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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Technologies: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Tech nologies -- Electronic Fluorescent, High-Intensity Discharge, and Light-Emitting Diode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Report is a compilation of four technical updates that address the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources: EPRI report 1018476 for linear fluorescent ballasts, 1018477 for hot and cold cathode compact fluorescent lamps, 1018479 for electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts, and 1018480 for light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting con...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting.

3

Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the most promising controllable energy efficient light source electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the upcoming growth of the HID lamp and electronic HID ballast market. Future technical improvements are emphasized along with discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from magnetically-ballasted HID lighting to higher efficiency electronic HID l...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

4

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. Illustration of a high-intensity discharge (HID) lIllustration amp. The lamp is a tall cylindrical shape, and a cutout of the outer tube shows the materials inside. A long, thin cylinder called the arc tube runs through the lamp between two electrodes. The space around the arc tube is labeled as a vacuum. In a high-intensity discharge lamp, electricity arcs between two electrodes, creating an intensely bright light. Mercury, sodium, or metal halide gas

5

Energy Basics: High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. HID lamps use an electric arc to produce...

6

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and light-emit...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

7

Fluorescent Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of 30-110 lumens per watt). They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours).

8

HIGH INTENSITY LIGHT SOURCES (Part II of Thesis)  

SciTech Connect

A stable carbon arc operated in controlled atmosphere is described. The arc was designed to serve as a light source during lifetime studies of the B/sup 2/ SIGMA state of the CN molecule. The CN radiation from the plasma of the arc was investigated and found to have a brightness temperature of 5500 icient laborato K at lambda 3883 A. This is considerably higher than an estimate of the value required for lifetime measurements. The stability of the carbon arc under various conditions is discussed. For successful lifetime measurements, the light source employed must have a high brightness temperature (intensity). A method for the determination of the brightness temperature of a light source at a specific wave length is described. The method was used for determining the brightness temperatures of some available light sources. Sodium, thallium, and mercury discharge lamps, a medium-pressure mercury arc lamp, and the carbon arc were studied. (auth)

Worden, E.F. Jr.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of...

10

,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5859,2946,5154,738,245,600 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7464,4047,6722,1108,663,991 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,10393,6055,9815,1759,1701,1996 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,9053,5004,8344,2296,2224,1611

11

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of 30-110 lumens per watt). They...

12

400-Watt Electronic High-Bay Fixture for Metal-Halide High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The product under assessment is an advanced lighting technology8212a 400-watt, metal-halide, electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballast technology designed to be operated as a stand-alone ballast or integrated as a fixture where the ballast becomes part of the fixture mechanical support system.

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

X-ray Methods in High-Intensity Discharges and Metal-Halide Lamps: X-ray Induced Fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

We describe the use of x-ray induced fluorescence to study metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps and to measure equilibrium vapor pressures of metal-halide salts. The physical principles of metal-halide lamps, relevant aspects of x-ray-atom interactions, the experimental method using synchrotron radiation, and x-ray induced fluorescence measurements relevant to metal-halide lamps are covered.

Curry, John J.; Lapatovich, Walter P.; Henins, Albert (NIST)

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting October 17, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent products to provide a similar amount of light. They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours). The two general types of fluorescent lamps are: Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) -- commonly found with integral ballasts and screw bases, these are popular lamps often used in household fixtures Fluorescent tube and circline lamps -- typically used for task lighting such as garages and under cabinet fixtures, and for lighting large areas in commercial buildings. CFLs CFLs combine the energy efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience and popularity of incandescent fixtures. CFLs fit most fixtures

15

Flash Lighting with Fluorescent Lamp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A flash lighting circuit with the fluorescent lamp is designed to produce lighting flicker by means of controlling the operating frequency and the duty-ratio of… (more)

Hsieh, Horng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Novel Light Source Based on a RF-Driven High Intensity Discharge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90-3122 Almost all the lighting news recently has been about advances in LED (Light Emitting Diode) lighting. But several companies are quietly developing new light sources that...

17

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and compact fluorescent lights. And I've already purchased a few of the new light emitting diode (LED) solid-state lighting lights-but that's the topic of a future blog. Stay...

18

Fluorescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics October 17, 2013 - 5:39pm Addthis Light from a fluorescent lamp is first created by an electric current conducted through an inert gas producing ultraviolet light that is invisible to the human eye. The ultraviolet light in turn interacts with special blends of phosphors coating the interior surface of the fluorescent lamp tube that efficiently converts the invisible light into useful white light. Fluorescent lamps require a special power supply called a ballast that is needed to regulate lamp operating current and provide a compatible start-up voltage. Electronic ballasts perform the same function as a magnetic ballast but outperform the outdated magnetic products by operating at a very high frequency that eliminates flicker and noise while

19

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting April 28, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert There is a major push today to get homeowners to adopt compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. They have been on the market for nearly three decades, and many homeowners still do not use them widely. But the tide is definitely turning. Their availability and the percentage of homeowners familiar with the technology and purchasing them for their homes have been steadily rising. The products have improved considerably compared to early products, and their prices have plummeted. The ENERGY STAR® Change a Light, Change the World Campaign has been running now for more than half a dozen years. This campaign is designed to

20

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting April 28, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert There is a major push today to get homeowners to adopt compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. They have been on the market for nearly three decades, and many homeowners still do not use them widely. But the tide is definitely turning. Their availability and the percentage of homeowners familiar with the technology and purchasing them for their homes have been steadily rising. The products have improved considerably compared to early products, and their prices have plummeted. The ENERGY STAR® Change a Light, Change the World Campaign has been running now for more than half a dozen years. This campaign is designed to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mercury-free fluorescent lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief comparative review of possible mercury free fluorescent lighting technologies is presented, including rare-gas positive column discharges, molecular discharges, and dielectric barrier discharges. Detailed experimental results on xenon positive column discharges will then be considered. In order to judge whether xenon-based discharges are a viable UV source it is necessary to measure the radiant emittance (power per unit area) for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) resonance xenon emission at 147 nm. Two techniques to determine the VUV radiant emittance have been developed and applied to xenon discharges. One method combines the measured resonance level density using absorption spectroscopy and a calculation of the trapped decay rate for the resonance radiation to arrive at the radiant emittance at 147 nm. A second method utilizes a direct measurement of the radiance (power per unit area per unit solid angle) at 147 nm using a calibrated VUV photodiode, and a calculation of the relative angular distribution of the resonance radiation to determine the radiant emittance. In both techniques a simulation of the transport of resonance radiation is key to determining the radiant emittance.

Doughty, D.A. [General Electric Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

High-Intensity Discharge Industrial Lighting Design Strategies for the Minimization of Energy Usage and Life-Cycle Cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Worldwide, the electrical energy consumed by artificial lighting is second only to the amount consumed by electric machinery. Of the energy usage attributed to lighting… (more)

Flory IV, Isaac L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Application guidance for fluorescent lighting projects  

SciTech Connect

This application guides is intended to help activity personnel retrofit fluorescent lighting. With this guide, an energy manager can determine if replacing T-12 lamp and magnetic ballast fixtures is cost effective.

Rocha, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

New and Underutilized Technology: Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting October 7, 2013 - 8:54am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for efficient high bay fluorescent lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits Efficient high bay fluorescent lighting can include either T5 or T8 fluorescent lighting systems for high-bay applications currently using metal halide fixtures. Fluorescent fixtures offer better light distribution, better light maintenance over the life of the lamp, improved color quality, and on-off control (re-strike time) with lower energy consumption. Application Efficient high bay fluorescent lighting is applicable for facilities containing high bay areas. Key Factors for Deployment

25

Fluorescence Enhancement of White-Light Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advances are being made in lighting technology, as incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs become less efficient compared to solid-state lighting devices, especially light-emitting diodes (LEDs).… (more)

Rosson, Teresa Ellen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method and apparatus for dimming fluorescent lights  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a dimmer for fluorescent lights that utilizes the standard ballast associated with the lights, comprising: means for controlling the transmission of the normal line A.C. voltage sine wave to the ballast. This is done so that the A.C. voltage is connected to the ballast for only a selectable period of time during each half cycle of the sine wave and is blocked during the remaining period of each half cycle thereby controlling the power supplied to the discharge portion of the lights to control brightness; and means for applying a high frequency voltage signal to the ballast during at least a portion of the time period when the A.C. signal to the ballast is blocked thereby supplying additional power to the filaments of lights.

Clark, R.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

High intensity hadron accelerators  

SciTech Connect

This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

Teng, L.C.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology  

SciTech Connect

Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. • Drill-down Review – These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

None

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

THE HISTORY AND TECHNICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH FREQUENCY FLUORESCENT LIGHTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec. 1953. "Hi-Volt-Cycle Lighting ~ Launched i n a Hi-Wide2, F e b r u a r y , 19 53. "Lighting Your Plant with Highg h Frequency Fluorescent Lighting John H. Campbell December

Campbell, John H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.eccj.or.jp/top_runner/pdf/tr_fluorescent_lights_jul.2009.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/product-standards-fluorescent-lightin Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Industry Codes & Standards Regulations: Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling This Energy Conservation Center Japan (ECCJ) document was created as a

31

Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast on Facebook Tweet about...

32

Shelf life of five meat products displayed under light emitting diode or fluorescent lighting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Light emitting diode (LED) and fluorescent (FLS) lighting effects on enhanced pork loin chops, beef longissimus dorsi and semimembranosus steaks, ground beef, and ground turkey… (more)

Steele, Kyle Stover

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Improved Performance of a Fluorescent Blue Organic Light Emitting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Improved Performance of a Fluorescent Blue Organic Light Emitting Diode with Hole Blocking Materials as Dopants for Transport Layers.

34

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode… (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Light Flicker in Compact Fluorescent Lamps Caused by Voltage Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents tests performed at the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC) Power Quality Test Facility to characterize the light output of an incandescent lamp and compact fluorescent lamps during voltage fluctuations.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

History and technical evolution of high frequency fluorescent lighting  

SciTech Connect

This work was performed to accelerate development and commercialization of solid-state, high frequency ballasts for fluorescent lighting systems. The history and development of fluorescent lamps, of ballasts for these fixtures, and of related circuits and equipment are reviewed. The higher lamp efficiency of high-frequency (300 to 3000 Hz) fluorescent lamps as compared with 60 Hz lamps, the development of frequency converter circuits for high-frequency lamps, and uses, electrical characteristics, and economics of these lighting systems are discussed. (LCL)

Campbell, J.H.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Altitude dependence of fluorescence light emission by extensive air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence light is induced by extensive air showers while developing in the Earth's atmosphere. The number of emitted fluorescence photons depends on the conditions of the air and on the energy deposited by the shower particles at every stage of the development. In a previous model calculation, the pressure and temperature dependences of the fluorescence yield have been studied on the basis of kinetic gas theory, assuming temperature-independent molecular collision cross-sections. In this work we investigate the importance of temperature-dependent collision cross-sections and of water vapour quenching on the expected fluorescence yield. The calculations will be applied to simulated air showers while using actual atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence on the reconstructed energy of extensive air showers.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium light tubes are recycled. They are made from aluminum and metal. Aluminum is a silver-white metal and is very light in weight and strong. Because aluminum is ductile, it can be drawn into wires or pressed

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

39

Very high intensity reaction chamber design  

SciTech Connect

The problem of achieving very high intensity irradiation by light in minimal regions was studied. Three types of irradiation chamber are suggested: the common laser-reaction chamber, the folded concentric or near-concentric resonator, and the asymmetric confocal resonator. In all designs the ratio of high-intensity illuminated volume to other volume is highly dependent (to the $sup 3$/$sub 2$ power) on the power and fluence tolerances of optical elements, primarily mirrors. Optimization of energy coupling is discussed for the common cavity. For the concentric cavities, optimization for both coherent and incoherent beams is treated. Formulae and numerical examples give the size of chambers, aspect ratios, maximum pass number, image sizes, fluences, and the like. Similarly for the asymmetric confocal chamber, formulae and numerical examples for fluences, dimensions, losses, and totally contained pass numbers are given. (auth)

Devaney, J.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Have You Switched to Compact Fluorescent Lights? Why or Why Not...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Switched to Compact Fluorescent Lights? Why or Why Not? Have You Switched to Compact Fluorescent Lights? Why or Why Not? May 1, 2009 - 1:52pm Addthis On Tuesday, John wrote about...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities Tobias K be photobleached before final sample preparation. The instrument consists of high power light emitting diodes

Kaufman, Laura

42

Remediation plan for fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

Lapatovich, Walter P. (Hudson, MA); Keeffe, William M. (Rockport, MA); Liebermann, Richard W. (Danvers, MA); Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

45

Section 5.4.1 Linear Fluorescent Lighting: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and color temperature. When specifying a lighting sys- tem, be sure that the lamp and ballast are electrically matched and the lamp and fixture optically matched. Fluorescent lamp...

46

Advanced Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the generation of artificial light using electric lamps, photometric and color performance have been paramount in lamp design, manufacturing, measurement, lighting design, and visual perception. Many designers and researchers have strived to understand how light and color are generated, related, and to improve them. This has stemmed from the development of incandescent lamps, halogen lamps, linear fluorescent lamps, high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps, and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) among other...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency | December 1, 2010 What to Do if a Compact Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or Fluorescent Tube Light Bulb Breaks in Your Home1 Fluorescent light bulbs contain a small amount of mercury sealed within the glass tubing. When a fluorescent bulb breaks in your home, some of this mercury is released as mercury vapor. The broken bulb can continue to release

McConnell, Terry

49

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes: a promising molecular design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes Light Emitting Diode (OLED), intermolecular p­p interactions should be usually suppressed to avoid any Emitting Diodes (SMOLEDs) is almost absent from the literature. In this work, three aryl-substituted Di

50

Kansas City Power and Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fixture Standard T8 LampsBallasts: 2 - 10unit Lighting Power Density: 1watt per square foot High Intensity Fluorescent: 50fixture Pulse Star Metal Halide: 50fixture...

51

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities Tobias K be photobleached before final sample preparation. The instrument consists of high power light emitting diodes for simple photobleaching pur- poses, we designed a simple but efficient lighting system using light emitting

Kaufman, Laura

52

Transverse instability in high intensity proton rings  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, many applications are being considered for low energy high intensity proton synchrotrons. Most high intensity proton rings are at low energy below transition. Several aspects of the beam dynamics of this kind of rings are different from the electron or high energy rings. The transverse microwave instabilities will be discussed in this article.

Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs January 26, 2010 - 11:41am Addthis Washington, DC - On January 25th, the General Counsel notified 25 manufacturers that the Department of Energy has withdrawn their right to use the Energy Star label on 34 different models of compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs). The Department took this action after its off-the-shelf testing revealed that the affected models do not last as long in regular use as Energy Star certification would require. As a result, these manufacturers have been informed that they can no longer ship or sell any of the 34 models of CFLs bearing the Energy Star label on the bulb or its packaging. All compact fluorescent light bulbs use about 75 percent less energy and

54

New Electronic Light Sources for Sustainability in a Greener Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the product areaselectronic linear fluorescent, electronic compact fluorescent, electronic high-intensity discharge (HID), and light-emitting diode (LED). This year, a new type of light sourcesolid-state plasma lighting (a miniature HID technology)was assessed. This project demonstrates how light sources are making their way into new designs providing new types of light fixtures. A total of seven products w...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

A dimmable (1000:1 range) fluorescent ballast for instrument panel lighting  

SciTech Connect

A 1000:1 wide range continuously dimmable ballast is designed for fluorescent lighting of aircraft instrument panels. High voltage, low energy, 800 Hz starting pulses reliably start the lamps at all light level settings. The starting pulses alone produce the illumination at the minimum light control setting.

Lauritzen, P.O.; Jorgensen, J.A.; Meyer, S.D.; Osborn, J.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Lighting Options for Homes.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

Baker, W.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

STABILIZED HIGH INTENSITY SOURCE OF 80 kv  

SciTech Connect

With the change of the current load from 0 to 2.5 mamp and simultaneous change of incoming intensity from 270 to 190 v, the stabilized high-intensity source changes less than l%.. The stabilized intensity can be arranged in steps of 5 kv from 60 to 80 kv. The high-intensity stabilizer automatically switches on upon reaching 60 kv. (tr-auth)

Polivanov, V.V.; Izyurov, A.V.; Pyatakov, N.I.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Potential Environmental Impacts from the Metals in Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), and Light-Emitting Diode (LED)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Bulbs Seong-Rin Lim, Daniel Kang, Oladele A. Ogunseitan,,§ and Julie M sources with compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs that use about 70% and 85 lighting systems are transitioning from incandes- cent to compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) and light

Short, Daniel

60

Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Basics Lighting Basics Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Text Version There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Lighting High-intensity Discharge Lighting Incandescent Lighting LED Lighting Low-pressure Sodium Lighting. Which type is best depends on the application. See the chart below for a comparison of lighting types. Lighting Comparison Chart Lighting Type Efficacy (lumens/watt) Lifetime (hours) Color Rendition Index (CRI) Color Temperature (K) Indoors/Outdoors Fluorescent Straight Tube 30-110 7000-24,000 50-90 (fair to good) 2700-6500 (warm to cold) Indoors/outdoors Compact Fluorescent 50-70 10,000 65-88 (good) 2700-6500 (warm to cold) Indoors/outdoors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Light Source Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALITE) research program is aimed at breakthrough basic research to achieve approximately 150 to 200 lumens per watt for fluorescent light sources, and to increase high intensity discharge light source efficiency by up to 50%. This report describes work on high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. These commercially available lamps currently have efficacies up to 120 lumens per watt (LPW), and radiate approximately 36% of their energy in the visible spectrum and 53% in the infrared ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

TESTING OF ENERGY CONSERVATION OF ELECTRONIC BALLASTS FOR FLUORESCENT LIGHTING REVIEW OF RECENT RESULTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DESIGN GOALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ur:.V(. ,(lh. Fluorescent Lighting Review of Recent Resultsfrom 30 0 C to 50°C. The lighting system.with core ballastswas conducted to measure the lighting system performance for

Verderber, R.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Advanced Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the following product areasdimmable light-emitting diode (LED) screw-in replacement lamp, hybrid compact fluorescent lamp/halogen screw-in replacement lamp, replacement recessed can LED downlight, organic LED (OLED) disc, replacement mini high-intensity discharge (HID) lamp and ballast system, and solid-state plasma lighting (miniature HID technology) high-bay fixture. The research in this project helps to demonstrate how...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Efficient Light Sources Today  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews new lamp and lighting technology in terms of application and economic impact. Included are the latest advances in High Intensity Discharge systems, energy saving fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and the new state of the art high performance fluorescent systems. Cost analyses will show that typical owning and operating cost reductions of 15 to 65% can be achieved without sacrificing illumination levels when the right system is chosen and properly applied.

Hart, A. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard  

SciTech Connect

Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

Lin, Jiang

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

High intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS  

SciTech Connect

Experience and results from recent high intensity proton running periods of the Brookhaven AGS, during which a record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse was reached, is presented. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of three high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the 1.5 GeV Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. Recently even higher intensity proton synchrotrons are studied for neutron spallation sources or proton driver for a muon collider. Implications of the experiences from the AGS to these proposals and also possible future upgrades for the AGS are discussed.

Brennan, J.M.; Roser, T.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Computational Simulations of High Intensity X-Ray Matter Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Free electron lasers have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity short pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1-10 keV energy range. For example, the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford is being designed to produce an output intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a 230 fs pulse. These sources will open the door to many novel research studies. However, the intense x-ray pulses may damage the optical components necessary for studying and controlling the output. At the full output intensity, the dose to optical components at normal incidence ranges from 1-10 eV/atom for low-Z materials (Z < 14) at photon energies of 1 keV. It is important to have an understanding of the effects of such high doses in order to specify the composition, placement, and orientation of optical components, such as mirrors and monochromators. Doses of 10 eV/atom are certainly unacceptable since they will lead to ablation of the surface of the optical components. However, it is not precisely known what the damage thresholds are for the materials being considered for optical components for x-ray free electron lasers. In this paper, we present analytic estimates and computational simulations of the effects of high-intensity x-ray pulses on materials. We outline guidelines for the maximum dose to various materials and discuss implications for the design of optical components.

London, R A; Rionta, R; Tatchyn, R; Roessler, S

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

70

CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers  

SciTech Connect

Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; /Michigan State U.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Improved fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging and tomography by enhanced excitation light rejection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence enhanced optical imaging and tomography studies involve the detection of weak fluorescent signals emanating from nano- to picomolar concentrations of exogenous or endogenously produced fluorophore concurrent with the rejection of an overwhelmingly large component of backscattered excitation light. The elimination of the back-reflected excitation light of the collected signal remains a major and often unrecognized challenge for further reducing the noise floor and increasing sensitivity of small animal fluorescence imaging. In this dissertation, we adapted collimating and gradient index (GRIN) lenses in an existing frequency-domain system to improve excitation light rejection and enhance planar and tomographic imaging. To achieve this goal, we developed planar and tomographic imaging systems based upon ray tracing calculations for improved rejection of excitation light. The “out-of-band (S (?x))” to “in-band (S (?m) - S (?x))” signal ratio assessing excitation leakage was acquired with and without collimating optics. The addition of collimating optics resulted in a 51 to 75% reduction in the transmission ratio of (S (?x))/ (S (?m) - S (?x)) for the phantom studies and an increase of target to background ratio (TBR) from 11% to 31% in animal studies. Additionally, we presented results demonstrating the improvement of model match between experiments and forward simulation models by adaptation of GRIN lens optics to a breast phantom study. In particular, 128 GRIN lenses on the fiber bundle face were employed to align the collected excitation and emission light normal to the filter surface in an existing frequency-domain system. As a result of GRIN lens collimation, we reduced the transmission ratio between 10 and 86 % and improved the model match for tomographic reconstruction of one (1 cm3) and two (0.1 cm3) targets in a 1087 cm3 of breast phantom. Ultimately, this work improves the sensitivity of NIR fluorescence imaging by enhancing the rejection of excitation light and shows that the current sensitivity challenges for translating fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging into the clinic can be overcome.

Hwang, Kil Dong

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Life cycle cost analysis for replacement of fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

AGS RESONANT EXTRACTION WITH HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams.[1] Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. We have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. We will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled us to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. We will report on our status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations.

AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; VANASSELT,W.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

Side-by-Side Testing of Commercial Office Lighting Systems: Two-lamp Fluorescent Fixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lighting systems in commercial office buildings are primary determinants of building energy use. In warmer climates, lighting energy use has important implications for building cooling loads as well as those directly associated with illumination tasks. To research the comparative performance of conventional and advanced office lighting systems, Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) set up the Lighting Flexible Test Facility (LFTF) which allows side-by-side comparison of lighting options in two otherwise identical 2.7 m x 3.7 m (9' x 12') south facing offices. The ceiling of the LFTF contains 0.61 m x 1.2 m (2' x 4') recessed fluorescent fixtures designed to be easily changed. Differing lighting systems were comparatively tested against each other over weeklong periods. Data on power consumption (watts), power quality (power factor), work-plane interior lighting levels (lux), bulb-wall, fixture and plenum temperatures were recorded every 15 minutes on a multi-channel data logger. This data allows realistic analysis of comparative lighting system performance including interactions with daylighting.

Parker, D. S.; Schrum, L.; Sonne, J. K.; Stedman, T. C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:17am Addthis Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important. Low-pressure sodium lamps work somewhat like fluorescent lamps. Like high-intensity discharge lighting, low-pressure sodium lamps require up to 10 minutes to start and have to cool before they can restart. Therefore, they are most suitable for applications in which they stay on for hours at a time. They are not suitable for use with motion detectors. The chart below compares low-pressure sodium lamps and high-intensity

76

Assessing photosynthetic light-use efficiency using a solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and photochemical reflectance index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photosynthetic light-use efficiency LUE is an important indicator of plant photosynthesis, but assessment by remote sensing needs to be further explored. In this study, two protective mechanisms for photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence ChlF and heat ...

Liangyun Liu; Yongjiang Zhang; Quanjun Jiao; Dailiang Peng

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to Market  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the history of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in America. CFLs were introduced in the 1970s; however, it has taken more than 20 years for them to gain widespread recognition in the U.S. residential lighting market. This report reviews the development of CFLs, efforts to increase market acceptance of them, and barriers to that acceptance. Lessons to be learned from this study of CFLs are identified in hopes of assisting future market introduction efforts for other promising energy-efficient technologies. This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Building Technologies, Emerging Technologies Program.

Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Steward, Heidi E.; Calwell, Chris

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

78

Obstacles and opportunities in the commercialization of the solid-state-electronic fluorescent-lighting ballast  

SciTech Connect

The Solid State Ballast (SSB) Program, aimed at improving the efficiency of fluorescent lights, is described. The first generation of solid state electronic ballasts has been developed and the technology has been transferred to the private sector. This report examines the opportunities for rapid dissemination of this technology into the marketplace. It includes a description of product characteristics and their influence on the commercialization of the SSB, a description of the technology delivery system presently used by the ballast industry, an analysis of the market for SSB, and identification of some high-leverage opportunities to accelerate the commercialization process. (MCW)

Johnson, D.R.; Marcus, A.A.; Campbell, R.S.; Sommers, P.; Skumatz, L.; Berk, B.; Petty, P.; Eschbach, C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A new optimized fluorescent lamp and ballast for low-energy general lighting applications  

SciTech Connect

A new fluorescent lamp and ballast system has been developed which minimizes system input power while maintaining light output close to values provided by conventional lamps and ballasts. The 28-WT-12 lamp designed for the new system utilizes a redesigned electrode structure which allows the lamp to be started in the rapid start manner but operated in an instant start mode to maximize the discharge efficacy (lumens/watt) while reducing lamp cathode power requirements. A matching two-lamp ballast incorporates a solid-state switching device to turn off the cathode heating circuit automatically once the lamps have started. Both lamps and ballasts are physically interchangeable with conventional equipment so that existing luminaires can be converted without luminaire, lampholder, and wiring modifications. This new lamp/ballast system can achieve efficacy values exceeding 80 lm/W--more than 25 percent better than the performance of conventional fluorescent systems of the early 1970's-along with the excellent life and reliability characteristics typical of electromagnetically ballasted systems. Economic analyses indicate that the new system is appropriate for many new commercial general lighting installations, although it is particularly suitable as a retrofit system for installations where power reductions are essential but where conversion costs must be minimized and illumination levels preserved.

Hammer, E.E.; McGowan, T.K.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.  

SciTech Connect

One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

2002-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Simulations Identify Requirements for LANL's High Intensity Laser...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify Requirements for LANL's High Intensity Laser Lab cielo equip Fig. 1. Cielo is a 1.37 petaflops capability-class supercomputer installed at LANL, funded by the US DOE NNSA...

82

A New High Intensity Electron Beam for Wakefield Acceleration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIGH INTENSITY ELECTRON BEAM FOR WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION STUDIES* M.E. Conde , W. Gai, C. Jing, R. Konecny, W. Liu, J.G. Power, H. Wang, Z. Yusof ANL, Argonne, IL 60439, USA...

83

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstration (like street lights) and commercialization andthe dominant light source for street and roadway lighting,has been a popular light source for street lighting because

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Performance of electronic ballasts and lighting controllers with 34-W fluorescent lamps: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamps are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the system efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lighting industry is driven to provide light sources and lighting systems that, when properly applied, will produce a suitable luminous environment in which to perform a specified task. Tasks may include everything from office work, manufacturing and inspection to viewing priceless art objects, selecting the right chair for your living room, and deciding which produce item to select for tonight's dinner. While energy efficiency is a major consideration in any new lighting system design, the sacrifice of lighting quality may cost more in terms of lost productivity and user dissatisfaction than can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in filament, fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Manufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved color rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take the form of either increasing lamp efficiency (lumens of light delivered per watt of power consumed) or decreasing lamp size, thus making a more easily controlled light source that places light where it is needed. The manufacturer's second goal is to produce lamps that render colors accurately while maintaining high efficiency. This paper will discuss new introductions in light sources and lighting systems and how they may impact the design of luminous environments of the future.

Krailo, D. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation  

SciTech Connect

Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation  

SciTech Connect

Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Lights Program to promote efficient lighting products through public education, consumer incentives, national product testing, and investments

Lin, Jiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated that conversion efficiencies of 30-40% are possible at intensities of 600-800 GW/cm2, which is the operating level of the Petawatt laser at LLNL. The main limiting factors are phase modulation and material damage.

Banks, P S

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs  

SciTech Connect

Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

Lawrence, G.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, Donald J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schamaun, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Donald C. (Los Alamos, NM); Potter, R. Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Joseph A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Note: A portable, light-emitting diode-based ruby fluorescence spectrometer for high-pressure calibration  

SciTech Connect

Ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with {approx}0.5 wt. % Cr doping) is one of the most widely used manometers at the giga-Pascal scale. Traditionally, its fluorescence is excited with intense laser sources. Here, I present a simple, robust, and portable design that employs light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead. This LED-based system is safer in comparison with laser-based ones.

Feng Yejun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

High intensity performance and upgrades at the Brookhaven AGS  

SciTech Connect

The high intensity proton beam of the AGS is used both for the slow-extracted-beam (SEB) area with many target station to produce secondary beams and the fast-extracted-beam (FEB) line used for the production of muons for the g-2 experiment and for high intensity target testing for the spallation neutron sources and muon production targets for the muon collider. The same FEB line will also be used for the transfer of beam to RHIC. The proton beam intensity in the AGS has increased steadily over the 35 year existence of the AGS, but the most dramatic increase occurred over the last couple of years with the addition of the new AGS Booster. All modifications associated with this are discussed.

Roser, T.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

FEDOTOV, A.V.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evaluation of fluorescent lighting systems in various underground coal mines. Final report, May 1975-June 1978  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a variety of coal mining lighting projects that were funded by the Bureau of Mines to obtain underground lighting experience in support of new lighting requirements for underground coal mines. Some of the variables covered were low and high coal, narrow and wide entries, conventional and continuous mining, ac and dc power, bituminous and anthracite coal, machine mounting, and area lighting.

Ketler, A.E.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

On the advantages of using green light to study fluorescence yield changes in leaves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, at variance with the commonly used set-ups, uses of a weakly absorbed light source (light-emitting diodes. Although the exciting light is weakly absorbed, the possibility to tune the intensity of the light emitting diodes allows one to reach photochemical rates ranging from 104 s- 1 to 0.25 s- 1 rendering

98

A Review of the Reflector Compact Fluorescent Lights Technology Procurement Program: Conclusions and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), from 2000 to 2007 to improve the performance of reflector type (R-lamp) compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and increase their availability throughout the United States by means of a technology development and procurement strategy. In 2000, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Emerging Technologies Program and its predecessors, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory undertook a technology procurement seeking R-CFLs that were specifically designed for use in ICAT recessed can fixtures and that met other minimum performance criteria including minimum light output and size restrictions (to ensure they fit in standard residential recessed cans). The technology procurement included two phases. In Phase I, requests for proposals (RFPs) were issued in October 2002 and five manufacturers responded with 12 lamp models. Eight of these models met the minimum requirements and passed the 6-hour short-term test in a simulated ICAT environment. These eight models were subjected to long-term tests of 6,000 or more hours in a simulated ICAT environment. Three of these models passed the short- and long-term tests and were promoted through the program website (www.pnl.gov/rlamps), press releases, and fliers. To increase the number of qualifying models, a second RFP was issued in June 2005. In April 2007, DOE announced that 16 reflector CFL (R-CFL) models by four manufacturers had met all the minimum requirements of Phase 2 of the R-CFL Technology Innovation Competition. PNNL developed both the criteria and the test apparatus design for Elevated Temperature Life Testing (ETLT), which has been included by DOE in its draft ENERGY STAR specifications for the reflector category of CFLs. PNNL promoted the winning lamps through a program website, press releases, and fliers as well as through program partners. PNNL also helped engage distributors including Costco, the Home Depot, Bonneville Power Administration, and utility organizations.

Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

High intensity discharge 400-watt sodium ballast. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid State 400-Watt Ballast lighting system are reported. Phase I of the project which was designed to modify the existing Datapower ballast to LBL configuration, measure performance characteristics, and compare efficiency with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis is covered. In addition, Datapower was tasked to build six (6) prototype 400-Watt High Pressure Sodium Ballasts for verification tests by an independent test facility and follow-on performance and life tests at LBL.

Felper, G.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

On the advantages of using green light to study fluorescence yield changes in leaves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the emission spectrum of a light emitting diode is chosen for the incident beam. Second, three (one each

Wollman, Francis-André

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ELECTRON COUD DYNAMICS IN HIGH-INTENSITY RINGS.  

SciTech Connect

Electron cloud due to beam-induced multipacting is one of the main concerns for the high intensity. Electrons generated and accumulated inside the beam pipe form an ''electron cloud'' that interacts with the circulating charged particle beam. With sizeable amount of electrons, this interaction can cause beam instability, beam loss and emittance growth. At the same time, the vacuum pressure will rise due to electron desorption. This talk intends to provide an overview of the mechanism and dynamics of the typical electron multipacting in various magnetic fields and mitigation measures with different beams.

WANG, L.; WEI, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

102

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presents the national energy consumption profile for HIDVolume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

FLIGHT: Clock Calibration Using Fluorescent Lighting Zhenjiang Li1,4, Wenwei Chen1, Cheng Li1, Mo Li1, Xiang-yang Li2, Yunhao Liu3,4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLIGHT: Clock Calibration Using Fluorescent Lighting Zhenjiang Li1,4, Wenwei Chen1, Cheng Li1, Mo propose a novel clock calibration approach called FLIGHT, which leverages the fact that the fluorescent, Performance Keywords Clock calibration, Fluorescent lighting, Energy efficiency 1. INTRODUCTION Maintaining

Liu, Yunhao

104

Testing of energy conservation of electronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Review of recent results and recommendations for design goals  

SciTech Connect

The performance of two 40-watt T-12 fluorescent lamps driven by both standard core-coil, and electronic ballasts has been measured over a range of temperatures and input voltages that simulate conditions they would experience in typical building installations. When using new energy-efficient lamps and electronic ballasts, an efficiency of 90 lumens/watt has been achieved, which represents an efficiency improvement of over 37% relative to standard lamps and core-coil ballasts. From these results, several design targets are suggested for ballast developers. Additional features of the electronic ballasts, (low noise, no flicker, and light level control), have potential to increase the use of efficient light sources (gas discharge types) as well as permit less costly luminaire construction. The dimming feature should also conserve energy whenever applied.

Verderber, R.R.; Cooper, D.; Ross, D.K.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Plasma Lens for High Intensity Laser Focusing  

SciTech Connect

A plasma lens based on a short hydrogen-filled alumina capillary discharge is experimentally characterized. For a plasma length of about 5mm, the focal length, measured from the plasma entrance, was {approx} 11 to 8mm for on axis densities of {approx} 2.5 to 5 x 1018cm-3, respectively. The plasma temperature away from the walls of the 1/2mm diameter capillary was estimated to be {approx} 8eV indicating that the plasma is fully ionized. Such a lens should thus be suitable for focusing very high intensity pulses. Comparisons of the measured focusing strength to that predicted by a first-order fluid model [N. A. Bobrova, et al., Phys. Rev. E 65, 016407 (2002)] shows reasonable agreement given that some of the observed plasma parameters are not predicted by this model.

Fang, F.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C. [UCLA Department of Electrical Engineering, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 (United States); Lopes, N. C. [Grupo de Lasers e Plasmas, ESuperior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Ito, H. [Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya City, Zip 321-8585 (Japan)

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Relationships of Light Transmission, Stratification and Fluorescence in the Hypoxic Region of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf in Spring/Summer 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of phytoplankton in hypoxic waters requires nutrients and light. In river plumes of the coastal ocean, river borne surface nutrient concentrations decrease with distance from the river mouth. Light availability at the surface also changes with distance from the river source, as particulates and other materials sink through the water column. Using in situ CTD sensors, water samples of nutrients, and ship flow-through data from two Louisiana Shelf research cruises, April and July 2009, the relationship between transmissivity, photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), stratification, and fluorescence are analyzed. PAR is measured using a silicon photovoltaic detector and is measured in the 400 to 700 nm range. A fluorometer is used to measure the fluorescence of chlorophyll a in g/L and is a proxy indicator for phytoplankton biomass. The Louisiana Shelf is home to the largest hypoxic zone in the western hemisphere, covering on average more than 15000 sq. km. The Louisiana hypoxic zone occurs seasonally in summer and is typically dissipated by physical processes in fall. Hypoxia is defined as waters that have a dissolved oxygen concentration of 1.4 ml/L and is the level at which marine organisms are typically adversely affected. Preliminary results show expected relationships between transmissivity and fluorescence in the water column indicating a positive correlation between light availability and fluorescence. The spatial distribution of stratification, light availability, fluorescence, and nutrients are compared for the different seasons.

Towns, Jenny L

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

HIGH INTENSITY PERFORMANCE AND UPGRADES AT THE BROOKHAVEN AGS  

SciTech Connect

Fig. 1 shows the present layout of the AGS-RHIC accelerator complex. The high intensity proton beam of the AGS is used both for the slow-extracted-beam (SEB) area with many target station to produce secondary beams and the fast-extracted-beam (FEB) line used for the production of muons for the g-2 experiment and for high intensity target testing for the spallation neutron sources and muon production targets for the muon collider. The same FEB line will also be used for the transfer of beam to RHIC. The proton beam intensity in the AGS has increased steadily over the 35 year existence of the AGS, but the most dramatic increase occurred over the last couple of years with the addition of the new AGS Booster[1]. In Fig. 2 the history of the AGS intensity improvements is shown and the major upgrades are indicated. The AGS Booster has one quarter the circumference of the AGS and therefore allows four Booster beam pulses to be stacked in the AGS at an injection energy of 1.5--1.9 GeV. At this increased energy, space charge forces are much reduced and this in turn allows for the dramatic increase in the AGS beam intensity. The 200 MeV LINAC is being used both for the injection into the Booster as well as an isotope production facility. A recent upgrade of the LINAC rf system made it possible to operated at an average H{sup {minus}} current of 150 {micro}A and a maximum of 12 x 10{sup 13} H{sup {minus}} per 500 {micro}s LINAC pulse for the isotope production target. Typical beam currents during the 500 {micro}s pulse are about 80 mA at the source, 60 mA after the 750 keV RFQ, 38 mA after the first LINAC tank (10 MeV), and 37 mA at end of the LINAC at 200 MeV. The normalized beam emittance is about 2 {pi} mm mrad for 95% of the beam and the beam energy spread is about {+-}1.2 MeV. A magnetic fast chopper installed at 750 keV allows the shaping of the beam injected into the Booster to avoid excessive beam loss.

ROSER,T.

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

108

Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

Ferdinand, R.; /Saclay; Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Solid-state lighting technology perspective.  

SciTech Connect

Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and...

111

Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

Sandia National Laboratories has created a method and apparatus for measuring the position of an object.  It relies on the attenuation of fluorescence light carried inside a fluorescent optical fiber to determine the position of an object. 

112

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energy Basics: Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color...

114

High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the energy efficiency and reduced emissions that can be obtained with a dual torch DC plasma transferred arc-melting system. Plasmelt Glass Technologies, LLC was formed to solicit and execute the project, which utilize a full-scale test melter system. The system is similar to the one that was originally constructed by Johns Manville, but Plasmelt has added significant improvements to the torch design and melter system that has extended the original JM short torch lives. The original JM design has been shown to achieve melt rates 5 to 10 times faster than conventional gas or electric melting, with improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. This project began on 7/28/2003 and ended 7/27/06. A laboratory scale melter was designed, constructed, and operated to conduct multiple experimental melting trials on various glass compositions. Glass quality was assessed. Although the melter design is generic and equally applicable to all sectors within the glass industry, the development of this melter has focused primarily on fiberglass with additional exploratory melting trials of frits, specialty, and minerals-melting applications. Throughput, energy efficiency, and glass quality have been shown to be heavily dependent on the selected glass composition. During this project, Plasmelt completed the proof-of-concept work in our Boulder, CO Lab to show the technical feasibility of this transferred-arc plasma melter. Late in the project, the work was focused on developing the processes and evaluating the economic viability of plasma melting aimed at the specific glasses of interest to specific client companies. Post project work is on going with client companies to address broader non-glass materials such as refractories and industrial minerals. Exploratory melting trials have been conducted on several glasses of commercial interest including: C-glass, E-glass, S-Glass, AR-Glass, B-glass, Lighting Glass, NE-Glass, and various frits. Exploratory melts of non-glassy materials, such as wollastonite, zirconium silicate, and alumino-silicate melts were successfully done indicating that plasma melting has potential application beyond glass. Experimental results were generated that show the high quality of plasma-melted fiberglass compositions, such as E-glass, can result in good fiberizing performance. Fiberizing performance and tensile strength data were achieved during the project to support this conclusion. High seed counts are a feature of the current lab scale melter and must be dealt with via other means, since fining work was outside the scope of this project.

Gonterman, J. Ronald; Weinstein, Michael A.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include:

116

High-intensity-discharger 400-W sodium ballast. Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of an energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid-State 400 Watt Ballast lighting system was undertaken. Under Phase I of the project, the existing ballast was modified, performance characteristics were measured, efficiency was compared with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis. Six (6) prototype 400 W High Pressure Sodium Ballasts were built, for verification tests by an independent test facility prior to follow-on performance and life tests. This report covers Phase II of the project which was designed to make test data comparisons on results received from the independent test laboratory, determine methods to increase ballast efficiency, determine the importance of power factors, conduct bulb life tests, perform specification review, performance versus cost analysis, investigate the ballast to determine compliance with new FCC requirement, and determine a line transient specification in respect to solid state ballasting. In addition, Phase II required reliability testing, a manufacturing test plan, a marketing study for solid-state ballast, and the manufacture and delivery of fifteen (15) demonstration ballast units to LBL. These requirements are discussed.

Felper, G.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

Forrest, Stephen (Ann Arbor, MI); Sun, Yiru (Princeton, NJ); Giebink, Noel (Ann Arbor, MI); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ); Sun, Yiru (Princeton, NJ); Giebink, Noel (Princeton, NJ); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Initial Results of the New High Intensity Electron Gun at the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INITIAL RESULTS OF THE NEW HIGH INTENSITY ELECTRON GUN AT THE ARGONNE WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR * M.E. Conde, W. Gai, R. Konecny, J.G. Power, P. Schoessow, X. Sun, ANL, Argonne, IL...

120

Sensitivity to Dark Energy candidates by searching for four-wave mixing of high-intensity lasers in the vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical challenges to understand Dark Matter and Dark Energy suggest the existence of low-mass and weakly coupling fields in the universe. The quasi-parallel photon-photon collision system (QPS) can provide chances to probe the resonant production of these light dark fields and the induced decay by the coherent nature of laser fields simultaneously. By focusing high-intensity lasers with different colors in the vacuum, new colors emerge as the signature of the interaction. Because four photons in the initial and final states interplay via the dark field exchange, this process is analogous to four-wave mixing in quantum optics, where the frequency sum and difference among the incident three waves generate the fourth wave with a new frequency via the nonlinear property of crystals. The interaction rate of the four-wave mixing process has the cubic dependence on the intensity of each wave. Therefore, if high-intensity laser fields are given, the sensitivity to the weakly coupling of dark fields to photons rapidly increases over the wide mass range below sub-eV. Based on the experimentally measurable photon energies and the linear polarization states, we formulate the relation between the accessible mass-coupling domains and the high-intensity laser parameters, where the effects of the finite spectrum width of pulse lasers are taken into account. The expected sensitivity suggests that we have a potential to explore interactions at the Super-Planckian coupling strength in the sub-eV mass range, if the cutting-edge laser technologies are properly combined.

Kensuke Homma

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Attaining and using extremely high intensities of solar energy with non-imaging concentrators  

SciTech Connect

Using the principles and techniques of non-imaging optics, solar concentrations that approach the theoretical maximum can be achieved. In this paper, the authors review recent progress in attaining, measuring, and using such ultrahigh solar fluxes. In particular, they review the design principles for optimized two-stage concentrators and solar furnaces and discuss the characteristics and properties of a variety of non-imaging secondaries which have been employed. These include Compound Parabolic Concentrators (CPC) type secondaries, Dielectric Totally Internally Reflecting Concentrators (DTIRC), and flow-line or {open_quotes}trumpet{close_quotes} concentrators. The usual design is a configuration where {phi}, the rim angle of the primary, is small, that is, corresponding to a system with a relatively large focal length to diameter (F/D) ratio. All three types of secondary are characterized by a design acceptance angle {phi}{sub a} which must be greater than or equal to {phi}. The design parameters and trade-offs for each of these systems including strategies for choice of particular secondary and degree of truncation, are presented. The authors review the calorimetric techniques used to measure these high intensities and describe a newly developed technique for {open_quotes}extracting{close_quotes} light from inside a high index medium. Finally they review a number of potential applications for highly concentrated solar energy and the current status of the associated technology. By making possible new and unique applications for intense solar flux, these techniques have opened a whole new frontier for research and development of potential economic uses of solar energy. 63 refs., 34 figs., 3 tabs.

Jenkins, D.; O`Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses parameters for selecting the most suitable auxiliary lighting device to operate and control gas-discharge lamps. The devices tested in this study include solid-state fluorescent and high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts; current limiters; and dynamic lighting controls. They have been evaluated in combination with the standard 40-W, F-40, T-12, rapid-start, cool-white fluorescent lamps. Solid-state ballast performance varied widely- from 68 to 79 lumens per watt (lm/W) in efficacy and from 0.83 to 0.98 in ballast factor. System efficacy was up to 26% higher than standard core-coil ballast efficacy. Current limiters used with standard core-coil ballast reduce light output and input power by 30 to 50% and may be suitable as retrofit devices to reduce light in overilluminated spaces. When operated at a constant lamp wall temperature, these devices either maintain or reduce system efficacy.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lighting for video February 23, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) LED light panel, C) HMI/MH light with diffusion, D) fluorescent ("kino flo") style light fluorescent or LED lights. In the earlier days this was created by bouncing light off reflectors, for example a soft light as a key light (LED or fluorescent) and then use available lights in the back- ground

Porr, Bernd

125

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Lighting Technology Screening Matrix: Let there be energy-efficient light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed the Lighting Technology Screen Matrix (LTSM), a software tool to evaluate alternative lighting retrofit technologies according to life-cycle cost. The LTSM can be used to evaluate retrofits for most configurations of fluorescent, incandescent, high-intensity discharge, and exit lighting systems for any level of operation, electricity price, discount rate, and utility rebate. The tool was developed in support of the Federal Relighting Initiative as part of the US Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Program (DOE/FEMP) to assist federal government facilities in their efforts to comply with federal energy regulations. This article describes the LTSM and demonstrates its application in case studies at federal installations.

Stucky, D.; Shankle, S.; Schultz, R.; Richman, E.; Dirks, J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses parameters for selecting the most suitable auxiliary lighting device to operate and control gas-discharge lamps. The devices tested in this study include solid-state, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts; current limiters; and dynamic lighting controls. They have been evaluated when operating the standard, 40-W, F-40, T-12, rapid-start, cool-white fluorescent lamps. Solid-state ballast performance varied widely, from 68 to 79 lumens per watt (1m/W) in efficacy, and from 0.83 to 0.98 in ballast factor. System efficacy was measured at up to 26% higher than standard core-coil ballast efficacy.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Edward teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Key, M.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California94551 (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Edward Teller medal lecture: High intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

Key, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Edward Teller medal lecture: high intensity lasers and the road to ignition  

SciTech Connect

There has been much progress in the development of high intensity lasers and in the science of laser driven inertially confined fusion such that ignition is now a near term prospect. This lecture reviews the field with particular emphasis on areas of my own involvement.

Key, M.H.

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments over the past fifteen years have evolved new short flame, high intensity (1,000,000 BTU/HR/ft3 ) combustion systems for industrial uses. Such systems produce a more uniform and higher heat flux than conventional low intensity systems and should enable substantial capital cost savings in new furnace applications. Recent performance improvements established from tests of high intensity combustion systems are described along with advances made in the analytical prediction of design performance. High intensity combustion systems can operate at zero excess air conditions without generating undesirable constituents in the exhaust. A more uniform gas temperature and gas emissivity renders modeling and design of the furnace radiant heat transfer section more realistic. 'Over-design' to allow for the less determinate conditions typical of low intensity, turbulent diffusion oil flame systems should be avoidable. A model has been set up and results generated which indicate the potentialities of the above premise. The application of vortex stabilized high intensity burners for reformer furnaces in the petrochemical industry is then reviewed and emphasized.

Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Wham, Robert M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

HIGH-INTENSITY EFFECTS IN THE LONGITUDINAL MOTION OF STORED PARTICLE BEAMS  

SciTech Connect

A brief review is given of the various self-field phenomena associated with the longitudinal motion of particles in storage rings. Although there are some high-intensity phenomena for which the coupling of longitudinal and transverse motion is essential, such as, for example, the headtail effect; the great majority of high-intensity phenomena primarily involve either longitudinal or transverse degrees of freedom. In this review, we restrict our attention to phenomena which are essentially longitudinal in nature. It is convenient to consider separately the behavior of unbunched (coasting) and bunched (external RF system in operation) beams. Detailed experimental information on coasting beams has been obtained on the ISR, on the (old) CERN electron model CESAR, and on electron ring accelerators. All high-energy electron storage rings have bunched beams and, of course, so do synchrotrons, so that there are a large number of sources of experimental information about the longitudinal motion of bunched beams.

Sessler, Andrew M.

1973-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

STATUS OF SLOW EXTRACTION OF HIGH INTENSITY PROTONS FROM BROOKHAVEN'S AGS.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams. We have an active program of high energy physics experiments, including the high precision measurement of the muons magnetic moment [1] and the discovery of the rare Kaon decay, K+ {yields} {pi} + {nu}{bar {nu}} [2]. This program is continuing into the future with the rare symmetry violating process experiments [3] currently being designed to operate at the AGS. In this paper, we will present results from operation of high intensity slow extraction, the problems we encounter, and our solutions to those problems.

BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BRENNAN,J.M.GLENN,J.W.ROSER,T.RUSSO,T.TSOUPAS,N.SMITH,K.ZENO,K.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) has started in 2009. The design goal of this new generation high intensity UCN source is to surpass by a factor of ~100 the current ultracold neutron densities available for fundamental physics research, with the greatest thrust coming from the search for a neutron electric dipole moment. The PSI UCN source is based on neutron production via proton induced lead spallation, followed by neutron thermalization in heavy water and neutron cooling in a solid deuterium crystal to cold and ultracold energies. A successful beam test with up to 2 mA proton beam on the spallation target was conducted recently. Most source components are installed, others being finally mounted. The installation is on the track for the first cool-down and UCN production in 2010.

Bernhard Lauss

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen targetr constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, cosntruction details and operating experience are discussed.

Mark, J.W.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed.

Mark, J.W.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Explosively pumped laser light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment: (Phase 2, The 34-watt F40 rapid start T-12 fluorescent lamp): Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamp systems are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the systems efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires  

SciTech Connect

Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

Hammer, E.E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Generation of high intensity rf pulses in the ionosphere by means of in situ compression  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate, using a simple model, that high intensity pulses can be generated from a frequency-chirped modifier of much lower intensity by making use of the dispersive properties of the ionosphere. We show that a frequency-chirped pulse can be constructed so that its various components overtake each other at a prescribed height, resulting in large (up to one hundred times) transient intensity enhancements as compared to those achievable from a steady modifier operating at the same power. We examine briefly one possible application: the enhancement of plasma wave amplitudes which occurs as a result of the interaction of such a compressed pulse with pre-generated turbulence.

Cowley, S.C.; Perkins, F.W.; Valeo, E.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High intensity electron beam ion trap for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

A high intensity electron beam ion trap under development at LLNL could be adapted for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams, enabling a substantial reduction in the size and cost of a post-accelerator. We report estimates of the acceptance, ionization time, charge state distribution, emittance, and beam intensity for charge state boosting of radioactive ions in this device. The estimates imply that, for tin isotopes, over 10{sup 10} ions/s can be ionized to q = 40+ with an absolute emittance of approximately 1 (pi) mm mrad at an energy of 30 x q.k.

Marrs, R.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Compact Fluorescent Lamps : Technologies : From the Lab to the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process. (Left) Compact Fluorescent Lamp; (Right) Cover of the 'Lighting Retrofit Workbook' (Left) Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) (Right) Retrofitting national parks...

145

Dynamical Schwinger effect and high-intensity lasers. Realising nonperturbative QED.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the possibility of experimental verification of vacuum e{sup +}e{sup -} pair creation at the focus of two counter-propagating optical laser beams with intensities 10{sup 20}-10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, achievable with present-day petawatt lasers, and approaching the Schwinger limit: 10{sup 29} W/cm{sup 2} to be reached at ELI. Our approach is based on the collisionless kinetic equation for the evolution of the e{sup +} and e{sup -} distribution functions governed by a non-Markovian source term for pair production. As possible experimental signals of vacuum pair production we consider e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into {gamma}-pairs and the refraction of a high-frequency probe laser beam by the produced e{sup +}e{sup -} plasma. We discuss the dependence of the dynamical pair production process on laser wavelength, with special emphasis on applications in the X-ray domain (X-FEL), as well as the prospects for {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} pair creation at high-intensity lasers. We investigate perspectives for using high-intensity lasers as 'boosters' of ion beams in the few-GeV per nucleon range, which is relevant, e.g., to the exploration of the QCD phase transition in laboratory experiments.

Blaschke, D. B.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Roepke, G.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.; Shkirmanov, D. S.; Smolyansky, S. A.; Physics; Univ. of Wroclaw; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research; Univ. Rostock; Saratov State Univ.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Dynamical Schwinger effect and high-intensity lasers. Realising nonperturbative QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the possibility of experimental verification of vacuum e^+e^- pair creation at the focus of two counter-propagating optical laser beams with intensities 10^{20}-10^{22} W/cm^2, achievable with present-day petawatt lasers, and approaching the Schwinger limit: 10^{29} W/cm^2 to be reached at ELI. Our approach is based on the collisionless kinetic equation for the evolution of the e^+ and e^- distribution functions governed by a non-Markovian source term for pair production. As possible experimental signals of vacuum pair production we consider e^+e^- annihilation into gamma-pairs and the refraction of a high-frequency probe laser beam by the produced e^+e^- plasma. We discuss the dependence of the dynamical pair production process on laser wavelength, with special emphasis on applications in the X-ray domain (X-FEL), as well as the prospects for \\mu^+\\mu^- and \\pi^+\\pi^- pair creation at high-intensity lasers. We investigate perspectives for using high-intensity lasers as ``boosters'' of ion beams in the few-GeV per nucleon range, which is relevant, e.g., to the exploration of the QCD phase transition in laboratory experiments.

D. B. Blaschke; A. V. Prozorkevich; G. Roepke; C. D. Roberts; S. M. Schmidt; D. S. Shkirmanov; S. A. Smolyansky

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

A high-intensity plasma-sputter heavy negative ion source  

SciTech Connect

A multicusp magnetic field plasma surface ion source, normally used for H/sup /minus//ion beam formation, has been modified for the generation of high-intensity, pulsed, heavy negative ion beams suitable for a variety of uses. To date, the source has been utilized to produce mA intensity pulsed beams of more than 24 species. A brief description of the source, and basic pulsed-mode operational data, (e.g., intensity versus cesium oven temperature, sputter probe voltage, and discharge pressure), are given. In addition, illustrative examples of intensity versus time and the mass distributions of ion beams extracted from a number of samples along with emittance data, are also presented. Preliminary results obtained during dc operation of the source under low discharge power conditions suggest that sources of this type may also be used to produce high-intensity (mA) dc beams. The results of these investigations are given, as well, and the technical issues that must be addressed for this mode of operation are discussed. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Alton, G.D.; Mori, Y.; Takagi, A.; Ueno, A.; Fukumoto, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The upgraded rf system for the AGS and high intensity proton beams  

SciTech Connect

The AGS has been upgraded over the past three years to produce a record beam intensity of 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse for the fixed-target physics program. The major elements of the upgrade are: the new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron, the main magnet power supply, a high frequency longitudinal dilution cavity, a feedback damper for transverse instabilities, a fast gamma transition jump system, and a new high-power rf system. The new rf system and its role in achieving the high intensity goal are the subjects of this report. The rf system is heavily beam loaded, with 7 Amps of rf current in the beam and a peak power of 0.75 MW delivered to the beam by ten cavities. As an example of the scale of beam loading, at one point in the acceleration cycle the cavities are operated at 1.5 kV/gap; whereas, were it not for the new power amplifiers, the beam-induced voltage on the cavities would be over 25 kV/gap. The upgraded rf system, comprising: new power amplifiers, wide band rf feedback, improved cavities, and new low-level beam control electronics, is described. Results of measurements with beam, which characterize the system`s performance, are presented. A typical high intensity acceleration cycle is described with emphasis on the key challenges of beam loading.

Brennan, J.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). AGS Dept.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Class Of Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Solutions And Associated Envelope Equations For High-intensity Charged Particle Beams  

SciTech Connect

A class of generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij solutions of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations and the associated envelope equations for high-intensity beams in a periodic lattice is derived. It includes the classical Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij solution as a special case. For a given lattice, the distribution functions and the envelope equations are specified by eight free parameters. The class of solutions derived captures a wider range of dynamical envelope behavior for high-intensity beams, and thus provides a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams.

Hong Qin and Ronald C. Davidson

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Lighting Controls | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluorescent lighting fixtures rather than replace them. Dimmers and LEDs Some light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs can be used with dimmers. LED bulbs and fixtures must be...

151

Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

Debreczeny, M.P.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

1997 Glossary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

All types of light bulbs are included: incandescent, fluorescent, compact fluorescent, halogen, and high-intensity-discharge (HID). (See Appliances ...

153

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency motors Lighting Controls Replace metal halide HID with high-intensity Daylighting fluorescents Replace incandescent with fluorescent or CFL

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fluorescence analyzer for lignin  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

Berthold, John W. (Salem, OH); Malito, Michael L. (Hubbard, OH); Jeffers, Larry (Alliance, OH)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Space charge measurements with a high intensity bunch at the Fermilab Main Injector  

SciTech Connect

For Project X, the Fermilab Main Injector will be required to operate with 3 times higher bunch intensity. The plan to study the space charge effects at the injection energy with intense bunches will be discussed. A multi-MW proton facility has been established as a critical need for the U.S. HEP program by HEPAP and P5. Utilization of the Main Injector (MI) as a high intensity proton source capable of delivering in excess of 2 MW beam power will require a factor of three increase in bunch intensity compared to current operations. Instabilities associated with beam loading, space charge, and electron cloud effects are common issues for high intensity proton machines. The MI intensities for current operations and Project X are listed in Table 1. The MI provides proton beams for Fermilab's Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider and MINOS neutrino experiments. The proposed 2MW proton facility, Project X, utilizes both the Recycler (RR) and the MI. The RR will be reconfigured as a proton accumulator and injector to realize the factor 3 bunch intensity increase in the MI. Since the energy in the RR and the MI at injection will be 6-8 GeV, which is relatively low, space charge effects will be significant and need to be studied. Studies based on the formation of high intensity bunches in the MI will guide the design and fabrication of the RF cavities and space-charge mitigation devices required for 2 MW operation of the MI. It is possible to create the higher bunch intensities required in the MI using a coalescing technique that has been successfully developed at Fermilab. This paper will discuss a 5 bunch coalescing scheme at 8 GeV which will produce 2.5 x 10{sup 11} protons in one bunch. Bunch stretching will be added to the coalescing process. The required RF parameters were optimized with longitudinal simulations. The beam studies, that have a goal of 85% coalescing efficiency, were started in June 2010.

Seiya, K.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab; Yagodnitsyna, A.; /Novosibirsk State U.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Kansas City Power and Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4,907-$35,142 by business 4,907-$35,142 by business class size and differs among Missouri and Kansas residents. Program Info State Kansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit ( Energy Audit (> 25,000 sq ft): 50% of cost, up to $500 High Performance T8 Fixtures: $20 - $30/fixture Standard T8 Lamps/Ballasts: $2 - $10/unit Lighting Power Density: $1/watt per square foot High Intensity Fluorescent: $50/fixture Pulse Star Metal Halide: $50/fixture Lighting Controls: $20 - $50 per sensor Single Phase Package/Split System AC: $92/ton Three Phase Unitary/Split System AC: $92/ton Unitary/Split System AC: $73 - $79/ton Motors: $50 - $130/motor Custom (Retrofit): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback, or 50% of the incremental cost Custom (New Construction): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback,

157

Kansas City Power and Light - Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7,299-$52,276 by business 7,299-$52,276 by business class, size, new construction, retrofit, and location. Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit ( Energy Audit (> 25,000 sq ft): 50% of cost, up to $500 High Performance T8 Fixtures: $20 - $30/fixture Standard T8 Lamps/Ballasts: $2 - $10/unit Lighting Power Density: $1/watt per square foot High Intensity Fluorescent: $50/fixture Pulse Star Metal Halide: $50/fixture Lighting Controls: $20 - $50 per sensor Single Phase Package/Split System AC: $92/ton Three Phase Unitary/Split System AC: $92/ton Unitary/Split System AC: $73 - $79/ton Motors: $50 - $130/motor Custom (Retrofit): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback, or 50% of the incremental cost Custom (New Construction): The lesser of a buydown to a two year payback,

158

ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

Qiu, Rui

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

159

Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

Parkin, Don M. (Los Alamos, NM); Dudey, Norman D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

High intensity production of high and medium charge state uraniumand other heavy ion beams with VENUS  

SciTech Connect

The next generation, superconducting ECR ion source VENUS(Versatile ECR ion source for NUclear Science) started operation with 28GHzmicrowave heating in 2004. Since then it has produced world recordion beam intensities. For example, 2850 e mu A of O6+, 200 e mu A of U33+or U34+, and in respect to high charge state ions, 1 e mu A of Ar18+, 270e mu A of Ar16+, 28 e mu A of Xe35+ and 4.9 e mu A of U47+ have beenproduced. A brief overview of the latest developments leading to theserecord intensities is given and the production of high intensity uraniumbeams is discussed in more detail.

Leitner, Daniela; Galloway, Michelle L.; Loew, Timothy J.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Rodriguez, Ingrid Castro; Todd, Damon S.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Design of a high-intensity RFQ for a possible LHC laser ion source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed a 100 MHz RFQ to accelerate Pb25+ ions from 9.6 keV/u to 250 keV/u for the LHC ion program. We assume an input beam from a laser ion source with a total beam current of 90 mA, out of which 9 mA is Pb25+. The main challenge of the design is to match the tight longitudinal acceptance of the downstream Interdigital H structure while dealing with a high intensity beam composed of a variety of charge states. In this paper, we present a baseline setup optimized for nominal conditions, and show the sensitivity of the RFQ performance to varying input beam characteristics and rf parameters. Further studies will cover the compatibility of this design with an upgraded ECR source under investigation at CERN.

Hanke, K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Characterizations and Diagnostics of Compton Light Source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is a world class Compton light source facility. At the HIGS, a Free-Electron Laser (FEL)… (more)

Sun, Changchun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Automatic monitoring helps reduce lighting costs  

SciTech Connect

A Benton, Arkansas utility is using a dimmable ballast system to curb high-intensity-discharge (HID) lighting costs. The system also incorpoates a monitoring control system. This control automatically maintains minimum illumination levels.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

High-intensity, high-brightness polarized and unpolarized beam production in charge-exchange collisions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Basic limitations on the high-intensity H{sup -} ion beam production were experimentally studied in charge-exchange collisions of the neutral atomic hydrogen beam in the Na-vapour jet ionizer cell. These studies are the part of the polarized source upgrade (to 10 mA peak current and 85% polarization) project for RHIC. In the source the atomic hydrogen beam of a 5-10 keV energy and total (equivalent) current up to 5 A is produced by neutralization of proton beam in pulsed hydrogen gas target. Formation of the proton beam (from the surface of the plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature {approx}0.2 eV) is produced by four-electrode spherical multi-aperture ion-optical system with geometrical focusing. The hydrogen atomic beam intensity up to 1.0 A/cm{sup 2} (equivalent) was obtained in the Na-jet ionizer aperture of a 2.0 cm diameter. At the first stage of the experiment H-beam with 36 mA current, 5 keV energy and {approx}1.0 cm {center_dot} mrad normalized emittance was obtained using the flat grids and magnetic focusing.

Zelenski, A.; Ritter, J.; Zubets, V.; Steski, D.; Atoian, G.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

Stafford, D

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

High-order harmonics from bow wave caustics driven by a high-intensity laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new mechanism of high-order harmonic generation during an interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with underdense plasma. A tightly focused laser pulse creates a cavity in plasma pushing electrons aside and exciting the wake wave and the bow wave. At the joint of the cavity wall and the bow wave boundary, an annular spike of electron density is formed. This spike surrounds the cavity and moves together with the laser pulse. Collective motion of electrons in the spike driven by the laser field generates high-order harmonics. A strong localization of the electron spike, its robustness to oscillations imposed by the laser field and, consequently, its ability to produce high-order harmonics is explained by catastrophe theory. The proposed mechanism explains the experimental observations of high-order harmonics with the 9 TW J-KAREN laser (JAEA, Japan) and the 120 TW Astra Gemini laser (CLF RAL, UK) [A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., arXiv:1004.4514 (2010); A. S. Pirozhkov et al, AIP Proceedings, this volume]. The theory is corroborated by high-resolution two-and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh. [Advanced Beam Technology Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); and others

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fluorescent fixtures and ballasts  

SciTech Connect

The basic parameters of a fluorescent lighting system that affect the illumination level are discussed. The parameters include the thermal performance of the fixture and the ballast factor, voltage regulation, and thermal regulation of the ballast/lamp system. Fixtures determine the minimum lamp-wall temperature of the lamps and are described as hot or cold. That is, the lamp-wall temperatures can vary from 39 to 61/sup 0/C. In general, cool fixtures tend to provide higher light levels and are more efficacious for a given ballast/lamp system. Solid-state fluorescent ballast/lamp systems have been measured and show a variation in light output from 6170 to 3780 lumens for the two-lamp, F-40, T-12, rapid-start lamps. Lighting designers must obtain this information in order to accurately predict illumination levels in a space.

Verderber, R.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric lighting constitutes approximately 21-23 % of the electric grid load in the United States. The higher energy and maintenance costs of incandescent lamps, combined with the favorable economics of high-efficiency compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), are making CFLs the increasingly popular choice for both residential and commercial lighting. Utility incentive and rebate programs to stimulate CFL use and the beginnings of a ban on incandescent lamps are enhancing CFL penetration levels in these enviro...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy saving controller for fluorescent lamps.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although fluorescent lamp is a very efficient lighting device in daily life, still the high harmonic distortion and low power factor cause unnecessary energy consumption.… (more)

Cheong, Zhi Xiong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Another Side of Light - D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Three quantum phenomena D. Three quantum phenomena In fluorescence, matter absorbs light waves of a high frequency and then emits light of the same or lower frequency. This process was studied and named by George Gabriel Stokes in the mid-19th century. Today, fluorescence is familiar to us from fluorescent light bulbs. A fluorescent bulb's filament produces ultraviolet light, which is absorbed by the bulb's inner coating, which then emits lower-frequency visible light-more visible light than an incandescent bulb produces with the same wattage. According to the hypothesis of light quanta, during fluorescence an atom absorbs a quantum of light whose energy is proportional to the light wave's frequency. If the atom doesn't supply any extra energy of its own, the light quantum emitted should either have the same energy or less energy

171

Development of a high intensity EBIT for basic and applied science/011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) is a device for producing and studying cold, very highly charged ions of any element, up to a fully ionized U{sup 92+}. These highly charged ions occur in hot plasmas and therefore play important roles in nuclear weapons, controlled fusion, and astrophysical phenomena. The remarkable interaction of these ions with surfaces may lead to technological applications. The highly charged ions can either be studied inside the EBIT itself with measurements of their x-ray emission spectra, or the ions can be extracted from the EBIT in order to study their interaction with solid material. Both types of measurements are being pursued vigorously with the two existing low-intensity EBITs at LLNL and with similar EBITs that have been built at six other laboratories around the world since the EBIT was first developed at LLNL 10 years ago. However, all existing EBITs have approximately the same intensity as the original LLNL EBIT; that is, they all produce about the same number of very-highly-charged ions (roughly 2 x 10{sup 6} per second) and the same number of x-ray photons (roughly 10{sup 7} per second). The goal of the High-Intensity-EBIT project is to increase the x-ray emission per centimeter of length along the electron beam by a factor of 100 and to increase the ion output by a factor of 1000. This dramatic increase in intensity will enable the next generation of basic and applied experimental research in the structure of highly charged ions. For example, the precision of EBIT x-ray measurements of atomic energy levels- which is now limited by count rate-can be improved by an order of magnitude, and new applications in surface science, nanotechnology, and microscopy will be possible with the expected intense ion beams. When the high ion output is combined with the demonstrated low emittance of EBIT ions, we will have a high-brightness source of highly charged ions that can be focused to submicrometer spots. One example of a measurement that will benefit from increased x-ray intensity is our study of the binding energy of high-Z heliumlike ions. The small ``two-electron`` contribution to this binding energy is a fundamental aspect of atomic structure. It arises from the small forces that the two electrons exert on each other in the presence of the much larger force from the atomic nucleus. Our existing EBIT measurements are sensitive to the so-called ``second order`` contribution to the two-electron binding energy, but with the High-Intensity EBIT we can probe an even more subtle effect: the screening by one electron of the quantum electrodynamic (QED) energy contribution from the other electron.

Marrs, R.E., LLNL

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world`s best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world`s best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using {sup 64}Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet.

Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution and Envelope Equation for High-intensity Beams in a Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice  

SciTech Connect

In an uncoupled lattice, the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution function first analyzed in 1959 is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high- intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized here to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the recently developed generalized Courant-Snyder invariant for coupled transverse dynamics. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space, determined by the generalized matrix envelope equation.

Hong Qin, Moses Chung, and Ronald C. Davidson

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

NIST Highlight about spectrally tunable lighting facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... white light produced by fluorescent lamps? Which spectral combination gives the best color quality and energy efficiency? ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Types of Lighting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selection. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Incandescent Outdoor solar Light-emitting diode (LED) Also learn how energy-efficient lightbulbs compare to traditional...

176

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999 L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings* ............................. 61,707 58,693 49,779 6,496 37,150 3,058 5,343 1,913 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 6,750 5,836 4,878 757 3,838 231 109 162 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 7,940 7,166 5,369 1,044 4,073 288 160 109 10,001 to 25,000 ....................... 10,534 9,773 7,783 1,312 5,712 358 633 232 25,001 to 50,000 ....................... 8,709 8,452 6,978 953 5,090 380 771 281

177

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*........................ 54,068 51,570 45,773 6,746 34,910 1,161 3,725 779 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000....................... 6,272 5,718 4,824 986 3,767 50 22 54 5,001 to 10,000.................... 7,299 6,667 5,728 1,240 4,341 61 169 45 10,001 to 25,000.................. 10,829 10,350 8,544 1,495 6,442 154 553 Q 25,001 to 50,000.................. 7,170 7,022 6,401 789 5,103 151 485 86

178

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003 L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*............................. 64,783 62,060 51,342 5,556 37,918 4,004 4,950 2,403 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000............................. 6,789 6,038 4,826 678 3,932 206 76 124 5,001 to 10,000........................... 6,585 6,090 4,974 739 3,829 192 238 248 10,001 to 25,000........................ 11,535 11,229 8,618 1,197 6,525 454 506 289 25,001 to 50,000........................ 8,668 8,297 6,544 763 4,971 527 454 240

179

Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

Carpenter, II, Robert W. (Pagosa Springs, CO); Rubenstein, Richard (Staten Island, NY); Piltch, Martin (Los Alamos, NM); Gray, Perry (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nonlinear reflection of high intensity picosecond laser pulse from overdense plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of 1.5 ps FWHM laser pulses with solid targets at intensity 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} and contrast ratio 10{sup 6} is studied. Red shift of a 'mirror' reflected fundamental wave and its second harmonic depending on the incident laser pulse energy and angle of incidence are observed. They are associated with Doppler shift corresponding to inward movement of the critical density surface from laser pondermotive pressure. Back scattered light has nonlinear dependence from laser intensity connected with SBS and changing of plasma surface.

Andreev, A. A.; Bayanov, V. I.; Vankov, A. B.; Kozlov, A. A.; Kurnin, I. V.; Platonov, K. Y.; Solovyev, N. A.; Chizhov, S. A.; Yashin, V. E. [Research Institute for Laser Physics, SC 'Vavilov State Optical Institute', 12, Birzhevaya line, St. Petersburg, 199034 (Russian Federation)

1998-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nonlinear reflection of high intensity picosecond laser pulse from overdense plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of 1.5 ps FWHM laser pulses with solid targets at intensity 10 15 –10 17 ? W/cm 2 and contrast ratio 10 6 is studied. Red shift of a “mirror” reflected fundamental wave and its second harmonic depending on the incident laser pulse energy and angle of incidence are observed. They are associated with Doppler shift corresponding to inward movement of the critical density surface from laser pondermotive pressure. Back scattered light has nonlinear dependence from laser intensity connected with SBS and changing of plasma surface.

A. A. Andreev; V. I. Bayanov; A. B. Vankov; A. A. Kozlov; I. V. Kurnin; K. Y. Platonov; N. A. Solovyev; S. A. Chizhov; V. E. Yashin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Compton harmonic resonances, stochastic instabilities, quasilinear diffusion, and collisionless damping with ultra-high intensity laser waves  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of electrons in two-dimensional, linearly or circularly polarized, ultra-high intensity (above 10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) laser waves, is investigated. The Compton harmonic resonances are identified as the source of various stochastic instabilities. Both Arnold diffusion and resonance overlap are considered. The quasilinear kinetic equation, describing the evolution of the electron distribution function, is derived, and the associated collisionless damping coefficient is calculated. The implications of these new processes are considered and discussed.

Rax, J.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Webcasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environment to compare the performance of conventional fluorescent troffers with T8 LED tube retrofits, LED retrofit kits, and dedicated LED troffers. Adaptive Street Lighting...

184

High-intensity discharge (HID) solid-state ballast program: engineering development report. Phase II  

SciTech Connect

A high frequency (28 to 31/sup 0/K Hz) electronic current source (ballast) designed to drive a 200 watt 100 volt sodium vapor gas discharge lamp is described. A resonant switching power amplifier system utilizing a novel constant power feedback loop is employed to maintain the lamp input power constant within two percent via changes due to lamp aging etc. The lamp input power and therefore the light output is adjustable from 50 to 100 percent of rated power. A input (electronic filter) inverter, changes the 277 volts alternating voltage input to a regulated direct current (DC) voltage used to power the output stage. The inverter reflects, a essentially unity power factor load to the power input source at all times.

Carlson, R.S.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Total Lighting Technology Light Output, by Sector (Trillion Lumen-Hour per Year)(1) Residential Commercial Industrial Other (2) Total Incandescent 1640 49% 180 1% 0 0% 50 1% 1870 5% General (A-type, Decorative) 1390 42% 120 0% 0 0% - - 1510 4% Reflector 190 6% 60 0% 0 0% - - 250 1% Miscellaneous 60 2% 0 0% - - 50 1% 110 0% Halogen 170 5% 240 1% 0 0% 20 0% 430 1% General 20 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 20 0% Reflector 110 3% 100 0% 0 0% - - 210 1% Low Voltage Display 10 0% 130 1% - - - - 140 0% Miscellaneous 30 1% 10 0% 0 0% 20 0% 70 0% Compact Fluorescent 780 23% 880 4% 0 0% 50 1% 1710 4% General (Screw, Pin) 670 20% 760 3% 0 0% - - 1430 4% Reflector 60 2% 130 1% 0 0% - - 180 0% Miscellaneous 50 2% - - - - 50 1% 100 0% Linear Fluorescent 670 20% 19180 79% 1800 40% 750 9% 22400 55% T5 0 0% 1480 6% 210 5% - - 1700 4% T8 80 2% 9690 40% 960 21% - - 10740 26% T12 470 14% 7880 32% 640 14% - - 8980 22% Miscellaneous 100 3% 120 0% 10 0% 750 9% 980 2% High Intensity Discharge

186

Electronic Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the fastest growing energy efficient light source the electronic compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the past and future growth of the CFL market while emphasizing future technical improvements along with discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from incandescent lamps to CFLs. The basic CFL technology is covered in Chapter 3 including test results for selected ...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

Schuresko, Daniel D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs July 29, 2012 - 6:37pm Addthis Although fluorescent lightbulbs are generally energy efficient, you can replace them with new, even more efficient bulbs that use better electrodes and coatings than older ones. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/JoLin. Although fluorescent lightbulbs are generally energy efficient, you can replace them with new, even more efficient bulbs that use better electrodes and coatings than older ones. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/JoLin. What does this mean for me? Today's fluorescent light fixtures and bulbs are far more efficient than older ones. You can replace fluorescent bulbs and ballasts with more efficient ones to save money and energy. All fluorescent bulbs contain a very small amount of mercury:

189

Experimental Estimate of Beam Loading and Minimum rf Voltage for Acceleration of High Intensity Beam in the Fermilab Booster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difference between the rf voltage seen by the beam and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field is used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Because the rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured, they can be used to calculate the effective accelerating voltage. Also an RFSUM reduction technique has been applied to measure experimentally the RFSUM limit at which the beam loss starts. With information on beam energy loss, the running conditions, especially for the high intensity beam, can be optimized in order to achieve a higher intensity beam from the Fermilab Booster.

Yang, X; Norem, J; Yang, Xi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Experimental estimate of beam loading and minimum rf voltage for acceleration of high intensity beam in the Fermilab Booster  

SciTech Connect

The difference between the rf voltage seen by the beam and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field is used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Because the rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured, they can be used to calculate the effective accelerating voltage. Also an RFSUM reduction technique has been applied to measure experimentally the RFSUM limit at which the beam loss starts. With information on beam energy loss, the running conditions, especially for the high intensity beam, can be optimized in order to achieve a higher intensity beam from the Fermilab Booster.

Xi Yang; Charles M Ankenbrandt and Jim Norem

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Optimizing electron-positron pair production on kilojoule-class high-intensity lasers for the purpose of pair-plasma creation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expressions for the yield of electron-positron pairs, their energy spectra, and production rates have been obtained in the interaction of multi-kJ pulses of high-intensity laser light interacting with solid targets. The Bethe-Heitler conversion of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung [D. A. Gryaznykh, Y. Z. Kandiev, and V. A. Lykov, JETP Lett. 67, 257 (1998); K. Nakashima and H. Takabe, Phys. Plasmas 9, 1505 (2002)] is shown to dominate over direct production (trident process) [E. P. Liang, S. C. Wilks, and M. Tabak, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4887 (1998)]. The yields and production rates have been optimized as a function of incident laser intensity by the choice of target material and dimensions, indicating that up to 5x10{sup 11} pairs can be produced on the OMEGA EP laser system [L. J. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)]. The corresponding production rates are high enough to make possible the creation of a pair plasma.

Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Short, R. W.; Stoeckl, C.; Storm, M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fluorescent refrigeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

High intensity discharge lamp self-adjusting ballast system sensitive to the radiant energy or heat of the lamp  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a self-adjusting ballast system for mercury vapor, high intensity discharge lamps having outputs of 100 watts or greater, comprising: a direct current source; a lamp circuit containing a high intensity discharge lamp; sensing means for sensing the radiant energy output of the lamp; a pulse width modulator which, in response to the output of the sensing means, varies the width of the pulses that power the lamp during warm-up of the lamp; a high frequency oscillator; a DC to AC converter that converts current from the direct source to pulses of alternating current for powering the lamp, the converter comprising: at least one switch for gating current to the lamp; a switch control means, responsive to the high frequency oscillator, for controlling the switch and controlling the frequency of the alternating current pulses that power the lamp; current sensing means for sensing the current being supplied to the lamp; and current control means for limiting the current through the lamp to a predetermined safe level when the current sensed by the current sensing means exceeds a reference value.

Kuhnel, D.S.; Ottenstein, S.A.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Light Field Microscopy Marc Levoy1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by photographing a speck of fluorescent crayon wax through a microscope objective and microlens array fluorescent specimens, the angular distribution of fluorescence is independent of the angular distribution research-grade fluorescent light sources. 3 #12;A B C D f (a) unrestricted optics (b) telecentric optics (c

Stanford University

197

LED-induced fluorescence diagnostics for turbine and combustion engine thermometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluorescence from phosphor coatings is the basis of an established technique for measuring temperature in a wide variety of turbine and combustion engine applications. Example surfaces include blades, vanes, combustors, intake valves, pistons, and rotors. Many situations that are remote and noncontact require the high intensity of a laser to illuminate the phosphor, especially if the surface is moving. Thermometric resolutions of 0.1 C are obtainable, and some laboratory versions of these systems have been calibrated against NIST standards to even higher precision. To improve the measurement signal-to-noise ratio, synchronous detection timing has been used to repeatedly interrogate the same blade in a high speed rotating turbine. High spatial resolution can be obtained by tightly focusing the interrogation beam in measurements of static surfaces, and by precise differential timing of the laser pulses on rotating surfaces. We report here the use of blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) as a n illumination source for producing useable fluorescence from phosphors for temperature measurements. An LED can excite most of the same phosphors used to cover the temperature range from 8 to 1400 C. The advantages of using LEDs are obvious in terms of size, power requirements, space requirements and cost. There can also be advantages associated with very long operating lifetimes, wide range of available colors, and their broader emission bandwidths as compared to laser diodes. Temperature may be inferred either from phase or time-decay determinations.

Allison, S.W.

2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Total Lighting Technology Electricity Consumption, by Sector (TWh per Year) (1) Incandescent 136 78% 15 4% 0 0% 4 4% 156 22% General (A-type, Decorative) 112 64% 9 3% 0 0% - - 122 17% Reflector 19 11% 5 2% 0 0% - - 24 3% Miscellaneous 5 3% 0 0% 0 0% 4 4% 9 1% Halogen 12 7% 15 4% 0 0% 1 1% 28 4% General 1 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 1 0% Reflector 8 5% 7 2% 0 0% - - 15 2% Low Voltage Display 1 0% 7 2% - - - - 8 1% Miscellaneous 2 1% 1 0% 0 0% 1 1% 4 1% Compact Fluorescent 15 9% 16 5% 0 0% 1 1% 32 5% General (Screw, Pin) 13 7% 13 4% 0 0% - - 26 4% Reflector 1 1% 3 1% 0 0% - - 4 1% Miscellaneous 1 1% - - 0 0% 1 1% 2 0% Linear Fluorescent 10 6% 250 72% 23 40% 10 9% 294 42% T5 0 0% 16 5% 2 4% - - 19 3% T8 1 1% 124 35% 12 21% - - 137 20% T12 7 4% 109 31% 9 15% - - 124 18% Miscellaneous 2 1% 2 0% 0 0% 10 9% 14 2% High Intensity Discharge 0 0% 49 14% 35 60% 98 83% 183 26% Mercury Vapor 0 0% 1 0% 4 7% 4 3% 9 1% Metal Halide 0 0% 43 12% 25 42% 29 25% 97 14% High Pressure Sodium 0 0% 5 1%

199

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

High-Intensity and High-Density Charge-Exchange Injection Studies into the CERN PS Booster at Intermediate Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the high brilliance LHC ultimate beam and the high intensity CNGS beam, single batch injections into the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) will be used to increase the overall machine intensity compared with the present double batch injections. Charge-exchange injection into the PS Booster with a new linac at intermediate energies is thus examined. A key parameter to consider is the energy dependence of beam incoherent tune shifts at injection. Increasing the linac energy from the present 50 MeV to 160 MeV should yield a safer tune shift. For each PS Booster ring, a charge-exchange injection scheme is envisaged inside a proper straight section, redesigned with new bends to make a local bump and using the existing fast bump magnets for horizontal phase-space painting. ACCSIM simulations for charge-exchange injection at 160 MeV have been investigated for both LHC and CNGS beams. After optimizing the parameters that are used for the space charge tracking routines, the results of the simulations agree well with ex...

Martini, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform  

SciTech Connect

Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

Merckel, Laura G., E-mail: L.G.Merckel-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Bartels, Lambertus W., E-mail: W.Bartels@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Koehler, Max O., E-mail: max.kohler@philips.com [Philips Healthcare (Finland); Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den, E-mail: D.vandenBongard@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiotherapy (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel, E-mail: R.Deckers-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands)] [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Mali, Willem P. Th. M., E-mail: W.Mali@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: Christoph.Binkert@ksw.ch [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Moonen, Chrit T., E-mail: C.Moonen@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A., E-mail: K.G.A.Gilhuijs@umcutrecht.nl; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den, E-mail: mbosch@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Guiding of high intensity ultrashort laser pulses in plasma channels produced with the dual laser pulse ignitor-heater technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors present results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme is proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (< 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a > 5 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 75 fs laser pulse.

Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Baseline vs. Replacement High Bay Lighting Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting has been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. New developments in fluorescent, induction, LED (light-emitting diode), and plasma lighting technologies have spurred various building managers to replace or retrofit existing lighting fixtures. These advances in lighting sources often allow conservation of electricity, better quality of light, and more flexibility in the control of light. However, these new lighting sources still have ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

Information Resources: Solid-State Lighting Webcasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environment to compare the performance of conventional fluorescent troffers with T8 LED tube retrofits, LED retrofit kits, and dedicated LED troffers. Adaptive Street Lighting...

205

LED Traffic Light as a Communications Device Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Chi-Ho Chan, Hugh Liu.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:http://www.eee.hku.hk/~gpang Abstract The visible light from an LED (light emitting diode) traffic light can be modulated and encoded on the description of an audio information system made up of high brightness, visible light emitting diodes (LEDs messages 1. Introduction Recently, high intensity light emitting diodes for traffic signals are available

Pang, Grantham

206

Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluorescent task lamp. The prototype used commercially available materials: 1watt light emitting diodes to the mounting board. Development of LightEmitting Diode Task Lamp using Advanced Technologies: Prototype 2 lightemitting diode task lamp. The problem of developing an energy efficient light emitting diode task lamp

207

Article #11, May 23, 2006 AJ's Technical Tips: Technologies for Lighting in Rural Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- enriched light (PAM 101 light emitting diode, 650 nm) for 5 min, during which time fluorescence emission measurements, PS I-enriched light (PAM 102 FR light emitting diode, 730 nm) was added to the PS II light

Jacobson, Arne

208

Fluorescent lamp dimming adaptor kit  

SciTech Connect

An add-on fluorescent lamp dimming adaptor is described for connecting to a conventional nondimming ballast in a fluorescent lighting system, the system including a source of ac voltage. The ballast has terminals for connecting to a fluorescent lamp, the adaptor comprising: a switching module adapted to be coupled to the terminals for switching current from the lamp, the switching module being connected in parallel with the lamp to divert current from the lamp when the switching module conducts; and a level control coupled to the switching module, the level control controlling the conductive state of the switching module to vary the current in the lamp according to a dimming control signal supplied to the level control, the level control causing the switching module to switch at a frequency in the range of 300 hertz and higher during times that the lamp current is being varied.

Alley, R.P.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Narrow Energy Spread Protons and Ions from High-Intensity, High-Contrast Laser Solid Target Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent simulations show that an idealized, high intensity, short pulse laser can generate quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with energies over 100 MeV in an interaction with a thin film. However, most short pulse laser facilities with sufficient intensity have difficulty controlling the nanosecond and picosecond contrast necessary to realize such a regime. Experiments were performed to investigate proton and ion acceleration from a high contrast, short pulse laser by employing dual plasma mirrors along with a deformable mirror at the HERCULES laser facility at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Sciences, University of Michigan. Plasma mirrors were characterized, allowing a 50% throughput with an intensity contrast increase of 105. The focal spot quality was also exceptional, showing a 1.1 micron full width at half maximum (FWHM) focal diameter. Experiments were done using temporally cleaned 30 TW, 32 fs pulses to achieve an intensity of up to 10{sup 21} Wcm{sup -2} on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Mylar targets with thicknesses ranging 50 nm to 13 microns. Proton beams with energy spreads below 2 MeV were observed from all thicknesses, peaking with energies up to 10.3 MeV and an energy spread of 0.8 MeV. Similar narrow energy spreads were observed for oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at the silicon nitride thickness of 50 nm with energies up to 24 MeV with an energy spread of 3 MeV, whereas the energy spread is greatly increased at a larger thickness. Maximum energies were confirmed with CR39 track detectors, while a Thomson ion spectrometer was used to gauge the monoenergetic nature of the beam.

Dollar, Franklin; Matsuoka, Takeshi; McGuffey, Christopher; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Thomas, Alec G. R.; Willingale, Louise; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, Univ. Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Davis, Jack; Petrov, George [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

211

Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again July 27, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Induction lighting is one of the best kept secrets in energy-efficient lighting. Simply stated, induction lighting is essentially a fluorescent light without electrodes or filaments, the items that frequently cause other bulbs to burn out quickly. Thus, many induction lighting units have an extremely long life of up to 100,000 hours. To put this in perspective, an induction lighting system lasting 100,000 hours will last more than 11 years in continuous 24/7 operation, and 25 years if operated 10 hours a day. The technology, however, is far from new. Nikola Tesla demonstrated induction lighting in the late 1890s around the same time that his rival,

212

HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel  

SciTech Connect

Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as MaRIE 1.0, Z, NIF, or Omega may offer additional advantages and we would expect these to be explored and evaluated during the CD process. Question 3 - A laser/optics experts group should review this proposal to ensure the level of R&D is reasonable to provide a sufficient chance of success (>50%). In the preparation of the HILL proposal, we sent our proposal and cost estimates to laser designers/scientists across the complex. Though risks were identified with our design, the prevailing view of those we engaged was that the risks were appropriately represented by the TRL levels assigned and that the enabling R&D planned in our proposal was adequate for risk mitigation. Question 4 - More data and peer review is needed from its sister facilities around the world. It is our specific intent to conduct both scientific and technical workshops with the user community if the High Intensity Science field is further encouraged as part of the NNSA Roadmap. Question 5 - Does HILL have to be co-located with MARIE 1.0? Is that feasible from the point of view of TA-53 real estate? Multiple siting options were considered for HILL, including co-location with MaRIE 1.0 (the most cost-effective and flexible option), as well as in a separate, stand-alone building and in a retro-fitted existing building. The cost estimate included these contingencies and candidate locations for HILL in TA-53 were identified. There is actually significant space at TA-53 on the hill in the northeast end of the mesa. Question 6 - What would be the impact on the weapons program if this facility were NOT built? An inability to elucidate aspects of weapons science in the dense plasma regime and validate computer models for same. This will lead to reduced confidence in the computer tools used for certification. Question 7 - Will HILL allow some of the x-ray vulnerability studies proposed by SPARC? If so what does Sandia's vulnerability group think of this method versus SPARC. It is possible that some of the scope envisioned for SPARC could be achieved on HILL, although likely that the energy produced at HILL not bei

Albright, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Luminaires Fluorescent Luminaires Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires October 7, 2013 - 10:52am Addthis Did You Know? Lighting Can Help You Accomplish Other Facility Upgrades and Efficiency Improvements Facilities with significant potential savings in lighting may be able to bundle lighting upgrades with heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and other energy conservation measures into a Utility Energy Service Contract (UESC) or Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). Because of the substantial cost and energy savings potential, replacing lighting can be a key component in financing facility retrofits. The funding portion of the FEMP website offers more information on these and other funding opportunities. FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements

214

Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) saves you money in the long run with lower energy bills. CFLs are significant Typical incandescent 75-watt light bulb Compact Fluorescent 18-watt light bulb Purchase cost $0.60 $ 5 that incandescent bulbs use becomes heat while only 10 percent becomes light. CFLs create less heat because more

215

Neptun Light: Order (2012-SE-3504)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Neptun Light, Inc. to pay a $13,000 civil penalty after finding Neptun Light had failed to certify that certain models of medium base compact fluorescent lamps comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

216

An introduction to Digital Addressable Lighting Interface (DALI) systems & study of a DALI day lighting application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) protocol has set forth the requirements for a digital fluorescent ballast that out performs its predecessors with respect to… (more)

Meyer, Lisa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Generalized Courant-Snyder Theory and Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution For High-intensity Beams In A Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice  

SciTech Connect

The Courant-Snyder (CS) theory and the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution for high-intensity beams in a uncoupled focusing lattice are generalized to the case of coupled transverse dynamics. The envelope function is generalized to an envelope matrix, and the envelope equation becomes a matrix envelope equation with matrix operations that are non-commutative. In an uncoupled lattice, the KV distribution function, first analyzed in 1959, is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high-intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the generalized CS invariant. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space. The fully self-consistent solution reduces the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations to a nonlinear matrix ordinary differential equation for the envelope matrix, which determines the geometry of the pulsating and rotating beam ellipse. These results provide us with a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice. A strongly coupled lattice, a so-called N-rolling lattice, is studied as an example. It is found that strong coupling does not deteriorate the beam quality. Instead, the coupling induces beam rotation, and reduces beam pulsation.

Hong QIn, Ronald Davidson

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting Types Lighting Types The following are the most widely used types of lighting equipment used in commercial buildings. Characteristics such as energy efficiency, light quality, and lifetime vary by lamp type. Standard Fluorescent A fluorescent lamp consists of a sealed gas-filled tube. The gas in the tube consists of a mixture of low pressure mercury vapor and an inert gas such as argon. The inner surface of the tube has a coating of phosphor powder. When an electrical current is applied to electrodes in the tube, the mercury vapor emits ultraviolet radiation which then causes the phosphor coating to emit visible light (the process is termed fluorescence). A ballast is required to regulate and control the current and voltage. Two types of ballasts are used, magnetic and electronic. Electronic ballasts

219

Today LED Holiday Lights, Tomorrow the World?  

SciTech Connect

This article for The APEM Advantage, the quarterly newsletter of the Association of Professional Energy Managers (APEM) describes the recent increase in the popularity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and compares LED light output with that of incandescent and compact fluorescent lighting.

Gordon, Kelly L.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Profile Lighting Equipment - Type and Characteristics of Equipment Emits Found In Incandescent Incandescent Light Bulb Produces light by electrically heating a tungsten filament Includes energy-efficient incandescent bulbs, such as Reflector or R-Lamps (accent and task lighting), Parabolic Aluminized Reflector (PAR) lamps (flood and spot lighting), and Ellipsoidal Reflector (ER) lamps (recessed lighting) Highly inefficient because much of the energy is lost as heat 14-18 Lumens Per Watt (LPW) 14% of Lit Commercial Floorspace Standard Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballast Standard Fluorescent with Magnetic Ballast Produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ultrabright fluorescent OLEDS using triplet sinks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer further comprises an organic host compound, an organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature, and an organic dopant compound. The triplet energy of the dopant compound is lower than the triplet energy of the host compound. The dopant compound does not strongly absorb the fluorescent emission of the emitting compound.

Zhang, Yifan; Forrest, Stephen R; Thompson, Mark

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Impact of Intrinsic Heavy Quark Distributions in the Proton on New Physics Searches at the High Intensity Frontier  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of an intense proton facility, at 'Project X' or elsewhere, will provide many new opportunities for searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. A Project X can serve a yet broader role in the search for new physics, and in this note we highlight the manner in which thus-enabled studies of the flavor structure of the proton, particularly of its intrinsic heavy quark content, facilitate other direct and indirect searches for new physics. Intrinsic heavy quarks in both light and heavy hadrons play a key role in searches for physics BSM with hadrons - and their study at the Intensity Frontier may prove crucial to establishing its existence.

Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cornell University Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Electric Lighting Quality The CUSD lighting design team utilized energy efficient products that meshed well with our daylighting scheme. We chose to use fluorescent tubes or compact fluorescent bulbs with an energy consumption of between 15 and 30 Watts throughout the house. The ballasts for all lamps dim to a 1% light output, so the interior and exterior lights can be adjusted as the level of available daylight fluctuates. Light sensors have been placed in front of our two largest apertures, allowing us to control how much artificial light is supplied to each space. The control of our ballasts is intricate, but refined and tested to avoid dysfunctional dimming or switching. While automatic controls are included, manual user overrides are provided in case the occupant prefers

224

Preparation of diamond-like carbon and boron nitirde films by high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition  

SciTech Connect

Intense ion beams (300-keV C{sup +}, O{sup +}, and H{sup +}, 20--30 kA, 50 to 400-ns pulsewidth, up to 0.3-Hz repetition rate) were used to prepare diamond-like carbon (DLC) and boron nitride (BN) films. Deposition rates of up to 25{plus_minus}5 nm/pulse were obtained with instantaneous rates exceeding 1 mm/s. Most films were uniform, light brown, translucent, and nonporous with some micron-size particulates. Raman and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated the presence of DLC. The films possessed favorable electron field-emission characteristics desirable for cold-cathode displays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) revealed that the C films contained diamond crystals with 25 to 125-nm grain size. BN films were composed of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzite phases.

Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remnev, G.E. [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Nuclear Physics Institute.] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hagerstown Light Department | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hagerstown Light Department Hagerstown Light Department Jump to: navigation, search Name Hagerstown Light Department Place Maryland Utility Id 7908 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GENERAL AND COMMERCIAL SERVICE Commercial LIGHT AND POWER SERVICE (HIGH LOAD FACTOR) Industrial LIGHT AND POWER SERVICE (Low Load Factor) Commercial OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE (200 Watts)Fluorescent luminaire Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE(100 Watts)Fluorescent luminaire Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE(175 Watts MV)) Lighting

226

Selecting effective fluorescent lamp and ballast for retrofit in the continental United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Electrical lighting is a major contributor to daytime peak energy demand, accounting for about 30 percent of total electricity consumption in most Army facilities. Some of this energy may be wasted because many existing lighting systems at Army Installations use outmoded technologies. While recent technology has improved the energy efficiency of all lighting systems, fluorescent lighting-the most widely used interior building lighting-has shown the greatest efficiency gains. Retrofits using high-efficiency fluorescent lamps and ballasts can yield significant operating cost savings. High-efficiency fluorescent lighting systems are widely available, but current information on their performance characteristics is highly technical and not easily accessible to Army facility managers considering retrofit options. This report provides a single, accessible source that summarizes fluorescent lamp and ballast performance characteristics and outlines selection procedures. Fluorescent lamp, Retrofit, Ballast, Lighting. Energy conservation.

Taylor, W.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications  

SciTech Connect

Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Energy Performance of Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the results of tests performed at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in contract with the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC), to determine the light output, power consumption, efficiency, and power factor of off-the-shelf electronic and magnetic compact fluorescent lamps.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electronmultiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual-wavelength fluorescence images were acquired using a targeted 111In- DTPA-K(IRDye800)-c(KRGDf) to selectively detect tumor angiogenesis and an untargeted Cy5.5 to image lymphatics. After acquiring the experimental data, fluorescence image-guided surgery was performed. Dynamic, multi-wavelength fluorescence imaging was accomplished using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF). Excitation light was used for reflectance images with a LCTF transmitting a shorter wavelength than the peak in the excitation light spectrum. Therefore, images can be dynamically acquired alternating frame by frame between emission and excitation light, which should enable image-guided surgery.

Kwon, Sun Kuk

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA); Rubenstein, Francis M. (Berkeley, CA); Whitman, Richard E. (Richmond, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

NOTICE TO APPLICANTS FOR SOLID STATE LIGHTING, IES ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... _____ 22/P13b* IES LM-66:2000 Single-Ended Compact Fluorescent Lamps - Intensity Measurements ... NVLAP ENERGY EFFICIENT LIGHTING ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solid-State Lighting Issue 28: Selected Business and Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be arranged in modules designed to replace cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFL), surface light emitting devices such as electro-luminescent panels, and bulbs for car headlights....

234

Neptun Light: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-3504) | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civil Penalty that Neptun Light, Inc. failed to certify a variety of medium base compact fluorescent lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. DOE...

235

Light-Light Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

Kanda, Naohiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Light-Light Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

Naohiro Kanda

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

237

Dynamic Solid State Lighting Matthew Aldrich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the fluorescent technology's lower color rendering ability and quality of light [26, 4, 58, 24]. LED implicit and explicit user goals. In this work, the focus in on the efficient control of a LED-based lighting network. This thesis presents a first-of-its-kind pentachromatic LED-based lighting network

238

Advanced lighting guidelines, 1993: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten- Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers' representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. (Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Benya, J.R. (Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

Glazer, A.M.; Benson, S.C.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

L&E: Adopt high-efficiency lighting for your parking lot | The Better  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lot lot Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Adopt high-efficiency lighting for your parking lot Most parking lots are illuminated by older high-intensity discharge (HID) lighting technology without any energy-saving controls. New light-emitting diode (LED) technology can cut parking lot lighting energy bills by 40%, or much more with controls, while delivering additional benefits including long life, reduced maintenance costs, and improved lighting uniformity. The Lighting & Electrical team developed a performance specification to help building owners take advantage of these improved lighting

243

Solid-State Lighting Issue 20: Selected Business & Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

doses of light bright enough to mimic dawn, between 2,500 to 10,000 lux. This amount of light is unattainable by incandescent bulbs, and largely inconvenient with fluorescent...

244

Zinc Oxide and Nitride Nanowire Based Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lumens/W, the LED beats the incandescent bulb and is on thefor an LED as opposed to an incandescent light bulb as shownbulb, fluorescent lamp, and blue light emitting diode. (24) (25) 2.2 LED

Lai, Elaine Michelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

New Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical update continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the following product areas—linear LED T8 fluorescent replacements, Edison-based dimmable LED lamps, commercial replacement side-lit LED fixtures, Edison-based reduced-consumption halogen lamps designed to replace 100W incandescent lamps, high bay induction LED lamps, and architectural LED lamps. Many of the products in this year’s report are designed as ...

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

LED Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are semiconductor devices that produce light when an electrical current is applied....

247

FAQ of Overview of Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 3 Leds FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 3 Leds 1. What is solid-state lighting? 2. What is a semiconductor? 3. What is a semiconductor LED (light emitting diode)? 4. What is an organic LED (OLED)? 5. Where can I see LED lighting today? 6. How do you produce white light using LEDs? 7. How does solid-state lighting differ from conventional lighting? 8. What is the energy efficiency of solid-state lighting today? How does the energy efficiency compare with incandescent and fluorescent lamps? 9. What is the cost of solid-state lighting today? How does the cost compare with incandescent and fluorescent lamps? 10. What is the quality of the white light using solid-state lighting today? How does it compare with incandescent and fluorescent lamps?

248

Explosive laser light initiation of propellants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

Piltch, M.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

Holton, J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Digital optical phase conjugation of fluorescence in turbid tissue  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a method for phase conjugating fluorescence. Our method, called reference free digital optical phase conjugation, can conjugate extremely weak, incoherent optical signals. It was used to phase conjugate fluorescent light originating from a bead covered with 0.5 mm of light-scattering tissue. The phase conjugated beam refocuses onto the bead and causes a local increase of over two orders of magnitude in the light intensity. Potential applications are in imaging, optical trapping, and targeted photochemical activation inside turbid tissue.

Vellekoop, Ivo M.; Cui Meng; Yang Changhuei [Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam  

SciTech Connect

Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Polarisation response of a gas medium in the field of a high-intensity ultrashort laser pulse: high order Kerr nonlinearities or plasma electron component?  

SciTech Connect

The polarisation response of quantum systems modelling silver and xenon atoms in the field of a high-intensity femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser (photon energy h{omega} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 eV), has been investigated by direct numerical integration of the Schroedinger equation. The applicability ranges of the perturbation theory and polarisation expansion in powers of field are determined. The contributions of excited atoms and electrons in the continuous-spectrum states to the polarisation response at the fundamental frequency, which arise as a result of excitation and photoionisation, are analysed. It is shown that specifically ionisation changes the sign of dielectric susceptibility with an increase in radiation intensity for the systems under consideration. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

Volkova, E A; Popov, Alexander M; Tikhonova, O V [D.V. Skobel'tsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

X-ray polarization spectroscopy to study anisotropic velocity distribution of hot electrons produced by an ultra-high-intensity laser  

SciTech Connect

The anisotropy of the hot-electron velocity distribution in ultra-high-intensity laser produced plasma was studied with x-ray polarization spectroscopy using multilayer planar targets including x-ray emission tracer in the middle layer. This measurement serves as a diagnostic for hot-electron transport from the laser-plasma interaction region to the overdense region where drastic changes in the isotropy of the electron velocity distribution are observed. These polarization degrees are consistent with analysis of a three-dimensional polarization spectroscopy model coupled with particle-in-cell simulations. Electron velocity distribution in the underdense region is affected by the electric field of the laser and that in the overdense region becomes wider with increase in the tracer depth. A full-angular spread in the overdense region of 22.4 deg.{sub -2.4}{sup +5.4} was obtained from the measured polarization degree.

Inubushi, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Okano, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Cai, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Kai, T.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kawamura, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R. [Dipartmento di Fisica 'G. Occhialini', University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, Talence (France); Boscheron, A.; Bonville, O.; Grenier, J. [CEA/CESTA, Le Barp (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Atomic gas temperature in a nonequilibrium high-intensity discharge lamp determined from the red wing of the resonance mercury line 254 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For developing low-wattage high intensity discharge (HID) lamps, a better understanding of the relatively unexplored nonequilibrium phenomena is essential. This needs interpretation of diagnostic results by methods free from equilibrium assumptions. In this paper, the atomic temperature is determined from the simulation of a quasistatic broadened resonance line by distinguishing between atomic temperature and excitation temperature in the equation of radiative transfer. The proposed method is applied to the red wing of the resonance mercury line 254 nm emitted from a HID lamp working on ac. The experimental results show severe deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium. More than one thousand degrees difference was obtained between atomic and electron temperatures at the maximum current phase.

Drakakis, E. [Technological Educational Institute, Department of Electrical Engineering, 71004 Heraklion (Greece); Karabourniotis, D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Changes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in Lighting Changes in Lighting The percentage of commercial buildings with lighting was unchanged between 1995 and 2003; however, three lighting types did show change in usage. Compact fluorescent lamps and halogen lamps showed a significant increase between 1995 and 2003 while the use of incandescent lights declined. The lighting questions in the 1995, 1999, and 2003 CBECS questionnaires were virtually identical which facilitates comparison across survey years. The use of compact fluorescent lamps more than doubled, from just under 10 percent of lit buildings to more than 20 percent (Figure 17 and Table 5). The use of halogen lamps nearly doubled, from 7 percent to 13 percent of lit buildings. Use of incandescent lights was the only lighting type to decline; their use dropped from 59 percent to just over one-half of lit buildings.

256

Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Harmonic generation at high intensities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

High intensity protons in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

Montag, C.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Blaskiewicz& #44; M.; Brennan& #44; J.M.; Drees& #44; K.A.; Fischer& #44; W.; Huang& #44; H.; Minty& #44; M.; Robert-Demolaize& #44; G.; Thieberger& #44; P.; Yip& #44; K.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

High-Intensity Proton Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

Jay L. Hirshfield

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101: Lighting Choices 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices August 13, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Learn about energy-efficient light bulbs that can light your home for less money. For many years, researchers have been working on new lighting options that produce the same light with less energy. Many of those designs are now on the market. This edition of Energy 101 features newer energy-saving light bulbs that provide the choices in colors and light levels you've come to expect, but with higher efficiencies-so they save you money. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save you about $50 per year. For more information on lighting choices from the Office of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices August 13, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Learn about energy-efficient light bulbs that can light your home for less money. For many years, researchers have been working on new lighting options that produce the same light with less energy. Many of those designs are now on the market. This edition of Energy 101 features newer energy-saving light bulbs that provide the choices in colors and light levels you've come to expect, but with higher efficiencies-so they save you money. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save you about $50 per year. For more information on lighting choices from the Office of Energy

262

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

263

Modification of fluorescent luminaries for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Reducing energy consumption in existing buildings by reducing the number of lamps presents technical problems when more than one fluorescent lamp operates from a single ballast. A preliminary investigation was made whereby capacitors were substituted for one fluorescent lamp in a two-lamp luminaire which operated with a single ballast. Under optimum conditions, lighting efficiency (foot-candles per watt) was nearly as high at reduced power input as it was with two lamps operating normally. No failures in lighting equipment or capacitors occurred and no fire hazards, other safety hazards, or other unsatisfactory occurrences were observed. A more thorough investigation involving a number of parameters is needed to ascertain the feasibility of this modification.

Beausoliel, R.W.; Meese, W.J.; Yonemura, G.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Modification of fluorescent luminaires for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Reducing energy consumption in existing buildings by reducing the number of lamps presents technical problems when more than one fluorescent lamp operates from a single ballast. A preliminary investigation was made whereby capacitors were substituted for one fluorescent lamp in a two-lamp luminaire which operated with a single ballast. Under optimum conditions, lighting efficiency (foot-candles per watt) was nearly as high at reduced power input as it was with two lamps operating normally. No failures in lighting equipment or capacitors occurred and no fire hazards, other safety hazards, or other unsatisfactory occurrences were observed. A more thorough investigation involving a number of parameters is needed to ascertain the feasibility of this modification. (auth)

Beausoliel, R.W.; Meese, W.J.; Yonemura, G.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM); Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Kiss, Csaba (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

New LED light sources and lamps for general illumination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light source compared to traditional light sources like incandescent bulbs and fluorescent tubes bulb. LEDs emit colored light with a narrow spectral band of 20-30 nm, colors covering the spectralNew LED light sources and lamps for general illumination Carsten Dam-Hansen, Birgitte Thestrup

267

Fluorescence emission induced by extensive air showers in dependence on atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged particles of extensive air showers (EAS), mainly electrons and positrons, initiate the emission of fluorescence light in the Earth's atmosphere. This light provides a calorimetric measurement of the energy of cosmic rays. For reconstructing the primary energy from an observed light track of an EAS, the fluorescence yield in air has to be known in dependence on atmospheric conditions, like air temperature, pressure, and humidity. Several experiments on fluorescence emission have published various sets of data covering different parts of the dependence of the fluorescence yield on atmospheric conditions. Using a compilation of published measurements, a calculation of the fluorescence yield in dependence on altitude is presented. The fluorescence calculation is applied to simulated air showers and different atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence of the atmospheric conditions on the reconstructed shower parameters.

Keilhauer, Bianca

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fiber bundle fluorescence endomicroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved design for fiber bundle fluorescence endomicroscopy is demonstrated. Scanned illumination and detection using coherent fiber bundles with 30,000 elements with 3 ?m resolution enables high speed imaging with ...

Tsai, Tsung-Han

269

Lighting Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Lighting is very critical in photography. The specimen should be placed on a background which will not detract from the resolution of the fracture surface. For basic lighting, one spotlight is suggested. The light is then raised or lowered, and

270

Recombinant fluorescent protein microsphere calibration standard  

SciTech Connect

A method for making recombinant fluorescent protein standard particles for calibration of fluorescence instruments.

Nolan, John P. (Santa Fe, NM); Nolan, Rhiannon L. (Santa Fe, NM); Ruscetti, Teresa (Los Alamos, NM); Lehnert, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Compatibility testing of fluorescent lamp and ballast systems  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in the use of electronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting systems, and the corresponding increase in the number of new products and new manufacturers in the market, has raised a number of questions regarding the compatibility of the lamps and ballasts used in fluorescent systems. Because many of the new products start and operate lamps differently than previous products, the relevant American National Standards Institute requirements may no longer be adequate for addressing compatibility concerns. The impacts on system performance of the newer products of a parametric study designed to test key hypotheses regarding the impact of ballast parameters on fluorescent lamp life. In this study, samples of 4-ft T8 fluorescent lamps were operated on duty cycles of 5 min on and 5 min off, using seven different ballast types. The results of the study indicate which parameters seem to have the biggest effect on lamp life, and can be used in establishing new performance standards for fluorescent systems.

Ji, Y.; Davis, R.; O' Rourke, C.; Chui, E.W.M.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Apparatus for injecting high power laser light into a fiber optic cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High intensity laser light is evenly injected into an optical fiber by the combination of a converging lens and a multisegment kinoform (binary optical element). The segments preferably have multi-order gratings on each which are aligned parallel to a radial line emanating from the center of the kinoform and pass through the center of the element. The grating in each segment causes circumferential (lateral) dispersion of the light, thereby avoiding detrimental concentration of light energy within the optical fiber.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Space charge effect of the high intensity proton beam during the resonance extraction for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Mu2e experiment to search for direct {mu} {yields} e conversion at Fermilab plans slow, resonant extraction of a beam with 3 x 10{sup 12} protons from the Debuncher ring. Space charge of this high intensity beam is a critical factor, since it induces significant betatron tune spread and consequently affects resonance extraction processes, such as spill uniformity and beam losses. This study shows the multi-particle simulation results in the early stages of resonance extraction and spill uniformity in the presence of 2D and 3D space charge effects. We have presented the results of the third-integer resonance extraction in early stage for the Mu2e experiment in the presence of space charge effects. In order to track particles and to calculate self-consistent space charge effects, Synergia2 was used, which is capable of parallel computing. The space charge tune shift was computed and was reasonable value compared with the analytical calculation. Locations of the septum and Lambertson were chosen so that particles are kicked and extracted efficiently. The spill rates for with and without space charge effects were uniform, but should be improved for the early stage after the sextupole field ramping.

Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Johnstone, John; Michelotti, Leo; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions  

SciTech Connect

We present results from the grant entitled, ���¢��������Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions.���¢������� The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

Mori, Warren, B.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about how these standards will affect the most popular types of incandescent bulbs we've all used for so long: the common non-reflector 40-watt, 60-watt, 75-watt, and 100-watt bulbs. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (also known as EISA) requires that these incandescent bulbs use 30% less energy than today's

276

Lighting Research Center Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

Lighting Group: Light Distribution Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrofit Alternatives to Incandescent Downlights Hotel and Institutional Bathroom Lighting Portable Office Lighting Systems Low Glare Outdoor Retrofit Luminaire LED Luminaires...

278

Types of Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting Types of Lighting Types of Lighting October 17, 2013 - 5:36pm Addthis When it comes to lighting options, you have a number of choices. | Photo courtesy of Clean Energy Resource Teams. When it comes to lighting options, you have a number of choices. | Photo courtesy of Clean Energy Resource Teams. You have several options to consider when selecting what type of lighting you should use in your home. When selecting energy-efficient lighting, it's a good idea to understand basic lighting terms and principles. Also, it helps to explore your lighting design options if you haven't already. This will help narrow your selection. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent

279

Energy-saving lighting systems. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Artificial lighting accounts for 20% of electrical energy, 7.6% of total energy, and 3.8% of total fuel in the US. Because conserving lighting energy can reduce operating costs as well as save energy, this book explores several practical ways to do that. The book first describes the complete range of light sources and their accessories, then goes on to cover photometric reports, techniques of lighting design, fluorescent luminaires, industrial lighting systems, manual and automatic lighting controls, the impact of air-conditioning on lighting systems, and exterior lighting. A glossary of lighting terminology, conversion tables, and recommended illumination levels appear in the appendix. The book is designed for students and practicity lighting engineers and designers. 56 references, 169 figures, 45 tables. (DCK)

Sorcar, P.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Outlaw lighting  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management programs by utilities and the federal government`s Green Lights program have made significant inroads in promoting energy-efficient lighting. But the Energy Policy Act now prohibits certain types of lighting. This article provides analysis to help architects determine new lamp performance compared with older lighting products.

Bryan, H.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Time-resolved Hyperspectral Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Frequency Modulated Excitation  

SciTech Connect

An intensity-modulated excitation light source is used together with a micro channel plate intensified CCD (ICCD) detector gated at a slightly different frequency to generate a beat frequency from a fluorescent sample. The addition of a spectrograph produces a hyperspectral time-resolved data product where the resulting beat frequency is detected with a low frame rate camera. Measuring the beat frequency of the spectrum as a function of time allows separation of the excited fluorescence from ambient constant light sources. The excitation and detector repetition rates are varied over a range of discrete frequencies, and the phase shift of the beat wave maps out the emission decay rate(s).

,; Neill, M

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines: 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines document consists of eight guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting products. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaries and Lighting Systems surveys advanced lighting fixture products designed to take advantage of current energy-efficient lamp technologies and includes luminaire tables to allow users to collect photometric performance characteristics for common commercial luminaires. Each of the remaining six guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-efficient and Electronic Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Conventional Shape Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, and Compact Metal Halide and White High Pressure Sodium Lamps -- includes a technology overview section, a description of current products available on the market, and an applications section. The document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers' representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Preliminary Results on Luminaire Designs for Hybrid Solar Lighting Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on the design of two hybrid lighting luminaires that blend light from a fiber optic end-emitted solar source with electric T8 fluorescent lamps. Both designs involve the retrofit of a commercially-available recessed fluorescent luminaire with minimal reductions in the original luminaire's optical efficiency. Two methods for high-angle dispersion of fiber optic end-emitted solar light are described and the resulting spatial intensity distributions, simulated using ZEMAX, are compared with standard cylindrical fluorescent tubes. Differences in spatial intensity distribution are qualitatively characterized and potential design improvements discussed.

Earl, D.D.

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corridors. The overall range of savings was six to 80 percent. The Advanced Lighting Guidelines On-Line Edition New Buildings Institute 2011 presents a table of lighting energy...

285

Confocal microphotoluminescence of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes Koichi Okamoto,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for conventional incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs.5 However, luminous efficacies of commercial white LEDsConfocal microphotoluminescence of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes Koichi Okamoto,a Akio Kaneta-well-structured light-emitting diodes LEDs with a yellow-green light 530 nm and an amber light 600 nm was measured

Okamoto, Koichi

286

Electronic Radio-Frequency (Electrodeless) Induction Lamps: A Fluorescent Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses an expanding energy efficient light source electronic radio-frequency (electrodeless) induction lamps. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) use the past and future growth of the CFL market to illustrate the potential for the induction lighting market while emphasizing future technical improvements. Discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers consider induction lamps for high-efficiency fluorescent applications with long-...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Shape the light, light the shape - lighting installation in performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the lighting design theory Light Inside Out, which is the technique of shaping light toward a creation of lighting installation in performance… (more)

Yu, Lih-Hwa, 1972-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

289

Information Resources: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting Facts-listed products as well as products evaluated in the latest CALiPER reports. Eric Richman, also of PNNL, reported on a recently completed GATEWAY demonstration project, in which LED and fluorescent lamps were installed in a variety of recessed troffer luminaires for comparison in an office environment. The presentation concluded with a discussion of specifications listed in a newly updated technology fact sheet. View presentation slides View the text-alternative version View the webcast (WMV 16 MB) Download Windows Media Player

290

Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Integrated fluorescence analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM); Yoshida, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an electronic ballast unit for a fluorescent lamp comprising: a circuit assembly having a pair of voltage input terminal and a first inductor and a capacitor in series relationship with each other to form a series resonant circuit. The circuit is adapted to be coupled to a fluorescent lamp to provide a starting voltage for the lamp; and a second inductor connected in shunt relationship to the first inductor and connected to the other input terminal. There is a core on which the first inductor and the second inductor are mounted. The core inductively couples the inductors with each other and are shaped to reduce core losses to minimize the increase of temperature of the core; the core is of a generally H-shaped configuration, and means of opposite ends of the H-shaped core to complete the magnetic flux path for each inductor, respectively.

Boyd, G.D.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Magnetic fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

Commercialization of gallium nitride nanorod arrays on silicon for solid-state lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One important component in energy usage is lighting, which is currently dominated by incandescent and fluorescent lamps. However, due to potentially higher efficiencies and thus higher energy savings, solid-state lighting ...

Wee, Qixun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Challenges to someone by Market Challenges to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Market Challenges on AddThis.com... Why SSL LED Basics OLED Basics Using LEDs R&D Challenges Market Challenges Market Challenges Resources Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America PDF Guiding Market Introduction of SSL Products PDF LED Directional Lamps PDF LED MR16 Lamps Recessed LED Downlights PDF General Service LED Lamps PDF What to Ask - A Checklist for Buyers of LED Lighting Products PDF

296

Survivability of Electronic Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Report addresses the fastest growing energy efficient light source8212the electronic compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). Because some of the failure modes for screw-in CFLs are different than those for plug-in CFLs, a cursory review of the difference between the two types of CFLs is provided in the first part of Chapter 2. A broad definition of shortened-life CFLs is also provided in Chapter 2 with an emphasis on revisiting mortality curves, the 10-minute lamp start, other relevant defini...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements for Linear...

298

Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

output) per watt (measure of power input). The efficacy of a typical incandescent light bulb ranges between 12 lmW and 18 lmW. The efficacy of a typical compact fluorescent...

299

Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

300

Lighting recommendations for the Social Security Administration Frank Hagel Federal Building in Richmond CA  

SciTech Connect

Specific recommendations are made to improve the lighting quality and energy efficiency of the lighting system at the Social Security Administration Frank Hagel Building in Richmond, CA. The main recommendation is to replace the recessed fluorescent lighting system in the general office area with indirect lighting. Indirect lighting will improve lighting quality, will provide an energy efficient solution and will be about the same cost as the direct lighting system originally proposed.

Rubinstein, Francis M.

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

Lister, Graeme [OSRAM SYLVANIA, CRSL, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA (United States); Curry, John J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of Project Cost Cannot exceed 100% of a single energy efficient measure's cost. Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Not Specified Lighting Fluorescent Lighting: $2 - $50/fixture HID Lighting: $20 - $25/fixture Induction Bulb: $10 Metal Halide PAR Bulb: $20

303

Scanning Lidar Based Atmospheric Monitoring for Fluorescent Detectors of Cosmic Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the cosmic-ray air-shower fluorescence at extreme energies require precise knowledge of atmospheric conditions. The absolute calibration of the cosmic-ray energy depends on the absorption of fluorescence light between its origin and point of its detection. To reconstruct basic atmospheric parameters we review a novel analysis method based on two- and multi-angle measurements performed by the scanning backscatter lidar system. Applied inversion methods, optical depth, absorption and backscatter coefficient, as well as other parameters that enter the lidar equation are discussed in connection to the attenuation of the light traveling from shower to fluorescence detector.

A. Filipcic; M. Horvat; D. Veberic; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Tillamook County PUD - Dairy Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Tillamook County PUD Tillamook PUD offers the Dairy Lighting Retrofit Program for its agricultural members to save energy on lighting in eligible barns/facilities. Tillamook PUD completes a lighting audit of the facility to calculate the energy savings and rebate amount. Incentives are provided for the replacement of existing mercury vapor, incandescent, and T12 fluorescent fixtures with new ORION AG9000 3-lamp T8 fluorescent fixtures. This rebate is available for retrofits only, new construction is not

305

Generating polarization controllable FELs at Dalian coherent light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The property of the FEL polarization is of great importance to the user community. FEL pulses with ultra-high intensity and flexible polarization control ability will absolutely open up new scientific realms. In this paper, several polarization control approaches are presented to investigate the great potential on Dalian coherent light source, which is a government-approved novel FEL user facility with the capability of wavelength continuously tunable in the EUV regime of 50-150 nm. The numerical simulations show that both circularly polarized FELs with highly modulating frequency and 100 microjoule level pulse energy could be generated at Dalian coherent light source.

Zhang, T; Wang, D; Zhao, Z T; Zhang, W Q; Wu, G R; Dai, D X; Yang, X M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

New and Underutilized Technology: Interior LED/Solid State Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior LED/Solid State Lighting Interior LED/Solid State Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Interior LED/Solid State Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:53pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for interior LED/solid state lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits Interior LED retrofits are currently viable for down lights, track lighting, sconces, and both line and low voltage task lighting. Replacements for incandescent A-lamps have also been improving rapidly. Replacements for fluorescent tube lighting may be viable for high-cost maintenance areas. Application Interior LED/solid state lighting is a rapidly improving technology currently most applicable for down lights, track lights, task lighting, accenting, high ceiling, and high cost maintenance areas.

307

A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting June 16, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Just when consumers started getting familiar with the spiral ice-cream cone-shaped and prong-shaped compact fluorescents (CFLs), along comes LED lighting, a solid-state lighting (SSL) solution. Some experts are predicting that solid-state lighting is set to turn the current lighting industry on its head, and perhaps in the not-too-distant future make the century-old incandescent light bulb go the way of the dinosaur. Many consumers have been saving money and helping the environment for years by using LED lights during the holidays. These light strings use 75% less energy than conventional (i.e., incandescent) light strings. ENERGY STAR decorative light strings are independently tested to meet strict lifetime

308

A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting June 16, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Just when consumers started getting familiar with the spiral ice-cream cone-shaped and prong-shaped compact fluorescents (CFLs), along comes LED lighting, a solid-state lighting (SSL) solution. Some experts are predicting that solid-state lighting is set to turn the current lighting industry on its head, and perhaps in the not-too-distant future make the century-old incandescent light bulb go the way of the dinosaur. Many consumers have been saving money and helping the environment for years by using LED lights during the holidays. These light strings use 75% less energy than conventional (i.e., incandescent) light strings. ENERGY STAR decorative light strings are independently tested to meet strict lifetime

309

Northern Lights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Lights Northern Lights Nature Bulletin No. 178-A February 6, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NORTHERN LIGHTS To a person seeing the Aurora Borealis or "northern lights" for the first time, it is an uncanny awe-inspiring spectacle. Sometimes it begins as a glow of red on the northern horizon, ominously suggesting a great fire, gradually changing to a curtain of violet-white, or greenish-yellow light extending from east to west. Some times this may be transformed to appear as fold upon fold of luminous draperies that march majestically across the sky; sometimes as a vast multitude of gigantic flaming swords furiously slashing at the heavens; sometimes as a flowing crown with long undulating colored streamers fanning downward and outward.

310

Section 5.4.3 Compact Fluorescent Lighting: Greening Federal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.7 m), wall-wash- ers, and decorative pendants. Retrofit lamps that contain the lamp, ballast, and screw base all in one unit are widely available. As a rule, however, these units...

311

IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING  

SciTech Connect

A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

Richard Zhang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

LED-Induced Fluorescence System for Tea Classification and Quality Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fluorescence system is developed by using several light emitting diodes (LEDs) with different wavelengths as excitation light sources. The fluorescence detection head consists of multi LED light sources and a multimode fiber for fluorescence collection, where the LEDs and the corresponding filters can be easily chosen to get appropriate excitation wavelengths for different applications. By analyzing fluorescence spectra with the principal component analysis method, the system is utilized in the classification of four types of green tea beverages and two types of black tea beverages. Qualities of the Xihu Longjing tea leaves of different grades, as well as the corresponding liquid tea samples, are studied to further investigate the ability and application of the system in the evaluation of classification/quality of tea and other foods.

Dong, Yongjiang; Mei, Liang; Feng, Chao; Yan, Chunsheng; He, Sailing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Interaction of a two-level atom with squeezed light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a degenerate parametric oscillator whose cavity contains a two-level atom. Applying the Heisenberg and quantum Langevin equations, we calculate in the bad-cavity limit the mean photon number, the quadrature variance, and the power spectrum for the cavity mode in general and for the signal light and fluorescent light in particular. We also obtain the normalized second-order correlation function for the fluorescent light. We find that the presence of the two-level atom leads to a decrease in the degree of squeezing of the signal light. It so turns out that the fluorescent light is in a squeezed state and the power spectrum consists of a single peak only.

Eyob Alebachew; K. Fesseha

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Light Organizing/Organizing Light [Light in Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a street through alter­ nating areas of dark and light, welandscapes, streets and squares. Light summons our spiritfor changing light, both outside rooms (such as streets and

Schwartz, Martin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Measurement and model assessment of fluorescence lifetime sensing in multiply scattering media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The generation and propagation of fluorescence light within biological tissue offers the potential for biomedical diagnostics and analyte sensing. Arising from an exogenous fluorescent dye injected as a contrast agent or immobilized in a polymer implant, the fluorescent decay kinetics can be sensitive to the tissue??s biochemical environment, providing quantitative in vivo information of the confined tissue site. The impact of light propagation and decay kinetics upon the measured signals is important for consideration, simply because tissue scatters light, giving rise to nanosecond photon time-of-flights that are comparable to fluorescence relaxation kinetics. The goal of this study is to develop a time-dependent model describing (i) the generation of fluorescence from dyes exhibiting multi-exponential or more complex kinetics and (ii) its propagation in scattering media. In the preliminary study, fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy is investigated in tissue-like scattering solution. Two fluorescent dyes, 3,3-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) and Indocynanine Green (ICG), which exhibit distinctly different lifetimes and each exhibits single-exponential decay kinetics, were employed. Measurements of phase-modulation as a function of modulation frequency were made at varying concentration ratios of the two dyes to experimentally simulate fluorescence multi-exponential decay kinetics in non-scattering and scattering solutions. The results suggest that frequency-domain measurements of fluorescent decay kinetics along with models of light propagation may be enhanced by scatter in order to probe kinetics more sensitively than in non-scattering solutions. The next study involved fluorescence lifetime sensing in scattering and non-scattering solutions with a pH sensitive dye, Carboxy Seminaphthofluorescein-1 (C-SNAFL-1), which is known to exhibit multi-exponential decay kinetics. The results demonstrate accurate pH sensing in scattering solution via fluorescence kinetics using a simplified propagation model incorporating an average lifetime. Finally, fluorescence lifetime sensing in immobilized systems were investigated. C-SNAFL-1 was immobilized in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles that were immersed in buffered polystyrene solutions. The results demonstrate the ability to perform pH sensing with fluorescence lifetime without the confounding effect of fluorophore loading or the use of 'reference' measurement within multiply scattering systems. In addition, the stability of the immobilized fluorescence sensor and the reliability of fluorescence lifetime measurement verify the prospect of this technology for implantable purposes.

Kuwana, Eddy

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Transforming the Lighting Sector with Semiconductor Lighting Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17-TED-000924-9/27 SR#2000-2333C 17-TED-000924-9/27 SR#2000-2333C Transforming the Lighting Sector With Semiconductor Lighting Technologies Thomas Drennen Sandia National Laboratories Roland Haitz Agilent Technologies Jeffrey Tsao E20 Communications Sandia National Laboratories USAEE/IAEE Annual Meetings Philadelphia, PA September 24-27, 2000 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 2 6217-TED-000924-9/27 SR#2000-2333C Overview * Introduction * U.S. Lighting Demand * Evolution of LEDs * The LED Simulation Model (LEDSim) * Results 3 6217-TED-000924-9/27 SR#2000-2333C Introduction 0 50 100 150 200 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Efficiency (lm/W) Year Incandescent Halogen Fluorescent Semi- conductor

317

Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Program Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: $2-$10 LED Task Light: $10.00 LED Night light: $1.25 Energy Star Ceiling Fan: $10 Provider Detroit Public Lighting Department The Detroit Public Lighting Department (PLD) offers residential customers rebates for energy efficient lights. In addition, low-income residential customers may qualify for free compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Specific rebate amounts, equipment requirements, and applications are available on

318

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ballast is described having at least a first and second terminal for engaging the filaments of at least one fluorescent lamp which requires a breakdown voltage to ignite the lamp and a maintaining voltage for maintaining ionization therewithin, the electronic ballast comprising: a direct current voltage source; a transistor; a transformer having a primary winding separated into a first winding, a second winding, a third winding, and a fourth winding; the first winding connected between the voltage source and the first terminal; the second winding connected between the two terminals; the third winding connected between the second terminal and to both the transistor and to ground; the fourth winding connected between ground and the transistor; the lamp being parallel to the second winding when the lamp filaments engages the ballast terminals.

Ureche, A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

Performance evaluation of fiber optic probes for tissue lifetime fluorescence spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflected light. Our findings can be applied towards optimization of fiber-optic probe designs Angeles, CA 90028. ABSTRACT The design of fiber-optic probes plays an important role in optical spectroscopic studies, including fluorescence spectroscopy of biological tissues. It can affect the light

Jones, Linda R.

320

Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions LED Lighting Facts LED lighting facts - A Program of the U.S. DOE DOE's LED Lighting Facts® program showcases LED products for general

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Typical Efficacies and Lifetimes of Lamps (1) Current Technology CRI (2) Incandescent 10 - 19 97 Halogen 14 - 20 99 Fluorescent - T5 25 - 55 52 - 75 Fluorescent - T8 35 - 87 7,500 - 20,000 52 - 90 Fluorescent - T12 35 - 92 7,500 - 20,000 50 - 92 Compact Fluorescent 40 - 70 82 Mercury Vapor 25 - 50 15 - 50 Metal Halide 65 - 70 High-Pressure Sodium 22 Low-Pressure Sodium 0 Solid State Lighting 33-97 Note(s): Source(s): 18 - 180 18,000 20 - 100 15,000 - 50,000 1) Theoretical maximum luminous efficacy of white light is 220 lumens/Watt. 2) CRI = Color Rendering Index, which indicates a lamp's ability to show natural colors. 3) The DOE Solid State Lighting program has set an efficacy goal twice that of fluorescent lights (160 lumen per Watt). DOE, EERE, Building Technology Program/Navigant Consulting, U.S. Lighting Market Characterization, Volume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy

323

Combination of fluorescence imaging and local spectrophotometry in fluorescence diagnostics of early cancer of larynx and bronchi  

SciTech Connect

The results of comparative studies of autofluorescence and 5-ALA-induced fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX, used in the diagnostics of early cancer of larynx and bronchi, are presented. The autofluorescence and 5-ALA-induced fluorescence images of larynx and bronchial tissues are analysed during the endoscopic study. The method of local spectrophotometry is used to verify findings obtained from fluorescence images. It is shown that such a combined approach can be efficiently used to improve the diagnostics of precancer and early cancer, to detect a primary multiple tumours, as well as for the diagnostics of a residual tumour or an early recurrence after the endoscopic, surgery or X-ray treatment. The developed approach allows one to minimise the number of false-positive results and to reduce the number of biopsies, which are commonly used in the white-light bronchoscopy search for occult cancerous loci. (laser biology and medicine)

Sokolov, Vladimir V; Filonenko, E V; Telegina, L V [P.A. Hertsen Moscow Research Oncological Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Boulgakova, N N; Smirnov, V V [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence”.E. Norman, UC Berkeley Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, privatepp. 349. G. Warren et al. “Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Jebel Ali Hotel PV lighting systems  

SciTech Connect

A large stand-alone PV lighting project was installed in June 1983 at the Jebel Ali Hotel in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. A high mast lighting system provides illumination for a 130 meter diameter traffic roundabout. The high mast system is powered by a 15 kilowatt peak array of Mobil Solar ribbon PV modules. Along the 700 meter access road leading to the hotel entrance, twenty-one PV powered streetlights provide low-level lighting. Each streetlight consists of a 20 watt fluorescent tube powered by two 35 Wp modules. Operation of both systems is completely automatic. Design, installation, and operating experience to date are reviewed.

Ellis, M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

Weiss, Robert B. (Salt Lake City, UT); Kimball, Alvin W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Gesteland, Raymond F. (Salt Lake City, UT); Ferguson, F. Mark (Salt Lake City, UT); Dunn, Diane M. (West Valley City, UT); Di Sera, Leonard J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Cherry, Joshua L. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A spreadsheet for analyzing the in situ performance of fluorescent luminaires  

SciTech Connect

A spreadsheet program for determining system efficacy, power input and light output of common 4 ft fluorescent lighting systems under realistic operating conditions is described. The program uses accepted IES engineering principles to precisely account for ballast factor, existing thermal conditions and maintenance practices. The spreadsheet, which includes a data base of lamp and ballast performance data, can be used to calculate the cost-effectiveness of many common lighting retrofits.

Rubinstein, F.; Zhang, Chin

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

National Synchrotron Light Source: vacuum system for National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a 24 million dollar project under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is a research facility dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron radiation is that radiation produced by the acceleration of charged particles at near the speed of light. This facility will provide a continuous spectrum of radiation from the vacuum ultraviolet to the hard x-ray range. The radiation will be highly intense, 100% polarized, extremely well collimated and will have a pulsed time structure. The radiation will be produced in two electron storage rings at energies of 700 MeV and 2.5 GeV, respectively. A maximum of one ampere at 2 GeV, or one-half ampere at 2.5 GeV, of electron beam will be stored.

Schuchman, J.C.; Godel, J.B.; Jordan, W.; Oversluizen, T.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Light Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

Gordon Chalmers

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Interference in the resonance fluorescence of two incoherently coupled transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluorescence light emitted by a 4-level system in $J=1/2$ to $J=1/2$ configuration driven by a monochromatic laser field and in an external magnetic field is studied. We show that the spectrum of resonance fluorescence emitted on the $\\pi$ transitions shows a signature of spontaneously generated interference effects. The degree of interference in the fluorescence spectrum can be controlled by means of the external magnetic field, provided that the Land\\'e g-factors of the excited and the ground state doublet are different. For a suitably chosen magnetic field strength, the relative weight of the Rayleigh line can be completely suppressed, even for low intensities of the coherent driving field. The incoherent fluorescence spectrum emitted on the $\\pi$ transitions exhibits a very narrow peak whose width and weight depends on the magnetic field strength. We demonstrate that the spectrum of resonance fluorescence emitted on the $\\sigma$ transitions show an indirect signature of interference. A measurement of the relative peak heights in the spectrum from the $\\sigma$ transitions allows to determine the branching ratio of the spontaneous decay of each excited state into the $\\sigma$ channel.

Martin Kiffner; Joerg Evers; Christoph H. Keitel

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

332

EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extensively in concert lighting and are finding increased usage in dance lighting because refers to the upstage back curtain (is white or a light color), which can be us for lighting or special Mixer #12;Monitor House speaker Lighting System Control Board: Similar to the sound board, the light

Bifano, Thomas

333

Texas Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electric lighting electric lighting The SNAP House's lighting design aims for elegant simplicity in concept, use, and maintenance. Throughout the house, soft, ambient light is juxtaposed with bright, direct task lighting. All ambient and most task lighting is integrated directly into the architectural design of the house. An accent light wall between the bedroom and bathroom provides a glowing light for nighttime navigation.

334

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method. 6 figs.

Jeffers, L.A.; Malito, M.L.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method.

Jeffers, Larry A. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH); Malito, Michael L. (Liberty Township, Trumbull County, OH)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Light Emitting Diode (LED) Lighting and Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the most promising and unique energy efficient light source light emitting diode (LED) lighting. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the upcoming growth of the LED and LED lighting market. Future technical improvements to LEDs and systems are also emphasized. Discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from traditional lighting to LED lighting is provided. LED lighting technologies are covered in...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Assessment: Free Lighting Retrofit: 70% of cost Provider RG&E and NYSEG NYSEG offers a lighting incentive program designed to serve small business customers with a demand of 100 kilowatts (kW) or less. These small business customers may schedule a free energy assessment and then receive a 70% discount on the installed cost of recommended lighting measures. Eligible lighting measures include the retrofitting of fluorescent fixtures,

339

The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb November 22, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis History of the Light Bulb Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Integration Specialist What are the key facts? Like all great inventions, the light bulb can't be credited to one inventor. It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors that have led to the light bulbs we use in our homes today. Learn more about the history of the incandescent light bulb. Explore the history of fluorescent lights, from the Geissler tube to CFLs. Read about the advancements in LED lights. More than 150 years ago, inventors began working on a bright idea that would have a dramatic impact on how we use energy in our homes and offices.

340

The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb November 22, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis History of the Light Bulb Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Integration Specialist What are the key facts? Like all great inventions, the light bulb can't be credited to one inventor. It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors that have led to the light bulbs we use in our homes today. Learn more about the history of the incandescent light bulb. Explore the history of fluorescent lights, from the Geissler tube to CFLs. Read about the advancements in LED lights. More than 150 years ago, inventors began working on a bright idea that would have a dramatic impact on how we use energy in our homes and offices.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The effects of supply harmonics on the performance of compact fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a performance evaluation of ten compact fluorescent lighting systems operated with sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform conditions. The lamps were either provided with an electronic ballast, a magnetic core ballast or a magnetic core ballast with a power factor correction circuit. The test results show that the electrical performance of the compact fluorescent lamps for both sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform operation is related to the different types of ballast used. The cost of operation of these compact fluorescent lamps was calculated and compared to the cost of a conventional 60 W incandescent lamp.

Arseneau, R.; Ouellette, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Tired of changing light bulbs AND want to save money? Still using 100 year-old technology?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tired of changing light bulbs AND want to save money? Still using 100 year-old technology? TAKE THE COMPACT FLUORESCENT LIGHT BULB CHALLENGE! · A 23 W Compact bulb gives the same light as a 100W regular are you waiting for? Count up the number of light bulbs in your home and go out and replace them

343

Energy Savings Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes in Niche Lighting Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes Savings Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes in Niche Lighting Applications Prepared for: Building Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Navigant Consulting Inc. 1801 K Street, NW Suite 500 Washington DC, 20006 September 2008 * Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Savings Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes in Niche Lighting Applications Released: September 2008 Revised: October 2008 This DOE report presents research findings for twelve different niche markets where LEDs are competing or poised to compete with traditional light sources (e.g., incandescent and fluorescent). Estimates of the energy saved due to current levels of LED market penetration as well as estimates of potential energy savings if these markets switched completely to LEDs

344

Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

Pellegrini, Claudio [UCLA

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

346

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

347

L&E - high efficiency lighting for parking structure | The Better Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

structure structure Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Adopt high-efficiency lighting for your parking structure Parking structures and garages are typically lighted by older HID lighting technology without any energy-saving controls. The latest high-efficiency alternatives with energy-saving controls-including light-emitting diode (LED), induction, and fluorescent technology options-can save building owners over 40% on their parking lot lighting bills while delivering additional benefits such as better-lighted spaces. The Lighting & Electrical team developed a performance specification that

348

Survey and Forecast of Marketplace Supply and Demand for Energy-Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility incentive programs have placed significant demands on the suppliers of certain types of energy-efficient lighting products--particularly compact fluorescent lamps and electronic ballasts. Two major federal programs may soon place even greater demands on the lighting industry. This report assesses the program-induced demand for efficient lighting products and their likely near-term supply.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Poly(p-phenylene vinylene)/tris(8-hydroxy) quinoline aluminum heterostructure light emitting diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poly(p-phenylene vinylene)/tris(8-hydroxy) quinoline aluminum heterostructure light emitting diode are presented from polymer/molecular organic heterostructure light emitting diodes composed of a layer,2 organic light emitting diodes OLEDs utilizing fluorescent molecules have attracted considerable interest

350

Energy and lighting design  

SciTech Connect

A detailed examination of the current energy conservation practices for lighting systems is presented. This first part of a two-part presentation covers the following: energy and lighting design; lighting and energy standards; lighting efficiency factors; light control and photometrics; lighting and the architectural interior; luminaire impact on the environment; basic design techniques; the lighting power budget; and conservation through control.

Helms, R.N.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Light Emitting Diodes and General Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Emitting Diodes and General Lighting Speaker(s): Martin Moeck Date: August 6, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 We give a short overview on high-power light emitting diodes,...

352

Ameren Illinois - Lighting Rebates for Businesses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Lighting Rebates for Businesses - Lighting Rebates for Businesses Ameren Illinois - Lighting Rebates for Businesses < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $600,000/year/facility Incentives $1-$200,000: paid at 100% Incentives $200,000- $600,000: paid at 50% Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge Expiration Date 5/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fluorescent U-Bend Relamp and Reballast: $0.25/watt reduced T12 to T8 Relamp and Reballast: $0.25/watt reduced T12 to T5 Fluorescent Fixture: $0.25/watt reduced T8 to reduced wattage T8 or T5 Relamp and Reballast: $0.40/watt reduced

353

Evaluation of Lighting and Lighting Control Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting and lighting controls have been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. Advances in lighting sources often allow for the conservation of quality of light while providing more flexibility in the control of light. Additionally, advances in core technologies within the lighting marketplace regularly lead to the introduction of new lamps, fixtures and controls.  With the rapid introduction of new products and designs, it is important to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

HIGH INTENSITY PERFORMANCE OF THE BROOKHAVEN AGS.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven AGS provides 24 GeV protons for a multi-user program of fixed-target high energy physics experiments, such as the study of extremely rare Kaon decays. Up to 7 x 10{sup 13} protons are slowly extracted over 2.2 seconds each 5.1 seconds. The muon storage ring of the g-2 experiment is supplied with bunches of 7 x 10{sup 12} protons. Since the completion of the a 1.9 GeV Booster synchrotron and installation of a new high-power rf system and transition jump system in the AGS various modes of operation have been explored to overcome space charge limits and beam instabilities at these extreme beam intensities. Experiments have been done using barrier cavities to enable accumulation of debunched beam in the AGS as a potential path to significantly higher intensities. We report on the present understanding of intensity limitations and prospects for overcoming them.

AHRENS,L.A.; ALESSI,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BROWN,K.; GARDNER,C.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,K.S.; VAN ASSELT,W.; ZHANG,S.Y.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

355

Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons  

SciTech Connect

The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

Weng, W.T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Aspects of a high intensity neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique methodology for creating a neutron source model was developed for deuterons and protons incident on solid phase beryllium and lithium targets. This model was then validated against experimental results already ...

Chapman, Peter H. (Peter Henry)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.  

SciTech Connect

Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Lighting Group: Controls: PIER Lighting Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIER Lighting Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects Objective Lighting controls are often expensive, complex, hard to commission properly and difficult to...

359

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated...

360

Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

None

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source Via partnership with whole sale provider Brazos Electric Power, Inc. and escheat funds Start Date 09/01/2009 State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting Upgrade: 0.30/watt saved per fixture T8 Fluorescent Upgrade: 1.50 - 2.25/bulb per fixture Provider CoServ Electric Cooperative CoServ Electric Cooperative provides rebates for commercial and industrial customers who upgrade to high efficiency lighting for the workplace. A rebate of $0.30/watt saved is available on custom lighting upgrades and a

362

New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Bay LED Lighting High Bay LED Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting October 7, 2013 - 8:55am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for high bay LED lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits LED light sources offer several potential benefits compared to metal halide or fluorescent lighting, including reduced energy consumption due to the ability to provide a more precise light distribution; longer operating life and lower maintenance requirements; less heat introduced into the space; and greater controllability for dimming and on/off control. Relevant to the cold storage application, LED performance improves in colder temperatures. Application High bay LED lighting is applicable for facilities containing high bay

363

Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

Fedele, Francesco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Eppstein, Margaret J. [Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)]. E-mail: maggie.eppstein@uvm.edu; Laible, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Godavarty, Anuradha [Photon Migration Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States); Sevick-Muraca, Eva M. [Photon Migration Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States)

2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Tailoring optical properties of light-emitting diodes by nanostructuring with nanospheres.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???III-V nitride based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have experienced rapid developments during past decade, proving their potential to substitute conventional incandescent bulbs and fluorescent lamps to… (more)

??

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Bliss headquarters building, lighting retrofit, Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to analyze the use of high efficiency fluorescent lighting with energy efficient lamps and electronic ballast for the Headquarters Building (Bldg. number 2) at Fort Bliss.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.

Nause, Jeff E; Ferguson, Ian; Doolittle, Alan

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Next Generation Light Source  

•Next Generation Light Source – Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination •High Entry Barrier – 71 ...

368

Measuring the Natural Fluorescence of Phytoplankton Cultures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory instrument, the Natural Fluorescence Chemostat, was developed to measure the natural fluorescence of phytoplankton cultures. With this instrument, the physical and chemical environment of a culture can be manipulated with respect to ...

S. R. Laney; R. M. Letelier; R. A. Desiderio; M. R. Abbott; D. A. Kiefer; C. R. Booth

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

First Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first dwarf galaxies, which constitute the building blocks of the collapsed objects we find today in the Universe, had formed hundreds of millions of years after the big bang. This pedagogical review describes the early growth of their small-amplitude seed fluctuations from the epoch of inflation through dark matter decoupling and matter-radiation equality, to the final collapse and fragmentation of the dark matter on all mass scales above \\~10^{-4} solar masses. The condensation of baryons into halos in the mass range of ~10^5-10^{10} solar masses led to the formation of the first stars and the re-ionization of the cold hydrogen gas, left over from the big bang. The production of heavy elements by the first stars started the metal enrichment process that eventually led to the formation of rocky planets and life. A wide variety of instruments currently under design [including large-aperture infrared telescopes on the ground or in space (JWST), and low-frequency arrays for the detection of redshifted 21cm radiation], will establish better understanding of the first sources of light during an epoch in cosmic history that was largely unexplored so far. Numerical simulations of reionization are computationally challenging, as they require radiative transfer across large cosmological volumes as well as sufficently high resolution to identify the sources of the ionizing radiation. The technological challenges for observations and the computational challenges for numerical simulations, will motivate intense work in this field over the coming decade.

Abraham Loeb

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

370

New Lighting Fixtures: Combining Creativity and Style with Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This article for a building trade magazine describes a national design competition for energy efficient lighting sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the American Lighting Association, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, with winners announced at ALA's Annual Conference May 14, 2004, in Tucson. The Lighting for Tomorrow competition was the first national lighting fixture design competition focusing on energy-efficient residential lighting. The competition invited fixture manufacturers and designers to come up with beautiful, functional lighting fixtures that also happen to be energy efficient. Fixtures were required to use a ''dedicated'' energy-efficient light source, such as a pin-based fluorescent lamp that cannot be replaced with a screw-in incandescent bulb. Fixtures also had to meet a minimum energy efficiency level that eliminated use of incandescent and halogen lamps, leaving the door open only to fluorescent sources and LEDs. More than 150 paper designs were submitted in the first phase of the competition, in 2003. Of those, 24 finalists were invited to submit working prototypes in 2004, and the winners were announced in May. The Grand Prize of $10,000 went to American Fluorescent of Waukegan, Illinois, for its ''Salem'' chandelier. Some winning fixtures are already available through Lowe's Home Improvement Centers.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Foster, Rebecca; McGowan, Terry

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Lighting When you're shopping for lightbulbs, compare lumens and use the Lighting Facts label to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want. You can save money and energy while lighting your home and still maintaining good light quantity and quality. Consider energy-efficient lighting options to use the same amount of light for less money. Learn strategies for comparing and buying lighting products and using them efficiently. Featured Lighting Choices to Save You Money Light your home for less money while using the same amount of light. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home.

372

Quantum Dot Fluorescence Lifetime Engineering with DNA ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum Dot Fluorescence Lifetime Engineering with DNA Origami ... such as metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots – is challenging ...

373

Bright White Light Emission from Ultrasmall Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple treatment method using formic acid has been found to increase the fluorescence quantum yield of ultrasmall white light-emitting CdSe nanocrystals from 8% to 45%. Brighter white-light emission occurs with other carboxylic acids as well, and the magnitude of the quantum yield enhancement is shown to be dependent on the alkyl chain length. Additionally, the nanocrystal luminescence remains enhanced relative to the untreated nanocrystals over several days. This brightened emission opens the possibility for even further quantum yield improvement and potential for use of these white-light nanocrystals in solid-state lighting applications.

Rosson, Teresa [Vanderbilt University; Claiborne, Sarah [Vanderbilt University; McBride, James [Vanderbilt University; Stratton, Benjamin S [Vanderbilt University; Rosenthal, Sandra [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases  

SciTech Connect

We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

Ave, M.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Bohacova, M.; /Chicago U., EFI; Daumiller, K.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Di Carlo, P.; /INFN, Aquila; Di Giulio, C.; /INFN, Rome; Luis, P.Facal San; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzales, D.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Hojvat, C.; /Fermilab; Horandel, J.R.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Hrabovsky, M.; /Palacky U.; Iarlori, M.; /INFN, Aquila /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging technology, also called "solid state lighting" as it is light produced by a solid-state (chip) device - General Service Incandescent Lamp: The most common residential light bulb in use, with a medium screw base, and a lumen range of 310 to 2,600 lumens

376

DOE Launches Change a Light, Change the World Campaign | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change a Light, Change the World Campaign Change a Light, Change the World Campaign DOE Launches Change a Light, Change the World Campaign October 3, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis Encourages Americans to Pledge to Change One Light to an Efficient Compact Fluorescent Lightbulb WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today launched the 2007 Change a Light, Change the World campaign encouraging every American to change at least one light at home to an ENERGY STAR® Compact Fluorescent Light bulb (CFL). These bulbs are estimated to use 75 percent less energy than standard bulbs and last up to ten times longer, resulting in fewer greenhouse gas emissions and substantial energy savings. This national call to action encourages all Americans to help change the world, one light - one energy-saving step - at

377

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory Speaker(s): Mehlika Inanici Date: July 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney Virtual Lighting Laboratory is a Radiance-based lighting analysis tool and methodology that proposes transformations in the utilization of computer visualization in lighting analysis and design decision-making. It is a computer environment, where the user has been provided with matrices of illuminance and luminance values extracted from high dynamic range images. The principal idea is to provide the laboratory to the designer and researcher to explore various lighting analysis techniques instead of imposing limited number of predetermined metrics. In addition, it introduces an analysis approach for temporal and spatial lighting

378

Intense Internal and External Fluorescence as Solar Cells Approach the Shockley-Queisser Efficiency Limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorbed sunlight in a solar cell produces electrons and holes. But, at the open circuit condition, the carriers have no place to go. They build up in density and, ideally, they emit external fluorescence that exactly balances the incoming sunlight. Any additional non-radiative recombination impairs the carrier density buildup, limiting the open-circuit voltage. At open-circuit, efficient external fluorescence is an indicator of low internal optical losses. Thus efficient external fluorescence is, counter-intuitively, a necessity for approaching the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. A great Solar Cell also needs to be a great Light Emitting Diode. Owing to the narrow escape cone for light, efficient external emission requires repeated attempts, and demands an internal luminescence efficiency >>90%.

Miller, Owen D; Kurtz, Sarah R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

New and Underutilized Technology: Spectrally Enhanced Lighting | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Spectrally Enhanced Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for spectrally enhanced lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research studies show that simply shifting the color of fluorescent lamps from the warmer yellow to the cooler blue end of the color spectrum allows people to see things more clearly and for spaces to appear brighter. By changing the light color to be more like daylight, lighting levels can be reduced to save energy while still achieving the same visual acuity. Conventional practices use lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3,000K to 4,100K. Spectrally enhanced lighting uses lamps with a CCT of

380

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

Siminovitch, M.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Structural Evidence for a Dehydrated Intermediate in Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Biosynthesis*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-OvchinnikovInstituteofBioorganicChemistry,RussianAcademyofSciences,117997GSP,MoscowV-437,Russia, the ¶ Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, Macromolecular undergoes irreversible photoconversion to a green fluorescent state under UV light exposure. Here we present in the chemical structure of the internal chromophore group and in the stereochemistry of its adjacent environment.

Wlodawer, Alexander

382

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

SciTech Connect

A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

Siminovitch, Michael (El Sobrante, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Multi-Photon Phosphor Feasibility Research: Advanced Light Source Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiencies of commercial light sources have reached a plateau at about 33 percent of the maximum possible, but these efficiencies will have to be doubled to achieve the energy savings in lighting needed in the future. One possibility is to develop phosphor materials for application to fluorescent lamps that emit two visible photons for each absorbed ultraviolet photon. Scientists discussed the possibility of developing such phosphor materials at a workshop held May 8 through May 10, 2001 in Peabody, Ma...

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Mobile lighting apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Laser remote sensing of backscattered light from a target sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser remote sensing apparatus comprises a laser to provide collimated excitation light at a wavelength; a sensing optic, comprising at least one optical element having a front receiving surface to focus the received excitation light onto a back surface comprising a target sample and wherein the target sample emits a return light signal that is recollimated by the front receiving surface; a telescope for collecting the recollimated return light signal from the sensing optic; and a detector for detecting and spectrally resolving the return light signal. The back surface further can comprise a substrate that absorbs the target sample from an environment. For example the substrate can be a SERS substrate comprising a roughened metal surface. The return light signal can be a surface-enhanced Raman signal or laser-induced fluorescence signal. For fluorescence applications, the return signal can be enhanced by about 10.sup.5, solely due to recollimation of the fluorescence return signal. For SERS applications, the return signal can be enhanced by 10.sup.9 or more, due both to recollimation and to structuring of the SERS substrate so that the incident laser and Raman scattered fields are in resonance with the surface plasmons of the SERS substrate.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, John D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

387

McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs McMinnville Water and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount McMinnville Water and Light Company Provider McMinnville Water and Light McMinnville Water and Light Company offers a variety of rebates for commercial and industrial customers to make energy efficient improvements to eligible facilities. MW&L offers rebates in three categories: Lighting retrofits, motor replacements, and process efficiency. Past lighting projects have included fluorescent lighting retrofits, mercury vapor

388

Considering lighting system performance and HVAC interactions in lighting retrofit analyses  

SciTech Connect

The performance of several typical fluorescent lighting retrofits are examined using analysis methods of varying sophistication. Estimates of energy and lighting performance based on the simple non-application specific data generally available tend to overestimate the energy savings obtained with the various retrofits by 10-30%. Adding a simple correction to account for cooling benefits exacerbates the error unless heating penalties are also considered. An analysis method that takes into account the thermal application factor of the lighting system shows that the error is typically due to systematically overestimating the energy usage of the original lighting system. If thermal application factor is considered, then detailed HVAC calculations do not significantly improve the energy-savings estimate.

Franconi, E.; Rubinstein, F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Geometry-dependent lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper we introduce geometrydependent lighting that allows lighting parameters to be defined independently and possibly discrepantly over an object or scene based on the local geometry. We present and discuss Light Collages, a lighting design system with geometry-dependent lights for effective feature-enhanced visualization. Our algorithm segments the objects into local surface patches and places lights that are locally consistent but globally discrepant to enhance the perception of shape. We use spherical harmonics for efficiently storing and computing light placement and assignment. We also outline a method to find the minimal number of light sources sufficient to illuminate an object well with our globally discrepant lighting approach. Index Terms — Lighting design, scientific illustration, discrepant lighting, light placement, silhouette enhancement, proximity shadows, spherical harmonics I.

Chang Ha Lee; Xuejun Hao; Amitabh Varshney

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Lighting Group: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New in the Lighting Group For more information on what's new in the Lighting Group, please contact: Francis Rubinstein Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4096...

391

Light in the city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on enhancing the awareness of light for the pedestrian,and using light as a way of revealing the structure of the city and its relation to the cosmos. It proposes that aesthetic qualities of light inform ...

Srinivasan, Kavita, 1976-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Specific light in sculpture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

Powell, John William

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Energy_Savings_Light_Emitting_Diodes_Niche_Lighting_Apps.pdf...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergySavingsLightEmittingDiodesNicheLightingApps.pdf EnergySavingsLightEmittingDiodesNicheLightingApps.pdf EnergySavingsLightEmittingDiodesNicheLightingApps.p...

394

Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J. [327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); 1011 Richardson Building, Photon Migration Laboratories, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); 327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for characterizing the spread of contamination and testing the barrier integrity of a new glovebox during material transfer operations and glove change-outs using fluorescent powder. Argonne National Laboratory-West has performed this test on several new gloveboxes prior to putting them into service. The test is performed after the glovebox has been leak tested and all systems have been verified to be operational. The purpose of the test is to show that bag-in/bag-out operations and glove change-outs can be accomplished without spreading the actual contaminated material to non-contaminated areas. The characterization test also provides information as to where contamination might be expected to build-up during actual operations. The fluorescent powder is used because it is easily detectable using an ultra-violet light and disperses in a similar fashion to radioactive material. The characterization and barrier integrity test of a glovebox using fluorescent powder provides a visual method of determining areas of potential contamination accumulation and helps evaluate the ability to perform clean transfer operations and glove change-outs.

Wahlquist, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Prospects for LED lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state lighting using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has the potential to reduce energy consumption for lighting by 50% while revolutionizing the way we illuminate our homes, work places, and public spaces. Nevertheless, substantial technical challenges remain in order for solid-state lighting to significantly displace the well-developed conventional lighting technologies. We review the potential of LED solid-state lighting to meet the long-term cost goals.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Gee, James Martin; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for lighting control systems in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities is on the rise with the demand for increased energy savings. With lighting accounting for almost 23% of grid load, there is significant opportunity to reduce lighting load while improving the quality of light for customers. Lighting control systems are becoming more intelligent as the need for them to interface with building control systems and demand response systems also increases. Lighting control systems use...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Composite Lighting Simulations with Lighting Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A whole variety of different techniques for simulating global illumination in virtual environments have been developed over recent years. Each technique, including Radiosity, Monte-Carlo ray- or photon tracing, and directional-dependent Radiance computations, is best suited for simulating only some special case environments. None of these techniques is currently able to efficiently simulate all important lighting effects in non-trivial scenes. In this paper, we describe a new approach for efficiently combining different global illumination algorithms to yield a composite lighting simulation: Lighting Networks. Lighting Networks can exploit the advantages of each algorithm and can combine them in such a way as to simulate lighting effects that could only be computed at great costs by any single algorithm. Furthermore, this approach allows a user to configure the Lighting Network to compute only specific lighting effects that are important for a given task, while avoiding a costly simulation of the full global illumination in a scene. We show how the light paths computed by a Lighting Network can be described using regular expressions. This mapping allows us to analyze the composite lighting simulation and ensure completeness and redundant-free computations. Several examples demonstrate the advantages and unique lighting effects that can be obtained using this technique. 1

Philipp Slusallek; Marc Stamminger; Wolfgang Heidrich; Jan-Christian Popp; Hans-peter Seidel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Lighting Group: Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Links Organizations Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) International Commission on Illumination (CIE) International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) International Association of Energy-Efficient Lighting Lightfair International Energy Agency - Task 21: Daylight in Buildings: Design Tools and Performance Analysis International Energy Agency - Task 31: Daylighting Buildings in 21st Century National Association on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions (NCQLP) National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors (NAILD) International Association of Lighting Management Companies (NALMCO) Research Centers California Lighting Technology Center Lighting Research Center Lighting Research at Canada Institute for Research in Construction

400

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Light Laboratory, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hubbell Lighting Photometric Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Energy Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Road Vista, San Diego, CA [200823- 0] Light Laboratory, Inc ... GA. CSA Group, Alpharetta, GA [200732- 0] Cooper Lighting Photometric Laboratory ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Light Metals 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... Softcover book: Light Metals 2008 Volume 2: Aluminum Reduction. Hardcover book and CD-ROM: Light Metals 2009 ...

405

Plant and Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publicationshouseplantligh t.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach "Artificial" light comes from many kinds of bulbs that emit different wavelengths of light; Many plants...

406

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Angle Limit," Phys. Rev. Lett., 99: 134801 (2007). 33 Researchers Produce Firsts with Bursts of Light BNL researchers have generated extremely short pulses of light that are the...

407

Lighting and Daylighting Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by using daylighting, or the process of using natural sunlight, windows, and skylights to provide lighting.

408

Lighting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Lighting Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Lighting Incentives...

409

Lighting Systems Test Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement equipment with light beam Lighting Systems Test Facilities NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be...

410

Lighting and Daylighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by using daylighting, or the process of using natural sunlight, windows, and skylights to provide lighting.

411

Looking For Light.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In my search for the way light can dictate the overall expression of an image, I have found that light is the means that activates… (more)

Lindholm, Kevin R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

LBNL Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED and ballast berkeley lamp workstation light switch Overview | What's New | Publications | Software | Facilities | People | Contact Us | Links Sources and Ballasts | Light...

413

Properties of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scattering of Light. Exploration: Sunset in a glass. ... How would you design a camera that could see through a sand storm? Invisible Light. ...

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Evaluating office lighting environments: Second-level analysis  

SciTech Connect

Data from a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) of 912 work stations with lighting power density (LPD), photometric, and occupant-response measures were examined in a detailed, second-level analysis. Seven types of lighting systems were identified with different combinations of direct and indirect ambient lighting, and task lighting and daylight. The mean illuminances at the primary task location were within the IES target values for office task with a range of mean illuminances from 32 to 75 fc, depending on the lighting system. The median LPD was about 2.36 watts/sq ft, with about one-third the work stations having LPD's at or below 2.0 watts/sq ft. Although a majority of the occupants (69%) were satisfied about their lighting, the highest percentage of those expressing dissatisfaction (37%) with lighting had an indirect fluorescent furniture-mounted (IFFM) system. The negative reaction of so many people to the IFFM system suggests that the combination of task lighting with an indirect ambient system had an important influence on lighting satisfaction, even though task illuminances tended to be higher with the IFFM system. Concepts of lighting quality, visual health, and control were explored, as well as average luminance to explain the negative reactions to the combination of indirect lighting with furniture-mounted lighting.

Collins, B.L.; Fisher, W.S.; Gillette, G.L.; Marans, R.W.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Cree LED Lighting Solutions Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures LLF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cree LED Lighting Solutions Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures LLF Jump to: navigation, search Name Cree LED Lighting Solutions (Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures (LLF)) Place...

416

Neptun Light: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-3504) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Neptun Light: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-3504) Neptun Light: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-3504) Neptun Light: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-3504) May 2, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Neptun Light, Inc. failed to certify a variety of medium base compact fluorescent lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Neptun Light: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-3504) More Documents & Publications Neptun Light: Order (2012-SE-3504) Excellence Opto: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-49002)

417

How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents July 29, 2012 - 6:25pm Addthis Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Compared to traditional incandescents, energy-efficient lightbulbs such as energy-saving incandescents, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and light emitting diodes (LEDs) have the following advantages: Typically use about 25%-80% less energy, saving you money

418

Blue-green and green phosphors for lighting applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Embodiments of the present techniques provide a related family of phosphors that may be used in lighting systems to generate blue or blue-green light. The phosphors include systems having a general formula of: ((Sr.sub.1-zM.sub.z).sub.1-(x+w)A.sub.wCe.sub.x).sub.3(Al.sub.1-ySi.s- ub.y)O.sub.4+y+3(x-w)F.sub.1-y-3(x-w) (I), wherein 0lighting systems, such as LEDs and fluorescent tubes, among others, to produce blue and blue/green light. Further, the phosphors may be used in blends with other phosphors, or in combined lighting systems, to produce white light suitable for illumination.

Setlur, Anant Achyut; Chandran, Ramachandran Gopi; Henderson, Claire Susan; Nammalwar, Pransanth Kumar; Radkov, Emil

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

Semiconductor Nanocrystals-Based White Light Emitting Diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the demands for energy and the concerns of global warming and climate change, energy efficient and environmentally friendly solid state lighting, such as white light emitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the most promising and suitable light source. Because of their small size, high efficiency, and long lifetime, WLEDs based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are emerging as a completely new technology platform for the development of flat-panel displays and solid state lighting, exhibiting the potential to replace the conventionally used incandescent and fluorescent lamps. This replacement could cut the ever-increasing energy consumption, solve the problem of rapidly depleting fossil fuel reserves, and improve the quality of the global environment. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in semiconductor nanocrystals-based WLEDs, compare different approaches for generating white light, and discuss the benefits and challenges of the solid state lighting technology.

Dai, Quanqin [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Performance of T12 and T8 Fluorescent Lamps and Troffers and LED Linear Replacement Lamps CALiPER Benchmark Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Commercially Available LED Product Evaluation and Reporting (CALiPER) Program was established in 2006 to investigate the performance of light-emitting diode (LED) based luminaires and replacement lamps. To help users better compare LED products with conventional lighting technologies, CALiPER has also performed benchmark research and testing of traditional (i.e., non-LED) lamps and fixtures. This benchmark report addresses standard 4-foot fluorescent lamps (i.e., T12 and T8) and the 2-foot by 4-foot recessed troffers in which they are commonly used. This report also examines available LED replacements for T12 and T8 fluorescent lamps, and their application in fluorescent troffers. The construction and operation of linear fluorescent lamps and troffers are discussed, as well as fluorescent lamp and fixture performance, based on manufacturer data and CALiPER benchmark testing. In addition, the report describes LED replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, and compares their bare lamp and in situ performance with fluorescent benchmarks on a range of standard lighting measures, including power usage, light output and distribution, efficacy, correlated color temperature, and the color rendering index. Potential performance and application issues indicated by CALiPER testing results are also examined.

Myer, Michael; Paget, Maria L.; Lingard, Robert D.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy conserving automatic light output system  

SciTech Connect

An energy conserving lighting system is provided wherein a plurality of fluorescent lamps are powered by a poorly regulated voltage source power supply which provides a decreasing supply voltage with increasing arc current so as to generally match the volt-ampere characteristics of the lamps. A transistor ballast and control circuit connected in the arc current path controls the arc current, and hence the light output, in accordance with the total ambient light, i.e., the light produced by the lamps together with whatever further light is produced by other sources such as daylight. In another embodiment, a transistor ballast is utilized in combination with an inductive ballast. The transistor ballast provides current control over a wide dynamic range up to a design current maximum at which maximum the transistor is saturated and the inductive ballast takes over the current limiting function. An operational amplifier is preferably connected in the base biassing circuit of the control transistor of the transistor ballast. In an embodiment wherein two sets of lamps with separate inductive ballasts are provided, the arc currents for the two ballasts are scaled or matched to provide the desired light output.

Widmayer, D.F.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

Seibert, Michael (Lakewood, CO); Makarova, Valeriya (Golden, CO); Tsygankov, Anatoly A. (Pushchino, RU); Rubin, Andrew B. (Moscow, RU)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Bremsstrahlung-induced K fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Bremsstrahlung radiation can be used to excite nearly monoenergetic x rays in secondary targets, which are then used to study the energy response of radiation detectors if the intensity and purity are known. A method is suggested for calculating the spectral intensity of the secondary target radiation, including K-fluorescent x rays, and the bremsstrahlung and characteristic line radiation scattered from the target. Coherent and incoherent scatter are included in the calculation. To test the theory, bremsstrahlung radiation from an x-ray unit operating in the 100- to 300-kV potential range was used to excite K-fluorescent radiation in secondary targets that range in atomic number from 29 to 90. The primary and secondary spectra were measured with NaI, silicon, and germanium detectors. The measured primary spectral intensities were used as input to the secondary spectral intensity calculation. Calculated secondary spectra were within 20 percent agreement with measurement. Optimization of the secondary target intensity and purity is discussed as a function of target thickness, potential, and selective filtration.

Storm, E.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Sandia National Laboratories Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

As shown in the figure, a small excitation source, such as a laser or LED, excites a localized area of fluorescence at an unknown position along the

425

Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lighting is the most common type of lighting used in homes. Incandescent lamps operate...

426

Solid-State Lighting: Registration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting: Registration on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Registration on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Registration on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting:...

427

Solid-State Lighting: Postings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid-State Lighting: Postings on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Postings on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Postings on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting:...

428

Quenching-independent measurement of species concentrations in flames by laser-induced fluorescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work accomplished in the last two years on measurement of species concentrations in flames via laser-induced fluorescence. During this period, we have published absolute number densities of atomic hydrogen in subatmospheric, premixed C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/Ar flames at equivalence ratios of 1.0 and 1.7 via two-photon excited fluorescence. This work has led to the development of a new single-laser, two-step fluorescence method for the detection of atomic hydrogen in flames. Using photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS), we have verified the T{sup {minus}1/2} dependence of quenching on temperature for atomic hydrogen, in agreement with kinetic theory. Previous work on pyrometry using laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and the anomalous fluorescence from pyrene has evolved into publication of a major review paper on temperature measurements by light-scattering methods. Finally, we have demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative LSF measurements of NO concentration by obtaining relative saturation curves and NO fluorescence profiles. 25 refs.

Salmon, J.T.; Carter, C.D.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Research Group overview what's new publications software facilities people contact us links...

430

Energy and lighting decisions  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the fundamental principles of lighting and uses them to evaluate energy-conserving lighting equipment and techniques. The selection of the proper lighting components and systems is complex, requiring a knowledge of the characteristics of light sources and their interactions with the auxiliary equipment and the environment. Furthermore, there are subjective aspects of lighting that are difficult to quantify. We address the simplistic way in which lighting is commonly approached, then present an argument as to the critical nature of the lighting decision. In the final sections we discuss and evaluate lighting equipment in terms of its applications and characteristics. Familiarity with the fundamental characteristics of the elements of lighting equipment will also permit more judicious appraisal and use of lighting concepts that may be introduced in the future. 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strand Basic Palette 400 channel 800 attrib. 1 Strand Lighting 200 Series 24/48 1 1 MicroVision 2 HORIZON

Indiana University

432

Lighting Retrofit Study  

SciTech Connect

The Lighting Retrofit Study was an effort to determine the most cost-effective methods of retrofitting several configurations of lighting systems at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). We developed a test protocol to compare a variety of lighting technologies for their applicability in labs and offices and designed and constructed a novel lighting contrast potential meter to allow for comparison of lighting quality as well as quantity.

Kromer, S.; Morse, O.; Siminovitch, M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

EXC-12-0005 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies 5 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies EXC-12-0005 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies On July 10, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Halco Lighting Technologies (Halco) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, Halco asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL). Specifically, Halco cited previous requests for

434

EXC-12-0014 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation 4 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation EXC-12-0014 - In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation On November 16, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Topaz Lighting Corporation (Topaz) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, Topaz asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL). Specifically, Topaz cited a previous OHA

435

EXC-12-0011 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation 1 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation EXC-12-0011 - In the Matter of Westinghouse Lighting Corporation On September 17, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Westinghouse Lighting Corporation (Westinghouse) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, Westinghouse asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the Lighting Efficiency Standards, which became effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL).

436

PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

4 4 PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC w I Project Accomplishments Summary (Attachment I) CRADA NO. TSB-1449-97 Date: U 1 8 1 9 8 Revision: 1 A . Parties The project is a relationship between the Lawrence Livennore National Laboratoq (LLNL) and Optiphase, Inc. University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 7000 East Avenue, L-399 Livermore, CA 94550 Optiphase, h c 7652 Haskell Ave. Van Nuys, CA 91406 Technical Contact - D r . Pepe Davis (8 18)782-0997ext 1 12 B . Background Fiber-optic-based sensors are excellent candidates for detecting the presence and monitoring the levels of degradation products in stockpiled weapons. Specifically, fl uorescence-based sensors are extremely sensitive, can have high specificity for compounds of interest, and are "e~ectrically

437

Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) has the potential of addressing a wide variety of applications, which require isotopic and/or elemental information about a sample. We have investigated a variety of non-proliferation applications that may be addressed by NRF. From these applications, we have selected two, measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders and material verification in dismantlement, to investigate in more detail. Analytical models have been developed to evaluate these applications, and test measurements have been conducted to validate those models. We found that it is unlikely with current technology to address the requirements for UF6 cylinder enrichment measurements. In contrast, NRF is a very promising approach for material verification for dismantlement.

Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Peplowski, Patrick N.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

438

Illuminating the Pecking Order in Off-Grid Lighting: A Demonstration of LED Lighting for Saving Energy in the Poultry Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lumina Project and Lighting Africa conducted a full-scale field test involving a switch from kerosene to solar-LED lighting for commercial broiler chicken production at an off-grid farm in Kenya. The test achieved lower operating costs, produced substantially more light, improved the working environment, and had no adverse effect on yields. A strategy using conventional solar-fluorescent lighting also achieved comparable yields, but entailed a six-fold higher capital cost and significantly higher recurring battery replacement costs. Thanks to higher energy and optical efficiencies, the LED system provided approximately twice the illumination to the chicken-production area and yet drew less than half the power.At the study farm, 3000 chickens were grown in each of three identical houses under kerosene, fluorescent, and LED lighting configurations. Under baseline conditions, a yearly expenditure of 1,200 USD is required to illuminate the three houses with kerosene. The LED system eliminates this fuel use and expense with a corresponding simple payback time of 1.5 years, while the solar-fluorescent system has a payback time of 9.3 years. The corresponding reduction in fuel expenditure in both cases represents a 15percent increase in after-tax net income (revenues minus expenses) across the entire business operation. The differential cost-effectiveness between the LED and fluorescent systems would be substantially greater if the fluorescent system were upsized to provide the same light as the LED system. Providing light with the fluorescent or LED systems is also far more economical than connecting to the grid in this case. The estimated grid-connection cost at this facility is 1.7 million Kenya Schillings (approximately 21,250 USD), which is nearly six-times the cost of the fluorescent system and 35-times the cost of the LED system.The LED system also confers various non-energy benefits. The relative uniformity of LED lighting, compared to the fluorescent or kerosene lighting, reduced crowding which in turn created a less stressful environment for the chickens. The far higher levels of illumination also created a better environment for the workers, while eliminating the time required for obtaining fuel and maintaining kerosene lanterns. An additional advantage of the LED system relative to the solar fluorescent system was that the former does not require a skilled technician to carry out the installation. The portable LED system lighting layout is also more easily adjusted than that of the hardwired fluorescent systems. Furthermore, switching to the LED system avoids over one metric ton of carbon dioxide emissions per house on an annual basis compared to kerosene. There is high potential for replication of this particular LED lighting strategy in the developing world. In order to estimate the scale of kerosene use and the potential for savings, more information is needed on the numbers of chickens produced off-grid, as well as lighting uses for other categories of poultry production (egg layers, indigenous broilers ). Our discovery that weight gain did not slow in the solar-fluorescent house after it experienced extended lighting outages beginning on day 14 of the 35-day study suggests that conventional farming practices in Kenyan broiler operations may call for more hours of lighting than is needed to achieve least-cost production.

Tracy, Jennifer; Mills, Evan

2010-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents high usage of an engine and the violet end represents low usage. A light blue coloring represents from red to light blue), and slowly increase their usage of engine A. The seventh row show a patternModeling Long-Term Search Engine Usage Ryen W. White, Ashish Kapoor, and Susan T. Dumais Microsoft

Bifano, Thomas

440

Spectrally Enhanced Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2007 November 2007 AfterImage + s p a c e 1 Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Brian Liebel, PE, LC Brian Liebel, PE, LC November 29, 2007 November 29, 2007 Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 29, 2007 November 29, 2007 29 November 2007 AfterImage + s p a c e 2 Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting This is not a technology; just a This is not a technology; just a different way to quantify light based on different way to quantify light based on well established scientific findings well established scientific findings Can be used in conjunction with ANY Can be used in conjunction with ANY type of lighting design to gain

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Evaluation of plant seedling water stress using dynamic fluorescence index with blue LED-based fluorescence imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic fluorescence image index system capable of non-destructive assessment of water stress in cabbage seedlings was developed. The quenching curves of chlorophyll fluorescence characteristic to the plant's water stress status under reduced excitation ... Keywords: Chlorophyll fluorescence, Fluorescence image, Fluorescence index, Water stress

Shih-Chieh Hsiao; Suming Chen; I-Chang Yang; Chia-Tseng Chen; Chao-Yin Tsai; Yung-Kun Chuang; Feng-Jehng Wang; Yu-Liang Chen; Tzong-Shyan Lin; Y. Martin Lo

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

COMBINED FLUORESCENT AND GOLD PROBES FOR MICROSCOPIC AND MORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS.  

SciTech Connect

Nanogold{reg_sign}, a gold cluster with a core of gold atoms 1.4 nm in diameter, has proven to be a superior probe label for electron microscopy (EM), giving both higher labeling density and improved access to previously hindered or restricted antigens. It may be visualized by autometallography (AMG) for use in light microscopy (LM): silver-and gold-amplified Nanogold detection has proven to be one of the most sensitive methods available for the detection of low copy number targets such as viral DNA in cells and tissue specimens. AMG enhancement has also made Nanogold an effective detection label in blots and gels. The following protocols will be described: Labeling of nuclear components in cells. Protocol for in situ hybridization and detection with fluorescein-Nanogold--or Cy3{trademark}-Nanogold-labeled streptavidin. Nanogold is an inert molecule, and generally does not interact with biological molecules unless a specific chemical reactivity is introduced into the molecule. Conjugates are prepared using site-specific chemical conjugation through reactive chemical functionalities introduced during Nanogold preparation, which allows the gold label to be attached to a specific site on the conjugate biomolecule. For example, a maleimido-Nanogold derivative, which is specific for thiol binding, is frequently attached to the hinge region of an antibody at a unique thiol site generated by selective reduction of a hinge disulfide. This site is remote from the antigen combining region, and the Nanogold, therefore, does not compromise target binding. Nanogold may also be prepared with specific reactivity towards amines or other unique chemical groups. This mode of attachment enables the preparation of probes labeled with both Nanogold and fluorescent labels. Different chemical reactivities are used to attach the Nanogold and the fluorescent groups to different sites in the conjugate biomolecule, as shown in Figure 7.1. In this manner, the two labels are spaced sufficiently far apart that fluorescent resonance energy transfer does not quench the fluorescent signal, and the probes may be used to label specimens for fluorescent and EM observation in a single staining procedure. This reduces the complexity of the staining procedure, allowing less specimen perturbation, and also enables a higher degree of correlation between the fluorescence and EM localization of the target, thus increasing the usefulness of the complementary data sets. Since gold and fluorescent-labeled probes are often used at different concentrations under different conditions, optimum procedures for the use of fluorescent and gold probes may entail some degree of compromise between the most appropriate conditions for the two types of probes. However, the chemical stability of the Nanogold label means that it is generally stable to a wide range of use conditions, and the following protocols have been found to be effective for labeling specimens with combined fluorescein and Nanogold-labeled antibody Fab' probes and with combined Cy3 and Nanogold-labeled streptavidin.

POWELL,R.D.HAINFELD,J.F.

2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

443

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 70% of the total cost Program Info Expiration Date 9/30/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T5/T8 with Electric Ballasts: $10 - $65 Hardwired CFL's: $40 - $80 Screw In CFL's: $3 - $12 Cold Cathode: $3 - $15 Ceramic Metal Halide Fixture: $30 - $50 LED's: $15 - $50 Induction: $80 - $400 High-output T5/T8: $50 - $180 Metal Halide/High Pressure Sodium: $80 - $400 Stairwell/Garage Fluorescent Fixture: $50 Occupancy Sensor/Timer: $30 - $60

444

Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Independence Power and Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $20,000, or 30% of the total project cost annually per organization Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount High Performance T-8 Systems: $20-$30 Reduced-Wattage T-8 Systems: $20-$30 Standard T-8 Lamp: $2 Standard T-8 Electric Ballast: $10 400W HID Replacement (250W or less T8, T5, or T5HO Fluorescent): $75 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixture: $50

445

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Commercial Energy Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T8 Fixtures: $5 - $18 /system or $0.50 /lamp Fluorescents: $4 - $125 CFLs: $8 - $25 Indirect Lighting: $16 - $24 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixtures: $25 - $65 Lighting Controls: $12 - $35 Variable Frequency Drive: $30 /hp Totally Enclosed Fan-Cooled: $10 - $600 Open Drip-Proof: $10 - $600 Custom: Buy down to 2 year pay back or 50% of cost, whichever is less

446

Semiconductor-Nanocrystals-Based White Light-Emitting Diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the demands for energy and the concerns of global warming and climate change, energy efficient and environmentally friendly solid-state lighting, such as white lightemitting diodes (WLEDs), is considered to be the most promising and suitable light source. Because of their small size, high efficiency, and long lifetime, WLEDs based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (or quantum dots) are emerging as a completely new technology platform for the development of flat-panel displays and solid-state lighting, exhibiting the potential to replace the conventionally used incandescent and fluorescent lamps. This replacement can cut the ever-increasing level of energy consumption, solve the problem of rapidly depleting fossil fuel reserves, and improve the quality of the global environment. In this review, the recent progress in semiconductor-nanocrystals-based WLEDs is highlighted, the different approaches for generating white light are compared, and the benefits and challenges of the solid-state lighting technology are discussed.

Dai, Quanqin [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

LED Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LED Lighting LED Lighting August 16, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are...

448

Plasma lighting, fiber optics, and daylight collectors: Toward the next revolution in high-efficiency illumination  

SciTech Connect

Combining three recently marketed innovations may provide the next revolution in illumination, making many other recent advances eventually obsolete. The first is plasma lighting, pioneered by Fusion Lighting Inc. of Rockville, Maryland, and first commercially applied by Hutchins International Ltd. of Mississauga, Ontario. This microwave-generated light source yields very high-quality light with efficacies at or beyond high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. The source uses no mercury, thus eliminating lamp disposal problems, and has no cathode, thereby providing very long lamp life. Using no phosphors, it also has very short start and re-strike periods, and is dimmable. The second innovation is in the distribution of light. Commercial developments in fiber optics and light guides now provide products that transfer light from a remote point and distribute it like standard light fixtures. Advances in fiber optic communications and applications to decorative lighting have supplied relatively economical systems for mounting and directing light from both electric light sources and the sun. The third advance is a result of efforts to harness daylight. Unlike architectural daylighting that directs sunlight into perimeter areas through glazing, daylight collectors are roof-mounted devices that supply light to interior and underground spaces through hollow columns and open chases. Aided by improvements and cost reductions in sun-tracking (i.e., heliostatic) controls that capture and concentrate sunlight, such collectors offer a source of free light to locations that might otherwise never receive it. When combined together, these three options could offer a centralized building lighting system that pipes lumens to distribution devices replacing many existing lamps and fixtures.

Audin, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Biological applications of an LCoS-BASED PROGRAMMABLE ARRAY MICROSCOPE (PAM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluorescence microscope (PAM) for rapid, light efficient 3D imaging of living specimens. The stand-alone module fluorescence microscope. The prototype system currently operated at the Max Planck Institute incorporates a 6-position high-intensity LED illuminator, modulated laser and lamp light sources, and an Andor iXon em

Rieger, Bernd

450

RG&E (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program RG&E (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Assessment: Free Lighting Retrofit: 70% of cost Provider RG&E and NYSEG RG&E offers a lighting incentive program designed to serve small business customers with a demand of 100 kilowatts (kW) or less. These small business customers may schedule a free energy assessment and then receive a 70% discount on the installed cost of recommended lighting measures. Eligible lighting measures include the retrofitting of fluorescent fixtures,

451

Natural lighting and skylights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work. However, they are only two of the many, many elements which must be considered; and they, therefore, must be considered, always, in relation to the other elements. The achievement of good lighting depends on a reasonable understanding of three primary factors: one, the visual response to lighting; two, the availability and types of lighting; and three, methods for controlling light. This thesis is intended to supply enough information to provide a working knowledge of each of these facets. The human visual response is discussed in "Goals For Good Lighting." The availability and types of lighting are dealt with in the section on available light. The remainder of the thesis concerns methods for controlling light. The use of scale models for studying the natural lighting characteristics of buildings due to the building geometry, the fenestration details and the interior reflectance has been well established as pointed out in the earlier part of this thesis. With the completion of the work outlined herein, the feasibility of using scale models for studying skylights is also an established fact. The method of analysis by models can be a valuable tool to any designer who is concerned about day-lighting.

Evans, Benjamin Hampton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hospital remedies architect's lighting overdesign for $22k: installs current limiters  

SciTech Connect

St. Luke's Hospital in Racine, Wisconsin is spending $22,000 to install current limiters in the fluorescent lamps of a new wing after finding that the architectural firm overdesigned the lighting fixtures so much that the hospital's lighting expenses were 50% higher than necessary. The hospital expects an 8-month payback on the current limiters. The hospital's corridor lighting reached 45-55 footcandles (fc), when only three fc are required for emergency lighting and 15 for corridor lighting. Representatives of the architectural firm argued that the design did not exceed state wattage requirements.

Ponczak, G.

1984-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

453

Lighting Group: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview of the Lighting Research Group The Lighting Research Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes, throughout the State of California and across the Nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research in the Lighting Group falls into three main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems and Controls and Communications. Click on a link below for more information about each of these research areas. Sources and Ballasts investigates next generation light sources, such as

454

Madrid Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Page 1 of 2 ELECTRIC LIGHTING QUALITY MAGIC BOX is a versatile home. Its design allows to change the room size by opening and closing the movable walls...

455

Automatic lighting controls demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Lighting energy audit workbook  

SciTech Connect

A simple test to determine the need for a lighting energy audit is followed by how-to information on conducting the audit, identifying savings opportunities, and developing an energy management plan for lighting.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Inverse Lighting for Photography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a technique for improving photographs using inverse lighting, a new process based on algorithms developed in computer graphics for computing the reflection of light in 3D space. From a photograph and a 3D surface model for the object pictured, inverse lighting estimates the directional distribution of the incident light. We then use this information to process the photograph digitally to alter the lighting on the object. Inverse lighting is a specific example of the general idea of inverse rendering. This refers to the practice of using the methods of computer graphics, which normally are used to render images from scene information, to infer scene information from images. Our system uses physically based rendering technology to construct a linear least squares system that we solve to find the lighting. As an application, the results are then used to simulate a change in the incident light in the photograph. An implementation is described that uses 3D models from a laser...

Stephen R. Marschner; Donald P. Greenberg

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fast Light, Fast Neutrinos?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light has been observed with group velocities both faster and slower than the speed of light. The recent report from OPERA of superluminal 17 GeV neutrinos may describe a similar phenomenon.

Cahill, Kevin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Light Wavelength and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Wavelength and Plants Name: John Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I just was wandering whether plants grow better in artificial light or in sunlight. I am...

460

Germinating and Light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germinating and Light Name: Chris Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Can you tell me how plants determine where the light is once they are out of the soil and not a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting fluorescent high-intensity" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PFP Emergency Lighting Study  

SciTech Connect

NFPA 101, section 5-9 mandates that, where required by building classification, all designated emergency egress routes be provided with adequate emergency lighting in the event of a normal lighting outage. Emergency lighting is to be arranged so that egress routes are illuminated to an average of 1.0 footcandle with a minimum at any point of 0.1 footcandle, as measured at floor level. These levels are permitted to drop to 60% of their original value over the required 90 minute emergency lighting duration after a power outage. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) has two designations for battery powered egress lights ''Emergency Lights'' are those battery powered lights required by NFPA 101 to provide lighting along officially designated egress routes in those buildings meeting the correct occupancy requirements. Emergency Lights are maintained on a monthly basis by procedure ZSR-12N-001. ''Backup Lights'' are battery powered lights not required by NFPA, but installed in areas where additional light may be needed. The Backup Light locations were identified by PFP Safety and Engineering based on several factors. (1) General occupancy and type of work in the area. Areas occupied briefly during a shiftly surveillance do not require backup lighting while a room occupied fairly frequently or for significant lengths of time will need one or two Backup lights to provide general illumination of the egress points. (2) Complexity of the egress routes. Office spaces with a standard hallway/room configuration will not require Backup Lights while a large room with several subdivisions or irregularly placed rooms, doors, and equipment will require Backup Lights to make egress safer. (3) Reasonable balance between the safety benefits of additional lighting and the man-hours/exposure required for periodic light maintenance. In some plant areas such as building 236-Z, the additional maintenance time and risk of contamination do not warrant having Backup Lights installed in all rooms. Sufficient light for egress is provided by existing lights located in the hallways.

BUSCH, M.S.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

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Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorescent and Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

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Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nondestructive Isotopic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7, (1959) pp. 54. [12] B.J. Quiter, ``Nuclear ResonanceFluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay,'' University ofclandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence,"

Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

TMS Light Metals Publication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following instructions should be used when submitting a manuscript for any TMS Light Metals proceedings volume. INTRODUCTION. Orientation to ...

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