of the protective oxide layer, are addressed with a qualitative argument, focusing on the possible corrosion mechanisms of zirconium-based cladding.

  5. Surface profile measurement in white-light scanning interferometry using a three-chip color CCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Suodong; Quan Chenggen; Zhu Rihong; Tay, Cho Jui; Chen Lei

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is a useful technique to measure surface profile when a test object contains discontinuous structures or microstructures. A black and white CCD camera is usually utilized to capture interferograms, and a series of corresponding algorithms is used to achieve the profile measurement. However, the color information in the interferograms is lost. A novel profile measurement method that uses phase information in different color channels (red-green-blue) of an interferogram obtained using a three-chip color CCD in WLSI is proposed. The phase values are extracted by a windowed Fourier transform algorithm. Simulation and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  6. The Second Post-Newtonian Light Propagation and Its Astrometric Measurement in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue-Mei Deng

    2015-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic theories of light propagation are generalized by introducing two new parameters $\\varsigma$ and $\\eta$ in the second post-Newtonian (2PN) order, in addition to the parameterized post-Newtonian parameters $\\gamma$ and $\\beta$. This new 2PN parameterized (2PPN) formalism includes the non-stationary gravitational fields and the influences of all kinds of relativistic effects. The multipolar components of gravitating bodies are taken into account as well at the first post-Newtonian order. The equations of motion and their solutions of this 2PPN light propagation problem are obtained. Started from the definition of a measurable quantity, a gauge-invariant angle between the directions of two incoming photons for a differential measurement in astrometric observation is discussed and its formula is derived. For a precision level of a few microacrsecond ($\\mu$as) for space astrometry missions in the near future, we further consider a model of angular measurement, LATOR-like missions. In this case, all terms with aimed at the accuracy of $\\sim1\\mu$as are estimated.

  7. LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarville, T; Soufli, R; Pivovaroff, M

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron or FEL X-ray mirrors are required to deliver an X-ray beam from its source to an experiment location, without contributing significantly to wave front distortion. Accurate mirror figure measurements are required prior to installation to meet this intent. This paper describes how a 300 mm aperture phasing interferometer was calibrated to <1 nm absolute accuracy and used to mount and measure 450 mm long flats for the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Measuring focus mirrors with an interferometer requires additional calibration, because high fringe density introduces systematic errors from the interferometer's imaging optics. This paper describes how these errors can be measured and corrected. The calibration approaches described here apply equally well to interferometers larger than 300 mm aperture, which are becoming more common in optics laboratories. The objective of this effort was to install LCLS flats with < 10 nm of spherical curvature, and < 2 nm rms a-sphere. The objective was met by measuring the mirrors after fabrication, coating and mounting, using a 300 mm aperture phasing interferometer calibrated to an accuracy < 1 nm. The key to calibrating the interferometer accurately was to sample the error using independent geometries that are available. The results of those measurements helped identify and reduce calibration error sources. The approach used to measure flats applies equally well to focus mirrors, provided an additional calibration is performed to measure the error introduced by fringe density. This calibration has been performed on the 300 mm aperture interferometer, and the measurement correction was evaluated for a typical focus mirror. The 300 mm aperture limitation requires stitching figure measurements together for many X-ray mirrors of interest, introducing another possible error source. Stitching is eliminated by applying the calibrations described above to larger aperture instruments. The authors are presently extending this work to a 600 mm instrument. Instruments with 900 mm aperture are now becoming available, which would accommodate the largest mirrors of interest.

  8. Resolving Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Anomalies with Measured Light Speed Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler shift observations of spacecraft, such as Galileo, NEAR, Cassini, Rosetta and MESSENGER in earth flybys, have all revealed unexplained speed `anomalies' - that the doppler-shift determined speeds are inconsistent with expected speeds. Here it is shown that these speed anomalies are not real and are actually the result of using an incorrect relationship between the observed doppler shift and the speed of the spacecraft - a relationship based on the assumption that the speed of light is isotropic in all frames, i.e. invariant. Taking account of the repeatedly measured light-speed anisotropy the anomalies are resolved. The Pioneer 10/11 anomalies are discussed, but not resolved. The spacecraft observations demonstrate again that the speed of light is not invariant, and is isotropic only with respect to a dynamical 3-space. The existing doppler shift data also offers a resource to characterise a new form of gravitational waves, the dynamical 3-space turbulence, that has also been detected by other techniques.

  9. Measurement of the Time-Resolved Reflection Matrix for Enhancing Light Energy Delivery into a Scattering Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Youngwoon

    Multiple scatterings occurring in a turbid medium attenuate the intensity of propagating waves. Here, we propose a method to efficiently deliver light energy to the desired target depth in a scattering medium. We measure ...

  10. A measurement of the absorption of liquid argon scintillation light by dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Benjamin James Poyner

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume ...

  11. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Measurement at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  12. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement during materials deposition, chemical reaction, and relaxation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study. 9 figs.

  13. A Machine-to-Machine Architecture to Merge Semantic Sensor Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    network Smart home & smart kitchen M2M area network M2M application: Suggest a recipe according the mood. PROBLEM Machine-to-Machine (M2M) applications are more and more popular due to the availability of smart M2M devices (sensors). M2M devices are used in a great deal of realms such as home monitoring [19

  14. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors for Measuring Transient Detonation/Shock Behavior;Time-of-Arrival Detection and Waveform Determination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Marcus Alexander; Willis, Michael David; Covert, Timothy T.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The miniaturization of explosive components has driven the need for a corresponding miniaturization of the current diagnostic techniques available to measure the explosive phenomena. Laser interferometry and the use of spectrally coated optical windows have proven to be an essential interrogation technique to acquire particle velocity time history data in one- dimensional gas gun and relatively large-scale explosive experiments. A new diagnostic technique described herein allows for experimental measurement of apparent particle velocity time histories in microscale explosive configurations and can be applied to shocks/non-shocks in inert materials. The diagnostic, Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors (EFOS), has been tested in challenging microscopic experimental configurations that give confidence in the technique's ability to measure the apparent particle velocity time histories of an explosive with pressure outputs in the tenths of kilobars to several kilobars. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors also allow for several measurements to be acquired in a single experiment because they are microscopic, thus reducing the number of experiments necessary. The future of EFOS technology will focus on further miniaturization, material selection appropriate for the operating pressure regime, and extensive hydrocode and optical analysis to transform apparent particle velocity time histories into true particle velocity time histories as well as the more meaningful pressure time histories.

  15. Light transmittance in forest canopies determined using airborne laser altimetry and in-canopy quantum measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    Light transmittance in forest canopies determined using airborne laser altimetry and in Abstract The vertical distribution of light transmittance was derived from field and laser altimeter-directed laser light than of direct solar radiation from typical elevation angles. Transects of light

  16. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  17. Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; /SLAC; Sanami, T.; /SLAC /KEK, Tsukuba; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

  18. New measurements of the EMC Effect in Light Nuclei and at Large x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskell, David

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the modification of structure functions in nuclei (the EMC Effect) has been the focus of intense experimental and theoretical study since the original discovery in 1983, the experimental emphasis has been on heavy or mediumheavy nuclei. The theoretical interpretation of the EMC Effect is far from clear; it remains difficult to disentangle the "conventional" nuclear physics effects of binding and Fermi motion from more exotic effects. The study of the EMC Effect in light nuclei, where the detailed nuclear structure is well understood, and at large x, where effects from Fermi motion dominate, will add new insight into the underlying mechanism at work. Experiment E03103 at Jefferson Lab measured electron scattering cross sections from nuclei (A=3 to 197) and the deuteron to provide new data on the EMC Effect. These measurements will greatly improve the precision of the existing data set on 4He, provide the first measurement of the EMC Effect in 3He for x>0.5, a

  19. Test report for photonic sensors used in electric-field measurement of simulated electromagnetic pulses. Final report, 28-30 Aug 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blocksom, R.; Bucholz, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of tests to record and analyze the characteristic response of three photonic Electric field, E-field sensors to simulated Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), compared to that of a reference metallic sensor. Work was performed under Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) contract N00014-89-C-2033, sponsored by Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). Tasks included: (1) selection of candidate sensors capable of measuring the E-field content (intensity and frequency spectrum) of simulated EMP phenomena generated by the Horizontally Polarized Dipole (HPD) EMP simulator at the Naval Air Test Center (NATC), Patuxent River, MD; (2) liaison with sensor designers, NATC personnel, and others as necessary to delineate test requirements and constraints; (3) development of a sensor test plan; (4) sensor tests in the HPD EMP simulation; (5) analysis of the test data; and (6) generation of the Test Report. The activities discussed herein were performed during the period of March 1990-January 1991. Since 1985, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and ARC Professional Services Group Defense Systems Division (ARC) have conducted an RD effort to produce a prototype fiber optic sensor system for application to EMP field measurement. The work was sponsored under Fleet Aircraft Assessment for Navy Testing and Analysis for EMP Limitation (FAANTAEL) project managed by NAVAIR Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Branch, AIR-5161.

  20. Millimeter-wave sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seoktae

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    New millimeter wave interferometric, multifunctional sensors have been studied for industrial sensing applications: displacement measurement, liquid-level gauging and velocimetry. Two types of configuration were investigated to implement the sensor...

  1. Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The switch helps with cost effective energy savings by turning off the lights when an occupancy sensor says the room is empty.

  2. Measurement of light capture in solar cells from silver- and tin-plated patterned bus bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winiarz, Christine Eve

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bus bars on solar cells shade silicon from light. When the bus bars are patterned, they can reflect light back onto the silicon using total internal reflection. These patterned bus bars are tin plated and produce 1-2.5% ...

  3. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  4. Foundations and Light Compass Foundations and Light Compass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jennifer L.

    Foundations and Light Compass Case Study Foundations and Light Compass Case Study Jennifer L. WongQuantitative Sensor--centric Designcentric Design Light CompassLight Compass ­­ Models and Abstractions Contaminant Transport Marine Microorganisms Ecosystems, Biocomplexity What is a Light Compass?What is a Light

  5. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tiedtke, K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Jastrow, U.; Jurani?, P.; Kreis, S.; Gerken, N.; Richter, M.; Arp, U.; Feng, Y.; Nordlund, D.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray opticalmore »elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.« less

  6. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  7. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  8. Early-Time Flux Measurements of SN 2014J Obtained with Small Robotic Telescopes: Extending the AAVSO Light Curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poppe, B; Zheng, W; Shivvers, I; Itagaki, K; Filippenko, A V; Kunz, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, early-time photometry of supernova (SN) 2014J is presented, extending the AAVSO CCD database to prediscovery dates. The applicability of NASA's small robotic MicroObservatory Network telescopes for photometric measurements is evaluated. Prediscovery and postdiscovery photometry of SN 2014J is measured from images taken by two different telescopes of the network, and is compared to measurements from the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope and the Itagaki Observatory. In the early light-curve phase (which exhibits stable spectral behavior with constant color indices), these data agree with reasonably high accuracy (better than 0.05 mag around maximum brightness, and 0.15 mag at earlier times). Owing to the changing spectral energy distribution of the SN and the different spectral characteristics of the systems used, differences increase after maximum light. We augment light curves of SN 2014J downloaded from the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) online database with these dat...

  9. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  10. Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, C.B.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities. 3 figs.

  11. Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Charles B. (Lakewood, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

  12. Abstract--Mobile devices are becoming increasingly sophisti-cated and now incorporate many diverse and powerful sensors.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gary

    sensors, direc- tion sensors (compasses), and acceleration sensors. In this paper we describe and evaluate diverse and powerful sensors. The latest generation of smart phones is especially laden with sensors, including GPS sensors, vision sensors (cameras), audio sensors (microphones), light sensors, temperature

  13. In situ measurements of nitric oxide in coal-combustion exhaust using a sensor based on a widely tunable external-cavity GaN diode laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, T.N.; Lucht, R.P.; Priyadarsan, S.; Annamalai, K.; Caton, J.A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineers

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A diode-laser-based sensor has been developed to measure nitric oxide mole fractions using absorption spectroscopy. The sensor is based on sum-frequency mixing of a 395 nm external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) and a 532 run laser in a beta-barium-borate crystal. Using a new tuning scheme, the GaN ECDL wavelength was modulated over 90 GHz without mode hops. The sensor was applied for measurements of the NO mole fraction in the exhaust of a laboratory-scale, 30 kW, coal-fired boiler burner. Absorption measurements were successfully performed despite severe attenuation by scattering from ash particles in the exhaust stream and on the exhaust-section windows. A detection limit (1 sigma) of 4.5 ppm m/root Hz at 700 K was demonstrated in coal-combustion exhaust at a maximum detection rate of 5 Hz.

  14. Contact-independent measurement of electrical Conductance of a Thin Film with a Nanoscale Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mentzel, Tamar

    Contact effects are a common impediment to electrical measurements throughout the fields of nanoelectronics, organic electronics, and the emerging field of graphene electronics. We demonstrate a novel method of measuring ...

  15. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  16. Derivative of the light frequency shift as a measure of spacetime curvature for gravitational wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Congedo

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of frequency shifts for light beams exchanged between two test masses nearly in free fall is at the heart of gravitational wave detection. It is envisaged that the derivative of the frequency shift is in fact limited by differential forces acting on those test masses. We calculate the derivative of the frequency shift with a fully covariant, gauge-independent and coordinate-free method. This method is general and does not require a congruence of nearby beams' null geodesics as done in previous work. We show that the derivative of the parallel transport is the only means by which gravitational effects shows up in the frequency shift. This contribution is given as an integral of the Riemann tensor --the only physical observable of curvature-- along the beam's geodesic. The remaining contributions are: the difference of velocities, the difference of non-gravitational forces, and finally fictitious forces, either locally at the test masses or non-locally integrated along the beam's geodesic. As an application relevant to gravitational wave detection, we work out the frequency shift in the local Lorentz frame of nearby geodesics.

  17. NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source) X-19A beamline performance for x-ray absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C.Y.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Stefan, P.M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the X-19A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described. The beamline is designed for high resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a wide energy range. All of the beamline optical components are compatible with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) operation. This permits measurements to be made in a window-less mode, thereby facilitating lower energy (<4 KeV) studies. To upgrade the beamline performance, several possible improvements in instrumentation and practice are discussed to increase photon statistics with an optimum energy resolution, while decreasing the harmonic contamination and noise level. A special effort has been made to improve the stability and UHV compatibility of the monochromator system. Initial x-ray absorption results demonstrate the capabilities of this beamline for x-ray absorption studies of low Z elements (e.g. S) in highly dilute systems. The future use of this beamline for carrying out various x-ray absorption experiments is presented. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Measurement of the energy resolution and calibration of hybrid pixel detectors with GaAs:Cr sensor and Timepix readout chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, A P; Bell, S T; Chelkov, G A; Dedovich, D V; Demichev, M A; Elkin, V G; Gostkin, M I; Kotov, S A; Kozhevnikov, D A; Kruchonak, U G; Nozdrin, A A; Porokhovoy, S Yu; Potrap, I N; Smolyanskiy, P I; Zakhvatkin, M M; Zhemchugov, A S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an iterative method of per-pixel energy calibration of hybrid pixel detectors with GaAs:Cr sensor and Timepix readout chip. A convolution of precisely measured spectra of characteristic X-rays of different metals with the resolution and the efficiency of the pixel detector is used for the calibration. The energy resolution of the detector is also measured during the calibration. The use of per-pixel calibration allows to achieve a good energy resolution of the Timepix detector with GaAs:Cr sensor: 8% and 13% at 60 keV and 20 keV, respectively.

  19. Optical position sensor for determining the interface between a clear and an opaque fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An inexpensive, optical position sensor for measuring a position or length, x, along a one-dimensional curvilinear, coordinate system. The sensor can be used, for example, to determine the position of an interface between a clear and an opaque fluid (such as crude oil and water). In one embodiment, the sensor utilizes the principle of dual-fluorescence, where a primary fiber emits primary fluorescent light and a parallel secondary fiber collects a portion of the primary fluorescent light that is not blocked by the opaque fluid. This, in turn, excites secondary fluorescence in the secondary fiber at a longer wavelength. A light detector measures the intensity of secondary fluorescence emitted from an end of the secondary fiber, which is used to calculate the unknown position or length, x. Side-emitting fibers can be used in place of, or in addition to, fluorescent fibers. The all-optical sensor is attractive for applications involving flammable liquids.

  20. A modular multispectral radiometer for light measurements in the UV and VIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    b Fachbereich Physik, Carl v. Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Germany ABSTRACT Solar radiation is the energy source for all photosynthetic life-forms. Due to their individual pigment compositions only Sensor with Enhanced Spectral Resolution), founded by the German Ministry of Research and Technology

  1. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated interferometric sensor depends on an appropriate performance function (e.g., desired displacement range, accuracy, robustness, etc.). In this dissertation, the performance limitations of a bundled differential intensity-modulated displacement sensor are analyzed, where the bundling configuration has been designed to optimize performance. The performance limitations of a white light Fabry-Perot displacement sensor are also analyzed. Both these sensors are non-contacting, but they have access to different regions of the performance-space. Further, both these sensors have different degrees of sensitivity to experimental uncertainty. Made in conjunction with careful analysis, the decision of which sensor to deploy need not be an uninformed one.

  2. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  3. Micromechanical transient sensor for measuring viscosity and density of a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Oden, Patrick I. (Plano, TX); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN); Finot, Eric Laurent (Torcy, FR)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring the viscosity and/or specific density of a fluid utilizes a microcantilever vibrated in the analyte fluid. The source of vibration is switched on and off and the transient behavior or decay in amplitude of the vibration is monitored. The method is particularly useful for the measurement of process conditions in remote locations in real time.

  4. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  5. REMORA 3: The first instrumented fuel experiment with on-line gas composition measurement by acoustic sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, T.; Muller, E.; Federici, E. [CEA - Nuclear Energy Div., DEN - Fuel Research Dept. - Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Rosenkrantz, E.; Ferrandis, J. Y. [CNRS - Univ. Montpellier 2, Southern Electronic Inst., UMR 5214, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Tiratay, X.; Silva, V. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div., DEN, Nuclear Reactors and Facilities Dept., F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Machard, D. [EDF, SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France); Trillon, G. [AREVA-NP, F-69456 Lyon (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the aim to improve the knowledge of nuclear fuel behaviour, the development of advanced instrumentation used during in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor (MTR) is necessary. To obtain data on high Burn-Up MOX fuel performance under transient operating conditions, especially in order to differentiate between the kinetics of fission gas and helium releases and to acquire data on the degradation of the fuel conductivity, a highly instrumented in-pile experiment called REMORA 3 has been conducted by CEA and IES (Southern Electronic Inst. - CNRS - Montpellier 2 Univ.). A rodlet extracted from a fuel rod base irradiated for five cycles in a French EDF commercial PWR has been re-instrumented with a fuel centerline thermocouple, a pressure transducer and an advanced acoustic sensor. This latter, patented by CEA and IES, is 1 used in addition to pressure measurement to determine the composition of the gases located in the free volume and the molar fractions of fission gas and helium. This instrumented fuel rodlet has been re-irradiated in a specific rig, GRIFFONOS, located in the periphery of the OSIRIS experimental reactor core at CEA Saclay. First of all, an important design stage and test phases have been performed before the irradiation in order to optimize the response and the accuracy of the sensors: - To control the influence of the temperature on the acoustic sensor behaviour, a thermal mock-up has been built. - To determine the temperature of the gas located in the acoustic cavity as a function of the coolant temperature, and the average temperature of the gases located in the rodlet free volume as a function of the linear heat rate, thermal calculations have been achieved. The former temperature is necessary to calculate the molar fractions of the gases and the latter is used to calculate the total amount of released gas from the internal rod pressure measurements. - At the end of the instrumented rod manufacturing, specific internal free volume and pressure measurements have been carried out. Preliminary calculations of the REMORA 3 experiments have been performed from these measurements, with the aim to determine free volume evolution as a function of linear heat rate history. - A tracer gas has been added to the filling gas in order to optimize the accuracy of the helium balance at the time of the post irradiation examination. The two phases of the REMORA 3 irradiation have been achieved at the end of 2010 in the OSIRIS reactor. Slight acoustic signal degradation, observed during the test under high neutron and gamma flux, has led to an efficiency optimization of the signal processing. The instrumentation ran smoothly and allowed to reach all the experimental objectives. After non destructive examination performed in the Osiris reactor pool, typically gamma spectrometry and neutron radiography, the instrumented rod and the device have been disassembled. Then the instrumented rod has been transported to the LECA facility in Cadarache Centre for post irradiation examination. The internal pressure and volume of the rodlet as well as precise gas composition measurements will be known after puncturing step performed in a hot cell of this facility. That will allow us to qualify the in-pile measurements and to finalize the data which will be used for the validation of the fuel behaviour computer codes. (authors)

  6. BUILDING MOBILE SENSOR NETWORKS USING SMARTPHONES AND WEB SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    to demonstrate solutions to multiple challenges in current wireless sensor networks. We also describe common capabilities, such as detecting user location, recording high-quality audio, measuring ambient light, sensing geomagnetic strength, and sensing orientation (Mohan). Due to widespread use of smartphones, it is now

  7. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical sensors are generally used as one-dimensional devices, where one measures the sensor’s response at a fixed setting, e.g., infrared absorption at a specific wavelength, or conductivity of a solid-state sensor at a specific operating...

  8. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  9. Silicate electrochemical measurements in seawater: Chemical and analytical aspects towards a reagentless sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    Silicate electrochemical measurements in seawater: Chemical and analytical aspects towards Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex, France Keywords: Molybdenum Silicate Reagentless developed a semi-autonomous method to detect silicate in aqueous samples. Molybdenum oxidation was used

  10. Light-Biasing Electron-Beam-Induced-Current Measurements for Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, M. J.; Olson, J. M.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Results using light-biasing EBIC are illustrated for dual-junction InGaP/InGaAs solar cells.

  11. On the feasibility of determining slant-range visibility by using measurements of scattered light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcomb, Fred Richard

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to vary according to the pollution sources; this prevented the use of average values of the scattering parameters. A one- light source, two-detector instrument which operated on a forward scattering angle was simulated in the numerical model... was developed that simulated the one- light source, two-detector instrument operating in the model atmospheres. The horizontal (surface) visual range and visual range of seven layers in the model atmospheres were computed. The value of the slant...

  12. Millimeter Wave Sensor Technologies Track Biometrics; Detect Chemicals, Gases, and Radiation: Argonne’s millimeter wave (mmW) sensor technologies measure a wide range of threat materials remotely

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Security threats come in many forms—airborne, radiative, gaseous, human, or infiltrative—and it can be costly and impractical to deploy a broad suite of detector technologies to identify all potential hazards in public places. Argonne’s millimeter wave (mmW) sensor technologies measure a wide range of threat materials remotely, making them well suited to many security, industrial and medical applications....

  13. Sensitivity enhancement of grating interferometer based two-dimensional sensor arrays using two-wavelength readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Urey, Hakan

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffraction gratings integrated with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors offer displacement measurements with subnanometer sensitivity. However, the sensitivity of the interferometric readout may drop significantly based on the gap between the grating and the reference surface. A two-wavelength (2-{lambda}) readout method was previously tested using a single MEMS sensor for illustrating increased displacement measurement capability. This work demonstrates sensitivity enhancement on a sensor array with large scale parallelization ({approx}20,000 sensors). The statistical representation, which is developed to model sensitivity enhancement within a grating based sensor array, is supported by experimental results using a thermal sensor array. In the experiments, two lasers at different wavelengths (633 and 650 nm) illuminate the thermal sensor array from the backside, time-sequentially. The diffracted first order light from the array is imaged onto a single CCD camera. The target scene is reconstructed by observing the change in the first diffracted order diffraction intensity for both wavelengths. Merging of the data from two measurements with two lasers was performed by taking the larger of the two CCD measurements with respect to the reference image for each sensor. {approx}30% increase in the average sensitivity was demonstrated for a 160x120 pixel IR sensor array. Proposed architecture is also applicable to a variety of sensing applications, such as parallel biosensing and atomic force microscopy, for improved displacement measurements and enhanced sensitivity.

  14. Terahertz Sensor for Non-Contact Thickness and Quality Measurement of Automobile Paints of Varying Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Ke; Shen, Yao-Chun; Zeitler, J. Axel

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    to resolve coating layers down to a thickness of 18 $mu{hbox{m}}$ and was validated for both single- and multi-layer automobile paint samples. Results of the terahertz measurements were benchmarked against other techniques that are currently used for non...

  15. Measurements of the Cerenkov light emitted by a TeO2 crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bellini; N. Casali; I. Dafinei; M. Marafini; S. Morganti; F. Orio; D. Pinci; M. Vignati; C. Voena

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bolometers have proven to be good instruments to search for rare processes because of their excellent energy resolution and their extremely low intrinsic background. In this kind of detectors, the capability of discriminating alpha particles from electrons represents an important aspect for the background reduction. One possibility for obtaining such a discrimination is provided by the detection of the Cerenkov light which, at the low energies of the natural radioactivity, is only emitted by electrons. In this paper, the results of the analysis of the light emitted by a TeO2 crystal at room temperature when transversed by a cosmic ray are reported. Light is promptly emitted after the particle crossing and a clear evidence of its directionality is also found. These results represent a strong indication that Cerenkov light is the main, if not even the only, component of the light signal in a TeO2 crystal. They open the possibility to make large improvements in the performance of experiments based on this kind of materials

  16. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  17. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  18. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  19. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Biophysik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Max-von Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in ?-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  20. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  1. Phase Estimation with Weak Measurement Using a White Light Source Xiao-Ye Xu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidman, Lev

    , University of Science and Technology of China, CAS, Hefei 230026, People's Republic of China 2 Raymond quantum noise [2]. To reduce the influence of the noise, quantum metrology technologies [3], including N00 to be useless in quantum metrology. Recently, it has been proposed that white light can be used for a very

  2. Laser Doppler sensor employing a single fan-shaped interference fringe system for distance and shape measurement of laterally moving objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfister, Thorsten; Buettner, Lars; Czarske, Juergen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For monitoring the position and shape of fast moving and, especially, rotating objects such as turbo machine rotors, contactless and compact sensors with a high measurement rate as well as high precision are required. We present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a novel laser Doppler sensor employing a single fan-shaped interference fringe system, which allows measuring for the position and shape of fast moving solid bodies with known tangential velocity. It is shown theoretically as well as experimentally that this sensor offers concurrently high position resolution and high temporal resolution in contrast to conventional measurement techniques, since its measurement uncertainty is, in principle, independent of the object velocity. Moreover, it can be built very compact, because it features low complexity. To prove its operational capability and its potential for practical applications, radial and axial shape measurements of rotating bodies are demonstrated in comparison with triangulation. An average position resolution of about 2 {mu}m could be achieved.

  3. Differential spectral responsivity measurement of photovoltaic detectors with a light-emitting-diode-based integrating sphere source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaid, Ghufron; Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Seongchong; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental realization of differential spectral responsivity measurement by using a light-emitting diode (LED)-based integrating sphere source. The spectral irradiance responsivity is measured by a Lambertian-like radiation field with a diameter of 40mm at the peak wavelengths of the 35 selectable LEDs covering a range from 280 to 1550nm. The systematic errors and uncertainties due to lock-in detection, spatial irradiance distribution, and reflection from the test detector are experimentally corrected or considered. In addition, we implemented a numerical procedure to correct the error due to the broad spectral bandwidth of the LEDs. The overall uncertainty of the DSR measurement is evaluated to be 2.2% (k=2) for Si detectors. To demonstrate its application, we present the measurement results of two Si photovoltaic detectors at different bias irradiance levels up to 120mW/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Clarke, Jr., Willis L. (San Ramon, CA); Ciarlo, Dino R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  5. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  6. Beyond the Replacement Paradigm: Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Switches · Smart Building & Grid Interfaces · Efficient full spectrum LEDs without droop · Versatile, low - Visible Light Communications Integration of smart fixtures, networked sensors and control systemsBeyond the Replacement Paradigm: Smart Lighting Robert F. Karlicek, Jr. Director, Smart Lighting

  7. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  8. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  9. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  10. Lattice measurement of $B_{B_s}$ with a chiral light quark action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Blossier

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The computation on the lattice of the bag parameter $B_{B_s}$ associated to the $B_s - \\bar{B_s}$ mixing amplitude in the Standard Model is presented. The estimation has been made by combining the static limit of HQET and the Neuberger light quark action which preserves the chiral symmetry on the lattice. We find $B^{\\bar{MS}}{stat}}_{B_s}(m_b)=0.92(3)$.

  11. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped boresilicate glass, accurate to .+-.0.5.degree. C. over an operating temperature range of about -196.degree. C. to 400.degree. C.; and a mixture of D.sub.2 O and H.sub.2 O, accurate to .+-.0.1.degree. C. over an operating range of about 5.degree. C. to 90.degree. C.

  13. A measurement-based analysis of the interaction among MAC, network and application layers in wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malesci, Umberto

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been a number of recent proposals for link and network-layer protocols in the sensor networking literature, each of which claims to be superior to other approaches. However, a proposal for a networking protocol ...

  14. Experimental use of airborne sensors in the measurement of Mississippi River outflow into the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Don

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ZNENTAL USE OP AIRBORNE SENSORS IN THE MEASUREMBNZ OP MISSISSIPPI RIVER OUTPLO? INTO THE GULP OP I'IEXICO DON 'WAKEN Lieutenant Commander U ~ ST Navy Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... . . . . , . , 39 2 Freight-data--handling - -o- ~ . . ----. ------58 Vo. -ARQZSXS OP. RBSULTS o -~ ~ ~ o ~ o '~ o=. oo ~ ? o =-'- 63 Airborne Sensor Evaluation , . . . . . . 63 l. Xnfrared Xmagery o . . . . '. . ~ , 63 Ultraviolet Imagery ~ ~ . o ' 65 3. Aerial...

  15. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  16. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  17. Independent measurement of the top quark mass and the light- and bottom-jet energy scales at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Fiedler

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the simultaneous determination of the energy scales for b-quark jets and light jets, the jet energy resolution, and the top quark mass at hadron colliders is presented. The method exploits the unique kinematics of events with top-antitop pair production, where one of the top quarks involves a leptonic and one a hadronic W boson decay. The paper shows a feasibility study of how this simultaneous measurement can be performed at the upcoming LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring the intensity and phase of an ultrashort light pulse

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kane, Daniel J. (Santa Fe, NM); Trebino, Rick P. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulse shape I(t) and phase evolution x(t) of ultrashort light pulses are obtained using an instantaneously responding nonlinear optical medium to form a signal pulse. A light pulse, such a laser pulse, is split into a gate pulse and a probe pulse, where the gate pulse is delayed relative to the probe pulse. The gate pulse and the probe pulse are combined within an instantaneously responding optical medium to form a signal pulse functionally related to a temporal slice of the gate pulse corresponding to the time delay of the probe pulse. The signal pulse is then input to a wavelength-selective device to output pulse field information comprising intensity vs. frequency for a first value of the time delay. The time delay is varied over a range of values effective to yield an intensity plot of signal intensity vs. wavelength and delay. In one embodiment, the beams are overlapped at an angle so that a selected range of delay times is within the intersection to produce a simultaneous output over the time delays of interest.

  19. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combusion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. The nitric oxide sensor has been used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based sensor measurements showed good agreement with the results from physical probe sampling of the combustion exhaust. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. Future planned modifications will lead to even faster response times at sensitivity levels at or below 1 ppm.

  20. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  1. Measurement- and comparison-based sizes of Schrödinger cat states of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Volkoff; K. B. Whaley

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend several measurement-based definitions of effective "cat-size" to coherent state superpositions with branches composed of either single coherent states or tensor products of coherent states. These effective cat-size measures depend on determining the maximal quantum distinguishability of certain states associated with the superposition state: e.g., in one measure, the maximal distinguishability of the branches of the superposition is considered as in quantum binary decision theory; in another measure, the maximal distinguishability of the initial superposition and its image after a one-parameter evolution generated by a local Hermitian operator is of interest. The cat-size scaling with the number of modes and mode intensity (i.e., photon number) is compared to the scaling derived directly from the Wigner function of the superposition and to that estimated experimentally from decoherence. We also apply earlier comparison-based methods for determining macroscopic superposition size that require a reference GHZ state. The case of a hierarchical Schr\\"{o}dinger cat state with branches composed of smaller superpositions is also analyzed from a measurement-based perspective.

  2. SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR MAXIMIZING LIFETIME PER UNIT COST IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR MAXIMIZING LIFETIME PER UNIT COST IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Yunxia Chen in a wireless sensor network (WSN). Analyzing the lifetime per unit cost of a linear WSN, we find that deploying of sensors deployed in the network, can be used to measure the utilization efficiency of sensors

  3. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  4. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  5. Measurement of the Cross Section Times Branching Ratio of Light Higgs Decays at CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgs boson production cross section at a 3 TeV CLIC machine allows for a precision measurement the coil and consist of a 30 layer tungsten- silicon electromagnetic calorimeter with 3.5×3.5 mm2 segmentation, followed by a tungsten- scintillator hadronic calorimeter with 75 layers in the barrel region

  6. Consensus Filters for Sensor Networks and Distributed Sensor Fusion Reza Olfati-Saber and Jeff S. Shamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamma, Jeff S.

    Consensus Filters for Sensor Networks and Distributed Sensor Fusion Reza Olfati-Saber and Jeff S for sensor fusion in sensor networks. This paper introduces a distributed filter that allows the nodes of a sensor network to track the average of n sensor measurements using an average consensus based distributed

  7. Sensor system for web inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sleefe, Gerard E. (1 Snowcap Ct., Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rudnick, Thomas J. (626 E. Jackson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119); Novak, James L. (11048 Malaguena La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

  8. Some light-ion excitation-function measurements on titanium, yttrium, and europium, and associated results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, H.I. Jr. [ed.; Lanier, R.G.; Mustafa, M.G.; Nuckolls, R.M.; Nagle, R.J.; O`Brien, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Frehaut, J.; Adam, A.; Philis, C. [Service de Physique et Techniques Nucleaires, Centre d`Etudes Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Boite Postale 12 (France)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses: Fabrication of Plastic-Matrix-Encapsulated Accelerator Targets and Their Use in Measuring Nuclear Excitation Functions; Correcting Excitation Function Data in the Low Energy Region for Finite Thickness of the Target Foils, Including Effects of Straggling; Excitation Functions for the Nuclear Reactions on Titanium Leading to the Production {sup 48}V, {sup 44}Sc and {sup 47}Sc by Proton, Deuteron and Triton Irradiations at 0--35 MeV; Some Excitation Functions of Proton and Deuteron Induced Reactions on {sup 89}Y; Measurements of the Excitation Functions of the Isobaric Chain {sup 87}Y, {sup 87}Y{sup m}, {sup 87}Y{sup g} and {sup 87}Sr{sup m}; Levels in {sup 87}Y Observed in the Decay of {sup 87}Zr; and Nuclear Reaction Excitation Functions from the Irradiation of {sup 151,153}Eu with Protons And deuterons up to 35 MeV.

  9. Collectivity in the light radon nuclei measured directly via Coulomb excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, L P; Jenkins, D G; Andreyev, A N; Bender, M; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; Deacon, A N; De Witte, H; DiJulio, D; Diriken, J; Ekström, A; Fransen, Ch; Freeman, S J; Geibel, K; Grahn, T; Hadinia, B; Hass, M; Heenen, P -H; Hess, H; Huyse, M; Jakobsson, U; Kesteloot, N; Konki, J; Kröll, Th; Kumar, V; Ivanov, O; Martin-Haugh, S; Mücher, D; Orlandi, R; Pakarinen, J; Petts, A; Peura, P; Rahkila, P; Reiter, P; Scheck, M; Seidlitz, M; Singh, K; Smith, J F; Van de Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Voulot, D; Wadsworth, R; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wimmer, K; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Zieli?ska, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Shape coexistence in heavy nuclei poses a strong challenge to state-of-the-art nuclear models, where several competing shape minima are found close to the ground state. A classic region for investigating this phenomenon is in the region around $Z=82$ and the neutron mid-shell at $N=104$. Purpose: Evidence for shape coexistence has been inferred from $\\alpha$-decay measurements, laser spectroscopy and in-beam measurements. While the latter allow the pattern of excited states and rotational band structures to be mapped out, a detailed understanding of shape coexistence can only come from measurements of electromagnetic matrix elements. Method: Secondary, radioactive ion beams of $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn were studied by means of low-energy Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. Results: The electric-quadrupole ($E2$) matrix element connecting the ground state and first-excited $2^{+}_{1}$ state was extracted for both $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn, corresponding to ${B(E2;2^{+}_{1} \\to 2^...

  10. Towards the reanalysis of void coefficients measurements at proteus for high conversion light water reactor lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hursin, M.; Koeberl, O.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Conversion Light Water Reactors (HCLWR) allows a better usage of fuel resources thanks to a higher breeding ratio than standard LWR. Their uses together with the current fleet of LWR constitute a fuel cycle thoroughly studied in Japan and the US today. However, one of the issues related to HCLWR is their void reactivity coefficient (VRC), which can be positive. Accurate predictions of void reactivity coefficient in HCLWR conditions and their comparisons with representative experiments are therefore required. In this paper an inter comparison of modern codes and cross-section libraries is performed for a former Benchmark on Void Reactivity Effect in PWRs conducted by the OECD/NEA. It shows an overview of the k-inf values and their associated VRC obtained for infinite lattice calculations with UO{sub 2} and highly enriched MOX fuel cells. The codes MCNPX2.5, TRIPOLI4.4 and CASMO-5 in conjunction with the libraries ENDF/B-VI.8, -VII.0, JEF-2.2 and JEFF-3.1 are used. A non-negligible spread of results for voided conditions is found for the high content MOX fuel. The spread of eigenvalues for the moderated and voided UO{sub 2} fuel are about 200 pcm and 700 pcm, respectively. The standard deviation for the VRCs for the UO{sub 2} fuel is about 0.7% while the one for the MOX fuel is about 13%. This work shows that an appropriate treatment of the unresolved resonance energy range is an important issue for the accurate determination of the void reactivity effect for HCLWR. A comparison to experimental results is needed to resolve the presented discrepancies. (authors)

  11. sMAP: Simple Measurement and Actuation for Open Buildings"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , pumps, etc), Schedules" · 2291 meters/sensors" ­ Power (building, floor, lights, chiller, pumps, etc

  12. Illumination Sufficiency Survey Techniques: In-situ Measurements of Lighting System Performance and a User Preference Survey for Illuminance in an Off-Grid, African Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to promote rechargeable electric lighting as a replacement for fuel-based light sources in developing countries are typically predicated on the notion that lighting service levels can be maintained or improved while reducing the costs and environmental impacts of existing practices. However, the extremely low incomes of those who depend on fuel-based lighting create a need to balance the hypothetically possible or desirable levels of light with those that are sufficient and affordable. In a pilot study of four night vendors in Kenya, we document a field technique we developed to simultaneously measure the effectiveness of lighting service provided by a lighting system and conduct a survey of lighting service demand by end-users. We took gridded illuminance measurements across each vendor's working and selling area, with users indicating the sufficiency of light at each point. User light sources included a mix of kerosene-fueled hurricane lanterns, pressure lamps, and LED lanterns.We observed illuminance levels ranging from just above zero to 150 lux. The LED systems markedly improved the lighting service levels over those provided by kerosene-fueled hurricane lanterns. Users reported that the minimum acceptable threshold was about 2 lux. The results also indicated that the LED lamps in use by the subjects did not always provide sufficient illumination over the desired retail areas. Our sample size is much too small, however, to reach any conclusions about requirements in the broader population. Given the small number of subjects and very specific type of user, our results should be regarded as indicative rather than conclusive. We recommend replicating the method at larger scales and across a variety of user types and contexts. Policymakers should revisit the subject of recommended illuminance levels regularly as LED technology advances and the price/service balance point evolves.

  13. Collectivity in the light radon nuclei measured directly via Coulomb excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. P. Gaffney; A. P. Robinson; D. G. Jenkins; A. N. Andreyev; M. Bender; A. Blazhev; N. Bree; B. Bruyneel; P. A. Butler; T. E. Cocolios; T. Davinson; A. N. Deacon; H. De Witte; D. DiJulio; J. Diriken; A. Ekström; Ch. Fransen; S. J. Freeman; K. Geibel; T. Grahn; B. Hadinia; M. Hass; P. -H. Heenen; H. Hess; M. Huyse; U. Jakobsson; N. Kesteloot; J. Konki; Th. Kröll; V. Kumar; O. Ivanov; S. Martin-Haugh; D. Mücher; R. Orlandi; J. Pakarinen; A. Petts; P. Peura; P. Rahkila; P. Reiter; M. Scheck; M. Seidlitz; K. Singh; J. F. Smith; J. Van de Walle; P. Van Duppen; D. Voulot; R. Wadsworth; N. Warr; F. Wenander; K. Wimmer; K. Wrzosek-Lipska; M. Zieli?ska

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Shape coexistence in heavy nuclei poses a strong challenge to state-of-the-art nuclear models, where several competing shape minima are found close to the ground state. A classic region for investigating this phenomenon is in the region around $Z=82$ and the neutron mid-shell at $N=104$. Purpose: Evidence for shape coexistence has been inferred from $\\alpha$-decay measurements, laser spectroscopy and in-beam measurements. While the latter allow the pattern of excited states and rotational band structures to be mapped out, a detailed understanding of shape coexistence can only come from measurements of electromagnetic matrix elements. Method: Secondary, radioactive ion beams of $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn were studied by means of low-energy Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. Results: The electric-quadrupole ($E2$) matrix element connecting the ground state and first-excited $2^{+}_{1}$ state was extracted for both $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn, corresponding to ${B(E2;2^{+}_{1} \\to 2^{+}_{1})=29^{+8}_{-8}}$ W.u. and $43^{+17}_{-12}$ W.u., respectively. Additionally, $E2$ matrix elements connecting the $2^{+}_{1}$ state with the $4^{+}_{1}$ and $2^{+}_{2}$ states were determined in $^{202}$Rn. No excited $0^{+}$ states were observed in the current data set, possibly due to a limited population of second-order processes at the currently-available beam energies. Conclusions: The results are discussed in terms of collectivity and the deformation of both nuclei studied is deduced to be weak, as expected from the low-lying level-energy schemes. Comparisons are also made to state-of-the-art beyond-mean-field model calculations and the magnitude of the transitional quadrupole moments are well reproduced.

  14. A measurement of the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of single crystals, using polarized light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Robert Latham

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For comparison, the value of the shift in germanium is 3. 9 X 10 eV/'C. Yiork on photoconductivity at Hebrew University stimulated some optical research at the same university, involving absorption, specular reflectivity, and thermoluminescence measurements... QUARTZ / WINDOW FIG. I. DEWAR FLASK 23 50. S83 ELECTRONIC T UBE DIV ISION OF DUMONT LABORATORIES I O. I- W LIl t' I- V) Z tlJ V) I. O S-I GOOO 9000 WAVELENGTH-ANGSTROMS FIG. 2. SPECTRAL IAESPONSE 12000 1. 5 TEMPEPATURE 'K FIG. B...

  15. Estimation of temporal separation of slow light pulses in atomic vapors by weak measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardeep Kumar; Shubhrangshu Dasgupta

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how two circular polarization components of a linearly polarized pulse, propagating through a coherently driven dilute atomic vapor, can be well resolved in time domain by weak measurement. Slower group velocity of one of the components due to electromagnetically induced transparency leads to a differential group delay between the two components. For low number density, this delay may not be large enough to temporally resolve the two components. We show how this can be enhanced in terms of mean time of arrival of the output pulse through a post-selected polarizer. We demonstrate the idea with all the analytical and numerical results, with a specific example of alkali atoms.

  16. New measurements of the European Muon Collaboration effect in very light nuclei.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arrington, J.; El Fassi, L.; Holt, R.; Potterveld, D. H.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E.; Solvignon, P.; Zheng, X.; Seely, J.; Daniel, A.; Gaskell, D.; Asaturyan, R. (Physics); (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.); (Univ. of Houston); (Thomas Jefferson National Lab.); (Yerevan Physics Inst.)

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    New Jefferson Lab data are presented on the nuclear dependence of the inclusive cross section from {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 9}Be and {sup 12}C for 0.3 < x < 0.9, Q{sup 2} {approx} 3-6 GeV{sup 2}. These data represent the first measurement of the EMC effect for {sup 3}He at large x and a significant improvement for {sup 4}He. The data do not support previous A-dependent or density-dependent fits to the EMC effect and suggest that the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions may depend on the local nuclear environment.

  17. Calibration-free optical chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for taking absorbance-based chemical measurements are described. In a specific embodiment, an indicator-based pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) sensor displays sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and measurement stability. These qualities are achieved by: 1) renewing the sensing solution, 2) allowing the sensing solution to reach equilibrium with the analyte, and 3) calculating the response from a ratio of the indicator solution absorbances which are determined relative to a blank solution. Careful solution preparation, wavelength calibration, and stray light rejection also contribute to this calibration-free system. Three pCO2 sensors were calibrated and each had response curves which were essentially identical within the uncertainty of the calibration. Long-term laboratory and field studies showed the response had no drift over extended periods (months). The theoretical response, determined from thermodynamic characterization of the indicator solution, also predicted the observed calibration-free performance.

  18. Optical Design of a Broadband Infrared Spectrometer for Bunch Length Measurement at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kiel; /SLAC

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory occur on the order of tens of femtoseconds and cannot be directly measured by conventional means. The length of the pulses can instead be reconstructed by measuring the spectrum of optical transition radiation emitted by the electrons as they move toward a conducting foil. Because the emitted radiation occurs in the mid-infrared from 0.6 to 30 microns a novel optical layout is required. Using a helium-neon laser with wavelength 633 nm, a series of gold-coated off-axis parabolic mirrors were positioned to direct a beam through a zinc selenide prism and to a focus at a CCD camera for imaging. Constructing this layout revealed a number of novel techniques for reducing the aberrations introduced into the system by the off-axis parabolic mirrors. The beam had a recorded radius of less than a millimeter at its final focus on the CCD imager. This preliminary setup serves as a model for the spectrometer that will ultimately measure the LCLS electron pulse duration.

  19. THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT FROM THE MEASUREMENTS OF THE ATTENUATION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The attenuation of high-energy gamma-ray spectrum due to the electron-positron pair production against the extragalactic background light (EBL) provides an indirect method to measure the EBL of the universe. We use the measurements of the absorption features of the gamma-rays from blazars as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to explore the EBL flux density and constrain the EBL spectrum, star formation rate density (SFRD), and photon escape fraction from galaxies out to z = 6. Our results are basically consistent with the existing determinations of the quantities. We find a larger photon escape fraction at high redshifts, especially at z = 3, compared to the result from recent Ly{alpha} measurements. Our SFRD result is consistent with the data from both gamma-ray burst and ultraviolet (UV) observations in the 1{sigma} level. However, the average SFRD we obtain at z {approx}> 3 matches the gamma-ray data better than the UV data. Thus our SFRD result at z {approx}> 6 favors the fact that star formation alone is sufficiently high enough to reionize the universe.

  20. New Measurements of the EMC Effect in Light Nuclei and at Large x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskell, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA, 23606 (United States)

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The modification of structure functions in nuclei (the EMC effect) has been the focus of intense experimental and theoretical study since the original observation in 1983. The EMC effect unequivocally demonstrates that quark distributions in nuclei are not simply the incoherent sum of the nucleon quark distributions. However, progress in understanding the root cause of these modifications has been hampered by the complexity of nuclear structure, making it difficult to disentangle the ''conventional'' nuclear effects of Fermi motion and binding from true medium modifications to nucleon structure. Experiment E03--103 at Jefferson Lab made measurements of nuclear structure function ratios from few--body nuclei ({sup 3}He and {sup 4}He) to deuterium, where the nuclear structure is well known, and for a range of nuclei, A = 3 to 197, at large x, where effects from Fermi motion and binding dominate.

  1. New Measurements of the European Muon Collaboration Effect in Very Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seely, J.; Clasie, B. [Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Daniel, A.; Bukhari, M. H. S.; Hungerford, E.; Kalantarians, N.; Rodriguez, V. M. [University of Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Gaskell, D.; Bosted, P.; Bruell, A.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Jones, M. K.; Lung, A. F.; Meekins, D. G.; Roche, J.; Smith, G. R.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wood, S. A. [Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Newport News, Virginia (United States); Arrington, J. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    New Jefferson Lab data are presented on the nuclear dependence of the inclusive cross section from {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 9}Be and {sup 12}C for 0.3measurement of the EMC effect for {sup 3}He at large x and a significant improvement for {sup 4}He. The data do not support previous A-dependent or density-dependent fits to the EMC effect and suggest that the nuclear dependence of the quark distributions may depend on the local nuclear environment.

  2. Sensors and Actuators A 150 (2009) 144150 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    positioning substrates and source/collection fibers to achieve 45 light incidence and collection of spatially) is a non-invasive optical method, which utilizes a special fiber optic sensor probe to measure the diffuse scattering coefficients can be readily extracted [9]. Rapid and accurate (automated) classification of pre

  3. Measurement of the absorption coefficient for light laterally propagating in light-emitting diode structures with In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelikov, Yu. S.; Bochkareva, N. I.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Martynov, I. A.; Rebane, Yu. T.; Tarkin, D. V.; Shreter, Yu. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)], E-mail: YShreter@mail.ioffe.ru

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure for measuring the absorption coefficient for light propagating parallel to the surface of a GaN-based light emitting diode chip on a sapphire substrate is suggested. The procedure implies the study of emission from one end face of the chip as the opposite end face is illuminated with a light emitting diode. The absorption coefficient is calculated from the ratio between the intensities of emission emerging from the end faces of the sapphire substrate and the epitaxial layer. From the measurements for chips based on p-GaN/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/n-GaN structures, the lateral absorption coefficient is determined at a level of (23 {+-} 3)cm{sup -1} at a wavelength of 465 nm. Possible causes for the discrepancy between the absorption coefficients determined in the study and those reported previously are analyzed.

  4. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  5. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  6. Illumination Sufficiency Survey Techniques: In-situ Measurements of Lighting System Performance and a User Preference Survey for Illuminance in an Off-Grid, African Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. Replacing Fuel Based Lighting with Light Emitting DiodesCountries: Energy and Lighting in Rural Nepali Homes. Leukosrn3-illum-threshold.pdf Lighting Africa, 2008. Lighting

  7. Development of a light detection system for bidirectional measurements over the solar spectrum and sun course simulations with scale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browne, Courtney, 1982-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of natural light in building structures can increase energy efficiency and lead to more sustainable architecture. To encourage such use of natural light, a dual experimental device is being developed at MIT to help ...

  8. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Measured Lighting-Switch Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Wen-Kuei; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy profile is one of the driving factors behind discrepancies between the measured and simulated energy consumption of buildings. The frequencies of occupants leaving their offices and the corresponding durations of absences have significant impact on energy use and the operational controls of buildings. This study used statistical methods to analyze the occupancy status, based on measured lighting-switch data in five-minute intervals, for a total of 200 open-plan (cubicle) offices. Five typical occupancy patterns were identified based on the average daily 24-hour profiles of the presence of occupants in their cubicles. These statistical patterns were represented by a one-square curve, a one-valley curve, a two-valley curve, a variable curve, and a flat curve. The key parameters that define the occupancy model are the average occupancy profile together with probability distributions of absence duration, and the number of times an occupant is absent from the cubicle. The statistical results also reveal that the number of absence occurrences decreases as total daily presence hours decrease, and the duration of absence from the cubicle decreases as the frequency of absence increases. The developed occupancy model captures the stochastic nature of occupants moving in and out of cubicles, and can be used to generate a more realistic occupancy schedule. This is crucial for improving the evaluation of the energy saving potential of occupancy based technologies and controls using building simulations. Finally, to demonstrate the use of the occupancy model, weekday occupant schedules were generated and discussed.

  10. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  11. Overcoming Common Pitfalls: Energy Efficient Lighting Projects...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    require light levels to go off after 2 am. This regular series would be easily set. Daylight based controls use sensors to figure out when more light is needed. Photo cells are...

  12. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Battaglia, M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bolla, G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Bortoletto, D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Caberera, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Carlstrom, J E [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, C. L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Da Via, C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Demarteau, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fast, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frisch, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States), et al.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  13. Pulseshape characteristics of a 300 $\\mu$m PR03 R-measuring VELO sensor read out with a Beetle1.3 chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palacios, A; Buytaert, J; Borel, J; Collins, P; Eckstein, D; Eklund, L; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Jans, E; Ketel, T; Petrie, D; Pivk, M; Tobin, M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The signal-to-noise, overspill and undershoot characteristics of a VELO module equipped with Beetle1.3 read-out chips have been measured using 120 GeV pions from the SPS test beam facility at CERN. The module consists of a PR03 n-on-n 300 $\\mu$m R measuring prototype sensor and a fully populated K03 hybrid. Results are presented for a single Beetle1.3 chip with a variety of chip parameter settings controlling the pre-amplifier and shaper currents and feedback voltages, with the objective of establishing the performance of the module and understanding its dependence on the read-out chip settings.

  14. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  15. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combustion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. In Year 3, however, we obtained a new GaN laser diode for our ECDL system, installed it, and completed an extensive series of measurements in the Texas A&M coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The combustor was operated with coal and coal/biomass as fuels, with and without reburn, and with and without ammonia injection. Several different fuel equivalence ratios were investigated for each operating condition. A series of spectral simulations was performed using the HITRAN code to investigate the potential sensitivity of absorption measurements of ammonia in different spectral regions. It was concluded that ammonia absorption features in the 3000-nm spectral region would be hard to measure due to water vapor interferences. We will concentrate on the spectral region near 1530 nm, where other researchers have had some success in measuring ammonia.

  16. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

    1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  17. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  18. The derivative of the light frequency shift as a measure of space-time curvature for gravitational wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of frequency shifts for light beams exchanged between two test masses nearly in free fall is at the heart of gravitational wave detection. It is envisaged that the derivative of the frequency shift is in fact limited by differential forces acting on those test masses. We calculate the derivative of the frequency shift with a fully covariant, gauge-independent and coordinate-free method. This method is general and does not require a congruence of nearby beams' null geodesics as done in previous work. We show that the derivative of the parallel transport is the only means by which gravitational effects shows up in the frequency shift. This contribution is given as an integral of the Riemann tensor --the only physical observable of curvature-- along the beam's geodesic. The remaining contributions are: the difference of velocities, the difference of non-gravitational forces, and finally fictitious forces, either locally at the test masses or non-locally integrated along the beam's geodesic. As an...

  19. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  20. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  1. A loss-based, magnetic field sensor implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candiani, A. [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Heraklion 70013 Greece (Greece); Department of Information Engineering (DII), University of Parma, Parma 43124 (Italy); Argyros, A.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Lwin, R. [Institute of Photonics and Optical Science (IPOS), School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Selleri, S. [Department of Information Engineering (DII), University of Parma, Parma 43124 (Italy); Pissadakis, S., E-mail: pissas@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Heraklion 70013 Greece (Greece)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an in-fiber magnetic field sensor based on magneto-driven optical loss effects, while being implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber. We demonstrate that magnetic field flux changes up to 2000 gauss can be detected when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the fiber axis. In addition, the sensor exhibits high polarization sensitivity for the interrogated wavelengths, providing the possibility of both field flux and direction measurements. The underlying physical and guidance mechanisms of this sensing transduction are further investigated using spectrophotometric, light scattering measurements, and numerical simulations, suggesting photonic Hall effect as the dominant physical, transducing mechanism.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF ALL-SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENT OF NITRIC OXIDE AND AMMONIA CONCENTRATIONS BY OPTICAL ABSORPTION IN PARTICLE-LADEN COMBUSTION EXHAUST STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2 described in this progress report, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. A series of spectral simulations was performed using the HITRAN code to investigate the potential sensitivity of absorption measurements of ammonia in different spectral regions. It was concluded that ammonia absorption features in the 3000-nm spectral region would be hard to measure due to water vapor interferences.

  3. BSu3A.82.pdf Biomedical Optics and 3D Imaging OSA 2012 A novel method for measurement of dynamic light scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    light scattering phase function of particles utilizing laser-Doppler power density spectra S Wojtkiewicz (LD) power density spectra. In the clinical practice, the LD technique is used to assess tissues is the frequency shift) is equal to the measured laser Doppler power density spectrum S(f) normalized by its

  4. Application of Geiger-mode photo sensors in Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamal Ahmed; Paul Buehler; Michael Cargnelli; Roland Hohler; Johann Marton; Herbert Orth; Ken Suzuki

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. In our institute we are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8x8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8x8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  5. Application of Geiger-mode photo sensors in Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Gamal; Cargnelli, Michael; Hohler, Roland; Marton, Johann; Orth, Herbert; Suzuki, Ken

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. In our institute we are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8x8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8x8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  6. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 deg. C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min{sup -1}, equal to 2.0 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min{sup -1} and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min{sup -1}, up to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min{sup -1} and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min{sup -1} with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min{sup -1} with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l{sup -1} min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min{sup -1}, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l{sup -1} min.

  7. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combustion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. In Year 3, however, we obtained a new GaN laser diode for our ECDL system, installed it, and completed an extensive series of measurements in the Texas A&M coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The combustor was operated with coal and coal/biomass as fuels, with and without reburn, and with and without ammonia injection. Several different fuel equivalence ratios were investigated for each operating condition.

  8. Experiential lighting : development and validation of perception-based lighting controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, Matthew (Matthew Henry)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting, and its emergence as a digital and networked medium, represents an ideal platform for conducting research on both sensor and human-derived methods of control. Notably, solid-state lighting makes possible the ...

  9. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

  10. In-Situ Measurement of Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation in Damp Heat Stress Testing for Estimation of Low-Light Power Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extent of potential-induced degradation of crystalline silicon modules in an environmental chamber is estimated using in-situ dark I-V measurements and applying superposition analysis. The dark I-V curves are shown to correctly give the module power performance at 200, 600 and 1,000 W/m2 irradiance conditions, as verified with a solar simulator. The onset of degradation measured in low light in relation to that under one sun irradiance can be clearly seen in the module design examined; the time to 5% relative degradation measured in low light (200 W/m2) was 28% less than that of full sun (1,000 W/m2 irradiance). The power of modules undergoing potential-induced degradation can therefore be characterized in the chamber, facilitating statistical analyses and lifetime forecasting.

  11. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM); Lentine, Anthony L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  12. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  13. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  14. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  15. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  16. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  17. Bathroom lights generally operate between five to eight hours per occupied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -specific luminaire that integrates a low-wattage light-emitting diode (LED) nightlight and an occupancy sensor

  18. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

  19. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

  20. A Collaborative Approach to In-Place Sensor Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    A Collaborative Approach to In-Place Sensor Calibration Vladimir Bychkovskiy, Seapahn Megerian in sensor measure- ments. In order to be useful, any sensor device must be calibrated to adjust its accuracy against the expected measurement scale. In large- scale sensor networks, calibration

  1. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Novikova; Eugeniy E. Mikhailov; Yanhong Xiao

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements.

  2. Sensor network and soft sensor design for stable nonlinear dynamic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Abhay Kumar

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    is designing soft sensors for a given measurement structure. In case of high-dimensional systems, the application of conventional soft sensor or observer designs may not always be practical due to the high computational requirements or the resulting observers...

  3. 700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder is a world leader in space-based research including measurements of the Sun with respect to sun center. LASP has built sun position sensors for decades beginning with sensors for sub

  4. Measurement of coherence length and incoherent source size of hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, So Yeong; Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jun, E-mail: limjun@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the spatial coherence length and incoherent source size of a hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II, the stored electron energy of which has been increased from 2.5 GeV to 3 GeV. The coherence length was determined by single-slit measurement of the visibility of the Fresnel diffraction pattern. The correlated incoherent source size was cross-checked for three different optics: the single slit, beryllium parabolic compound refractive lenses, and the Fresnel zone plate. We concluded that the undulator beamline has an effective incoherent source size (FWHM) of 540 ?m (horizontal) × 50 ?m (vertical)

  5. Junction Temperature Measurements and Thermal Modeling of GaInN/GaN Quantum Well Light-Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    quantum well (QW) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on sapphire and bulk GaN substrate by micro efficiency in dies grown on GaN substrates with a thermal resistance of 75 K/W. For dies on sapphire of GaN-based blue and green LEDs grown on sapphire and GaN substrates using micro-Raman spectroscopy

  6. Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

    2008-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.

  7. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Scharf; Robert Klanner

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode connected with a 50 $\\Omega $ cable to an amplifier followed by a 5 GS/s sampling oscilloscope. The charge carriers in the sensor were produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for the laser light of both wavelengths, at voltages 50 V above the depletion voltage of about 90 V up to the maximum applied voltage of 1000 V. The method has been developed for the precise measurement of the dependence of the drift velocity of electrons and holes in high-ohmic silicon on crystal orientation, electric field and temperature. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  8. Lithographic measurement of EUV flare in the 0.3-NA Micro ExposureTool optic at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of flare present in a 0.3-NA EUV optic (the MET optic) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is measured using a lithographic method. Photoresist behavior at high exposure doses makes analysis difficult. Flare measurement analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy is compared, and optical microscopy is found to be a more reliable technique. In addition, the measured results are compared with predictions based on surface roughness measurement of the MET optical elements. When the fields in the exposure matrix are spaced far enough apart to avoid influence from surrounding fields and the data is corrected for imperfect mask contrast and aerial image proximity effects, the results match predicted values quite well. The amount of flare present in this optic ranges from 4.7% for 2 {micro}m features to 6.8% for 500 nm features.

  9. PFP Emergency Lighting Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUSCH, M.S.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    NFPA 101, section 5-9 mandates that, where required by building classification, all designated emergency egress routes be provided with adequate emergency lighting in the event of a normal lighting outage. Emergency lighting is to be arranged so that egress routes are illuminated to an average of 1.0 footcandle with a minimum at any point of 0.1 footcandle, as measured at floor level. These levels are permitted to drop to 60% of their original value over the required 90 minute emergency lighting duration after a power outage. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) has two designations for battery powered egress lights ''Emergency Lights'' are those battery powered lights required by NFPA 101 to provide lighting along officially designated egress routes in those buildings meeting the correct occupancy requirements. Emergency Lights are maintained on a monthly basis by procedure ZSR-12N-001. ''Backup Lights'' are battery powered lights not required by NFPA, but installed in areas where additional light may be needed. The Backup Light locations were identified by PFP Safety and Engineering based on several factors. (1) General occupancy and type of work in the area. Areas occupied briefly during a shiftly surveillance do not require backup lighting while a room occupied fairly frequently or for significant lengths of time will need one or two Backup lights to provide general illumination of the egress points. (2) Complexity of the egress routes. Office spaces with a standard hallway/room configuration will not require Backup Lights while a large room with several subdivisions or irregularly placed rooms, doors, and equipment will require Backup Lights to make egress safer. (3) Reasonable balance between the safety benefits of additional lighting and the man-hours/exposure required for periodic light maintenance. In some plant areas such as building 236-Z, the additional maintenance time and risk of contamination do not warrant having Backup Lights installed in all rooms. Sufficient light for egress is provided by existing lights located in the hallways.

  10. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  11. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  12. 444 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2013 Flexible Sputter-Deposited Carbon Strain Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    - ventional sensors [1]. This new generation of light, flexible, and low cost polymeric sensors are very444 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2013 Flexible Sputter-Deposited Carbon Strain on a flexible polyimide substrate. Amorphous carbon was sputter-deposited onto a 125-µm-thick polyimide film

  13. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  14. How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions Daylight dimming employs sensors that detect ambient light levels and then allow ballasts to...

  15. Advanced intercomparison study with different optical sensing technologies -- FTIR, UV-DOAS and conventional point sensor measurements of atmospheric gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ropertz, A.; Lamp, T.; Weber, K.; Mueller, M.; Haren, G. van

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In summer 1998 a measurement campaign was performed at the lake Baldeney See in the south of the city of Essen in Germany. Two major goals should be achieved: First the intercomparison of several different remote sensing systems in real field measurements and second the determination of the ambient air quality level during summer with respect to a complex orographic and climatological situation which is intensely used as an recreational area. The evaluation of the remote sensing data in combination with the meteorological data results in a conclusive estimation of the air quality. But it also shows several effects concerning the concentration analysis such as the need of calibration correction for the different systems. This paper refers to the results of the intercomparison of the remote sensing systems open-path FTIR and DOAS and some interesting features of the nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentration results like secondary ozone peak concentration during night time. Moreover the open-path FTIR results of a SF6-tracer experiment are presented.

  16. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry...

  17. Fibratus tactile sensor using reflection on an optical lever Satoshi Saga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Fibratus tactile sensor using reflection on an optical lever Satoshi Saga Tohoku University Shinobu this fibratus tactile sensor. Keywords: tactile sensor, fiber, image sensor, optical measure- ment, optical measure- ments; further, the wiring assembly is complicated. Some optical sensors [Yamada et al. 2002

  18. Waveguide-based Ultrasonic and Far-field Electromagnetic Sensors...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ultrasonic and farfield electromagnetic sensors to measure key Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoir parameters, including directional temperature, pressure,...

  19. Chemical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  20. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  1. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design, Implementation, and EvaluationImplementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim Bolbrock, Guohong Cao, and Tom La of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation

  2. Analogic fiber optic position sensor with nanometric resolution Frdric Lamarque

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analogic fiber optic position sensor with nanometric resolution Frédéric Lamarque Université de of the sensor is presented as well as experimentation results. Keywords Fiber optic sensor, nanometric size is approximately 1.5x2.0x0.6 mm3 and the measurement resolution is 0.1 µm [4]. An optical sensor

  3. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  4. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  6. Development of Fiber Bragg Grating Strain, Thermal, and Magnetic Sensors for Smart Structure Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grating Sensors,” Structural Health Monitoring, vol. 2, no.sensor arrays for structural health monitoring of filamentin the field of structural health monitoring by measuring

  7. Lateral displacement and rotational displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duden, Thomas

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A position measuring sensor formed from opposing sets of capacitor plates measures both rotational displacement and lateral displacement from the changes in capacitances as overlapping areas of capacitors change. Capacitances are measured by a measuring circuit. The measured capacitances are provided to a calculating circuit that performs calculations to obtain angular and lateral displacement from the capacitances measured by the measuring circuit.

  8. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  9. Power consumption, discharge capacitance and light emission as measures for thrust production of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegseis, J. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany); Grundmann, S. [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany); Tropea, C. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany); Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new procedure of determining the time resolved capacitance of a plasma actuator during operation is introduced, representing a simple diagnostic tool that provides insight into the phenomenological behavior of plasma actuators. The procedure is demonstrated by presenting example correlations between consumed electrical energy, size of the plasma region, and the operating voltage. It is shown that the capacitance of a plasma actuator is considerably increased by the presence of the plasma; hence a system that has previously been impedance matched can be considerably de-tuned when varying the operating voltage of the actuator. Such information is fundamental for any attempts to increase the energy efficiency of plasma-actuator systems. A combined analysis of the capacitance, light emission, size of the plasma region, force production, and power consumption is presented.

  10. Proposal -Interactive City Lighting LED based lighting systems have enabled radically new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposal - Interactive City Lighting Abstract LED based lighting systems have also be integrated with sensors and smart environments. This has opened up a new world. The use of the LED as a potential means for providing interactive city lighting for social

  11. Review of water, lighting, and cooling energy efficiency measures for low-income homes located in warm climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, M.A.; Gettings, M.B.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed a literature review of weatherization measures applicable for homes located in warm climate regions. Sources for this information included: (1) documented engineering estimates, (2) vendor information, (3) reported performance from research and field tests, and (4) direct discussions with researchers, vendors, and field reporters. Estimated savings are extrapolated from reported energy savings and applied to the end-use energy consumption for low-income homes reported by the Energy Information Administration. Additionally, installation costs, savings-to-investment ratios, and parameters indicating performance sensitivity to issues such as occupancy, construction, client education, and maintenance requirements are presented. The report is comprised of two sections: (1) an overview of measure performance, and (2) an appendix. The overview of measures is in a tabular format, which allows for quick reference. More detailed discussions and references for each measure are presented in the Appendix and it is highly recommended that these be reviewed prior to measure selection.

  12. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  13. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  14. ccurate and low-cost sensor localization is a critical requirement for the deployment of wireless sensor networks in a wide variety of applications. Low-power wireless sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwari, Neal

    sensor networks in a wide variety of applications. Low-power wireless sensors may be many hops away from) measurements in wireless sensor networks. Wideband and ultra-wideband (UWB) measurements, and RF and acoustic Dramatic advances in RF and MEMS IC design have made possible the use of large networks of wireless sensors

  15. Simultaneous localization and tracking in wireless ad-hoc sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christopher J. (Christopher Jorgen)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we present LaSLAT, a sensor network algorithm that uses range measurements between sensors and a moving target to simultaneously localize the sensors, calibrate sensing hardware, and recover the target's ...

  16. Measurements of the meson-photon transition form factors of light pseudoscalar mesons at large momentum transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the electromagnetic transitions ?*?? meson. We have measured these form factors in the momentum transfer ranges from 1.5 to 9, 20, and 30GeV(2) for ?(0), ?, and ??, respectively, and have made comparisons to various theoretical predictions....

  17. Measurements of photon scattering lengths in scintillator and a test of the linearity of light yield as a function of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    neutrinoless double beta decay and measure solar neutrinos and geoneutrinos. The type of particle by ap- proximately 9500 PMTs. For detections of neutrinoless double beta decay, the liquid scintillator double beta decay, low energy solar neutrinos, geo- neutrinos and supernova neutrinos using scintillation

  18. Results from a Prototype MAPS Sensor Telescope and Readout Systemwith Zero Suppression for the Heavy Flavor Tracker at STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Ritter, Hans G.; Rose, AndrewA.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal A.; Thomas, James H.; Vu, Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard H.

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a three Mimostar-2 Monolithic Active PixelSensor (MAPS) sensor telescope prototype with an accompanying readoutsystem incorporating on-the-fly data sparsification. The system has beencharacterized and we report on the measured performance of the sensortelescope and readout system in beam tests conducted both at the AdvancedLight Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and inthe STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Thiseffort is part of the development and prototyping work that will lead toa vertex detector for the STAR experiment.

  19. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  20. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  1. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  2. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland) [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II ? lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

  3. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

  4. QUALIFICATION OF A TRULY DISTRIBUTED FIBER OPTIC TECHNIQUE FOR STRAIN AND TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) and insensitive to electromagnetic fields. Thanks to the low attenuation of the transmitted light signal monitoring is a key factor in life cycle management of infrastructures. Truly distributed fiber optic sensors experiments seem very promising since measurements performed with distributed sensing systems are found

  5. NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JE Daw; JL Rempe; BR Tittmann; B Reinhardt; P Ramuhalli; R Montgomery; HT Chien

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several Department Of Energy-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development, Advanced Reactor Concepts, Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Plant programs, are investigating new fuels and materials for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials when irradiated. The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) in-pile instrumentation development activities are focused upon addressing cross-cutting needs for DOE-NE irradiation testing by providing higher fidelity, real-time data, with increased accuracy and resolution from smaller, compact sensors that are less intrusive. Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential to measure a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes, under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues associated with in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors. The first is transducer survivability. The ability of ultrasonic transducer materials to maintain their useful properties during an irradiation must be demonstrated. The second issue is signal processing. Ultrasonic testing is typically performed in a lab or field environment, where the sensor and sample are accessible. Due to the harsh nature of in-pile testing, and the range of measurements that are desired, an enhanced signal processing capability is needed to make in-pile ultrasonic sensors viable. This project addresses these technology deployment issues.

  6. MB3a Infrasound Sensor Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion J.; McDowell, Kyle D.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated a new infrasound sensor, the MB3a, manufactured by Seismo Wave. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by researchers at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the technology was recently licensed to Seismo Wave for production and sales. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, dynamic range, seismic sensitivity, and self- calibration ability. The MB3a infrasound sensors are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  7. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  8. Smart lighting: New Roles for Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Smart lighting: New Roles for Light in the Solid State Lighting World Robert F. Karlicek, Jr. Director, Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center Professor, Electrical, Systems and Computer Lighting · What is Smart Lighting · Technology Barriers to Smart Lighting · Visible Light Communications

  9. Development of Refrigerant Change Indicator and Dirty Air Filter Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, V.

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common problems affecting residential and light commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are slow refrigerant leaks and dirty air filters. Equipment users are usually not aware of a problem until most of the refrigerant has escaped or the air filter is clogged with dirt. While a dirty air filter can be detected with a technology based on the air pressure differential across the filter, such as a ''whistling'' indicator, it is not easy to incorporate this technology into existing HVAC diagnostic equipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a low-cost, nonintrusive refrigerant charge indicator and dirty air filter detection sensor. The sensors, based on temperature measurements, will be inexpensive and easy to incorporate into existing heat pumps and air conditioners. The refrigerant charge indicator is based on the fact that when refrigerant starts to leak, the evaporator coil temperature starts to drop and the level of liquid subcooling drops. When the coil temperature or liquid subcooling drops below a preset reading, a signal, such as a yellow warning light, can be activated to warn the equipment user that the system is undercharged. A further drop of coil temperature or liquid subcooling below another preset reading would trigger a second warning signal, such as a red warning light, to warn the equipment user that the unit now detects a leak and immediate action should be taken. The warning light cannot be turned off until it is re-set by a refrigeration repairman. To detect clogged air filters, two additional temperature sensors can be applied, one each across the evaporator. When the air filter is accumulating buildup, the temperature differential across the evaporator will increase because of the reduced airflow. When the temperature differential reaches a pre-set reading, a signal will be sent to the equipment user that the air filter needs to be changed. A traditional refrigerant charge indicator requires intrusion into the system to measure the refrigerant high-side and low-side pressures. Once the pressures are known, based on the equipment's refrigerant charging chart? or in most cases, based on the technician's experience? the refrigerant charging status is determined. However, there is a catch: by the time a refrigeration technician is called, most of the refrigerant has already escaped into the atmosphere. The new technology provides a real-time warning so that when, say, 20% of the refrigerant has leaked, the equipment users will be warned, even though the equipment is still functioning properly at rated capacity. Temperature sensors are becoming very accurate and very low in cost, compared with pressure sensors. Using temperature sensors to detect refrigerant charge status is inherently nonintrusive, inexpensive, and accurate. With the addition of two temperature sensors for detecting dirty air filters, the capability of the diagnostic equipment is further enhanced with very little added cost. This report provides laboratory test data on the change of indoor coil refrigerant temperature and subcooling as a function of refrigerant charge for a 2-ton split heat pump system. The data can be used in designing the indicators for refrigerant loss and dirty air filter sensors.

  10. Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on an embedded server, and temperature sensors that were distributed throughout the house. The residence is divided into four Control Zones. Zone 1 contains the downstairs living, dining, and kitchen area. Zone 2 contains the bathrooms and laundry... radiation. The temperature and humidity sensors are manufactured by Sensirion, models SH11 and SH15. The light sensors consist of a thermally sensitive radiation sensor (TSR) and a photosynthetic active radiation sensor, manufactured by Hamamatsu...

  11. Commercial Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial lighting accounts for more than 20 percent of total commercial building energy use. The Energy Department works to reduce lighting energy use through research and deployment.

  12. Design and characterization of a low cost dual differential proving ring force sensor utilizing Hall-effect sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivest, Christopher W. (Christopher Warren)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel dual differential hall-effect based proving ring force sensor has been designed, manufactured, and tested. Strain gauge based force sensors are among the most common methods of measuring static and dynamic forces, ...

  13. Angular output of hollow, metal-lined, waveguide Raman sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biedrzycki, Stephen; Buric, Michael P.; Falk, Joel; Woodruff, Steven D.

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow, metal-lined waveguides used as gas sensors based on spontaneous Raman scattering are capable of large angular collection. The collection of light from a large solid angle implies the collection of a large number of waveguide modes. An accurate estimation of the propagation losses for these modes is required to predict the total collected Raman power. We report a theory/experimental comparison of the Raman power collected as a function of the solid angle and waveguide length. New theoretical observations are compared with previous theory appropriate only for low-order modes. A cutback experiment is demonstrated to verify the validity of either theory. The angular distribution of Raman light is measured using aluminum and silver-lined waveguides of varying lengths.

  14. Thermal sensor with an improved coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

  15. Optical Sensor Technology Development and Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. G. Parker

    2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this ESP (Enhanced Surveillance) project are to evaluate sensor performance for future aging studies of materials, components and weapon systems. The goal of this project is to provide analysis capability to experimentally identify and characterize the aging mechanisms and kinetics of Core Stack Assembly (CSA) materials. The work on fiber optic light sources, hermetic sealing of fiber optics, fiber optic hydrogen sensors, and detection systems will be discussed.

  16. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  17. Online Sensor Calibration Assessment in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe, efficient, and economic operation of nuclear systems (nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication and storage, used fuel processing, etc.) relies on transmission of accurate and reliable measurements. During operation, sensors degrade due to age, environmental exposure, and maintenance interventions. Sensor degradation can affect the measured and transmitted signals, including sensor failure, signal drift, sensor response time, etc. Currently, periodic sensor recalibration is performed to avoid these problems. Sensor recalibration activities include both calibration assessment and adjustment (if necessary). In nuclear power plants, periodic recalibration of safety-related sensors is required by the plant technical specifications. Recalibration typically occurs during refueling outages (about every 18 to 24 months). Non-safety-related sensors also undergo recalibration, though not as frequently. However, this approach to maintaining sensor calibration and performance is time-consuming and expensive, leading to unnecessary maintenance, increased radiation exposure to maintenance personnel, and potential damage to sensors. Online monitoring (OLM) of sensor performance is a non-invasive approach to assess instrument calibration. OLM can mitigate many of the limitations of the current periodic recalibration practice by providing more frequent assessment of calibration and identifying those sensors that are operating outside of calibration tolerance limits without removing sensors or interrupting operation. This can support extended operating intervals for unfaulted sensors and target recalibration efforts to only degraded sensors.

  18. Applicability of daylighting computer modeling in real case studies: Comparison between measured and simulated daylight availability and lighting consumption. Building and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Atif

    this paper is published in / Une version de ce document se trouve dans : IEA (International Energy Agency) Task 21 / Annex 29: Daylight in Buildings, November 1998, 68 pp. www.nrc.ca/irc/ircpubs NRCC-42862 Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 Applicability of Daylighting Computer Modeling in Real Case Studies: Comparison between Measured and Simulated Daylight Availability and Lighting Consumption A report of IEA SHC Task 21 / IEA ECBCS Annex 29 Daylight in Buildings Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools Report T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 Applicability of Daylighting Computer Modeling in Real Case Studies: Comparison between Measured and Simulated Daylight Availability and Lighting Consumption by Anca D. Galasiu * Morad R. Atif * A report of IEA SHC Task 21 / IEA ECBCS Annex 29 * National Research Council Canada, Institute for Research in Construction, Indoor Environment Research Program Subtask C: Daylighting Design Tools Report T21/C1-21/CAN/98-11 IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (IEA SHC) The International Energy Agency (IEA) was established in 1974 as an autonomous agency within the framework of the Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to carry out a comprehensive program of energy cooperation among its 24 member countries and the Commission of the European Communities. An important part of the Agency's program involves collaboration in the research, development and demonstration of new energy technologies to reduce excessive reliance on imported oil, increase long-term energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The IEA's R&D activities are headed by the Committee on Energy Research and Technology (CERT) and supported by a small Secretariat staff, headquartered in Paris. In addition, three Working Parties are charged with monitorin...

  19. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  20. Laser cooling of infrared sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselbeck, M. P. (Michael P.); Sheik-Bahae, M (Mansoor); Thiede, J. (Jared); Distel, J. R. (James R.); Greenfield, S. R. (Scott R.); Patterson, Wendy M.; Bigotta, S.; Imangholi, B.; Seletskiy, D. (Denis); Bender, D.; Vankipuram, V.; Vadiee, N.; Epstein, Richard I.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of laser cooling of solids. In this all-solid-state approach to refrigeration, heat is removed radiatively when an engineered material is exposed to high power laser light. We report a record amount of net cooling (88 K below ambient) that has been achieved with a sample made from doped fluoride glass. Issues involved in the design of a practical laser cooler are presented. The possibility of laser cooling of semiconductor sensors is discussed.

  1. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  2. MEMS `SMART DUST MOTES' FOR DESIGNING, MONITORING AND ENABLING EFFICIENT LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    -based lighting system has the potential to achieve many environmental benefits in comparison to existing sensorMEMS `SMART DUST MOTES' FOR DESIGNING, MONITORING AND ENABLING EFFICIENT LIGHTING Alice M. Agogino focused on office lighting monitoring and control based on the new MEMS `smart dust mote' sensor

  3. IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Brent

    , and light emitting diode brake- light messaging. These technologies all focus on improving the signal- ance, sensor, radar, fluorescence, light emitting diode. I. INTRODUCTION As a compromise between · Radar reflection-enhanced license plates · Vehicle-to-vehicle light emitting diode (LED) brake- light

  4. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  5. Illumination Sufficiency Survey Techniques: In-situ Measurements of Lighting System Performance and a User Preference Survey for Illuminance in an Off-Grid, African Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Jacobson, 2007. The Off-grid Lighting Market in WesternBudget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for SmallSurvey for Illuminance in an Off-Grid, African Setting Peter

  6. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) sensor using vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to achieve PD Coupler Terminated 6 internal mirror reflectances as high as 86% [11]. Low coherent interferometery (LCI) using broadband light sources such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) has been researched [12,13]. FFPI sensor systems have been...

  7. Universal signal processing method for multimode reflective sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Robert Eugene

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity, but the sensor configuration is complicated and requires the use of expensive lasers and single mode fibers. Amplitude modulation trades sensitivity for low cost and ease of configuration by using light emitting diodes and multimode fibers. A... fiber optic based sensor using amplitude modulation would provide a simple, low cost solution to the interference problem inherent in the use of composite materials. CHAPTER II BACKGROUND Development of optical fiber sensors started around 1977 [1...

  8. Sensor device and methods for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothgeb, Timothy Michael; Gansle, Kristina Marie Rohal; Joyce, Jonathan Livingston; Jordan, James Madison; Rohwer, Tedd Addison; Lockhart, Randal Ray; Smith, Christopher Lawrence; Trinh, Toan; Cipollone, Mark Gary

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor device and method of employment is provided. More specifically, a sensor device adapted to detect, identify and/or measure a chemical and/or physical characteristic upon placement of the device into an environment, especially a liquid medium for which monitoring is sought is provided.

  9. Localized Pipeline Encroachment Detector System Using Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Xiaoxi 1986-

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NOMENCLATURE WSN Wireless Sensor Network ROW Right of Way WIFI Wireless Fidelity PC Personal Computer LED Light Emitting Diode USB Universal Serial Bus IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers A/D Analog to Digital WPAN Wireless...

  10. Microfabricated Optical Sensor Probe for the Detection of Esophageal Cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinna Balareddy, Karthik Reddy

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    spectrometry. The sensor probe consists of a lithographically patterned polymer waveguides chip and three micromachined positioning substrates and source/collection fibers to achieve 45 degree light incidence and collection of spatially resolved diffuse...

  11. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, David K. (Knoxville, TN); Allgood, Glenn O. (Powell, TN); Mooney, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Duncan, Michael G. (Clinton, TN); Turner, John C. (Clinton, TN); Treece, Dale A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric.

  12. PHOTOSWITCHR Photoelectric Sensors General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gale

    (Sensor) DC Micro Ê Ê Ê For NPN type tie the load to Brown (+). For PNP type tie the load to Blue Beam Load Load Load Load Load Load Light Source Unit Protection Supply Voltage Current Consumption Photoelectric Sensors 42CA General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style R1­46 Typical Response Curve 100 1 0.1 0 1 (3

  13. Universal signal processing method for multimode reflective sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Robert Eugene

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity, but the sensor configuration is complicated and requires the use of expensive lasers and single mode fibers. Amplitude modulation trades sensitivity for low cost and ease of configuration by using light emitting diodes and multimode fibers. A... method for reflective sensors using optical fibers as the data transmission media. The proposed transmitter - receiver unit was based on the amplitude modulation of reflected optical signals. This involves the use of an light emitting diode (LED...

  14. Light-Tracking in a Noisy Environment An Experiment in Autonomous Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jennifer S.

    Light-Tracking in a Noisy Environment An Experiment in Autonomous Robotics Tony Kristovich, Issa, no data is perfect. Tracking a single point of light requires the robot to ignore sunlight, overhead light's light sensor does not merely detect light and dark, but approximately 250 distinct levels of brightness

  15. Cross-layered Synchronization Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Cross-layered Synchronization Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks Thomas Beluch, Daniela. Advances in wireless sensor network performances and improvement of attainable bit rates allow research on such measurement systems using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). However, current WSN synchronization protocols do

  16. INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great Lakes to track changes Concentrations Measured by Acoustic and Optical Sensors Nathan Hawley* Great Lakes Environmental Research sensitive to particles of different sizes, the simultaneous deployment of acoustic and optical sensors may

  17. Low Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cevher, Volkan

    Low Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network Initialization M. Borkar distribution can be determined in a distributed heterogeneous sensor network with reduced subspace distribution for networks with a variety of sensor types as long as the collective set of measurements from all

  18. Light Vector Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Milov

    2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the current status of experimental results obtained in the measurement of light vector mesons produced in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at different energies. The review is focused on two phenomena related to the light vector mesons; the modification of the spectral shape in search of Chiral symmetry restoration and suppression of the meson production in heavy ion collisions. The experimental results show that the spectral shape of light vector mesons are modified compared to the parameters measured in vacuum. The nature and the magnitude of the modification depends on the energy density of the media in which they are produced. The suppression patterns of light vector mesons are different from the measurements of other mesons and baryons. The mechanisms responsible for the suppression of the mesons are not yet understood. Systematic comparison of existing experimental results points to the missing data which may help to resolve the problem.

  19. Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light is a "wave packet" A photon is a "light particle" #12;Electromagnetic Radiation and You Light is sometimes

  20. Development of a 1 x N Fiber Optic Sensor Array for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Repasky, Kevin

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber sensor array for sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations measurements was developed for monitoring geologic carbon sequestration sites. The fiber sensor array uses a single temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating with a nominal wavelength of 2.004 􀁐m. Light from this DFB laser is direct to one of the 4 probes via an in-line 1 x 4 fiber optic switch. Each of the 4 probes are buried and allow the sub-surface CO{sub 2} to enter the probe through Millipore filters that allow the soil gas to enter the probe but keeps out the soil and water. Light from the DFB laser interacts with the CO{sub 2} before it is directed back through the in-line fiber optic switch. The DFB laser is tuned across two CO{sub 2} absorption features where a transmission measurement is made allowing the CO{sub 2} concentration to be retrieved. The fiber optic switch then directs the light to the next probe where this process is repeated allowing sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentration measurements at each of the probes to be made as a function of time. The fiber sensor array was deployed for fifty-eight days beginning June 19, 2012 at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site where sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations were monitored. Background measurements indicate the fiber sensor array can monitor background levels as low as 1,000 parts per million (ppm). A thirty four day sub-surface release of 0.15 tones CO{sub 2}/day began on July 10, 2012. The elevated subsurface CO{sub 2} concentration was easily detected by each of the four probes with values ranging to over 60,000 ppm, a factor of greater than 6 higher than background measurements. The fiber sensor array was also deploy at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) site in north-central Montana between July 9th and August 7th, 2013 where background measurements were made in a remote sequestration site with minimal infrastructure. The project provided opportunities for two graduate students to participate in research directly related to geologic carbon sequestration. Furthermore, commercialization of the technology developed is being pursued with five different companies via the Department of energy SBIR/STTR program

  1. Toward a high-fidelity wireless sensor network for rehabilitation supervision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward a high-fidelity wireless sensor network for rehabilitation supervision Abdelkrim Hadjidj and the implementation of a new light-weight and easy to use wireless sensor network for high-fidelity rehabilitation performance through intensive real world experimentations and simulations. Keywords: wireless sensor networks

  2. Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlachos, Kyriakos G.

    Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer C. Markos1 , K *gkakaran@eie.gr Keywords: white-light interferometer, fibre-optic pressure sensor, PDMS-based Fabry progress in fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry­Perot interferometric sensors ", Optical Fiber Technology, 23, p

  3. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  4. Lump detection with a gelsight sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Xiaodan

    A GelSight sensor is a tactile sensing device comprising a clear elastomeric pad covered with a reflective membrane, coupled with optics to measure the membrane's deformations. When the pad is pressed against an object's ...

  5. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  6. Wireless sensor networks and environmental monitoring applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Borgne, Yann-Aël

    by the Human Resources and Mobility program of the European community (MEST-CT-2004-505079) #12;ULB Machine Radio: 4kbps, 180m Sensors: Light and accelerometer Energy: Solar powered Golem and deputy dust 16mm3 ­ Remote or non invasive monitoring ·... #12;Solbosch greenhouses ·Greenhouses used by different research

  7. Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Betty Lise

    1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if://blogs.stthomas.edu/realestate/2011/01/24/residential-real-estate-professionals-how-do-you- develop feedback! There is a connection between the output and the input! Therefore forces inputs to same voltage

  8. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  9. aerosol polarimetry sensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mission Richard J. Peralta,*1 Carl Nardell,1 Brian Cairns Sensor (APS) being built by Raytheon under contract to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Scheduled of the measurements,...

  10. Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

  11. Sneaky light stop

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemore »to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.« less

  12. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  13. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  14. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  15. Evaluation of infrasound sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kromer, R.P.; McDonald, T.S.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia is evaluating the performance of various infrasound sensors that could be used as part of the International Monitoring Systems (IMS). Specifications for infrasound stations are outlined in CTBT/PC/II/1/Add.2. This document specifies minimum requirements for sensor, digitizer and system. The infrasound sensors evaluation task has the following objectives: provide an overview of the sensors presently in use; evaluate these sensors with respect to the requirements of the IMS.

  16. Decentralized TDOA Sensor Pairing in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Wei; Lihua, Xie; Wendong, Xiao

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    localization in wireless sensor networks,” IEEE Signallocalization in wireless sensor networks,” IEEE Trans.techniques for wireless sensor networks: A survey,” IEEE

  17. Wireless sensor systems and methods, and methods of monitoring structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Svoboda, John M.; Johnson, James T.; Harding, L. Dean; Klingler, Kerry M.

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wireless sensor system includes a passive sensor apparatus configured to be embedded within a concrete structure to monitor infiltration of contaminants into the structure. The sensor apparatus includes charging circuitry and a plurality of sensors respectively configured to measure environmental parameters of the structure which include information related to the infiltration of contaminants into the structure. A reader apparatus is communicatively coupled to the sensor apparatus, the reader apparatus being configured to provide power to the charging circuitry during measurements of the environmental parameters by the sensors. The reader apparatus is configured to independently interrogate individual ones of the sensors to obtain information measured by the individual sensors. The reader apparatus is configured to generate an induction field to energize the sensor apparatus. Information measured by the sensor apparatus is transmitted to the reader apparatus via a response signal that is superimposed on a return induction field generated by the sensor apparatus. Methods of monitoring structural integrity of the structure are also provided.

  18. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Anbo (Blacksburg, VA)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

  19. Local Vote Decision Fusion for Target Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michailidis, George

    1 Local Vote Decision Fusion for Target Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks Natallia Katenka by a wireless sensor network. Sensors acquire measurements emitted from the target that are corrupted by noise Wireless sensor networks are widely used for monitoring natural phenomena in space and over time, as well

  20. Fig. 1 Teleoperated slave robot Development of Distributed Optical Torque Sensors for Realization of Local Impedance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Fig. 1 Teleoperated slave robot Development of Distributed Optical Torque Sensors for Realization the recent development of optical torque sensor in order to replace expensive strain gauge sensor attached shapes of mechanical structure of sensor as well as optical measurement approaches are given. The results

  1. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  2. Microbend fiber-optic temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature sensor is made of optical fiber into which quasi-sinusoidal microbends have been permanently introduced. In particular, the present invention includes a graded-index optical fiber directing steady light through a section of the optical fiber containing a plurality of permanent microbends. The microbend section of the optical fiber is contained in a thermally expansive sheath, attached to a thermally expansive structure, or attached to a bimetallic element undergoing temperature changes and being monitored. The microbend section is secured to the thermally expansive sheath which allows the amplitude of the microbends to decrease with temperature. The resultant increase in the optical fiber`s transmission thus allows temperature to be measured. The plural microbend section of the optical fiber is secured to the thermally expansive structure only at its ends and the microbends themselves are completely unconstrained laterally by any bonding agent to obtain maximum longitudinal temperature sensitivity. Although the permanent microbends reduce the transmission capabilities of fiber optics, the present invention utilizes this phenomenon as a transduction mechanism which is optimized to measure temperature. 5 figs.

  3. Microbend fiber-optic temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature sensor is made of optical fiber into which quasi-sinusoidal microbends have been permanently introduced. In particular, the present invention includes a graded-index optical fiber directing steady light through a section of the optical fiber containing a plurality of permanent microbends. The microbend section of the optical fiber is contained in a thermally expansive sheath, attached to a thermally expansive structure, or attached to a bimetallic element undergoing temperature changes and being monitored. The microbend section is secured to the thermally expansive sheath which allows the amplitude of the microbends to decrease with temperature. The resultant increase in the optical fiber's transmission thus allows temperature to be measured. The plural microbend section of the optical fiber is secured to the thermally expansive structure only at its ends and the microbends themselves are completely unconstrained laterally by any bonding agent to obtain maximum longitudinal temperature sensitivity. Although the permanent microbends reduce the transmission capabilities of fiber optics, the present invention utilizes this phenomenon as a transduction mechanism which is optimized to measure temperature.

  4. Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 - In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H. Guymer-320 #12;#12;Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 ± In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H

  5. Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Channel-Specific Wireless Sensor Network Path Data”. In:Average Power in Wireless Sensor Networks through Data Ratedesign space of wireless sensor networks”. In: IEEE Wireless

  6. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gale et al. (2006) and evaluation of sensor performance byConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systemsConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systems

  7. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  8. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  9. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  10. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  11. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  12. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Bakhtiari, Sasan (Bolingbrook, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  13. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation. The solar radiation data, in W/m 2 , werelight sensor and solar radiation data are shown in Figure 2-exceed those of the solar radiation data. Figure 2-3. Light

  14. Energy Star Lighting Fixtures: How Does THAT Work? | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or include other special features, like motion sensors or automatic shut-off in daylight, to further help you reduce your lighting energy use. And the best part is that...

  15. Image Recognition System for Automated Lighting Retrofit Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venable, K.; Bhatia, D.; Coverick, R.; Gutierrez, C.; Knight, J.; McGarry, D.; McGee, K.; Smith, Z.; Terrill, T. J.; Vanderford, B.; Weiser, R.; Wightman, K.; Rasmussen, B. P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a prototype system that can enumerate and classify the lighting in a building using an optical camera, accelerometer, spectrometer, and distance sensor. As the aerial vehicle navigates throughout a room, the prototype system captures images...

  16. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElfresh, Michael (Livermore, CA); Lucas, Matthew (Pittsburgh, PA); Silveira, Joseph P. (Tracy, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  17. SPEED LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE AT UC SANTA BARBARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and WattStopper Occupancy Sensor · Lagoon Road NETWORKED RAODWAY LED Cree XSP Luminaire with LumewaveSwap with Lumewave Controls & WattStopper Occupancy Sensor ROADWAY LIGHTING Lagoon Road Initial pilot utilized Luminaire with Lumewave Controls Photo:zeronetenergy.blogspot.com ABOUT THE STATE PARTNERSHIP FOR ENERGY

  18. Putting policy in drive : coordinating measures to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. light-duty vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Christopher W. (Christopher William)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The challenges of energy security and climate change have prompted efforts to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions in light-duty vehicles within the United States. Failures in the market for lower rates of fuel ...

  19. Laser interferometry force-feedback sensor for an interfacial force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houston, Jack E.; Smith, William L.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning force microscope is provided with a force-feedback sensor to increase sensitivity and stability in determining interfacial forces between a probe and a sample. The sensor utilizes an interferometry technique that uses a collimated light beam directed onto a deflecting member, comprising a common plate suspended above capacitor electrodes situated on a substrate forming an interference cavity with a probe on the side of the common plate opposite the side suspended above capacitor electrodes. The probe interacts with the surface of the sample and the intensity of the reflected beam is measured and used to determine the change in displacement of the probe to the sample and to control the probe distance relative to the surface of the sample.

  20. Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  1. Measurement Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Catch Composition - Pelagic codes M Male F Female I Indeterminate U Unknown (not inspected) #12;Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Photos Comment Length 1 Version 1.2 6/2011 HookNo. Species name

  2. How to upgrade your incandescent light bulbs Many people are choosing replacements for their standard incandescent light bulbs to save money or energy, because they've heard of new LED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    or building a new home, work wi efficient light fixture, · use occupancy or vacancy sensors, or · if you are renovating your home

  3. Light and Matter: Reading Messages from the Cosmos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crenshaw, Michael

    1 Chapter 5 Light and Matter: Reading Messages from the Cosmos How do we experience light? · The warmth of sunlight tells us that light is a form of energy · We can measure the amount of energy emitted ) Colors of Light · White light is made up of many different colors How do light and matter interact

  4. Mechanical and optical behavior of a novel optical fiber crack sensor and an interferometric strain sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Noah Gale, 1969-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proper interpretation of measurements from an optical fiber sensor requires a full understanding of its mechanical response to external action and the corresponding change in optical output. To quantify the mechanical ...

  5. Sensor network and soft sensor design for stable nonlinear dynamic systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Abhay Kumar

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In chemical processes, online measurements of all the process variables and parameters required for process control, monitoring and optimization are seldom available. The use of soft sensors or observers is, therefore, highly significant as they can...

  6. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotovsky, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D A

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This work offers the first, thin, MEMS contact-stress (CS) sensor capable of accurate in situ measruement of time-varying, contact-stress between two solid interfaces (e.g. in vivo cartilage contact-stress and body armor dynamic loading). This CS sensor is a silicon-based device with a load sensitive diaphragm. The diaphragm is doped to create piezoresistors arranged in a full Wheatstone bridge. The sensor is similar in performance to established silicon pressure sensors, but it is reliably produced to a thickness of 65 {micro}m. Unlike commercial devices or other research efforts, this CS sensor, including packaging, is extremely thin (< 150 {micro}m fully packaged) so that it can be unobtrusively placed between contacting structures. It is built from elastic, well-characterized materials, providing accurate and high-speed (50+ kHz) measurements over a potential embedded lifetime of decades. This work explored sensor designs for an interface load range of 0-2 MPa; however, the CS sensor has a flexible design architecture to measure a wide variety of interface load ranges.

  7. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  8. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a full-range, low cast humidity sensor has led Honeywell to develop a capacitive relative humidity (RH) sensor with resistance to environmental contaminants. The sensor is used in a bridge circuit to give either a voltage or a current...

  9. Sensor Networks and Consensus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    3 Dic 2009 1/32 Sensor Networks and Consensus An application: Localization and Tracking Distributed Sensors Calibration Randomized Kalman Filter Distributed Kalman Smoother Simone Del Favero PhD Thesis: Localization and Tracking Distributed Sensors Calibration Randomized Kalman Filter Distributed Kalman Smoother

  10. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  11. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a full-range, low cast humidity sensor has led Honeywell to develop a capacitive relative humidity (RH) sensor with resistance to environmental contaminants. The sensor is used in a bridge circuit to give either a voltage or a current...

  12. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  13. Damage Detection of CFRP Plates by Full-Spectral Analysis of a Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor Signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizutani, Yoshihiro [Optical Non-Destructive Testing Laboratory, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2600 GB Delft (Netherlands); Solid and Structures Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, 2-12-1-I1-70, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Groves, Roger M. [Optical Non-Destructive Testing Laboratory, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2600 GB Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the measurement of average strain, strain distribution and vibration of cantilever beam made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP), using a single Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor mounted on the beam surface. Average strain is determined from the displacement of the peak wavelength of reflected light from the FBG sensor. Unstrained reference FBG sensors were used to compensate for temperature drift and the photoelastic coefficient (P{sub e}), which was used to calculate the gauge factor. Measured strains agree with those measured by a resistance foil strain gauge attached to the sample. Stress distributions are measured by monitoring the variation in the full width half maximum (FWHM) values of the reflected spectrum, using a proposed optical analytical model, described in the paper. FWHM values were measured for both the cantilever test beam and a for a reference beam, loaded using a four-point bending rig. The trend of the stress distribution for the test beam matches with our analytical model, however with a relatively large noise present in the experimentally determined data. The vibration of cantilever beam was measured by temporal analysis of the peak reflection wavelength. This technique is very stable as measurements are not affected by variations in the signal amplitude. Finally an application of FBG sensors for damage detection of CFRP plates is demonstrated, by measuring the average strain and natural frequency. With small defects of different sizes applied to the CFRP plate, average strains were seen to increase with damage size and the natural frequency decreased with damage size.

  14. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card.

  15. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card. 8 figs.

  16. Acceleration of Radiance for Lighting Simulation by Using Parallel Computing with OpenCL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Wangda

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Art And Science Of Lighting Visualization, MorganLuminance Measurements. ” Lighting Research & Technology,The Art and Science of Lighting Visualization. ” San

  17. Chemical micro-sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical capillary electrophoresis system for analyzing an analyte. A modulated optical pump beam impinges on an capillary containing the analyte/buffer solution which is separated by electrophoresis. The thermally-induced change in the index of refraction of light in said electrophoresis capillary is monitored using an integrated micro-interferometer. The interferometer includes a first interferometer arm intersecting the electrophoresis capillary proximate the excitation beam and a second, reference interferometer arm. Changes in index of refraction in the analyte measured by interrogating the interferometer state using white light interferometry and a phase-generated carrier demodulation technique. Background thermo-optical activity in the buffer solution is cancelled by splitting the pump beam and exciting pure buffer solution in a second section of capillary where it crosses the reference arm of the interferometer.

  18. Sensible Organizations: A Sensor-Based System for Organizational Design and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olguin Olguin, Daniel

    We propose a sensor-based organizational design system capable of measuring social interactions in the workplace. By combining behavioral sensor data with other sources of information such as text-mined documents, surveys, ...

  19. A retrofit 60 Hz current sensor for non-intrusive power monitoring at the circuit breaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford, Zachary

    We present a new sensor for power monitoring that measures current flow in a circuit breaker without permanent modification of the breaker panel or the circuit breaker itself. The sensor consists of three parts: an inductive ...

  20. Co-simulation Based Building Controls Implementation with Networked Sensors and Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors and actuators. This implementation has demonstrated an up to 57% savings in lighting electricity, WA, USA. Copyright 2011 ACM 978-1-4503-0749-9 ...$10.00 Keywords Integrated controls, lighting in the U.S. in 2010 while lighting alone in buildings is responsible for 18% of site electricity usage

  1. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged to the sharing of sensor resources in wireless sensor networks. There are several issues and challenges

  2. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grace, Karen M. (Ranchos de Taos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Honkanen, Seppo (Tucson, AZ)

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  3. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  4. Fiber optic micromirror sensor for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Buss, R. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (US))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the growing concern over environmental pollution, there is a need for sensors to locate and measure the distribution of a wide range of pollutants. In this paper the authors report a fiber optic sensor, based on a thin film micromirror, which responds to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This generic class of sensor will be useful for monitoring applications where the pollutant has already been identified.

  5. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  6. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B&W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  7. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, D.K.; Allgood, G.O.; Mooney, L.R.; Duncan, M.G.; Turner, J.C.; Treece, D.A.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric. 13 figs.

  8. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  9. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  10. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  11. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  12. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  13. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  14. Ultrasensitive measurement of MEMS cantilever displacement sensitivity below the shot noise limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Pooser; B. J. Lawrie

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The displacement of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) cantilevers is used to measure a broad variety of phenomena in devices ranging from force microscopes to biochemical sensors to thermal imaging systems. We demonstrate the first direct measurement of a MEMS cantilever displacement with a noise floor at 40% of the shot noise limit (SNL). By combining multi-spatial-mode quantum light sources with a simple ?differential measurement, we show that sub-SNL MEMS displacement sensitivity is highly accessible compared to previous efforts that measured the displacement of macroscopic mirrors with very distinct spatial structures crafted with multiple optical parametric amplifiers and locking loops. These results support a new class of quantum MEMS sensor with an ultimate signal to noise ratio determined by quantum correlations, enabling ultra-trace sensing, imaging, and microscopy applications in which signals were previously obscured by shot noise.

  15. Sensitive And Selective Chemical Sensor With Nanostructured Surfaces.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical sensor is provided which includes an optical resonator including a nanostructured surface comprising a plurality of nanoparticles bound to one or more surfaces of the resonator. The nanoparticles provide optical absorption and the sensor further comprises a detector for detecting the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment. In particular, a selective chemical interaction is provided which modifies the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment, and an analyte is detected based on the modified optical absorption. A light pulse is generated which enters the resonator to interrogate the modified optical absorption and the exiting light pulse is detected by the detector.

  16. INFLUENCE OF FILM STRUCTURE AND LIGHT ON CHARGE TRAPPING AND DISSIPATION DYNAMICS IN SPUN-CAST ORGANIC THIN-FILM TRANSISTORS MEASURED BY SCANNING KELVIN PROBE MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teague, L.; Moth, M.; Anthony, J.

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein, time-dependent scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of solution processed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) reveals a correlation between film microstructure and OTFT device performance with the location of trapped charge within the device channel. The accumulation of the observed trapped charge is concurrent with the decrease in I{sub SD} during operation (V{sub G}=-40 V, V{sub SD}= -10 V). We discuss the charge trapping and dissipation dynamics as they relate to the film structure and show that application of light quickly dissipates the observed trapped charge.

  17. Magnet options for sensors for the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Luft, P.A.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.S.

    2001-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been developing sensors for the pulp and paper industry that uses a magnetic field. The applications for magnetic sensors that have studied include (1) sensors for the measurement of the water and ice content of wood chips entering the pulping mill, (2) sensors for measuring the water content and other constituents of the black liquor leaving the paper digester, and (3) sensors for measuring paper thickness and water content as the paper is being processed. These tasks can be done using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The magnetic field used for doing the NMR can come from either permanent magnets or superconducting magnets. The choice of the magnet is dependent on a number of factors, which include the size of the sample and field strength needed to do the sensing task at hand. This paper describes some superconducting magnet options that can be used in the pulp and paper industry.

  18. J. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded light duty vehicles in Algeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ; Nejjari et al., 2003, Atek et al., 2004). As a result, many stations of air pollution measurement and Boukadoum, 2005). Vehicle pollutant emissions constitute not only a problem of air quality in big citiesJ. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded

  19. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90% NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

  20. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical squestionnairesquestionnaires AgreementLighting

  1. Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging for Bioaffinity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging for Bioaffinity Sensors Alastair W. Wark, Hye Jin Lee A novel bioaffinity sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging measurements of a multiple- layered structure that supports the generation of long- range surface plasmons (LRSPs) at the water

  2. APAWSAN: Actor Positioning for Aerial Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    to be autonomous during deployment. The recent advances in development of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs stations can improve network performance measures such as energy consumption and traffic load balancing vehicles (UAVs) with built in sensors made it possible to deploy aerial sensor and actor networks

  3. Online Visualization of Adaptive Distributed Sensor Webs Ashit Talukder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panangadan, Anand

    parameters collected using onshore and offshore sensors and from mobile platforms such as unmanned underwater underwater vehicles (UUVs) to augment the measurements of static sensors. In this paper we describe our vehicles and passing surface ships. 1 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION

  4. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) sensor using vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research represents the first effort to apply vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) to the monitoring of interferometric fiber optic sensors. Modulation of the drive current causes thermal tuning of the laser light frequency...

  5. Estimating attitude and wind velocity using biomimetic sensors on a microrobotic bee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Sawyer Buckminster

    to estimate attitude angle relative to a luminous sky. We demonstrate accurate wind velocity estimation have three light sensors, distinct from the compound eyes, that point roughly upward and sense the sky

  6. Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama Description Totals R.Halls Wells- Metz Light ERS ETC SourceFour 25 25 50 degree ERS Strand Lighting 64 14 24 12 14 36 degree ERS ETC Source Four 15 15 36 degree ERS Strand Lighting 124 60 58 2 4 26 degree ERS ETC SourceFour 2 2 26 degree ERS Strand

  7. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  8. Fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Field tests were carried out in a 3-cylinder automotive engine with a piezoelectric pressure sensor as a reference transducer up to about 3500 rpm. The fiber optic sensor data generally matched those measured by the piezoelectric reference sensor...

  9. Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors and Materials Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical...

  10. Measurement of two-dimensional concentration fields of a glycol-based tracer aerosol using laser light sheet illumination and microcomputer video image acquisition and processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revi, Frank

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a tracer aerosol with a bulk density close to that of air is a convenient way to study the dispersal of pollutants in ambient room air flow. Conventional point measurement techniques do not permit the rapid and ...

  11. 3-Axis Magnetic Sensor Hybrid The Honeywell HMC2003 is a high sensitivity, three-axis magnetic sensor hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    3-Axis Magnetic Sensor Hybrid HMC2003 The Honeywell HMC2003 is a high sensitivity, three-axis magnetic sensor hybrid assembly used to measure low magnetic field strengths. Honeywell's most sensitive Reference, Traffic Detection, Proximity Detection and Medical Devices Honeywell continues to maintain

  12. Gyro Enhanced Orientation Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheikh, Yaser Ajmal

    ­ container handling, hydraulic lift systems, machine tools www.microstrain.com #12;Copyright © 2006 Micro3DM-GX1® Gyro Enhanced Orientation Sensor Technical Product Overview Micro Sensors.Big Ideas protocol. Embedded microcontrollers relieve the host system from the burden of orientation calculations

  13. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. 4800 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 #12;In recent years

  14. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  15. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  16. Non-contact current and voltage sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Gary D; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C; Schappert, Michael A

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient device to measure current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing that contains the current and voltage sensors, which may be a ferrite cylinder with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap along the circumference to measure current, or alternative a winding provided through the cylinder along its axis and a capacitive plate or wire disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  17. EXTERIOR LIGHTING CASE STUDY For more information, visit PARTNERSHIPDEMONSTRATIONS.ORG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    EXTERIOR LIGHTING CASE STUDY » For more information, visit PARTNERSHIPDEMONSTRATIONS.ORG In 2013, UC Santa Barbara partnered with the SPEED team to demonstrate network controlled LED lighting sensors. These lighting controls allowed all the units to be incorporated into an adaptive mesh network

  18. Cross delay line sensor characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, Israel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remelius, Dennis K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tiee, Joe J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buck, Steven E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whittemore, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shirey, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a wealth of information in the scientific literature on the physical properties and device characterization procedures for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS), charge coupled device (CCD) and avalanche photodiode (APD) format detectors. Numerous papers and books have also treated photocathode operation in the context of photomultiplier tube (PMT) operation for either non imaging applications or limited night vision capability. However, much less information has been reported in the literature about the characterization procedures and properties of photocathode detectors with novel cross delay line (XDL) anode structures. These allow one to detect single photons and create images by recording space and time coordinate (X, Y & T) information. In this paper, we report on the physical characteristics and performance of a cross delay line anode sensor with an enhanced near infrared wavelength response photocathode and high dynamic range micro channel plate (MCP) gain (> 10{sup 6}) multiplier stage. Measurement procedures and results including the device dark event rate (DER), pulse height distribution, quantum and electronic device efficiency (QE & DQE) and spatial resolution per effective pixel region in a 25 mm sensor array are presented. The overall knowledge and information obtained from XDL sensor characterization allow us to optimize device performance and assess capability. These device performance properties and capabilities make XDL detectors ideal for remote sensing field applications that require single photon detection, imaging, sub nano-second timing response, high spatial resolution (10's of microns) and large effective image format.

  19. Visual Odometry Aided by a Sun Sensor and an Inclinometer Andrew J. Lambert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sislian, J. P.

    Visual Odometry Aided by a Sun Sensor and an Inclinometer by Andrew J. Lambert A thesis submitted Odometry Aided by a Sun Sensor and an Inclinometer Andrew J. Lambert Master of Applied Science Graduate approach incorporating sun sensor and inclinometer measurements directly into the VO pipeline, utilizing

  20. Room-temperature mid-infrared laser sensor for trace gas detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and pipeline leak detection. Applications such as landfill emissions monitoring require measurements of gasRoom-temperature mid-infrared laser sensor for trace gas detection Thomas To¨ pfer, Konstantin P of a compact, portable, room-temperature mid-infrared gas sensor is reported. The sensor is based on continuous

  1. Connectivity-based Distributed Coverage Hole Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Connectivity-based Distributed Coverage Hole Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks Feng Yan as an important measure of quality of service provided by a wireless sensor network (WSN). Yet, coverage holes may. INTRODUCTION Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have attracted significant research attention due to their wide

  2. Sensors and Actuators A 203 (2013) 149153 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors and Actuators A 203 (2013) 149­153 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Sensors sensors and skin, measured signals (either capacitance or impedance) can be susceptible to artifacts for single point evaluation and multipoint mapping, the pre- cision in real-world use can be limited

  3. Sensors and Actuators A 203 (2013) 149153 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors and Actuators A 203 (2013) 149­153 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Sensors hydration sensors and skin, measured signals (either capacitance or impedance) can be susceptible for single point evaluation and multipoint mapping, the pre- cision in real-world use can be limited

  4. QueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    , it uses a series of custom active infrared sensors to detect the length of a line in a store or restaurant the design, implementation, and evaluation of QueueTrak, a sensor network that measures the length of linesQueueTrak: Automated Line Length Detection using a Wireless Sensor Network Jared Alexander, Matthew

  5. All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures

  6. Modeling a Prototype Optical Collision Avoidance Sensor For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    Modeling a Prototype Optical Collision Avoidance Sensor For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Cyrus Minwalla) are essential in controlled airspace under visual flight rules (VFR). A prototype optical sensor accomplishes and evaluation of the prototype sensor are presented here, as are preliminary measurements to clarify the roles

  7. LED Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light-Emitting diodes (LEDs) efficiently produce light in a fundamentally different way than any legacy or traditional source of light.

  8. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienertLift Forces in a Light

  9. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, Steven (Newtonville, MA); Bernstein, Lawrence S. (Lexington, MA); Bien, Fritz (Concord, MA); Gersh, Michael E. (Bedford, MA); Goldstein, Neil (Belmont, MA)

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution.

  10. Systems and methods for optically measuring properties of hydrocarbon fuel gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.; Gersh, M.E.; Goldstein, N.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for optical interrogation and measurement of a hydrocarbon fuel gas includes a light source generating light at near-visible wavelengths. A cell containing the gas is optically coupled to the light source which is in turn partially transmitted by the sample. A spectrometer disperses the transmitted light and captures an image thereof. The image is captured by a low-cost silicon-based two-dimensional CCD array. The captured spectral image is processed by electronics for determining energy or BTU content and composition of the gas. The innovative optical approach provides a relatively inexpensive, durable, maintenance-free sensor and method which is reliable in the field and relatively simple to calibrate. In view of the above, accurate monitoring is possible at a plurality of locations along the distribution chain leading to more efficient distribution. 14 figs.

  11. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  12. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  13. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim on implementation and evaluation due to the difficulty of building mobile sensors. In the litera- ture, some--Mobile sensors are useful in many environments because they can move to increase the sensing coverage

  14. Mobile RobotsSensor Networks Autonomous Sensor/Actuator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breu, Ruth

    mobile networks with dynamic topology Optimized task allocation and communication based on application and energy constraints Secure communication and data management in mobile sensor networks Solution SpaceMobile RobotsSensor Networks Autonomous Sensor/Actuator Networks ROSES RObot assisted SEnsor

  15. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  16. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  17. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  18. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris B. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  19. A Multi-frequency, Self-Calibrating, In-Situ Soil Sensor with Energy Efficient Wireless Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    in a network spread over a large area. The sensor works on the principle of soil impedance measurement. The sensor has the capability to measure impedance at multiple frequencies. This improves accuracy and alsoA Multi-frequency, Self-Calibrating, In-Situ Soil Sensor with Energy Efficient Wireless Interface

  20. Sensor Fault Diagnosis Using Principal Component Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharifi, Mahmoudreza

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to address the problem of fault diagnosis of sensors which measure a set of direct redundant variables. This study proposes: 1. A method for linear senor fault diagnosis 2. An analysis of isolability and detectability...

  1. Sensor Fault Diagnosis Using Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharifi, Mahmoudreza

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to address the problem of fault diagnosis of sensors which measure a set of direct redundant variables. This study proposes: 1. A method for linear senor fault diagnosis 2. An analysis of isolability and detectability...

  2. atlas pixel sensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G; Tsiskaridtze, S; Tsurin, I; Unno, Y; Weigel, P; Wittig, T 2012-01-01 5 Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Sensors Using Leakage Current Measurement System CERN Preprints...

  3. atlas pixel sensors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G; Tsiskaridtze, S; Tsurin, I; Unno, Y; Weigel, P; Wittig, T 2012-01-01 5 Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Sensors Using Leakage Current Measurement System CERN Preprints...

  4. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. Aircraft as a meteorological sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Meteorological Institute 2 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Photo cover: A KLM Airbus A330-200 landsAircraft as a meteorological sensor Using Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance data to derive upper air Meteorological Institute 3 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Aircraft as a meteorological sensor Using

  6. Multi-dimensional position sensor using range detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small, non-contact optical sensor uses ranges and images to detect its relative position to an object in up to six degrees of freedom. The sensor has three light emitting range detectors which illuminate a target and can be used to determine distance and two tilt angles. A camera located between the three range detectors senses the three remaining degrees of freedom, two translations and one rotation. Various range detectors, with different light sources, e.g. lasers and LEDs, different collection options, and different detection schemes, e.g. diminishing return and time of flight can be used. This sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines, e.g. it can instruct a robot how to adjust automatically to different positions and orientations of a part.

  7. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Erika L. (Westmont, IL); Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  8. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  9. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  10. Sensors & Measurement | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is TakingDepartmentSensitivities of

  11. Cross-Database Evaluation Using an Open Finger Vein Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , transmitting NIR light around 850nm through the finger appears to be a suitable technique to image the vein. in 2001 and obtained in 2004 [4]. Commercial physical access control devices based on finger vein were]. As a consequence, research on finger vein recognition requires both to develop and build sensors as well

  12. A wireless soil moisture smart sensor web using physics-based optimal control: Concept and initial demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moghaddam, Mahta

    This paper introduces a new concept for a smart wireless sensor web technology for optimal measurements of surface-to-depth profiles of soil moisture using in-situ sensors. The objective of the technology, supported by the ...

  13. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  14. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Lawless; C. Clark

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NO{sub x} sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NO{sub x} from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5-$10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NO{sub x}. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650-700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NO{sub x} sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NO{sub x} sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NO{sub x} and oxygen sensors yields the NO{sub x} content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  15. Sustainable Office Lighting Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

  16. Steam distribution and energy delivery optimization using wireless sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Extreme Measurement Communications Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) explores the deployment of a wireless sensor system with a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework in the ORNL campus. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize the energy delivery within the steam distribution system. We address the goal of achieving significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam valves/traps. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capabilities. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observe the state measurements of these sensors. Our assessments are based on analysis of the wireless sensor measurements. We describe Fourier-spectrum based algorithms that interpret acoustic vibration sensor data to characterize flows and classify the steam system status. We are able to present the sensor readings, steam flow, steam trap status and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.

  17. Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

  18. Modular sensor network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring (Berkeley, CA); Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul (Tracy, CA); Kershaw, Christopher Patrick (Hayward, CA); Kyker, Ronald Dean (Livermore, CA)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  19. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed to place the sensor nodes in the field. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  20. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).