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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

2

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings, and recycling. Alcoa provides the packaging, automotive, aerospace, and construction markets with a variety

3

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

4

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

5

Standby electricity consumption and saving potentials of Turkish households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The share of the residential sector currently accounts for about 25% of the national electricity consumption in Turkey. Due to increase in household income levels and decrease in the costs of appliances; significant increases in appliance ownerships and residential electricity consumption levels have been observed in recent years. Most domestic appliances continue consuming electricity when they are not performing their primary functions, i.e. at standby mode, which can constitute up 15% of the total household electricity consumption in some countries. Although the demand in Turkish residential electricity consumption is increasing, there are limited studies on the components of the residential electricity consumption and no studies specifically examining the extent and effects of standby electricity consumption using a surveying/measurement methodology. Thus, determining the share of standby electricity consumption in total home electricity use and the ways of reducing it are important issues in residential energy conservation strategies. In this study, surveys and standby power measurements are conducted at 260 households in Ankara, Turkey, to determine the amount, share, and saving potentials of the standby electricity consumption of Turkish homes. The survey is designed to gather information on the appliance properties, lights, electricity consumption behavior, economic and demographics of the occupants, and electricity bills. A total of 1746 appliances with standby power are measured in the surveyed homes. Using the survey and standby power measurements data, the standby, active, and lighting end-use electricity consumptions of the surveyed homes are determined. The average Turkish household standby power and standby electricity consumption are estimated as 22W and 95kWh/yr, respectively. It was also found that the standby electricity consumption constitutes 4% of the total electricity consumption in Turkish homes. Two scenarios are then applied to the surveyed homes to determine the potentials in reducing standby electricity consumption of the households.

Mustafa Cagri Sahin; Merih Aydinalp Koksal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Texas Electric Lighting Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

electric lighting electric lighting The SNAP House's lighting design aims for elegant simplicity in concept, use, and maintenance. Throughout the house, soft, ambient light is juxtaposed with bright, direct task lighting. All ambient and most task lighting is integrated directly into the architectural design of the house. An accent light wall between the bedroom and bathroom provides a glowing light for nighttime navigation.

7

Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector SERIES: Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector Release date: November 7, 2014...

8

Cornell University Electric Lighting Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Electric Lighting Quality The CUSD lighting design team utilized energy efficient products that meshed well with our daylighting scheme. We chose to use fluorescent tubes or compact fluorescent bulbs with an energy consumption of between 15 and 30 Watts throughout the house. The ballasts for all lamps dim to a 1% light output, so the interior and exterior lights can be adjusted as the level of available daylight fluctuates. Light sensors have been placed in front of our two largest apertures, allowing us to control how much artificial light is supplied to each space. The control of our ballasts is intricate, but refined and tested to avoid dysfunctional dimming or switching. While automatic controls are included, manual user overrides are provided in case the occupant prefers

9

Analyzing electricity consumption via data mining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a model to analyze the massive data of electricity. Feature subset is determined by the correlation ... be determined further. The effects on analyzing electricity consumption of the other thr...

Jinshuo Liu; Huiying Lan; Yizhen Fu; Hui Wu

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of the nations renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications.

12

Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

13

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

15

Electricity Consumption Simulation Based on Multi-agent System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to simulate impact on electricity of macroeconomic policy and foreign trade, Electricity Consumption Simulation System (ECMAS) was established based ... according to I/O table and data of electricity consumption

Minjie Xu; Zhaoguang Hu; Baoguo Shan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households ... Conventional wisdom holds that large appliances, in particular washers, dryers, refrigerators and freezers, dominate residential energy consumption apart from heat, hot water and light. ... (16) It excludes lighting, all professional equipment, space heating, hot water, garden or car equipment, fire alarms, and air conditioning. ...

Edgar G. Hertwich; Charlotte Roux

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison between electricity consumption and behavioralU.S. residential electricity consumption Energy Policy, 42(of the residential electricity consumption. Energy Policy,

Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Btu, EC is the electricity consumption of EVs in Kwh perreductions EV in electricity consumption contributedsensitive to EV electricity consumption, which,in turn,is

Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Prediction of Electric Load using Kohonen Maps -Application to the Polish Electricity Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Electric Load using Kohonen Maps - Application to the Polish Electricity Consumption on Kohonen maps is proposed. This method is applied to the prediction of the Polish electricity consumption of the electric load is specific. For each day, we have 24 values (or more) of the electricity consumption

Verleysen, Michel

20

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency ENERGY EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT This educational...

22

On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 20, 2011 ... The problem that we focus on, is the minimization of the energy consumption of an electrical vehicle achievable on a given driving cycle.

Abdelkader Merakeb

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article uses the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds testing procedure to identify the long run equilibrium relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth. Toda Yamamoto and...

Muhammad Shahbaz; Mete Feridun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Natural light controls and guides in buildings. Energy saving for electrical lighting, reduction of cooling load  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The residential sector is responsible for approximately a quarter of energy consumption in Europe. This consumption, together with that of other buildings, mainly from the tertiary sector, makes up 40% of total energy consumption and 36% of CO2 emissions. Artificial lighting makes up 14% of electrical consumption in the European Union and 19% worldwide. Through the use of well-designed natural lighting, controlled by technologies or systems which guarantee accessibility from all areas inside buildings, energy consumption for lighting and air conditioning can be kept to a minimum. The authors of this article carried out a state of the art on the technologies or control systems of natural light in buildings, concentrating on those control methods which not only protect the occupants from direct solar glare but also maximize natural light penetration in buildings based on the occupants? preferences, whilst allowing for a reduction in electrical consumption for lighting and cooling. All of the control and/or natural light guidance systems and/or strategies guarantee the penetration of daylight into the building, thus reducing the electrical energy consumption for lighting and cooling. At the same time they improve the thermal and visual comfort of the users of the buildings. However various studies have also brought to light certain disadvantages to these systems.

E.J. Gago; T. Muneer; M. Knez; H. Kster

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Green Lab: Power Consumption by Commercial Light Bulbs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Going green is a slogan that is very contemporary both with industry and in the political arena. Choosing more energy-efficient devices is one way homeowners can go green. A simple method is to change home lighting from hot incandescent bulbs to compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). But do they really save energy? How do their illuminations compare? Even if the CFLs are more energy efficient they still add to our pollution problem because of the mercury inside them. Light-emitting diodes(LEDs) could be the answer but they are not available at our local stores. Can LEDs be made to screw right into a standard socket? How expensive are they? What are the power consumptions of so-called 60-W and 100-W CFL and LED light bulbs? These are the questions that are answered during this lab activity. Students measure the voltage and current for each of the three types of bulbs and then calculate the electrical power required by each. An optional experiment is to set the light outputs of each bulb so they are equal in intensity and then determine the power consumed. While not practical in the home this experiment gives students an understanding of value for their buck.

James A. Einsporn; Andrew F. Zhou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vibration sensors, for inferring electrical consumption when direct measurementvibration and light sensors, we can increase our coverage, especially in places where direct electrical measurementAND MEASUREMENT Building A/C Unit ? Accelerometer ? Fig (A) accel x Building A/C Unit ? Vibration

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

28

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption Aaron Garrett, PhD Joshua load and electrical data from a highly-instrumented and automated ZEBRAlliance research home consume 40% of the US primary energy (73% of the electrical energy). By 2030, it is estimated that 60

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

29

A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment [Extended and communications technology accounts for a significant fraction of worldwide electricity consumption. Given inferring the electricity consumption of different components of the installed base of telecommu- nications

Fisher, Kathleen

30

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

31

The nexus between electricity consumption and economic growth in Bahrain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper explores the relationship between electricity consumption, foreign direct investment, capital and economic growth in the case of the Kingdom of Bahrain. The CobbDouglas production is used over the period of 1980Q12010Q4. We have applied the ARDL bounds testing approach and found that cointegration exists among the series. Electricity consumption, foreign direct investment and capital add in economic growth. The VECM Granger causality analysis has exposed the feedback effect between electricity consumption and economic growth and the same is true for foreign direct investment and electricity consumption. This study suggests government authorities to explore new sources of energy to achieve sustainable economic development for the long run.

Helmi Hamdi; Rashid Sbia; Muhammad Shahbaz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Robust electricity consumption modeling of Turkey using Singular Value Decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Multivariable regression method is used to model Turkeys electricity consumption through a nonlinear relationship. Electricity consumption is modeled as a function of four demographic and economic indicators such as, population, gross domestic product per capita, imports and exports. The second order model includes 15 coefficients for bias, first degree terms and second degree terms. Data preprocessing is applied to transform all variables to have zero mean and percent relative variance. Singular Value Decomposition is applied to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to provide robustness to the estimations. Variance and covariance information in the data set is used to determine the number of important dimensions in the data. Electricity consumption of Turkey is modeled using annual data from 1970 to 2011. The results show that electricity consumption can be robustly modeled using Singular Value Decomposition.

Kadir Kavaklioglu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Trends in worldwide ICT electricity consumption from 2007 to 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Information and Communication Technology (ICT) devices and services are becoming more and more widespread in all aspects of human life. Following an increased worldwide focus on the environmental impacts of energy consumption in general, there is also a growing attention to the electricity consumption associated with ICT equipment. In this paper we assess how ICT electricity consumption in the use phase has evolved from 2007 to 2012 based on three main ICT categories: communication networks, personal computers, and data centers. We provide a detailed description of how we calculate the electricity use and evolution in these three categories. Our estimates show that the yearly growth of all three individual ICT categories (10%, 5%, and 4%, respectively) is higher than the growth of worldwide electricity consumption in the same time frame (3%). The relative share of this subset of ICT products and services in the total worldwide electricity consumption has increased from about 3.9% in 2007 to 4.6% in 2012. We find that the absolute electricity consumption of each of the three categories is still roughly equal. This highlights the need for energy-efficiency research across all these domains, rather than focusing on a single one.

Ward Van Heddeghem; Sofie Lambert; Bart Lannoo; Didier Colle; Mario Pickavet; Piet Demeester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sustainable Aspects of Electricity Consumption in Klang Valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently, energy crisis is considered a global issue and the demand for an urgent solution seems inevitable. Residential buildings consume nearly one third of Total National Energy Consumption. Studies show that a significant part of energy use can be avoided through occupants awareness about energy consumption. In order to discover and understand energy use of Malaysian residents, this paper has identified the residential electricity use behavior and its determinants by an empirical study. The results showed that out of the six introduced \\{IVs\\} of the regression model to predict the electricity consumption behavior only three predictors can significantly contribute to the model.

Nehzat Jalalkamali; Mohamed Yusoff Abbas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

36

Quantitative modelling of electricity consumption using computational intelligence aided design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High electricity consumption is of concern to the world for a variety of reasons, including its social-economic-environmental coupled impacts on well-being of individuals, social life and the federal energy policies. This paper proposes a quantitative model to examine the long-term relationship between annual electricity consumption and its major macroeconomic variables, including gross domestic product, electricity price, efficiency, economic structure, and carbon dioxide emission, using computational intelligence aided design (CIAD). It develops a firefly algorithm with variable population (FAVP) to obtain the parameters of the electricity consumption model through optimising two proposed trend indices: moving mean of the average precision (mmAP) and moving mean of standard derivation (mmSTD). The model is validated with empirical electricity consumption data in China between 1980 and 2012, based on which the error of approximations between 1980 and 2009 is 15% and the error of predictions between 2010 and 2012 is [?8%,?5%]. The main contributions of this research are to develop: (1) a novel quantitative model that can accurately predict the social, economic and environmental coupled impacts on the annual electricity demands; (2) the conceptual CIAD framework; (3) FAVP algorithm; and (4) two new trend indices of mmAP and mmSTD. The findings of this research can assist the decision makers in resolving the conflict between energy consumption growth and carbon emission reduction without dooming the economic prosperity in the long run.

Yi Chen; Guangfeng Zhang; Tongdan Jin; Shaomin Wu; Bei Peng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Electricity Consumption of Pumps in Heat Exchanging Stations of DH Systems in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzed the current electricity consumption of heating exchanging stations in China. By...

Lei Dong; JianJun Xia; Yi Jiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4047 4047 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142254047 Varnish cache server Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

39

The effect of tree shade on home summer electrical consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the months and years of the study. 44 Average daily mean temperatures and associated mean total and basal energy consumptions for the months and years of the study period. 46 Average April through October electrical usage per square foot of home area... the months and years of the study. 44 Average daily mean temperatures and associated mean total and basal energy consumptions for the months and years of the study period. 46 Average April through October electrical usage per square foot of home area...

Rudie, Raymond Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Retrofit Lighting: $3 - $400 per unit New Construction Lighting: $10 - $50 per unit Provider Flathead Electric Cooperative Flathead Electric Cooperative, in conjunction with Bonneville Power Administration, encourages energy efficiency in the commercial sector by providing a commercial lighting retro-fit rebate program and a new

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist Last Out of...

42

Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor- space In Occupied Floor- space In Vacant Floor- space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 5 9 4 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 12 6 6 9 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 13 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 7 14 5 5 7 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 21 10 10 11 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 12 15 8 8 10 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 13 24 10 11 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 13 19 11 11 10 Over 500,000 26 18 18 34

43

Electricity consumption of telecommunication equipment to achieve a telemeeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The article assesses the electricity consumption in use of telecommunication equipment to achieve one remote multi-user work meeting, an existing service proposed by Orange group. It also examines the electric gains of substitution for a meeting requiring physical transport. Equipment comprises participant computers PC and phones, access to core networks and servers to permit audio link and the share of documents on PC display between users. Each device requires power to perform hours of activity or transfer nominal bit/s of throughput. A generic and modular method is suggested to determine from this information, which is not directly related to services processed by the devices, the consumption of the service under study. The method thus provides a quantitative relation of service consumption to its characteristics duration, number of users and access throughput but also to device consumption efficiency and utilization rate. The relation of dependance permits to assess potential energy saving by substituting devices for more efficiency ones and/or by increasing their utilization rate at same provided service. With some utilization rates at around 10%, as observed for the servers, a telemeeting between three users and lasting 2.3h requires 9MJ of electricity. Using better equipment and higher rates it can be decreased to 1.5MJ. By comparison transport of two of the users by train over a total distance of 2500km requires 500MJ. The method can be applied to any service provided its characteristics are known.

X. Chavanne; S. Schinella; D. Marquet; J.P. Frangi; S. Le Masson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Calculation method for electricity end-use for residential lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of the electricity demand for different electrical appliances in households is very important in the work to reduce electricity use in households. Metering of end-uses is expensive and time consuming and therefore other methods for calculation of end-use electricity can be very useful. This paper presents a method to calculate the electricity used for lighting in households based on regression analysis of daily electricity consumption, out-door temperatures and the length of daylight at the same time and location. The method is illustrated with analyses of 45 Norwegian households. The electricity use for lighting in an average Norwegian household is calculated to 1050kWh/year or 6% of total electricity use. The results are comparable to metering results of lighting in other studies in the Nordic countries. The methodology can also be used to compensate for the seasonal effect when metering electricity for lighting less than a year. When smart meters are more commonly available, the possible adaption of this method will increase, and the need for end-use demand calculations will still be present.

Eva Rosenberg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Model for electric energy consumption in eastern Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrical energy consumption in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia is modeled as a function of weather data, global solar radiation, population, and gross domestic product per capita. Five years of data have been used to develop the energy consumption model. Variable selection in the regression model is carried out by using the general stepping-regression technique. Model adequacy is determined from a residual analysis technique. Model validation aims to determine if the model will function successfully in its intended operating field. In this regard, new energy consumption data for a sixth year are collected, and the results predicted by the regression model are compared with the new data set. Finally, the sensitivity of the model is examined. It is found that the model is strongly influenced by the ambient temperature.

Al-Garni, A.Z.; Al-Nassar, Y.N.; Zubair, S.M.; Al-Shehri, A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributor to annual electricity consumption, and certainplay in Other electricity consumption in new homes, andor range. Other electricity consumption was derived by

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Solar Electric Light Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Electric Light Fund Solar Electric Light Fund Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Electric Light Fund Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Electric Light Fund Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Phase: Create Early Successes Resource Type: Publications, Training materials Website: www.self.org/ Locality: US, Africa, Asia, Latin America Cost: Free The mission of the Solar Electric Light Fund (SELF) is to empower people in developing countries to rise from poverty using energy from the sun. What We Do The Solar Electric Light Fund (SELF) has been working in the field of renewable energy, household energy and decentralized rural electrification for over 18 years. We have a proven track record of managing complex, multi-disciplinary international projects and have worked on renewable

48

An integrated fuzzy regression algorithm for improved electricity consumption estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents an integrated fuzzy regression and time-series technique to estimate and predict electricity demand. Furthermore, it is difficult to model uncertain behaviour of energy consumption with only conventional time-series and fuzzy regression, which could be an ideal substitute for such cases. After reviewing various fuzzy regression models and studying their advantages and shortcomings, the best model is selected. Also, the impact of data preprocessing and post-processing on the fuzzy regression performance is to study and to show that this method does not contribute to the efficiency of the model. In addition, another unique feature of this study is utilisation of autocorrelation function to define input variables versus trial and error method. At last, the comparison of actual data with fuzzy regression and ARIMA model, using Granger??Newbold test, is achieved. Monthly electricity consumption of Iran from 1995 to 2005 is considered as the case of this study.

Ali Azadeh; Morteza Saberi; Anahita Gitiforouz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The electricity consumption impacts of commercial energy management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of energy management systems (EMS) in large commercial and institutional buildings in North Carolina was undertaken to determine how EMS currently affect electricity consumption and what their potential is for being used to reduce on-peak electricity demand. A survey was mailed to 5000 commercial customers; the 430 responses were tabulated and analyzed; EMS vendors were interviewed, and 30 sites were investigated in detail. The detailed assessments included a site interview and reconstruction of historic billing data to evaluate EMS impact, if any. The results indicate that well-tuned EMS can result in a 10 to 40 percent reduction in billed demand, and smaller reductions in energy.

Buchanan, S.; Taylor, R.; Paulos, S.; Warren, W.; Hay, J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A new adaptive fuzzy inference system for electricity consumption forecasting with hike in prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large increase or hike in energy prices has proven to impact electricity consumption in a way which cannot be drawn ... (FIS) to estimate and forecast long-term electricity consumption when prices experience larg...

S. M. Sajadi; S. M. Asadzadeh; V. Majazi Dalfard

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Lighting Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 70% of the equipment cost of a qualified efficiency upgrade Provider Central Hudson Gas and Electric Central Hudson Gas and Electric's (Central Hudson) Commercial Lighting Rebate Program is for businesses, retailers, institutional customers and non-profit customers of Central Hudson. The progam utilizes the services of Lime Energy to install new lighting fixtures with Central Hudson covering up to 70% of the cost. The 30 percent of cost remaining can be financed at

52

Investment appraisal of technology innovations on dairy farm electricity consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to conduct an investment appraisal for milk-cooling, water-heating, and milk-harvesting technologies on a range of farm sizes in 2 different electricity-pricing environments. This was achieved by using a model for electricity consumption on dairy farms. The model simulated the effect of 6 technology investment scenarios on the electricity consumption and electricity costs of the 3 largest electricity-consuming systems within the dairy farm (i.e., milk-cooling, water-heating, and milking machine systems). The technology investment scenarios were direct expansion milk-cooling, ice bank milk-cooling, milk precooling, solar water-heating, and variable speed drive vacuum pump-milking systems. A dairy farm profitability calculator was combined with the electricity consumption model to assess the effect of each investment scenario on the total discounted net income over a 10-yr period subsequent to the investment taking place. Included in the calculation were the initial investments, which were depreciated to zero over the 10-yr period. The return on additional investment for 5 investment scenarios compared with a base scenario was computed as the investment appraisal metric. The results of this study showed that the highest return on investment figures were realized by using a direct expansion milk-cooling system with precooling of milk to 15C with water before milk entry to the storage tank, heating water with an electrical water-heating system, and using standard vacuum pump control on the milking system. Return on investment figures did not exceed the suggested hurdle rate of 10% for any of the ice bank scenarios, making the ice bank system reliant on a grant aid framework to reduce the initial capital investment and improve the return on investment. The solar water-heating and variable speed drive vacuum pump scenarios failed to produce positive return on investment figures on any of the 3 farm sizes considered on either the day and night tariff or the flat tariff, even when the technology costs were reduced by 40% in a sensitivity analysis of technology costs.

J. Upton; M. Murphy; I.J.M. De Boer; P. W. G. Groot Koerkamp; P.B.M. Berensten; L. Shalloo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Expiration Date Installation must be made within one year of the preliminary approval date State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 20-29 kW saved: $75/kW new; $150/kW retrofit 30-39 kW saved: $100/kW new; $200/kW retrofit 40-49 kW saved: $125/kW new; $250/kW retrofit 50 or more kW saved: $150/kW new; $300/kW retrofit Provider Conservation Section For existing and new commercial construction, Pedernales Electric Cooperative provides incentives for kW saved through efficient lighting.

54

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

55

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

56

Overview of the Electrical Energy Segment of the Energy Information Administration/ Manufacturing Consumption Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, liquefied petroleum gas, coke and breeze, coal, and electricity, only the electricity segment is overviewed. Along with pure electrical energy consumption information, newly available data covers methods that manufacturers used to purchase and modify...

Lockhead, S.

57

Response of office building electricity consumption to urban weather in Adelaide, South Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of climate dependency of building energy consumption is useful for predicting the impacts of climate change and urban heat island on energy demand and associated carbon emissions, and to evaluate and improve building energy performance. Climate dependent electricity consumption is examined in this study for four office buildings in Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia with a warm-summer Mediterranean climate. Influences of both outdoor temperature and specific humidity on building electricity consumption are analyzed using the multiple linear regression, based on both sub-daily and monthly electricity consumption data. The results indicate that there is a daytime mean temperature threshold of around 17C, above which, electricity consumption increases with air temperature. Specific humidity also contributes to interpreting the temporal variability of office hour electricity consumption. Daytime temperature and specific humidity together determine 8090% of office hour electricity consumption variation for days with mean daytime temperature above the threshold temperature. Office building daily electricity consumption can be examined with monthly electricity consumption data of a period of three years. The results also suggest that heatwaves may increase office building electricity demand by up to 50%, and that one degree warming can increase annual office electricity consumption by 2% in Adelaide.

Huade Guan; Veronica Soebarto; John Bennett; Roger Clay; Robert Andrew; Yunhui Guo; Saeedeh Gharib; Kathryn Bellette

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Chicopee Electric Light- Residential Solar Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chicopee Electric Light offered rebates to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic systems on their homes. Customer rebates are $0.50 per watt for a maximum of $2,500 per installation.

59

Sustainability in the Electricity Production and Consumption System A Consumers Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production and consumption systems (PACS) of electricity provide broad insights into possible actions and ... the life cycle from production and supply to consumption. More importantly for the context of the ...

Doris Fuchs; Sylvia Lorek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cloud-Based Massive Electricity Data Mining and Consumption Pattern Discovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the development of the power systems in China, there is large volume of basic electricity consumption data accumulated. Mining these data to discover possible consumption patterns and group the users in a .....

Chen Ming; Cao Maoyong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prediction of electricity energy consumption of Turkey via artificial bee colony: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the worldwide growth of energy consumption, analysis of energy issues and the development ... become an important issue. In this study, electricity energy consumption of Turkey is predicted by artificial b...

Feyza Grbz; Celal ztrk; Panos Pardalos

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Light Company Vigilante Electric Cooperative, Inc. Raft River...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inland Power & Light Company Vigilante Electric Cooperative, Inc. Raft River Rural Electric Cooperative, Inc. Northern Lights, Inc. Lower Valley Energy, Inc. Clearwater Power...

63

Cagayan Electric Power and Light Co Cepalco | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power and Light Co Cepalco Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cagayan Electric Power and Light Co (Cepalco) Place: Philippines Sector: Solar Product: Provides electricity to...

64

Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Download the webinar slides from the U.S. Department...

65

A Real-World, Simple Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring Electrical Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a simple, commercial WSN for monitoring electrical energy consumption. We discuss WSN characteristics, practical problems, constraints and design decisions which mainly are motivated by our concrete...

Cornelia Kappler; Georg Riegel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Application of ARIMA Modle in the Prediction of the Electricity Consumption of Jiangsu Province  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forecasts of electricity can play a rational allocation of resources ... regional economic development. Based on the annual electricity consumption data of Jiangsu Province, the ARIMA model of Jiangsu Provinces

Wu Min; Cao Jia-he

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth of Guangdong Province in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Guangdong is a province with the most electricity consumption (EC) and the fastest economic growth ... , there has long been a contradiction between electricity supply and demand in Guangdong and this...

Lianhong Lv; Hong Luo; Baoliu Zhang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Electricity consumption and human development level: A comparative analysis based on panel data for 50 countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a representative of modern energy, the level of electricity consumption can be regarded as an appraisal criterion of a countrys development level. This study analyses the causality between electricity consumption and human development and assesses the changing trend of electricity consumption. The models in this study are established using panel data from 19902009 for 50 countries divided into four groups according to income. For human development indicators, per-capita GDP, consumption expenditure, urbanisation rate, life expectancy at birth and the adult literacy rate were selected. The results show that long-run bidirectional causality exists between electricity consumption and five indicators. Additionally, the higher the income of a country, the greater is its electricity consumption and the higher is its level of human development. Further, the variables of four income-groupings vary considerably. Specifically, as income increases, the contribution of electricity consumption to GDP and consumption expenditure increases, but the urbanisation rate, life expectancy at birth and adult literacy rate present a weakening trend. This mainly because that the latter indicators in high-income countries are increasing to converge. To improve human development, electricity should be incorporated into the basic public services construction to enhance the availability of electricity for low-income residents.

Shuwen Niu; Yanqin Jia; Wendie Wang; Renfei He; Lili Hu; Yan Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in public parking lots to foster significant reductions in participants' energy consumption. The project's primary goal for exterior lighting is to drive LEEP participation...

70

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

71

Use of light-emitting diodes as light sources to lower energy consumption for cultivation of photosynthesizing microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data are cited for the productivity of phototrophs subjected to interrupted illumination by light-emitting diodes. It is demonstrated that a significant reduction in energy consumption for the produc...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

CO2 emissions related to the electricity consumption in the european primary aluminium production a comparison of electricity supply approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to estimate the specific CO2 emissions related to the electricity consumption in the European primary aluminium production and ... compare different choices of system boundaries of ...

Matthias Koch; Jochen Harnisch

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

MEW Efforts in Reducing Electricity and Water Consumption in Government and Private Sectors in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers, membership No. 1715. MEW EFFORTS IN REDUCING ELECTRICITY AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SECTORS IN KUWAIT Eng. Iqbal Al-Tayar Manager ? Technical Supervision Department Planning and Training Sector Ministry... of Electricity & Water (MEW) - Kuwait Historical Background - Electricity ? In 1913, the first electric machine was installed in Kuwait to operate 400 lambs for Al-Saif Palace. ? In 1934, two electric generators were installed with a total capacity of 60 k...

Al-Tayar, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Stand-by Electricity Consumption in Japanese Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years as Japanese household electrical appliances have become more multi-functional and high performance, the number of appliances that consume a little electricity even when turned off has grown. There...

Hidetoshi Nakagami; Akio Tanaka

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. No. III. The Anode Loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 February 1916 research-article The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. No. III. The Anode Loss W. G. Duffield Mary D. Waller The Royal Society is collaborating with...

1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Household electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in the Netherlands: A model-based analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Twenty percent of the total energy consumption in the Netherlands comes from household electricity consumption. This comes from household electric appliances whose number has grown in recent years. The paper explores the effect of smart meter introduction, appliance efficiency and consumer behaviour on reducing electricity consumption in the Netherlands. It does so by combining two perspectives: a sociotechnical approach and a bottom up simulation approach. The range of scenarios explored through simulation in the paper provides an understanding of the interplay between efficiency, smart meter diffusion and consumer behaviour. The results show their effect on electricity consumption and suggest that further effort is required to control and reduce it. Insights from the paper suggest that future studies should disaggregate with respect to a number of factors.

George Papachristos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Persuading Consumers to Reduce Their Consumption of Electricity in the Home  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous work has identified that providing real time feedback or interventions to consumers can persuade consumers to change behaviour and reduce domestic electricity consumption. However, little work has invest...

Alan F. Smeaton; Aiden R. Doherty

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Solar Electric Light Company SELCO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light Company SELCO Light Company SELCO Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO) Place Bangalore, Karnataka, India Zip 560078 Sector Services, Solar Product Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO) manufactures photovoltaic products and services targeted especially at end consumers in developing countries who have no access to land electricity. References Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO) is a company located in Bangalore, Karnataka, India . References ↑ "Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Electric_Light_Company_SELCO&oldid=35125

79

On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electrical vehicle energy management can be expressed as a Bang-Bang .... reflects the losses due to the internal resistance of the battery. The system...

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

A macroeconomic analysis of electricity consumption in Tunisia: energy policy implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity demand forecasting is becoming an essential instrument for energy management policy in a liberalised electricity market. To address the needs, an electricity consumption forecasting model based on macroeconomic factors for Tunisia during the period of 1971 to 2008 has been investigated. A cointegration and error correction model incorporated with causality analysis present an appropriate framework for studying the aggregate electricity demand. It is found that the there are long run relationships between electricity consumption, real income, population and the consumer price index. For causality results, it was found there are unidirectional relationships from electricity consumption to real income, from electricity consumption to consumer price index and from population to real income. The results from our study might be useful for the government in forming appropriate energy policies. Indeed, the policymaker would visibly pose problems for electricity security by increasing investment in the electricity supply sector in order to cope with the increasing demand and undertaking more research to sustain their social, economic and environmental needs by implementing an energy efficiency measures.

Néjib Chouaïbi; Tahar Abdessalem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source Via partnership with whole sale provider Brazos Electric Power, Inc. and escheat funds Start Date 09/01/2009 State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting Upgrade: 0.30/watt saved per fixture T8 Fluorescent Upgrade: 1.50 - 2.25/bulb per fixture Provider CoServ Electric Cooperative CoServ Electric Cooperative provides rebates for commercial and industrial customers who upgrade to high efficiency lighting for the workplace. A rebate of $0.30/watt saved is available on custom lighting upgrades and a

82

Electricity consumption and economic growth in transition countries: A revisit using bootstrap panel Granger causality analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this paper is to revisit the Granger causal relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth for 15 transition economies for the period 19752010 using a bootstrap panel causality approach that allows for both cross-sectional dependency and for heterogeneity across countries. Applying this approach, we found a unidirectional causality running from electricity consumption to economic growth only in Belarus and Bulgaria; from economic growth to electricity consumption in the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and the Russian Federation; bidirectional causality only in Ukraine while no Granger causality in any direction in Albania, Macedonia, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovak Republic and Slovenia. These results show that there is a limited support for the electricity-led growth hypothesis. Nevertheless these different findings provide important implications for energy strategies and policies for transition countries.

Yemane Wolde-Rufael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Contact Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power CFL Bulbs: Up to 10 CFL bulbs at reduced cost Water Heater: $75 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for home energy audits, CFL light bulbs, tank water heaters and refrigerator recycling. Water heater purchases and

84

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility...

85

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $200 Air Source Heat Pumps: $100 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $300/ton + $50/EER/ton Fan Motors: $50/unit Programmable Thermostats: $25 Tank Water Heater: $50

86

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings New Construction: Varies widely

87

Analysis and Simulation of Fuel Consumption and Energy Throughput on a Parallel Diesel-Electric Hybrid Powertrain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this master thesis is to study the energy throughput and fuel consumption of a parallel diesel-electric hybrid vehicle. This has been done (more)

Gustafsson, Johanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The nexus of electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reexamines the causal link between electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries (i.e., Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) for the period 19902010, using panel causality analysis, accounting for dependency and heterogeneity across countries. Regarding the electricityGDP nexus, the empirical results support evidence on the feedback hypothesis for Russia and the conservation hypothesis for South Africa. However, a neutrality hypothesis holds for Brazil, India and China, indicating neither electricity consumption nor economic growth is sensitive to each other in these three countries. Regarding the GDPCO2 emissions nexus, a feedback hypothesis for Russia, a one-way Granger causality running from GDP to CO2 emissions in South Africa and reverse relationship from CO2 emissions to GDP in Brazil is found. There is no evidence of Granger causality between GDP and CO2 emissions in India and China. Furthermore, electricity consumption is found to Granger cause CO2 emissions in India, while there is no Granger causality between electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa. Therefore, the differing results for the BRICS countries imply that policies cannot be uniformly implemented as they will have different effects in each of the BRICS countries under study.

Wendy N. Cowan; Tsangyao Chang; Roula Inglesi-Lotz; Rangan Gupta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Assessment: Free Lighting Retrofit: 70% of cost Provider RG&E and NYSEG NYSEG offers a lighting incentive program designed to serve small business customers with a demand of 100 kilowatts (kW) or less. These small business customers may schedule a free energy assessment and then receive a 70% discount on the installed cost of recommended lighting measures. Eligible lighting measures include the retrofitting of fluorescent fixtures,

90

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8) 8) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. All data in this set are classified as UK National Statistics. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

92

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Massachusetts) Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Massachusetts) < Back Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $25,000; 30% of total cost if project did not recieve financing from CEL, 20% of total cost if project did recieve financing from CEL Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.17 per annual kWh saved Lighting: $0.17 per annual kWh saved New Construction: $0.17 per annual kWh saved Provider Program Administrator Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a Pilot Energy Efficiency Program to encourage non-residential, commercial, and industrial facilities to pursue

93

Well-to-wheel Energy Consumption and Pollutant Emissions Comparison between Electric and Non-electric Vehicles: a Modeling Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although electric vehicles (EVs) gain more and more popularity these years, the issue on whether they are really more environmentally and ecologically sound than non-electric vehicles, e.g. gasoline and diesel fuel burned internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has become a heat-debated one. This paper outlines an assessment model which intends to compare well-to-wheel energy consumption and pollutant emissions between \\{EVs\\} and non-electric ones, using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique based on the potential environmental and ecological impact. The modeling in this case predicted that from the perspective of total energy consumption and pollution, further improvements are still necessary for the feasibility and widespread use of EVs.

Z.J. Li; X.L. Chen; M. Ding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

The socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors affecting electricity consumption in domestic buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper aims to investigate the socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors that have significant or non-significant effects on domestic electricity consumption. To achieve this aim, a comprehensive literature review of international research investigating these factors was undertaken. Although papers examining the factors affecting electricity demand are numerous, to the authors knowledge, a comprehensive analysis taking stock of all previous findings has not previously been undertaken. The review establishes that no less than 62 factors potentially have an effect on domestic electricity use. This includes 13 socio-economic factors, 12 dwelling factors and 37 appliance factors. Of the 62 factors, four of the socio-economic factors, seven of the dwelling factors, and nine of the appliance related factors were found to unambiguously have a significant positive effect on electricity use. This paper contributes to a better understanding of those factors that certainly affect electricity consumption and those for which effects are unclear and require further research. Understanding the effects of factors can support both the implementation of effective energy policy and aid prediction of future electricity consumption in the domestic sector.

Rory V. Jones; Alba Fuertes; Kevin J. Lomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

97

Does energy consumption by the US electric power sector exhibit long memory behavior?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes energy consumption by the US electric power by various energy sources through fractional integration. In doing so, we are able to determine the level of persistence of the shocks affecting each energy source. The results indicate long memory behavior as each energy source is highly persistent, displaying long memory along with autoregressive behavior and strong seasonal patterns.

Luis A. Gil-Alana; David Loomis; James E. Payne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Green Computing Wanted: Electricity Consumptions in the IT Industry and by Household Computers in Five Major Chinese Cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhausted energy consumption becomes a world-wide issue nowadays. Computing contributes a large portion of energy consumption. The concept of green computing has been popularized. Along with the rapid development of China, energy issue becomes more and ... Keywords: energy/electricity consumption, IT industry, household computers, energy efficiency, green computing

Luyang Wang; Tao Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Farm  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas and Electric) - Farm Gas and Electric) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1/1/2012 State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Clothes Washer: $100 Refrigerator Replacement: $50 Dishwasher Replacement: $20 Freezer: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Water Heater: $50 Electric Heat Pump Water Heaters: $100 Circulating Fans: $25 - $75

100

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 6 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 5 5 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 10 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 8 8 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 10 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 11 11 Over 500,000 26 18 18 21 Principal Building Activity Education 8 9 6 6 Food Sales and Service 8 9 8 7 Health Care 14 12 12 9 Lodging 11 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 5 7 7 7 Office 6 10 7 6 Public Assembly 7 12 28 30 Public Order and Safety 18 29 18 18 Religious Worship 10 10 11 11 Warehouse and Storage

102

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Lighting Retrofit Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $20,000 per project Program Info State Alaska Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $1,000/kW or 50% of the project cost Provider Golden Valley Electric Association BusBusiness $ense is a Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) program designed to increase the efficiency with which energy is used on GVEA's system. It provides rebates of up to $20,000 to existing facilities receiving the commercial rate who reduce their lighting loads through energy efficient lighting retrofit projects. Facilities on GVEA's

103

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous EquipmentElectricity Use in New Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The "Other" end-uses (appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment) continue to grow. This is particularly true innew homes, where increasing floor area and amenities are leading tohigher saturation of these types of devices. This paper combines thefindings of several field studies to assess the current state ofknowledge about the "Other" end-uses in new homes. The field studiesinclude sub-metered measurements of occupied houses in Arizona, Florida,and Colorado, as well as device-level surveys and power measurements inunoccupied new homes. We find that appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment can consume from 46 percent to 88 percent ofwhole-house electricity use in current low-energy homes. Moreover, theannual consumption for the "Other" end-uses is not significantly lower innew homes (even those designed for low energy use) compared to existinghomes. The device-level surveys show that builder-installed equipment isa significant contributor to annual electricity consumption, and certaindevices that are becoming more common in new homes, such as structuredwiring systems, contribute significantly to this power consumption. Thesefindings suggest that energy consumption by these "Other" end uses isstill too large to allow cost-effective zero-energy homes.

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan,Gregory

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the relationship between electrical power consumption per capita and GDP per capita in 130 countries using the data reported by World Bank. We found that an electrical power consumption per capita...

Aki-Hiro Sato

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR OF JORDAN: APPLICATION OF MULTIVARIATE LINEAR REGRESSION AND ADAPTIVE NEURO?FUZZY TECHNIQUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study two techniques for modeling electricity consumption of the Jordanian industrial sector are presented: (i) multivariate linear regression and (ii) neuro?fuzzy models. Electricity consumption is modeled as function of different variables such as number of establishments number of employees electricity tariff prevailing fuel prices production outputs capacity utilizations and structural effects. It was found that industrial production and capacity utilization are the most important variables that have significant effect on future electrical power demand. The results showed that both the multivariate linear regression and neuro?fuzzy models are generally comparable and can be used adequately to simulate industrial electricity consumption. However comparison that is based on the square root average squared error of data suggests that the neuro?fuzzy model performs slightly better for future prediction of electricity consumption than the multivariate linear regression model. Such results are in full agreement with similar work using different methods for other countries.

M. Samhouri; A. Al?Ghandoor; R. H. Fouad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Solar Day-Lighting Using Optical Fibers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Green lighting alternatives can substantially reduce electricity consumption. Solar day-lighting system, by transporting the concentrated sunlight through optical fibers, has been...

Kumar, Naveen; Patil, Sanket

107

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Retail Supplier State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction: Varies, see program web site Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings

108

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available. Major findings of the report include: water withdrawal and consumption factors vary greatly across and within fuel technologies, and water factors show greater agreement when organized according to cooling technologies as opposed to fuel technologies; a transition to a less carbon-intensive electricity sector could result in either an increase or a decrease in water use, depending on the choice of technologies and cooling systems employed; concentrating solar power technologies and coal facilities with carbon capture and sequestration capabilities have the highest water consumption values when using a recirculating cooling system; and non-thermal renewables, such as photovoltaics and wind, have the lowest water consumption factors. Improved power plant data and further studies into the water requirements of energy technologies in different climatic regions would facilitate greater resolution in analyses of water impacts of future energy and economic scenarios. This report provides the foundation for conducting water use impact assessments of the power sector while also identifying gaps in data that could guide future research.

J Macknick; R Newmark; G Heath; K C Hallett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

110

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation: $300 maximum rebate Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $50 Freezer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 Central A/C: Up to $500 Ductless Mini-Split AC: Up to $500 Air Source Heat Pump: Up to $500 Insulation: 30% of installed cost Provider EFI Municipal Rebates Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a variety of incentives for its

111

Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Webinar Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol U.S. DOE WEBINAR ON H2 FUELING PROTOCOLS: PARTICIPANTS Rob Burgess Moderator Jesse Schneider TIR J2601,...

112

Central Electric Cooperative- Non-Residential Lighting Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Central Electric Cooperative offers a commercial lighting system improvement incentive for any customer not on a residential utility rate. To use the program and learn how much the rebates can...

113

Electricity consumption from renewable and non-renewable sources and economic growth: Evidence from Latin American countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study explores the effect of renewable and non-renewable electricity consumption on economic growth in 18 Latin American countries. To achieve the goal of this study a panel Gross Domestic Product (GDP) model was constructed taking the period 19802010 into account. From the Pedroni cointegration test results it was found that renewable electricity consumption, non-renewable electricity consumption, labor, gross fixed capital formation, and total trade are cointegrated. Moreover, the panel Dynamic Ordinary Least Squares (DOLS) test results revealed that all above the mentioned variables have a long run positive effect on GDP growth in the investigated countries. The Vector Error-Correction (VEC) Granger causality model results revealed the existence of feedback causality between the variables. The results of the study indicated that renewable electricity consumption is more significant than non-renewable electricity consumption in promoting economic growth in the investigated countries in the long run and the short run. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the investigated countries should increase their investment on renewable energy projects to increase the role of electricity consumption from renewable sources. In addition, it is essential that these countries should reduce their non-renewable electricity consumption by increasing their energy efficiency and implementing energy saving projects. By applying these recommendations, these countries would be able to mitigate global warming and reduce their dependency on fossil fuel to increase their energy security.

Usama Al-mulali; Hassan Gholipour Fereidouni; Janice Y.M. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NC Utilities Commission These rules shall apply to any person, firm, or corporation (except municipalities, or agents thereof) which is now or may hereafter become engaged as a public utility in the business of furnishing electric current for domestic, commercial or industrial consumers within the State of North Carolina. The rules are intended to define good practice which can normally

115

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska) Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources Irrigation districts, created in section 46-1xx, are encouraged to

116

Economic growth, electricity consumption, urbanization and environmental degradation relationship in United Arab Emirates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study explores the relationship between economic growth, electricity consumption, urbanization and environmental degradation in case of United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study covers the quarter frequency data over the period of 19752011. We have applied the ARDL bounds testing approach to examine the long run relationship between the variables in the presence of structural breaks. The VECM Granger causality is applied to investigate the direction of causal relationship between the variables. Our empirical exercise reported the existence of cointegration among the series. Further, we found an inverted U-shaped relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions i.e. economic growth raises energy emissions initially and declines it after a threshold point of income per capita (EKC exists). Electricity consumption declines CO2 emissions. The relationship between urbanization and CO2 emissions is positive. Exports seem to improve the environmental quality by lowering CO2 emissions. The causality analysis validates the feedback effect between CO2 emissions and electricity consumption. Economic growth and urbanization Granger cause CO2 emissions.

Muhammad Shahbaz; Rashid Sbia; Helmi Hamdi; Ilhan Ozturk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc Place Hawaii Utility Id 8287 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location HI NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png SCHEDULE "F" Street Light Service Lighting SCHEDULE "G" General Service Non-Demand - Single Phase Commercial SCHEDULE "G" General Service Non-Demand - Three Phase Commercial

118

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric) - Commercial Energy Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T8 Fixtures: $5 - $18 /system or $0.50 /lamp Fluorescents: $4 - $125 CFLs: $8 - $25 Indirect Lighting: $16 - $24 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixtures: $25 - $65 Lighting Controls: $12 - $35 Variable Frequency Drive: $30 /hp Totally Enclosed Fan-Cooled: $10 - $600 Open Drip-Proof: $10 - $600 Custom: Buy down to 2 year pay back or 50% of cost, whichever is less

119

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2005 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 - 5 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The domestic electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. These data are classified as UK National Statistics. Note about spreadsheets: separate tabs exist for each local authority (LA), but the tabs are hidden. To view data, simply 'unhide' the appropriate tab(s). You do not need to "enable macros" to view the data. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

120

Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd Place Zhongshan, China Zip 528411 Sector Solar Product Chinese light manufactuere who is building a 10MW a-Si thin-film solar cell factory. Coordinates 22.516701°, 113.366699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.516701,"lon":113.366699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electric dipole moment of light nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the sensitivity of the deuteron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) to variation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we write the EDM as a sum of two terms, one depends on the target wave function, the second on intermediate multiple scattering states in the {sup 3}P{sub 1} channel. This second contribution is sensitive to off-shell behavior of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} amplitude.

Afnan, Iraj R. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001 (Australia); Gibson, Benjamin F. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Alaska Electric Light&Power Co for November 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales...

123

Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

December 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Alaska Electric Light&Power Co for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales...

124

Bremen Electric Light & Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bremen Electric Light & Power Co Bremen Electric Light & Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Bremen Electric Light & Power Co Place Indiana Utility Id 2192 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial: Single Phase Commercial Commercial: Three Phase Commercial Industrial: Single Phase Industrial Industrial: Three Phase Industrial Large Power Industrial Mega Industrial Power Industrial Municipal: Single Phase Commercial Municipal: Three Phase Commercial Residential Residential

125

Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company Place New Hampshire Utility Id 6374 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company (Massachusetts).

126

The effect of electricity consumption from renewable sources on countries? economic growth levels: Evidence from advanced, emerging and developing economies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses a sample of 36 countries for the time period 19902011 in order to examine the relationship between countries? electricity consumption from renewable sources and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) levels. Several nonparametric techniques are applied to investigate the effect of electricity consumption from several renewable sources including wind, geothermal, solar, biomass and waste on countries? GDP levels. When investigating the whole sample ignoring countries? economic development status, the results reveal an increasing relationship up to a certain GDP level, which after that point the effect of electricity consumption on GDP stabilises. However when analyzing separately the Emerging Markets and Developing Economies, and, the Advanced-Developed Economies, the results change significantly. For the case of Emerging Market and Developing Economies the relationship appears to be highly nonlinear (an M-shape form) indicating that on those countries the levels of electricity consumption from renewable sources will not result on higher GDP levels. In contrast for the case of the advanced economies the results reveal an increasing nonlinear relationship indicating that higher electricity consumption levels from renewable sources results to higher GDP levels. This finding is mainly attributed to the fact that in the advanced-developed economies more terawatts from renewable sources are generated and consumed compared to the emerging market and developing economies, which traditionally their economies rely on non-renewable sources for power generation and consumption.

George E. Halkos; Nickolaos G. Tzeremes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Differentiated long term projections of the hourly electricity consumption in local areas. The case of Denmark West  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Assessing grid developments the spatial distribution of the electricity consumption is important. In Denmark the electricity grid consists of transmission and local distribution grids with different voltages that are connected via transformer stations each covering a local area with between 10.000 and 100.000 customers. Data for the hourly electricity consumption at transformer stations shows that the profile of consumption differs considerably between local areas, and this is partly due to a different weight of categories of customers in the different areas. Categories of customers have quite distinct consumption profiles and contribute quite differently to the aggregated load profile. In forecasts, demand by categories of customers is expected to develop differently implying that both the level and the profile of consumption at each transformer stations are expected to change differently. Still, in the previous planning of the transmission grid in Denmark specific local conditions have not been considered. As a first step towards differentiated local load forecasts, the paper presents a new model for long term projections of consumption in local areas and illustrates a first use of the model related to the transmission grid planning by the Danish TSO Energinet.dk. The model is a distribution system that distributes hourly consumption in an aggregated area to hourly consumption at each transformer station. Using econometrics, the model is estimated on national statistics for the hourly consumption by categories of customers and data for the hourly consumption at each transformer station for the years 20092011. Applying the model for load forecasts, a major conclusion is that different transformer stations will experience different changes both in the level - and in the hourly profile of load.

F.M. Andersen; H.V. Larsen; N. Juul; R.B. Gaardestrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Alaska Electric Light&Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light&Power Co Light&Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Alaska Electric Light&Power Co Place Alaska Utility Id 213 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial & Government Dual Fuel Commercial Experimental Off-Peak Electric Vehicle Charging 10:00 pm - 7:00 am Commercial General Residential Residential Large Commercial Commercial Off-Peak/Heat storage from 10pm-6am Large Commercial Commercial

129

Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L.von 2. The EV primary energy consumption relative to that~ Fig. 3. The EV primary energy consumption relative to thatVehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum

Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The partners involved in the Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) campaign, along with private and public entities, advocate for and install energy-efficient lighting in public parking lots to foster significant reductions in participants energy consumption.

131

The implications of using hydrocarbon fuels to generate electricity for hydrogen fuel powered automobiles on electrical capital, hydrocarbon consumption, and anthropogenic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers some of the impacts of adopting hydrogen fuel cell powered electric automobiles in the US. The change will need significant adjustments to the electrical generation industry including additional capital and hydrocarbon fuel consumption as well as impacting anthropogenic greenhouse emissions. Examining the use of three fuels to generate hydrogen fuels, using three production methods, distributed in three geographic scenarios, we determine that while the change reduces anthropogenic greenhouse emissions with minimal additional electrical generation capital expenditures, it accelerates the use of natural gas. Electrolysis provides a sustainable, longer-term solution, but requires more capital investment in electrical generation and yields an increase in anthropogenic greenhouse emissions.

Derek Tittle; Jingwen Qu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Alaska Electric Light&Power Co for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-02 Utility...

133

Transport energy consumption in mountainous roads. A comparative case study for internal combustion engines and electric vehicles in Andorra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper analyses transport energy consumption of conventional and electric vehicles in mountainous roads. A standard round trip in Andorra has been modelled in order to characterise vehicle dynamics in hilly regions. Two conventional diesel vehicles and their electric-equivalent models have been simulated and their performances have been compared. Six scenarios have been simulated to study the effects of factors such as orography, traffic congestion and driving style. The European fuel consumption and emissions test and Artemis urban driving cycles, representative of European driving cycles, have also been included in the comparative analysis. The results show that road grade has a major impact on fuel economy, although it affects consumption in different levels depending on the technology analysed. Electric vehicles are less affected by this factor as opposed to conventional vehicles, increasing the potential energy savings in a hypothetical electrification of the car fleet. However, electric vehicle range in mountainous terrains is lower compared to that estimated by manufacturers, a fact that could adversely affect a massive adoption of electric cars in the short term.

Oriol Travesset-Baro; Marti Rosas-Casals; Eric Jover

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

showing the energy flows in the building electrical loadfocus primarily on electrical energy, which represents thefor monitoring electrical energy. However, as wireless

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cumulative energy, emissions, and water consumption for geothermal electric power production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis has been conducted on geothermal electricity generation. The technologies covered in the study include flash binary enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and coproduced gas and electricity plants. The life cycle performance metrics quantified in the study include materials water and energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The life cycle stages taken into account were the plant and fuel cycle stages the latter of which includes fuel production and fuel use (operational). The plant cycle includes the construction of the plant wells and above ground piping and the production of the materials that comprise those systems. With the exception of geothermal flash plants GHG emissions from the plant cycle are generally small and the only such emissions from geothermal plants. Some operational GHGs arise from flash plants and though substantial when compared to other geothermal power plants these are nonetheless considerably smaller than those emitted from fossil fuel fired plants. For operational geothermal emissions an emission rate (g/kW h) distribution function vs. cumulative capacity was developed using California plant data. Substantial GHG emissions arise from coproduced facilities and two other renewable power plants but these are almost totally due to the production and use of natural gas and biofuels. Nonetheless those GHGs are still much less than those from fossil fuel fired plants. Though significant amounts of water are consumed for plant and well construction especially for well field stimulation of EGS plants they are small in comparison to estimated water consumed during plant operation. This also applies to air cooled plants which nominally should consume no water during operation. Considering that geothermal operational water use data are scarce our estimates show the lowest water consumption for flash and coproduced plants and the highest for EGS though the latter must be considered provisional due to the absence of field data. The EGS estimate was based on binary plant data.

J. L. Sullivan; C. Clark; J. Han; C. Harto; M. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ultrastrong light-matter coupling in electrically doped microcavity organic light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coupling of the electromagnetic field with an electronic transition gives rise, for strong enough light-matter interactions, to hybrid states called exciton-polaritons. When the energy exchanged between light and matter becomes a significant fraction of the material transition energy an extreme optical regime called ultrastrong coupling (USC) is achieved. We report a microcavity embedded p-i-n monolithic organic light emitting diode working in USC, employing a thin film of squaraine dye as active layer. A normalized coupling ratio of 30% has been achieved at room temperature. These USC devices exhibit a dispersion-less angle-resolved electroluminescence that can be exploited for the realization of innovative optoelectronic devices. Our results may open the way towards electrically pumped polariton lasers.

Mazzeo, M., E-mail: marco.mazzeo@unisalento.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi, Universit del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Genco, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi, Universit del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gambino, S. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy); Ballarini, D.; Mangione, F.; Sanvitto, D. [NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Stefano, O.; Patan, S.; Savasta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universit di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d'Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Gigli, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi, Universit del Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN, Istituto Italiano Tecnologia, Via Barsanti 1, 73010 Lecce (Italy)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

On the impact of urban heat island and global warming on the power demand and electricity consumption of buildingsA review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Urban heat island and global warming increase significantly the ambient temperature. Higher temperatures have a serious impact on the electricity consumption of the building sector increasing considerably the peak and the total electricity demand. The present paper aims to collect, analyze and present in a comparative way existing studies investigating the impact of ambient temperature increase on electricity consumption. Analysis of eleven studies dealing with the impact of the ambient temperature on the peak electricity demand showed that for each degree of temperature increase, the increase of the peak electricity load varies between 0.45% and 4.6%. This corresponds to an additional electricity penalty of about 21 (10.4)W per degree of temperature increase and per person. In parallel, analysis of fifteen studies examining the impact of ambient temperature on the total electricity consumption, showed that the actual increase of the electricity demand per degree of temperature increase varies between 0.5% and 8.5%.

M. Santamouris; C. Cartalis; A. Synnefa; D. Kolokotsa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% | 9.03 1990 | 65.0% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 9.26 1991 | 65.6% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 9.42 1992 | 64.6% 35.2% 0.2% 100% | 9.43 1993 | 65.7% 34.1% 0.2% 100% | 9.76 1994 | 65.5% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.01 1995 | 66.2% 33.6% 0.2% 100% | 10.28 1996 | 66.5% 33.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.58 1997 | 66.8% 33.0% 0.2% 100% | 10.73 1998 | 67.6% 32.2% 0.2% 100% | 11.14 1999 | 67.9% 32.0% 0.2% 100% | 11.30 2000 | 68.7% 31.1% 0.2% 100% | 11.67 2001 | 70.5% 29.4% 0.2% 100% |

139

Forecasting short-term electricity consumption using a semantics-based genetic programming framework: The South Italy case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Accurate and robust short-term load forecasting plays a significant role in electric power operations. This paper proposes a variant of genetic programming, improved by incorporating semantic awareness in algorithm, to address a short term load forecasting problem. The objective is to automatically generate models that could effectively and reliably predict energy consumption. The presented results, obtained considering a particularly interesting case of the South Italy area, show that the proposed approach outperforms state of the art methods. Hence, the proposed approach reveals appropriate for the problem of forecasting electricity consumption. This study, besides providing an important contribution to the energy load forecasting, confirms the suitability of genetic programming improved with semantic methods in addressing complex real-life applications.

Mauro Castelli; Leonardo Vanneschi; Matteo De Felice

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Categorization of residential electricity consumption as a basis for the assessment of the impacts of demand response actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a smart(er) grid context, the existence of dynamic tariffs and bidirectional communications will simultaneously allow and require an active role from the end-user concerning electricity management. However, the residential end-user will not be always available to manage energy resources and decide, based on price signals and preferences/needs, the best response actions to implement or the best usage of the electricity produced locally. Therefore, energy management systems are required to monitor consumption/generation/storage and to make the best decisions according to input signals and the user's needs and preferences. The design of adequate algorithms to be implemented in those systems require the prior characterization of domestic electricity demand and categorization of loads, according to availability, typical usage patterns, working cycles and technical constraints. Automated demand response actions must be tailored and chosen according to this previous analysis of load characteristics. In this paper, a characterization of household electricity consumption is presented and an operational categorization of end-use loads is proposed. The existing potential for demand response to a diversified set of management actions is described and a tool to assess the impact of implementing several actions with different rates of penetration of energy management systems is presented. The results obtained show the potential savings for the end-user and expected changes in the load diagram with a decrease of the aggregated peak electricity demand and a smoothed valley.

Ana Soares; lvaro Gomes; Carlos Henggeler Antunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $25,000 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,500 - $25,000 Provider Customer Service Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy), in conjunction with Wells

142

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption, long lifetime on batteries, low sample rates,instead of replying on batteries. At the same time, we arelow power operation on batteries is not required, since the

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sensitivity to electricity consumption in urban business and commercial area buildings according to climatic change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, urban high temperature phenomenon has become a problem which results from human activities, the increase in energy consumption, and land-cover change in urban areas ... is increased and results in the d...

Kang-guk Lee; Sung-bum Kim; Won-hwa Hong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

145

Demand side management of industrial electricity consumption: Promoting the use of renewable energy through real-time pricing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the installed capacity of wind generation in Ireland continues to increase towards an overall goal of 40% of electricity from renewable sources by 2020, it is inevitable that the frequency of wind curtailment occurrences will increase. Using this otherwise discarded energy by strategically increasing demand at times that would otherwise require curtailment has the potential to reduce the installed capacity of wind required to meet the national 2020 target. Considering two industrial electricity consumers, this study analyses the potential for the implementation of price based demand response by an industrial consumer to increase their proportional use of wind generated electricity by shifting their demand towards times of low prices. Results indicate that while curtailing during peak price times has little or no benefit in terms of wind energy consumption, demand shifting towards low price times is likely to increase a consumers consumption of wind generation by approximately 5.8% for every 10% saved on the consumers average unit price of electricity.

Paddy Finn; Colin Fitzpatrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-08 Utility Company Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) Place Alaska Start Date 2008-08-01 End Date...

147

Alaska Electric Light&Power Co (Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Alaska Electric Light&Power Co for July 2008. Monthly...

148

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. Kahn (2011). Electricity Consumption and Durable Housing:49 3.3.3. Pre-installation electricity consumption of CSIon Electricity Consumption .

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. I. Variation with Current and Arc-Length. II. Influence upon the Luminous Radiation from the Arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 December 1915 research-article The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. I. Variation with Current and Arc-Length. II. Influence upon the Luminous Radiation from the...

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Light Manufacturing Facilities in The Northern Plains: A Study of Detailed Data from 10 Industrial Energy Audits Conducted in 1993  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSUMPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGHT MANUFACTURING FACll..ITIES IN THE NORTHERN PLAINS: A study of detailed data from 10 industrial energy audits conducted in 1993. Michael Twedt Graduate Research Assistant IEOPIEADC South Dakota... profiles and common energy conservation opportunities. A statistical breakdown of energy consumption of 10 light manufacturing facilities by process, equipment type, and end use is provided. Common energy optimization procedures are also summarized...

Twedt, M.; Bassett, K.

152

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Minimum project size for the full $5,000 grant is 20 fixtures; smaller projects will receive a $250 per-fixture grant. Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to $5,000 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible roadway lighting fixtures. Participants must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of

153

Predicting electricity consumption and cost for South African mines / S.S. (Stephen) Cox.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Electricity costs in South Africa have risen steeply; there are a number of factors that have contributed to this increase. The increased costs have a (more)

Cox, Samuel Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy flows in the building electrical load tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .intrinsic property of energy load trees is additivity - thevisualization of energy flows in the load tree, as shown in

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Lighting Electricity Rates on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting Electricity Rates on OpenEI Lighting Electricity Rates on OpenEI Home > Groups > Utility Rate Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 31 May, 2013 - 12:04 API Utility Rates I'm pleased to announce that a new lighting rate category and about 10,000 lighting rates are now officially offered in OpenEI's utility rate database! Streetlights and other similar electric lighting uses are typically billed using uniquely designed lighting rates. Illinois State University (ISU) had contributed approximately 10,000 lighting rates, and now these rates have been categorized under a new "lighting" category (in the same dropdown list that contains "residential", "commercial" and "industrial" categories). With the new categorization, users can now query

156

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces isthe total furnace electricity consumption and are primarilyto calculate the electricity consumption during cooling

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in forecasting electricity consumption in the residentialmodeling, since household electricity consumption is largelyup forecasting of electricity consumption by combining

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery Utility electricity consumption Electricity providedis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electricity generated from sources that are renewable hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the...

160

A Clustering Model for Mining Consumption Patterns from Imprecise Electric Load Time Series Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel clustering model for mining patterns from imprecise electric load time series. The model consists of three components. First, it contains a process that deals with representation an...

Qiudan Li; Stephen Shaoyi Liao; Dandan Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Understanding Socio-Economic Driving Factors of Indonesian Households Electricity Consumption in Two Urban Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indonesia is one of the most diverse countries in the world in terms of its society. Therefore, there are several different characteristics in daily practices, including in consuming electricity. In order to unde...

Muhammad Ery Wijaya; Tetsuo Tezuka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Improvements in Test Protocols for Electric Vehicles to Determine Range and Total Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As electric vehicles have entered the market fairly recently, ... tested the same way as the ICE-driven cars with the exception that determining range is ... However, the current procedures address mainly primary...

Juhani Laurikko; Jukka Nuottimki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights on in a New  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09: Keeping the Lights on in 09: Keeping the Lights on in a New World Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights on in a New World Elertricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Keeping the Lights on in a New World: The purpose of the report is to address current trends with respect to construction of generation and transmission; use of demand-side resources and increased efficiency; and plans for meeting future electricity needs that will result in reliable supplies of electricity, at reasonable cost and with due regard for the environment. The report focuses on specific actions the U.S. Department of Energy can take to meet these challenges. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights on in a New World More Documents & Publications Chapter 3 Demand-Side Resources

165

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program (Iowa) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on November 9, 2012. Financial Incentive Program Place Iowa Additional Place applies to MidAmerican Energy Name MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program Incentive Type Utility Grant Program Applicable Sector Local Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Induction Lighitng, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Up to $5,000 Equipment Requirements Fixtures must have an efficiency rating equal to or greater than 66 lumens per watt as tested under Illuminating Engineering Society of North America LM-79-08 testing to qualify for a grant.

166

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing for Optimizing Distribution Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters (air quality, noise pollution, traffic levels, water quality, etc.) in a distributed manner and create anomolies in pollution levels in specific locations, such as sporting events, rallies and fairs pollution and a series of other social problems. The urban electrical energy development has also been

Beigl, Michael

167

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cientA Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission the behavior of the various decision-makers, who operate in a decentralized manner and include power generators

Nagurney, Anna

168

Lighting Technology Panel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Panel Technology Panel Federal Utility Partnership Working Group N b 2009 November 1 1 8, 2009 Doug Avery Southern California Edison Southern California Edison National Energy Conservation M d t Mandates * There are Federal and State Mandates to reduce energy consumption - California Investor Owned Electric Utilities are ordered to save around 3 Billion kWh's each y year from 2007-2113 - Federal buildings ordered to reduce electrical Federal buildings ordered to reduce electrical energy consumption 35% by 2012 Energy Consump ption gy Lighting accounts for 42 7% of energy consumption Lighting accounts for 42.7% of energy consumption Data Courtesy of SDG&E Data Courtesy of SDG&E Energy Consump ption gy More than ¾ of the lighting load is non-residential. Data Courtesy of SDG&E

169

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the lighting and plug load energy results.

170

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a number of energy efficiency rebates for Minnesota residential customers which implement HVAC, lighting, appliance, window, insulation and water heating upgrades. Eligible...

171

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

State Government Savings Category Heat Pumps Lighting Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New...

172

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81 Municipal Solid Waste 50 1 1 1 1 1 Wood and Other Biomass 50 5 5 5 5 6 Solar Thermal 100 9 9 9 9 9 Solar Photovoltaic 150 11 11 13 23 52 Wind 100 123 124 153 182 262 Total 277 372 538 760 1,041 Distributed Generation 148 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Cumulative additions after Dec. 31, 2010. 2) Based on current stock average capacity. 3) Combustion turbine/diesel data used.

173

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

174

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

175

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

176

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

177

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

178

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

179

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

180

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Real-world fuel consumption and CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions by driving conditions for light-duty passenger vehicles in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The increasing discrepancy between on-road and type-approval fuel consumption for \\{LDPVs\\} (light-duty passenger vehicles) has attracted tremendous attention. We measured on-road emissions for 60 \\{LDPVs\\} in three China's cities and calculated their fuel consumption and CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions. We further evaluated the impacts of variations in area-averaged speed on relative fuel consumption of gasoline \\{LDPVs\\} for the UAB (urban area of Beijing). On-road fuel consumption under the average driving pattern is 102% higher than that normalized to the NEDC (new European driving cycle) cycle for all tested vehicles, and the on-road NEDC-normalized fuel consumption is higher by 3012% compared to type-approval values for gasoline vehicles. We observed very strong correlations between relative fuel consumption and average speed. Traffic control applied to \\{LDPVs\\} driving within the UAB during weekdays can substantially reduce total fleet fuel consumption by 235% during restriction hours by limiting vehicle use and improving driving conditions. Our results confirmed that a new cycle for the type approval test for \\{LDPVs\\} with more real-world driving features is of great necessity. Furthermore, enhanced traffic control measures could play an important role in mitigating real-world fuel consumption and CO2 emissions for \\{LDPVs\\} in China.

Shaojun Zhang; Ye Wu; Huan Liu; Ruikun Huang; Puikei Un; Yu Zhou; Lixin Fu; Jiming Hao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

RG&E (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program RG&E (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Assessment: Free Lighting Retrofit: 70% of cost Provider RG&E and NYSEG RG&E offers a lighting incentive program designed to serve small business customers with a demand of 100 kilowatts (kW) or less. These small business customers may schedule a free energy assessment and then receive a 70% discount on the installed cost of recommended lighting measures. Eligible lighting measures include the retrofitting of fluorescent fixtures,

183

Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Last-Out Energy Conservation Check List Office Symbol Name: Suite Room Number: Date Initials All Lights in Suite are Off? All Printers in Suite are Off? All Scanners in Suite are...

184

Simulation and analysis of a solar assisted heat pump system with two different storage types for high levels of PV electricity self-consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The incentives for PV-systems in Europe is being gradually lowered or ended. This makes a higher level of self-consumption interesting for owners of PV-systems. Sweden has an incentive of 35% of the investment cost for PV-systems. Unfortunately not all consumers can get this incentive. Therefore a high level of self-consumption will be necessary if the PV-systems are to be profitable in Sweden. A reference system with two different energy storage technologies is investigated in this paper. One system with 48kWh of batteries and one system with a hot water storage tank where the electricity is stored as heat. The research questions in this paper are: Which storage system gives the highest level of PV electricity self-consumption? Are the storage systems profitable with the assumptions made in this paper? What are the levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) for the reference system with different storage system? The system with batteries has a self-consumption of 89% of the annual PV-electricity output and the system with a hot water storage tank has 88%. The system with batteries has a levelized cost of electricity two times higher than the system with a hot water storage tank.

Richard Thygesen; Bjrn Karlsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014 22.2 2015 22.2 2016 22.2 2017 22.2 2018 22.2 2019 22.2 2020 22.2 2021 22.2 2022 22.2 2023 22.2 2024 22.2 2025 22.2 2026 22.2 2027 22.2 2028 22.2 2029 22.2 285.6 87.9 211.3 161.19 114.7 882.9 285.6 87.9 205.3 159.30 114.7 875.0 285.6 88.6 201.8 159.01 114.7 871.8 285.6 88.9 199.6 158.22 114.7 869.2 285.6 89.0 194.5 154.88 114.7 860.8 285.6 89.0 191.9 153.01 113.9 855.6 285.6 89.0 189.2 150.00 113.2

186

Electric dipole moments of light nuclei from {chi}EFT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I present recent calculations of EDMs of light nuclei using chiral effective field theory techniques. At leading-order, we argue that they can be expressed in terms of six CP-violating low-energy constants. With our expressions, eventual non-zero measurements of EDMs of deuteron, helion, and triton can be combined to disentangle the different sources of CP-violation.

Higa, Renato [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998 318 42 360 154 1999 315 44 359 155 2000 271 45 316 165 2001 214 39 253 170 2002 260 44 304 194 2003 272 45 317 196 2004 265 49 314 184 2005 267 53 320 180 2006 286 62 349 165 2007 246 71 317 177 2008 253 94 347 167 2009 272 113 384 159 2010 289 100 390 165 2011 296 172 468 159 2012 296 148 444 161 2013 297 172 469 158 2014 297 186 483 161 2015 297 197 494 160 2016 297 207 504 160 2017 297 212 510 161 2018 298 224 522 161 2019 298 230 528 161 2020 298 246 544 161 2021

188

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1989 73.6 2.6 1.7 1.1 0.2 N.A. 1.5 1990 73.3 2.7 2.1 1.2 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1991 75.4 2.6 2.5 1.3 0.3 N.A. 1.9 1992 74.2 2.9 2.5 1.4 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1993 76.8 2.9 2.6 1.5 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1994 76.9 3.0 2.7 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1995 77.4 3.0 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1996 75.3 2.9 2.9 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1997 78.3 2.9 2.9 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.6 1998 78.0 2.9 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1999 78.3 2.8 3.0 1.8 0.4 N.A. 2.3 2000 78.2 2.8 3.3 1.7 0.4 N.A. 2.4 2001 77.9 2.2

189

Electric lighting for the 1990s: The major issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lighting community has grown from a simple business to a larger population with more diverse motives and needs. Here the author looks at the different facets of this industry. First is the conservation and environmental advocacy concerns, often pressed by groups adamantly committed to their objectives. The industry must keep abreast of technology, and know the facts as it moves in new directions. The user needs to have the tools available to design lighting systems which meet his and his clients needs for performance, productivity, and quality, when the system is being designed. Issues related to utility efforts through demand side management programs, governmental action through legislative and regulatory effort, and the application of new technology in new construction, and retrofitting, are discussed. The need now is to move to an integrated approach rather than a unilateral one that will reconcile the issues; this will leverage the strengths of all participants.

Gough, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5% 12.1% 16.8% (1) 100% 1987 10.9% 4.7% 56.5% 9.7% 0.5% 10.2% 17.8% (1) 100% 1988 9.5% 5.6% 56.5% 8.2% 0.4% 8.6% 19.9% (1) 100% 1989 10.5% 5.7% 54.2% 9.4% 1.4% 10.8% 18.8% (1) 100% 1990 10.7% 4.2% 53.4% 9.9% 1.7% 11.6% 20.0% (1) 100% 1991 11.0% 3.9% 52.8% 9.7% 1.8% 11.5% 20.9% (1) 100% 1992 11.5% 3.2% 53.7% 8.4% 2.0% 10.4% 21.1% (1) 100% 1993 11.1% 3.5% 54.2% 9.0% 2.0% 11.0% 20.2% (1) 100% 1994 12.4% 3.3% 53.5%

191

Electric Boosting System for Light Truck/SUV Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems. One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-TurboTM designs do both. The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-TurboTM, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-TurboTM can be used to generate modest amounts of electrical power and supplement the alternator under most load-speed conditions. It is shown that a single (large) e-TurboTM consumes slightly less electrical power for the same steady state torque shaping than a bi-Turbo configuration. However, the transient response of a bi-Turbo configuration in slightly better. It was shown that in order to make full use of additional capabilities of e-TurboTM wide compressor flow range is required. Variable geometry compressor (VGC) technology developed under a separate project was evaluated for incorporation into e-TurboTM designs. It was shown that the combination of these two technologies enables very high torque at low engine speeds. Designs and hardware combining VGC and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. There is concern about high power demands (even though momentary) of e-TurboTM. Reducing the inertia of the turbocharger can reduce power demand and increase battery life. Low inertia turbocharger technology called IBT developed under a separate project was evaluated for synergy with e-TurboTM designs. It was concluded that inertial reduction provided by IBT is very beneficial for e-TurboTM. Designs and hardware combining IBT and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. e-TurboTM provides several additional flexibilities including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for emissions reduction with minimum fuel economy penalty and exhaust temperature control for aftertreatment. In integrated multi-parameter control system is needed to realize the full potential of e-TurboTM performance. Honeywell expertise in process control systems involving hundreds of sensors and actuators was applied to demonstrate the potential benefits of multi-parameter, model based control systems.

Steve Arnold, Craig Balis, Pierre Barthelet, Etienne Poix, Tariq Samad, Greg Hampson, S.M. Shahed

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Novel effects of demand side management data on accuracy of electrical energy consumption modeling and long-term forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide implementation of demand side management (DSM) programs has had positive impacts on electrical energy consumption (EEC) and the examination of their effects on long-term forecasting is warranted. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of historical DSM data on accuracy of EEC modeling and long-term forecasting. To achieve the objective, optimal artificial neural network (ANN) models based on improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) and shuffled frog-leaping (SFL) algorithms are developed for EEC forecasting. For long-term EEC modeling and forecasting for the U.S. for 20102030, two historical data types used in conjunction with developed models include (i) EEC and (ii) socio-economic indicators, namely, gross domestic product, energy imports, energy exports, and population for 19672009 period. Simulation results from IPSO-ANN and SFL-ANN models show that using socio-economic indicators as input data achieves lower mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) for long-term EEC forecasting, as compared with EEC data. Based on IPSO-ANN, it is found that, for the U.S. EEC long-term forecasting, the addition of DSM data to socio-economic indicators data reduces MAPE by 36% and results in the estimated difference of 3592.8 MBOE (5849.9TWh) in EEC for 20102030.

F.J. Ardakani; M.M. Ardehali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Combining forecasts of electricity consumption in China with time-varying weights updated by a high-order Markov chain model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electricity consumption forecasting has been always playing a vital role in power system management and planning. Inaccurate prediction may cause wastes of scarce energy resource or electricity shortages. However, forecasting electricity consumption has proven to be a challenging task due to various unstable factors. Especially, China is undergoing a period of economic transition, which highlights this difficulty. This paper proposes a time-varying-weight combining method, i.e. High-order Markov chain based Time-varying Weighted Average (HM-TWA) method to predict the monthly electricity consumption in China. HM-TWA first calculates the in-sample time-varying combining weights by quadratic programming for the individual forecasts. Then it predicts the out-of-sample time-varying adaptive weights through extrapolating these in-sample weights using a high-order Markov chain model. Finally, the combined forecasts can be obtained. In addition, to ensure that the sample data have the same properties as the required forecasts, a reasonable multi-step-ahead forecasting scheme is designed for HM-TWA. The out-of-sample forecasting performance evaluation shows that HM-TWA outperforms the component models and traditional combining methods, and its effectiveness is further verified by comparing it with some other existing models.

Weigang Zhao; Jianzhou Wang; Haiyan Lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Light weight space power reactors for nuclear electric propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) unit capable of propelling a manned vehicle to MARS will be required to have a value of {alpha} (kg/kWe) which is less than five. In order to meet this goal the reactor mass, and thus its contribution to the value of {alpha} will have to be minimized. In this paper a candidate for such a reactor is described. It consists of a gas cooled Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), with specially chosen materials which allow it to operate at an exit temperature of approximately 2000 K. One of the unique features of a PBR is the direct cooling of particulate fuel by the working fluid. This feature allows for high power densities, highest possible gas exit temperatures, for a given fuel temperature and because of the thin particle bed a low pressure drop. The PBR's described in this paper will have a ceramic moderator (Be{sub 2}C), ZrC coated fuel particles and a carbon/carbon hot frit. All the reactors will be designed with sufficient fissile loading to operate at full power for seven years. The burn up possible with particulate fuel is approximately 30%--50%. These rector designs achieve a value of {alpha} less than unity in the power range of interest (5 MWe). 5 refs., 3 figs.

Ludewig, H.; Mughabghab, S.; Lazareth, O.; Perkins, K.; Schmidt, E.; Powell, J.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Modelling household electricity consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A number of conclusions are drawn, however given the limited and non-representative na- ture of the data on which the model is calibrated, these can (more)

de la Rue, Philip Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Enhancement and Electric Charge-Assisted Tuning of Nonlinear Light Generation in Bipolar Plasmonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancement and Electric Charge-Assisted Tuning of Nonlinear Light Generation in Bipolar Plasmonics) structure, termed plasmonic-enhanced, charge-assisted second-harmonic generator (p-CASH), that not only in many fields, such as commu- nications, sensors, imaging, medical treatments, displays, solar cells

197

Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USA. CEC, 2012. Electricity Consumption by Planning http://beyond their electricity consumption within each hour. Overwith significant electricity consumption. The variation in

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

199

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

200

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption. Total energy consumption (in thousand BTUs) waselectricity and total energy consumption. Because all homesin gas, electric, and total energy consumption. Removing

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

New top layer reduces the"wiggle"that degrades the conversion of light to electricity in solar cells by absorbing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New top layer reduces the"wiggle"that degrades the conversion of light to electricity in solar cells by absorbing light within a specific wavelength. Today's thin-film solar cells could not function light to pass through to the cell's active layers. Until recently, TCOs were seen as a necessary

203

Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sunlight contains energy which can be directly converted into electricity in solar cells of various types. This is an example of what is called 'direct conversion', involving no moving parts or heat conversion processes. This chapter looks at photovoltaic and photoelectric devices and also at other ideas for using light energy, some of which operate in the infrared part of the spectrum. Solar electric power is a rapidly developing field, opening up many opportunities for novel applications, as well as requirements, including for storage, with one idea being solar-powered hydrogen production and then direct conversion to electricity in fuel cells. Direct conversion is not always efficient, and this chapter introduces the concept of 'energy return on energy invested'. In speculative mood this chapter also looks at the idea of a global grid, allowing daytime solar generation to be used on the night side of the planet.

David Elliott ? Pages 4-1 to 4-20

204

Assessment of the effect of low viscosity oils usage on a light duty diesel engine fuel consumption in stationary and transient conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regarding the global warming due to CO2 emissions, the crude oil depletion and its corresponding rising prices, \\{OEMs\\} are exploring different solutions to increase the internal combustion engine efficiency, among which, the use of Low Viscosity Oils (LVO) represents one attractive cost-effective way to accomplish this goal. Reported in terms of fuel consumption, the effect of LVO is round 2%, depending on the test conditions, especially if the test has taken place in laboratory or on road conditions. This study presents the fuel consumption benefits of a commercial 5W20, compared against higher SAE grade oils, on a light duty diesel engine, when it is running under motored test, stationary fired test and the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC).

Vicente Macin; Bernardo Tormos; Vicente Bermdez; Leonardo Ramrez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy-efficiency standards for homes have the potential to reduce energy consumption and peak electrical demand.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Issue Energy-efficiency standards for homes have the potential to reduce energy consumption HVAC system efficiency, including problems with airflows, refrigerant system components, and ductwork standards, but little data is available on the actu- al energy performance of new homes. The Solution

206

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 90% of household electricity consumption in China. Usinggives an annual electricity consumption of 12kWh assumingto look at is electricity consumption at the household

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal electric vehicle (EV) policies in the United States currently include vehicle purchase subsidies linked to EV battery capacity and subsidies for installing charging stations. We assess the cost-effectiveness of increased battery capacity vs. nondomestic charging infrastructure installation for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks, and \\{SUVs\\} in the US. We find across a wide range of scenarios that the least-cost solution is for more drivers to switch to low-capacity plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (short electric range with gasoline backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are needed per vehicle, nondomestic charging infrastructure installation is substantially more expensive than increased battery capacity per gallon saved, and both approaches have higher costs than US oil premium estimates. Cost effectiveness of all subsidies are lower under a binding fuel economy standard. Comparison of results to the structure of current federal subsidies shows that policy is not aligned with fuel savings potential, and we discuss issues and alternatives.

Scott B. Peterson; Jeremy J. Michalek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Spatial effects of carbon dioxide emissions from residential energy consumption: A county-level study using enhanced nocturnal lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the worlds largest developing country and greenhouse gas emitter, Chinas residential energy consumption (REC) is now responsible for over 11% of the countrys total energy consumption. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes spatially distributed information from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Programs Operational Linescan System (DMSPOLS) and human activity index (HAI) to test the hypothesis that counties with similar carbon dioxide emissions from REC are more spatially clustered than would be expected by chance. Our results revealed a high degree of county-level clustering in the distribution of emissions per capita. However, further analysis showed that high-emission counties tended to be surrounded by counties with relatively low per capita GDP levels. Therefore, our results contrasted with other evidence that REC emissions were closely related to GDP levels. Accordingly, we stress the need for the consideration of other factors in determining emission patterns, such as residential consumption patterns (e.g., consumer choices, behavior, knowledge, and information diffusion).

Heli Lu; Guifang Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EV's, roadway-powered electric automobiles, and light dutyFor Roadway-Powered Electric Automobiles -a---- Range ofFor Roadway-Powered Electric Automobiles Range of Estimated

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004) Survey on Electricity Consumption Characteristics ofof residential electricity consumption in rapidly developingbusiness as usual electricity consumption by country/region

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Residen- iv tial Electricity Consumption 8 Introduction 9Observed residential electricity consumption 2003 to 2006total residential electricity consumption for 2006 by five-

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Advances in recording scattered light changes in crustacean nerve with electrical activation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated optical changes associated with crustacean nerve stimulation using birefringent and large angle scattered light. Improved detection schemes disclosed high temporal structure of the optical signals and allowed further investigations of biophysical mechanisms responsible for such changes. Most studies of physiological activity in neuronal tissue use techniques that measure the electrical behavior or ionic permeability of the nerve, such as voltage or ion sensitive dyes injected into cells, or invasive electric recording apparatus. While these techniques provide high resolution, they are detrimental to tissue and do not easily lend themselves to clinical applications in humans. Electrical and chemical components of neural excitation evoke physical responses observed through changes in scattered and absorbed light. This method is suited for in-vivo applications. Intrinsic optical changes have shown themselves to be multifaceted in nature and point to several different physiological processes that occur with different time courses during neural excitation. Fast changes occur concomitantly with electrical events, and slow changes parallel metabolic events including changes in blood flow and oxygenation. Previous experiments with isolated crustacean nerves have been used to study the biophysical mechanisms of fast optical changes. However, they have been confounded by multiple superimposed action potentials which make it difficult to discriminate the temporal signatures of individual optical responses. Often many averages were needed to adequately resolve the signal. More recently, optical signals have been observed in single trials. Initially large angle scattering measurements were used to record these events with much of the signal coming from cellular swelling associated with water influx during activation. By exploiting the birefringent properties derived from the molecular stiucture of nerve membranes, signals appear larger with a greater contrast, but direct comparison of birefringent and 90{sup o} scattering signals has not been reported. New developments in computer and optical technology allow optical recording with higher temporal resolution than could be achieved previously. This has led us to undertake more detailed studies of the biophysical mechanisms underlying these transient changes. Optimization of this technology in conjunction with other technical developments presents a path to noninvasive dynamic clinical observation of optical responses. To conduct these optical recordings, we placed dissected leg, claw and ventral cord nerves from crayfish and lobster in a recording chamber constructed from black Delrin. The chamber consisted of several wells situated perpendicularly to the long axis of the nerve that could beelectrically isolated for stimulating and recording electrical activation, and a window in the center for optical measurements. To measure the birefringence from the nerve, light from a 120W halogen bulb was focused onto the nerve from below the window through a 10X microscope objective and polarized at a 45 degree angle with respect to the long axis of the nerve bundle. A second polarizer turned 90 degrees with respect to the first polarizer was placed on top of the chamber and excluded direct source illumination, passing only birefringent light from the nerve. A large area photodiode placed directly on top of the polarizer detected the magnitude of the birefringent light. To measure light scattered 90 degrees by the nerve, a short length of image conduit placed perpendicularly to the nerve directed large angle scattered light from the nerve to a second photodiode. The output of each photodiode was amplified by a first stage amplifier which produced a DC level output, and was coupled to an AC amplifier (0.3 Hz High Pass) with a gain of 1000 to optimally record changes across time.

Carter, K. M. (Kathleen M.); Rector, D. M. (David M.); Martinez, A. T. (Anne T.); Guerra, F. M. (Francisco M.); George, J. S. (John S.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A spin light emitting diode incorporating ability of electrical helicity switching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication and optical characteristics of a spin light-emitting-diode (spin-LED) having dual spin-injection electrodes with anti-parallel magnetization configuration are reported. Alternating a current between the two electrodes using a computer-driven current source has led us to the observation of helicity switching of circular polarization at the frequency of 1 kHz. Neither external magnetic fields nor optical delay modulators were used. Sending dc-currents to both electrodes with appropriate ratio has resulted in continuous variation of circular polarization between the two opposite helicity, including the null polarization. These results suggest that the tested spin-LED has the feasibility of a monolithic light source whose circular polarization can be switched or continuously tuned all electrically.

Nishizawa, N., E-mail: nishizawa@isl.titech.ac.jp; Nishibayashi, K.; Munekata, H. [Imaging Science and Engineering Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-J3-15 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source...

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electrical and Optical Enhancement in Internally Nanopatterned Organic Light-Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kao, K.C. , Hwang, W. Electrical Transport in Solids: withPress, 2009. Stallinga, P. Electrical Characterization offrom electrical model . 100

Fina, Michael Dane

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cumulative electricity consumption deficit amounts toper unit of electricity consumption than the overalldata on value added and electricity consumption by sectors

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thus, reduced electricity consumption from higher efficiencyestimated the daily electricity consumption from a survey ofby total commercial electricity consumption. The price of

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blowerto the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance.not account for the electricity consumption of the appliance

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dynamics of Electricity Markets with Unknown Utility Functions: AnExtremum Seeking Control Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time and schedule the electricity consumption and productionclearing price. The electricity consumption of the consumerswhere x i is the electricity consumption of consumer i ? N

Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

charging kW Utility electricity consumption Electricityis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling...

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4. Figure 5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by EndkWh/ft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Useof Total) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Imagine a day, you drove your car without spilling a dime from your pocket? A day, you pay just a dollar bill for your monthly electrical energy consumption? Yes, this is what renewable energy resources does! We  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pay just a dollar bill for your monthly electrical energy consumption? Yes, this is what renewable Imagine a day, you drove your car without spilling a dime from your pocket? A day, you energy resources does! We have means to achieve this if we make use of the natural resources

Kostic, Milivoje M.

227

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

228

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

229

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. Atanasiu (2006). Electricity Consumption and Efficiencywill see their electricity consumption rise significantly.the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

231

Energy consumption and environmental pollution: a stochastic model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......indicated that total energy consumption in sugar beet production...pollution. Although energy consumption increased sugar beet yield...and found that hybrid and electric car technologies exhibit (efficiency...ergy efficiency, affects consumption choice by Swedish households......

Charles S. Tapiero

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

233

Regional-Scale Estimation of Electric Power and Power Plant CO2 Emissions Using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System Nighttime Satellite Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For estimation, the relationship between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) annual nighttime stable light product (NSL) for 2006 and statistical data on power generation, power consumption, and power plant CO2 emissions in 10 electric power supply regions of Japan was investigated. ... There are similar linear correlations of electricity consumption for lighting and total electricity consumption at the regional (e.g., state and province) level, but possibly not for CO2 emissions because of regional concentrations of electricity from renewable energy and nuclear power plants, which produce low CO2 emissions. ...

Husi Letu; Takashi Y. Nakajima; Fumihiko Nishio

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS%20analysis/CBECS%20lighting/lighting_pdf.html[4/28/2009 9:20:44 AM] Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the

235

Tobacco Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tobacco consumption is the use of tobacco products in different forms such as , , , water-pipes or tobacco products. Cigarettes and tobacco products containing tobacco are highly engineered so as to creat...

Martina Ptschke-Langer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

238

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

239

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

240

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

242

Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Electric Metering | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. The purpose is to measure the electricity used by equipment that building occupants can control. Data is collected and reported by zones throughout Forrestal's north, south and west buildings. See the Forrestal metering zone map, below, for details on the zones.

244

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

245

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

246

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

247

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

248

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ESC TN ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average and among the highest in the nation, but spending for electricity is closer to average due to relatively low electricity prices. * Tennessee homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of the country.

249

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

250

Understanding household energy consumption patterns: When West Is Best in Metro Manila  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the topic of energy and development through a multi-disciplinary and systemic approach that combines environmental considerations with a social understanding of consumption. The focus is on electricity usage in the home and specifically lighting and cooling. Set in the urban mega-polis of Metro Manila, the Philippines, energy consumption is first placed in its biophysical perspective: the energy sources and electricity grid are presented, in relation to the Philippines as well as the region. The research findings then explore the social and cultural drivers behind household electricity consumption, revealing in several examples the strong influence of globalizationunderstood here as the flow of people, remittances, images and ideas. Policy recommendations are provided, based on the research results, with concluding remarks relevant to other similar contexts.

Marlyne D. Sahakian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)- Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alliant Energy (Interstate Power and Light - IP&L) offers low-interest financing program for the installation of energy efficient improvements. Businesses, Residences, farms or ag-related...

252

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are neededCost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b

Michalek, Jeremy J.

253

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

254

Review of experiments to evaluate the ability of electrical heater rods to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Issues related to using electrical fuel rod simulators to simulate nuclear fuel rod behavior during postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors are summarized. Experimental programs which will provide a data base for comparing electrical heater rod and nuclear fuel rod LOCA responses are reviewed.

McPherson, G D; Tolman, E L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

256

A Hypothesis for the Speed of Propagation of Light in electric and magnetic fields and the Planning of an Experiment for its Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As generally known, the speed of propagation of light in solid state bodies can be different from the speed of light in vacuum. That the mere presence of electric or magnetic fields in the vacuum can suffice to influence the speed of light, is a hypothesis under discussion, which is based on considerations of Quantumelectrodynamics. For a verification of this hypothesis, an interference-experiment might be performed, of which the planning is given in this article.

Claus W. Turtur

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

258

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

259

Total Light Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Light Management Light Management Why is saving Energy Important World Electricity Consumption (2007) Top 20 Countries 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 U n i t e d S t a t e s C h i n a J a p a n R u s s i a I n d i a G e r m a n y C a n a d a A f r i c a F r a n c e B r a z i l K o r e a , S o u t h U n i t e d K i n g d o m I t a l y S p a i n A u s t r a l i a T a i w a n S o u t h A f r i c a M e x i c o S a u d i A r a b i a I r a n Billion kWh Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration Lighting Control Strategies 4 5 6 Occupancy/Vacancy Sensing * The greatest energy savings achieved with any lighting fixture is when the lights are shut off * Minimize wasted light by providing occupancy sensing or vacancy sensing 7 8 Daylight Harvesting * Most commercial space has enough natural light flowing into it, and the amount of artificial light being generated can be unnecessary * Cut back on the production of artificial lighting by

260

A Light Effect in Chlorine under Electric Discharge : Influence of the Intensity and Frequency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... as the various electrical quantities ; the electrode spacing, area and 'ageing' under the discharge ; the nature of the gas, its temperature and especially the pressure. The chief ... ; a deflexion of 54 served to indicate the current. On irradiation by the carbon arc, the current decreased by 20-21 or about 38 per cent (see table); ...

S. S. JOSHI; P. G. DEO

1943-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Consumption Behavior in Investment/Consumption Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter we study the consumption behavior of an agent in the dynamic framework of consumption/investment decision making that allows the presence of a subsistence consumption level and the possibility of ...

E. L. Presman

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The USDOE Forrestal Building Lighting Retrofit: Preliminary Analysis of Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In September of 1993 a 36,832 fixture lighting retrofit was completed at the United States Department of Energy Forrestal complex in Washington, D.C. This retrofit represents DOE's largest project to date that utilizes a Shared Energy Savings (SES...

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Vajda, E. J.; Shincovich, M.; D'Angelo III, L.; Harris, L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Lighting in Commercial Buildings Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

264

"1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220 "3. North Pole","Petroleum","Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",144 "4. Bradley Lake","Hydroelectric","Homer Electric Assn Inc",126 "5. Anchorage 1","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",88 "6. Snettisham","Hydroelectric","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",78 "7. Bernice Lake","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",62 "8. Lemon Creek","Petroleum","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",58

265

Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Vigilante Electric Coop. Northern  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Vigilante Electric Coop. Northern Lights Bonners Ferry East End Mutual Heyburn Burley United Electric Albion Raft River Rural Electric Coop. Declo...

266

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

267

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

268

Well-to-Wheel Analyses for Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Electric Vehicles Using Various Thermal Power Generation Technologies in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compared BEV with the conventional gasoline car, diesel car, and hybrid electric car in terms of total energy use and... According to definition from U.S. EPA, mid-size car is pointed to th...

Wei Shen; Weijian Han

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either {alpha}-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance.

Kwang-Ohk Cheon

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

271

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

272

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

273

"1. Labadie","Coal","Union Electric Co",2407 "2. Iatan","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",1555  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "1. Labadie","Coal","Union Electric Co",2407 "2. Iatan","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",1555 "3. Rush Island","Coal","Union Electric Co",1204 "4. Callaway","Nuclear","Union Electric Co",1190 "5. New Madrid","Coal","Associated Electric Coop, Inc",1160 "6. Thomas Hill","Coal","Associated Electric Coop, Inc",1125 "7. Sioux","Coal","Union Electric Co",986 "8. Hawthorn","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",979 "9. Meramec","Coal","Union Electric Co",951 "10. Aries Power Project","Gas","Dogwood Energy LLC",614

274

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 50% of the cost Provider New Hampshire Electric Co-Op New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives for its small commercial customers (those using less than 100 kW) through the Small Business Energy Solutions Program. The Co-op will conduct a free assessment of a company's energy consumption, recommend efficiency improvements to reduce consumption, and provide rebates of up to 50% toward the cost of implementing the recommendations. Eligible improvements include: lighting

276

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

277

Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone electrical lighting energy Consumption. Measured vs. zone electrical lighting energy consumption. Measured vs.

Konis, Kyle Stas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone electrical lighting energy Consumption. Measured vs. zone electrical lighting energy consumption. Measured vs.

Konis, Kyle Stas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas restructuring, gas pipelines were opened to multiple users. Manufacturers or their representatives could go directly to the wellhead to purchase their natural gas, arrange the transportation, and have the natural gas delivered either by the local distribution company or directly through a connecting pipeline. More recently, the electricity markets have been undergoing change. When Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992, requirements were included not only to open access to the ownership of electricity generation, but also to open access to the transmission lines so that wholesale trade in electricity would be possible. Now several States, including California and

280

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

electricity.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This...

282

Electricity Monthly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

283

DOE Issues Request for Information on Fuel Cells for Continuous On-Board Recharging for Battery Electric Light-Duty Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The USDOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued an RFI seeking feedback from the research community and relevant stakeholders about fuel cell technology validation, commercial acceleration, and potential deployment strategies for continuous fuel cell rechargers on board light-duty electric vehicle fleets.

284

Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 76. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic Table 3. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 4. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 5. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 6. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 7. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central Table 8. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain Table 9. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity

285

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus 2010 DOE Vehicle...

287

Status of advanced light-duty transportation technologies in the US  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases is driving a fundamental change toward more efficient, advanced vehicles, and fuels in the transportation sector. The paper reviews the current status of light duty vehicles in the US and discusses policies to improve fuel efficiency, advanced electric drives, and sustainable cellulosic biofuels. The paper describes the cost, technical, infrastructure, and market barriers for alternative technologies, i.e., advanced biofuels and light-duty vehicles, including diesel vehicles, natural-gas vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell electric vehicles. The paper also presents R&D targets and technology validation programs of the US government.

David Andress; Sujit Das; Fred Joseck; T. Dean Nguyen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Solid-state lighting technology perspective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Please cite this article in press as: T. Zhang, et al., Modelling electricity consumption in office buildings: An agent based approach. Energy Buildings (2011), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.07.007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in revised form 20 May 2011 Accepted 7 July 2011 Keywords: Office energy consumption Agent-based simulation, catering and hot water. Thus, energy consumption in office buildings is one of the research areas which cause energy consumption. Yet in the UK the energy consumption in office buildings has been primarily

Aickelin, Uwe

290

Externality of Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Externalities of consumption exist if one individual's consumption of agood or service has positive... utility of another person. Apositive externality increases ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $50,000 Provider Incentive Programs Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and industrial customers. Rebates of up to $50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce energy consumption

292

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

293

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

294

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

295

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

296

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

297

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

299

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Use: February 2014 Retail RatesPrices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

300

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: July 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: August 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

302

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

303

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

304

Population, Consumption & the Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/11/2009 1 Population, Consumption & the Environment Alex de Sherbinin Center for International of carbon in 2001 · The ecological footprint, a composite measure of consumption measured in hectares kind of consumption is bad for the environment? 2. How are population dynamics and consumption linked

Columbia University

305

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

306

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

307

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

308

Research on viscosity-reduction technology by electric heating and blending light oil in ultra-deep heavy oil wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Tahe oilfield in China, heavy oil is commonly lifted using the light oil blending technology. However, due to the lack of light oil, the production of heavy oil has been seriously limited. Thus, a new c...

Mo Zhu; Haiquan Zhong; Yingchuan Li

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Exposing Datapath Elements to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption by Mark Jerome Hampton Submitted to the Department of ElectricalExposing Datapath Elements to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption by Mark Jerome Hampton B Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial ful llment

310

Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Electricity Glossary FAQS Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers...

311

Saving Electricity | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Electronics Buying & Making Electricity Tips and Advice Tips: Lighting Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes...

312

Lighting Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

313

Evolution of the energy consumed by street lighting in Spain estimated with DMSP-OLS data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of the analysis of satellite imagery to study light pollution in Spain. Both calibrated and non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images were used. We describe the method to scale the non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images which allows us to use differential photometry techniques in order to study the evolution of the light pollution. Population data and DMSP-OLS satellite calibrated images for the year 2006 were compared to test the reliability of official statistics in public lighting consumption. We found a relationship between the population and the energy consumption which is valid for several regions. Finally the true evolution of the electricity consumption for street lighting in Spain from 1992 to 2010 was derived, it have been doubled in the last 18 years in most of the provinces.

de Miguel, Alejandro Snchez; Castao, Jos Gmez; Pascual, Sergio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evolution of the energy consumed by street lighting in Spain estimated with DMSP-OLS data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We present the results of the analysis of satellite imagery to study light pollution in Spain. Both calibrated and non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images were used. We describe the method to scale the non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images which allows us to use differential photometry techniques in order to study the evolution of the light pollution. Population data and DMSP-OLS satellite calibrated images for the year 2006 were compared to test the reliability of official statistics in public lighting consumption. We found a relationship between the population and the energy consumption which is valid for several regions. Finally the true evolution of the electricity consumption for street lighting in Spain from 1992 to 2010 was derived; it has been doubled in the last 18 years in most of the provinces.

Alejandro Snchez de Miguel; Jaime Zamorano; Jos Gmez Castao; Sergio Pascual

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

andInfrastructureElectricityConsumption(GWh/train?studyestimatesannualelectricityconsumptionbylightingstudy estimates electricity consumption for traffic

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

electricity.gif (3233 bytes) electricity.gif (3233 bytes) Electricity continues to be the most rapidly growing form of energy consumption in the IEO99 projections. The strongest long-term growth in electricity consumption is projected for the developing countries of Asia. Long-term growth in electricity consumption is expected to be strongest in the developing economies of Asia, followed by Central and South America (Figure 64). In the reference case for the International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), the projected growth rates for electricity consumption in the developing Asian nations average nearly 5 percent per year from 1996 to 2020 (Table 17). Electricity consumption growth in Central and South America is projected to exceed 4 percent between 1996 and 2020. The projected increases in electricity use are based on expectations of rapid

317

State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

319

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

320

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per...

322

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

323

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Secretary Chu's Message about Forrestal Electric Metering  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Dear Colleagues, The Department of Energy has a responsibility and an opportunity to lead by example in promoting sustainable energy practices. As many of you have heard me say, energy efficiency is one of our best and most immediate opportunities to save energy, cut utility bills and decrease carbon pollution. I want to thank you for the steps many of you have already taken to reduce energy consumption. Today, I'm asking all employees at the Forrestal Building to take these efforts to the next level by participating in a competition to save money by saving energy. We recently divided the Forrestal complex into five zones and installed electric meters to measure the daily electricity consumption of overhead lights and power outlets in each zone. You've probably seen

325

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

326

Assessing the impact of changes in the electricity price structure on dairy farm energy costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to provide information on the changes in electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms, through the simulation of various electricity tariffs that may exist in the future and how these tariffs interact with changes in farm management (i.e. shifting the milking operation to an earlier or later time of the day). A previously developed model capable of simulating electricity consumption and costs on dairy farms (MECD) was used to simulate five different electricity tariffs (Flat, Day&Night, Time of Use Tariff 1 (TOU1), TOU2 and Real Time Pricing (RTP)) on three representative Irish dairy farms: a small farm (SF), a medium farm (MF) and a large farm (LF). The Flat tariff consisted of one electricity price for all time periods, the Day&Night tariff consisted of two electricity prices, a high rate from 09:00 to 00:00h and a low rate thereafter. The TOU tariff structure was similar to that of the Day&Night tariff except that a peak price band was introduced between 17:00 and 19:00h. The RTP tariff varied dynamically according to the electricity demand on the national grid. The model used in these simulations was a mechanistic mathematical representation of the electricity consumption that simulated farm equipment under the following headings; milk cooling system, water heating system, milking machine system, lighting systems, water pump systems and the winter housing facilities. The effect of milking start time was simulated to determine the effect on electricity consumption and costs at farm level. The earliest AM milking start time and the latest PM milking start time resulted in the lowest energy consumption. The difference between the lowest and highest electricity consumption within a farm was 7% for SF, 5% for MF and 5% for LF. This difference was accounted for by the variation in the milk cooling system coefficient of performance. The greatest scope to reduce total annual electricity costs by adjusting milking start times was on TOU2 (39%, 34% and 33% of total annual electricity costs on the SF, MF and LF) and the least scope for reductions using this method was on the Flat tariff (7%, 5% and 7% of total annual electricity costs). The potential for reduction of annual electricity consumption and related costs per litre of milk produced by adjusting milking times was higher for the LF than the SF or MF across all electricity tariffs. It is anticipated that these results and the use of the MECD will help support the decision-making process at farm level around increasing energy efficiency and electricity cost forecasts in future electricity pricing tariff structures.

J. Upton; M. Murphy; L. Shalloo; P.W.G. Groot Koerkamp; I.J.M. De Boer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

World energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

613,004 733,992 905,868 898,441 749,379 636,285 2001-2013 613,004 733,992 905,868 898,441 749,379 636,285 2001-2013 Alabama 21,814 29,325 30,779 33,496 26,773 26,791 2001-2013 Alaska 2,660 2,667 2,549 2,509 2,322 2,440 2001-2013 Arizona 9,608 23,656 32,223 32,612 25,355 15,157 2001-2013 Arkansas 5,777 10,363 10,497 10,091 7,482 6,116 2001-2013 California 56,457 66,002 82,047 82,511 82,139 69,457 2001-2013 Colorado 6,136 8,848 10,258 9,801 8,839 5,479 2001-2013 Connecticut 9,363 8,491 11,393 9,827 9,182 8,042 2001-2013 Delaware 3,353 3,645 5,026 4,157 3,895 3,483 2001-2013 District of Columbia -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013 Florida 86,344 96,637 96,912 107,377 95,708 93,341 2001-2013 Georgia 21,096 26,054 24,911 28,011 26,038 24,806 2001-2013 Hawaii -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013

329

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,841,408 6,668,379 6,872,533 7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 6,841,408 6,668,379 6,872,533 7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 1997-2012 Alabama 175,736 164,266 227,015 281,722 342,841 401,306 1997-2012 Alaska 40,901 43,199 38,078 39,732 41,738 39,758 1997-2012 Arizona 280,156 283,817 261,904 224,430 180,966 228,818 1997-2012 Arkansas 63,594 64,188 83,266 96,553 107,014 129,059 1997-2012 California 834,286 857,867 808,928 736,092 616,564 855,342 1997-2012 Colorado 123,788 106,454 115,234 92,657 85,015 86,309 1997-2012 Connecticut 73,627 59,354 70,864 85,144 107,897 114,054 1997-2012 Delaware 13,493 11,181 10,990 24,383 38,984 53,295 1997-2012 District of Columbia -- -- -- -- 1,003 W 1997-2012 Florida 772,968 797,266 913,672 981,750 1,043,786 1,138,771 1997-2012 Georgia

330

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

563,306 614,637 735,693 906,613 899,337 749,910 2001-2013 563,306 614,637 735,693 906,613 899,337 749,910 2001-2013 Alabama 22,145 21,858 29,207 30,646 33,364 26,650 2001-2013 Alaska 3,075 2,783 2,821 2,544 3,068 2,326 2001-2013 Arizona 11,182 9,607 23,660 32,289 32,627 25,375 2001-2013 Arkansas 5,244 5,913 10,480 10,623 10,213 7,597 2001-2013 California 49,432 54,781 66,503 83,228 83,193 83,324 2001-2013 Colorado 6,213 6,120 8,902 10,615 10,089 8,938 2001-2013 Connecticut 8,518 9,607 8,698 11,622 10,062 9,318 2001-2013 Delaware 2,642 3,411 4,471 5,115 4,230 3,887 2001-2013 District of Columbia -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013 Florida 79,903 86,424 96,667 97,039 107,430 95,668 2001-2013 Georgia 20,533 21,175 26,102 24,963 28,053 26,086 2001-2013 Hawaii -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013

331

Worldwide electricity consumption of communication networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a growing research interest in improving the energy efficiency of communication networks. In order to assess the impact of introducing new energy efficient technologies, an...

Lambert, Sofie; Van Heddeghem, Ward; Vereecken, Willem; Lannoo, Bart; Colle, Didier; Pickavet, Mario

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

usage in a developing country. Relationships between these factors are important for energy planning in India and around the globe. Just as electrification was a huge undertaking...

333

Energy consumption and GHG emission scenarios of a university campus in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study estimates energy consumption and related GHG emissions for the buildings and facilities of the main university campus at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The campus has a built area of 1.3km2. Based on the strategic plan of growth, a scenario analysis for 2020 was also developed estimating baseline and mitigation scenarios that include energy efficiency technologies and solar water heating. To estimate energy consumption, a representative sample of buildings and facilities by category was selected in order to develop level I and when possible level II energy audits. The study was complemented with results of level III energy audits performed in previous studies for some buildings. The bottom-up results from energy audits were compared to the electricity bill for the whole campus. We found that lighting represents 28% of total energy use, followed by special research equipment 17%, refrigeration 14%, and water heating that includes the Olympic swimming pool 9%. If energy efficiency technologies are applied for retrofitting and considered for new buildings in lighting, refrigeration, air conditioning; and a hybrid system (solarelectricLPG) is used for water heating, energy consumption could be 7.5% less than in 2011 and CO2 emissions 11.3% less than in 2011.

Azucena Escobedo; Sonia Briceo; Hctor Jurez; Daniel Castillo; Mireya Imaz; Claudia Sheinbaum

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

335

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

336

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at the NAVFAC Engineering Service Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document details new lighting technology that reduces energy consumption and reduces maintenance, while providing effective illumination.

338

Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption (RTECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses...

339

The Consumption of a Finite Planet: Well-Being, Convergence, Divergence and the Nascent Green Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global oil consumption amounted to 9 billion barrels per day ... daily oil. Some have predicted that oil consumption will be falling by 2020, not because ... hybrid cars are becoming more popular. However, electric car

Jules Pretty

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A24. A24. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of Energy- Management Program, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 285 SIC Management Any Type of Sponsored Self-Sponsored Sponsored Sponsored Code Industry Group and Industry Program Sponsorship Involvement Involvement Involvement Involvement a No Energy Electric Utility Government Third Party Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs (1992 through 1994) RSE Row Factors Federal, State, or Local RSE Column Factors: 0.7 1.1 1.0 0.7 1.9 0.9 20-39 ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs . .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

342

Natural gas consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas consumption gas consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

343

Mobile lighting apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Light Bodies: Exploring Interactions with Responsive Lights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reinterpretation of street lighting. Before fixed infrastructure illuminated cities at night, people carried Urban street lighting today is a networked, fixed infrastructure that relies on the electrical grid. WeLight Bodies: Exploring Interactions with Responsive Lights Susanne Seitinger MIT Media Laboratory

Hunt, Galen

345

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electricity and Magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and practical applications; or, speaking briefly, theory and practice. In the theoretical part, magnetism is first treated, then electricity, in the order statical electricity, electro-chemistry, and ... first treated, then electricity, in the order statical electricity, electro-chemistry, and electro-magnetism. In the practical part are comprised telegraphy and telephony, electric lighting and transmission of ...

A. GRAY

1891-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

347

An Engineering-Economic Analysis of White Light-Emitting Diodes for General  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Engineering-Economic Analysis of White Light-Emitting Diodes for General An Engineering-Economic Analysis of White Light-Emitting Diodes for General Illumination for the U.S. Residential and Commercial Sectors Speaker(s): Inês Magarida Lima de Azevedo Date: February 15, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Because lighting constitutes more than 20% of total US electricity consumption, and many current lighting technologies are highly inefficient, improved technologies for lighting hold great potential for energy savings and for reducing associated greenhouse gas emissions. Solid-state lighting is a technology that shows great promise as a source of efficient, affordable, color-balanced white light in the near future. Indeed, under a pure engineering-economic analysis, solid-state lighting already performs better than incandescent bulbs and is expected to surpass the most

348

Retail electricity competition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze a number of unstudied aspects of retail electricity competition. We first explore the implications of load profiling of consumers whose traditional meters do not allow for measurement of their real time consumption, ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Bounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Andrew Gearhart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Kernels Andrew Gearhart Electrical Engineering Fall 2014 #12;Bounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Kernels Copyright 2014 by Andrew Scott, little consideration was given to the potential energy efficiency of algorithms them- selves. A dominant

California at Berkeley, University of

350

Energy Consumption Patterns of the Rural Photovoltaic Market In Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the energy consumption of photovoltaic-powered rural dwellings in a representative region of Spain. We have measured the actual consumed electrical energy in several dwelling...

A. Krenzinger; M. Montero

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global and country-specific estimates of total energyglobal and country-specific estimates of total energytotal global electricity consumption is about 5,000 TWh 68 , the energy

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 201 412 431 13,124 31,858 25,200 15.3 12.9 17.1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ..................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q

354

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 137 254 189 261 202 11,300 18,549 12,374 17,064 10,894 12.1 13.7 15.3 15.3 18.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 19 27 14 32 23 1,210 1,631 923 1,811 903 15.7 16.4 15.0 17.8 25.8 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 12 18 15 27 14 1,175 1,639 1,062 1,855 914 10.2 10.9 14.3 14.3 15.5

355

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 172 234 452 185 13,899 17,725 26,017 12,541 12.4 13.2 17.4 14.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 14 30 52 19 1,031 1,742 2,410 1,296 13.5 17.4 21.5 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 17 37 21 1,128 1,558 2,640 1,319 9.8 10.8 14.0 15.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 22 33 59 28 2,094 3,317 4,746 2,338 10.4 10.0 12.5 12.1

356

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 66 254 57 5,523 13,837 3,546 12.0 18.3 16.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 10 28 7 821 1,233 481 12.4 22.4 15.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7 20 5 681 1,389 386 10.8 14.4 13.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 9 31 12 1,204 2,411 842 7.8 12.8 14.1

357

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 141 68 117 8,634 4,165 8,376 16.3 16.3 14.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 17 7 12 696 439 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 12 5 15 865 451 868 13.8 12.1 17.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 16 12 16 1,493 933 1,405 11.0 13.0 11.5

358

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ................................ 162 538 343 17,509 32,945 19,727 9.2 16.3 17.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 24 54 38 2,072 2,767 1,640 11.4 19.4 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 16 41 29 1,919 3,154 1,572 8.2 13.0 18.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 28 69 45 3,201 5,610 3,683 8.7 12.3 12.2

359

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 41 131 168 3,430 10,469 12,202 12.0 12.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 5 9 20 369 662 921 12.9 13.9 21.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 8 9 360 768 877 8.4 10.4 10.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 24 674 1,420 2,113 Q 11.6 11.2

360

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 6: Electricity World electricity consumption doubles in the IEO2006 projections from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD countries account for 71 percent of the projected growth, and OECD countries account for 29 percent. Figure 55. World Net Electricity Consumption, 2003-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 56. World Net Electricity Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 57. Net Electricity Consumption in OECD Countries by End-Use Sector, 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

362

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offsets the sizable electricity savings. References TitleElectricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements forfueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Feasible Caf Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE EMERGING HYBRID-ELECTRIC AND DIESEL TECHNOLOGIES TOof the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies tomodern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Lighting in Commercial Buildings (1986 data) -- Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary 6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary Executive Summary Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration's(EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

367

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Use Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion kilowatthours (kWh) of electricity in 1999. Office and mercantile buildings used the most total electricity. Both of these building types used electricity as their predominant energy source. Figure showing total electricity consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Electricity Consumption per Building by Building Type Inpatient health care buildings used by far the most electricity per building. Figure showing electricity consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

368

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama ............. 586.1 349.4 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.1 411.8 86.3 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,439.3 Alaska ................. 6.0 42.3 3.3 0.0 1.5 4.8 0.0 13.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (s) 66.3 Arizona ............... 449.9 183.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 327.3 89.1 2.4 0.0 0.8 2.5 1.5 1,057.9 Arkansas ............. 300.5 109.2 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.6 148.5 28.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 588.9 California ............ 19.7 630.1 0.4 11.1 (s) 11.5 383.6 413.4 69.0 122.0 8.4 75.3 20.1 1,753.1 Colorado ............. 362.4 88.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 20.2 0.9

369

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

370

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama ........... 65.0 265.4 155.4 13.4 12.8 319.8 13.4 49.1 563.8 0.0 154.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 303.7 1,352.2 579.1 1,931.3 Alaska ............... 9.5 294.7 81.8 118.2 1.3 34.6 0.4 28.6 265.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.2 (s) 21.6 593.2 44.7 637.9 Arizona ............. 10.0 109.8 151.3 21.5 9.1 323.4 (s) 21.1 526.5 0.0 4.4 3.1 0.3 7.9 255.7 917.8 513.7 1,431.5 Arkansas ........... 5.6 179.4 134.5 5.9 9.4 175.6 0.1 19.8 345.4 0.0 82.6 0.0 0.7 0.2 163.5 777.4 339.8 1,117.1 California ..........

371

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama ............. 65.0 179.1 23.9 3.7 3.3 6.7 46.3 83.9 0.0 147.2 0.0 (s) 115.1 590.4 219.5 810.0 Alaska ................. 0.1 253.8 19.2 0.1 1.0 0.0 27.1 47.4 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 4.5 306.0 9.4 315.4 Arizona ............... 10.0 22.0 33.2 1.4 4.6 (s) 18.4 57.6 0.0 1.4 3.1 0.2 42.1 136.5 84.7 221.2 Arkansas ............. 5.6 93.1 31.1 2.6 4.0 0.1 17.4 55.1 0.0 72.7 0.0 (s) 58.0 284.5 120.5 405.0 California ............ 35.6 767.4 77.2 23.9 29.6 (s) 312.5

372

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

373

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2001 projections. Developing nations in Asia and in Central and South America are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. In the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case, worldwide electricity consumption is projected to increase at an average annual rate of 2.7 percent from 1999 to 2020 (Table 20). The most rapid growth in electricity use is projected for developing Asia, at 4.5 percent per year, and by 2020 developing Asia is expected to consume more than twice as much electricity as it did in 1999. China’s electricity consumption is projected to triple, growing by an average of 5.5 percent per year from 1999 to 2020. The expected growth rate for electricity use in

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric methane consumption Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxidation of Methane with Air in AC Electric Gas Discharge Summary: , and specific energy consumption. Methane and oxygen conversions increased with input power but...

375

Comparison of 60-Hz electric fields and incandescent light as aversive stimuli controlling the behavior of rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rats were exposed to two procedures which enabled them to press a lever to turn off a 90 or 100 kV/m 60-Hz electric field or, later in the study, illumination from an incandescent lamp. Under one procedure, a response turned off the stimulus for a fixed duration, after which the stimulus was turned on again. A response during the off-period restarted the fixed duration. None of the rats turned the field off reliably. Next, under an alternative procedure, pressing one lever turned the field off; pressing the other lever turned it back on; responding under those conditions differed little from that seen at 0 kV/m. Under both procedures, when illumination from an incandescent lamp served as the stimulus, each rat did turn the stimulus off, and performances varied with stimulus intensity. The results show that a 100 kV/m 60-Hz electric field is not sufficient to function as an aversive stimulus under two procedures where illumination from a lamp does function as an aversive stimulus.

Stern, S.; Laties, V.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Electricity in Horticulture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ELECTRO-CULTURE has to take into account the effects of electric heating, electric lighting and the voltage stress on the life of plants. The first applica-tion of ... and increases up to forty per cent have been obtained. Electricity in the form of light was the next application in the aid of ...

1936-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

377

Experimental correlations for transient soot measurement in diesel exhaust aerosol with light extinction, electrical mobility and diffusion charger sensor techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of soot measurement deviation using a diffusion charger sensor with three dilution ratios was conducted in order to obtain an optimum setting that can be used to obtain accurate measurements in terms of soot mass emitted by a light-duty diesel engine under transient operating conditions. The paper includes three experimental phases: an experimental validation of the measurement settings in steady-state operating conditions; evaluation of the proposed setting under the New European Driving Cycle; and a study of correlations for different measurement techniques. These correlations provide a reliable tool for estimating soot emission from light extinction measurement or from accumulation particle mode concentration. There are several methods and correlations to estimate soot concentration in the literature but most of them were assessed for steady-state operating points. In this case, the correlations are obtained by more than 4000 points measured in transient conditions. The results of the new two correlations, with less than 4% deviation from the reference measurement, are presented in this paper.

Vicente Bermdez; Jos V Pastor; J Javier Lpez; Daniel Campos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

Adler, J.

379

Fuel Consumption and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculating fuel consumption and emissions is a typical offline analysis ... simulations or real trajectory data) and the engine speed (as obtained from gear-shift schemes ... as input and is parameterized by veh...

Martin Treiber; Arne Kesting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Spermatophore consumption in a cephalopod  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Animal behaviour 1001 14 70 Spermatophore consumption in a cephalopod Benjamin J. Wegener...provide evidence of ejaculate and sperm consumption in a cephalopod. Through labelling...combination of female spermatophore consumption and short-term external sperm storage...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Food consumption trends and drivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Food consumption trends and drivers John Kearney...Government policy. A picture of food consumption (availability) trends and projections...largely responsible for these observed consumption trends are the subject of this review...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

X-ray absorption and resonant x-ray emission spectra by electric quadrupole excitation in light rare-earth systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have made precise theoretical calculations for both 2p3/2?4f x-ray absorption spectra and 3d?2p3/2 resonant x-ray emission spectra involving electric quadrupole excitations at the L3 edge of light rare-earth elements from La to Eu. It is shown that the energy separation of a double-peak structure observed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) does not agree with that determined from resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES), in contrast to recent experimental results by Bartolom et al. The reason for this difference is that the energy separation in XAS is determined by the 4f-4f interaction only, while that in RXES is determined by both 4f-4f and 3d-4f interactions.

M. Nakazawa; K. Fukui; H. Ogasawara; A. Kotani; C. F. Hague

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

Rice consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural... Economics RICE CONSUMPTION IN CHINA A Thesis by JIN LAN Approved as to style and content by: E, We ey F. Peterson (Chair of Committee) James E. Christiansen (Member) Carl Shaf (Member) Daniel I. Padberg (Head of Department) August 1989...

Lan, Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection Local water management districts are required to establish programs and

385

New OLED Lighting Systems Shine Bright, Save Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Universal Display Corporation Universal Display Corporation (UDC) (Ewing, NJ), founded in 1994, provides OLED innovations and helps commercialize new generations of OLED products through technology licensing, UniversalPHOLED® materials sales, technology development, and technology transfer services. UDC is a world leader in the development of innovative OLED technology for use in flat panel displays, lighting, and organic electronics. It holds one of the largest patent portfolios in the OLED field. www.universaldisplay.com New OLED Lighting Systems Shine Bright, Save Energy Challenge Lighting consumes over 22% of the total electricity produced in the U.S. and, according to industry estimates, accounts for over $200 billion per year in electric bills worldwide. A majority of this energy consumption

386

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

387

Integrated performance of an automated venetian blind/electric lighting system in a full-scale office environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive results are presented from a fill-scale testbed of a prototype automated venetian blind lighting system installed in two unoccupied, private offices in Oakland, California. The dynamic system balanced daylight against solar heat gains in real-time, to reduce perimeter zone energy use and to increase comfort. This limited proof-of-concept test was designed to work out practical ''bugs'' and refine design details to increase cost effectiveness and acceptability of this innovative technology for real-world applications. We present results from 14 months of tuning the system design and monitoring energy performance and control system operations. For this southeast-facing office, we found that 1-22% lighting energy savings, 13-28% cooling load reductions, and 13-28% peak cooling load reductions can be achieved by the dynamic system under clear sky and overcast conditions year round, compared to a static, partly closed blind with the same optimized daylighting control system. These energy savings increase if compared to conventional daylighting controls with manually-operated blinds. Monitored data indicated that the control system met design objectives under all weather conditions to within 10% for at least 90% of the year. A pilot human factors study indicated that some of our default control settings should be adjusted to increase user satisfaction. With these adjustments, energy savings will decrease. The final prototype design yielded a 10-year simple payback for this site. If mechanical system downsizing opportunities and qualitative improvements to worker's comfort are included, this innovative technology could be more cost effective. Marketing information for commercializing this technology is given.

DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, S.E.; Vine, E.L.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWh/square foot) 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 226 14.9 3.8 8.8 18.1 17.9 1.18 0.079 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 48 17.8 3.8 9.0 20.0 4.4 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 96 12.9 4.0 8.2 15.5 9.2 1.23 0.096 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 178 11.4 3.1 7.2 15.0 15.2 0.97 0.086

389

US MidAtl NY Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MidAtl NY MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space heating, water heating, and cooking. Electricity costs are closer to the national average due to higher than average electricity prices in the state.

390

US MidAtl NY Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MidAtl NY MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space heating, water heating, and cooking. Electricity costs are closer to the national average due to higher than average electricity prices in the state.

391

renewable electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity electricity Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

392

What People Do with Consumption Feedback: A Long-Term Living Lab Study of a Home Energy Management System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......usage at home. The need...of their energy use from...estimated their consumption based on...the HEMS on average every 5...domestic energy consumption provided...we see an average electricity...with the consumption in the year...domestic energy consumption...monitoring in the home, but also......

Tobias Schwartz; Gunnar Stevens; Timo Jakobi; Sebastian Denef; Leonardo Ramirez; Volker Wulf; Dave Randall

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

International Energy Outlook 2001 - World Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents the Energy Information Administration (EIA) outlook for world energy markets to 2020. Current trends in world energy markets are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of the IEO2001 projections for energy consumption by primary energy source and for carbon emissions by fossil fuel. Uncertainty in the forecast is highlighted by an examination of alternative assumptions about economic growth and their impacts on the

394

Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Influence of climatic and geographical conditions on the level of energy consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the consumption of electricity in modern postindustrial society is ... effective territory. According to this conception, the world market will be saturated by electric energy at the level of 60 ...

V. V. Klimenko

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 11 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama ............. 0.0 23.5 0.4 124.4 13.4 0.3 2.3 316.3 6.7 463.7 0.0 487.2 0.0 487.2 Alaska ................. 0.0 3.5 0.8 44.4 118.2 (s) 0.4 32.9 0.4 197.2 0.0 200.7 0.0 200.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 15.6 1.0 111.3 21.5 0.8 1.6 318.2 0.0 454.5 0.0 470.1 0.0 470.1 Arkansas ............. 0.0 11.5 0.4 99.7 5.9 0.4 2.0 171.3 0.0 279.8 (s) 291.2 (s) 291.2 California ............ 0.0 25.7 1.9 440.9 549.7 3.8 13.3 1,770.1 186.9 2,966.5 2.8 2,995.1 5.5 3,000.5 Colorado ............. 0.0 14.7 0.6 83.2 58.3 0.3

397

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

398

Production Hall and Inventory Shade Lighting by Solar Energy System and Economical Lighting (LEDs)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the increasing energy and environmental concern in the world, one must look for alternatives to nonrenewable energy resources and the polluting fossil fuels. The renewable energy sources play an important role in electricity generation as well as many other useful applications. Various renewable energy sources like wind, solar, geothermal, ocean thermal and biomass can be used for generating electricity and meeting our daily energy demands. The solar energy can produce most of the world's requirements of the energy that is produced by the sun and collected on earth. Clean and sustainable energy protect our environment. The solar energy system with economical lighting (LEDs) can be used for lighting the production hall and inventory stores to reduce the energy consumption (watts) to less than a quarter of the normal consumption (high pressure, light HPL) and that will reduce the cost of energy. In addition, using the sun tracker will increase the efficiency of overall daily output of the solar panels more than 34% of the fixed panel. This will make the system more reliable and more economical.

Ahmad K. Jassim; Fouad K. Abood

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AVEC'12 Energy management of HEV to optimize fuel consumption and pollutant emissions Pierre Michel, several energy management strategies are proposed to optimize jointly the fuel consumption and pollutant-line strategy are given. Keywords: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV), energy management, pollution, fuel consumption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

400

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Focus Area: Fuel Efficiency Topics: Market Analysis Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuelratings/ratings-search.cfm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadas-fuel-consumption-guide-websit Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This website provides a compilation of fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy Savings in Electric Arc Furnace Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, followed by suggestions on how energy consumption can be reduced. unit cost of electricity in steelmaking is discussed with emphasis on energy management....

Lubbeck, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Use of Computer Simulation to Reduce the Energy Consumption in a Tall Office Building in Dubai-UAE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increasing the cooling load due to its heat dissipation. Proper design for the maximization of natural light helps reduce the use of artificial lights and results in reduction in the buildings energy consumption. Computer simulation of the lighting and energy...

Abu-Hijleh, B.; Abu-Dakka, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices Pavel.S.A vinod.namboodiri@wichita.edu ABSTRACT In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these have rarely characterized

Namboodiri, Vinod

405

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 demonstration of a plug-in diesel-electric HUMVEE by thediesel max output (kW) continuous/Me- kW type efficiency electric

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Stocks Above normal temperatures in January have allowed electric utilities to significantly replinish stockpiles of coal. The upswing in coal stockpiles corresponds to decreasing consumption of coal at electric generators seen in the resource use section across all regions of the country. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. Along with coal stockpiles at electric power plants, the supply of coal significantly increased in January of 2012. Total bituminous coal days of burn increased 10 percent from January 2011 to 87, while subbituminous supply increased nearly 10

407

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: December 2011 End Use: December 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

408

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: August 2011 End Use: August 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

409

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: November 2011 End Use: November 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

410

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: February 2012 End Use: February 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

411

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2011 End Use: October 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

412

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: March 2012 End Use: March 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

413

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: September 2011 End Use: September 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

414

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2013 End Use: October 2013 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

415

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: January 2012 End Use: January 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

416

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our environment from heavy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All mercury lamps contain small amounts of mercury. An electric current passes through the lamp and vaporizes the mercury to generate light. Recycling mercury containing lamps protects human health and our the environment by recycling universal wastes, contact EH&S at (949) 824-6200 or visit: www.ehs.uci.edu Mercury

George, Steven C.

417

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Mobility Chains Analysis of Technologies for Passenger Cars and Light-Duty Vehicles Fueled with Biofuels: Application of the GREET Model to the Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) Project Project ID: 82 Principal Investigator: Michael Wang Brief Description: The mobility chains analysis estimated the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of various biofuels in light-duty vehicles. Keywords: Well-to-wheels (WTW); ethanol; biofuels; Fischer Tropsch diesel; hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) Purpose The project was a multi-organization, multi-sponsor project to examine the potential of biofuels in the U.S. Argonne was responsible for the well-to-wheels analysis of biofuel production and use.

418

Bus HVAC energy consumption test method based on HVAC unit behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a test method for determination of energy consumption of bus HVAC unit. The energy consumption corresponds to a bus engine fuel consumption increase during the HVAC unit operation period. The HVAC unit energy consumption is determined from the unit input power, which is measured under several levels of bus engine speeds and at different levels of testing heat load in the laboratory environment. Since the bus engine fuel consumption is incrementally induced by powering an HVAC unit, the results are subsequently recalculated to the unit fuel consumption under the defined road cycles in terms of standardized diesel engine. The method is likewise applicable either for classic or electric HVAC units with a main consumer (compressor or high voltage alternator) mechanically driven directly from the bus engine and also for electric HVAC units supplied from an alternative electric energy source in case of hybrid or fully electric buses.

M. Hegar; M. Kolda; M. Kopecka; V. Rajtmajer; A. Ryska

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

422

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

423

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

424

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

425

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

426

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

427

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama ............. 0.0 25.5 7.0 (s) 2.7 0.2 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 75.9 112.4 144.8 257.2 Alaska ................. 9.4 16.9 10.1 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.0 11.5 0.0 0.3 0.1 9.7 48.0 20.2 68.2 Arizona ............... 0.0 33.1 6.8 (s) 1.5 0.7 0.0 8.9 0.0 0.5 (s) 100.7 143.2 202.3 345.5 Arkansas ............. 0.0 40.6 3.6 (s) 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.2 0.0 1.3 0.0 41.4 88.6 86.1 174.7 California ............ 0.0 250.9 47.9 0.1 8.7 1.4 0.0 58.1 (s) 17.4 0.7 418.9 746.2 809.9 1,556.1 Colorado ............. 3.2 57.6 5.9 (s) 2.9 0.2 0.0 9.1 0.0 1.2 0.2

428

Household transitions to energy efficient lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract New energy efficient lighting technologies can significantly reduce household electricity consumption, but adoption has been slow. A unique dataset of German households is used in this paper to examine the factors associated with the replacement of old incandescent lamps (ILs) with new energy efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The rebound effect of increased lamp luminosity in the transition to energy efficient bulbs is analyzed jointly with the replacement decision to account for household self-selection in bulb-type choice. Results indicate that the EU ban on \\{ILs\\} accelerated the pace of transition to \\{CFLs\\} and LEDs, while storage of bulbs significantly dampened the speed of the transition. Higher lighting needs and bulb attributes like energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and durability spur IL replacement with \\{CFLs\\} or LEDs. Electricity gains from new energy efficient lighting are mitigated by 23% and 47% increases in luminosity for CFL and LED replacements, respectively. Model results suggest that taking the replacement bulb from storage and higher levels of education dampen the magnitude of these luminosity rebounds in IL to CFL transitions.

Bradford Mills; Joachim Schleich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

430

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

431

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

432

Data Center Power Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

433

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................... 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2

434

Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Principles and Terms Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms July 29, 2012 - 5:20pm Addthis Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of Tadson Bussey. Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of Tadson Bussey. Learn More Find out how to shop for lights by lumens, not watts. To choose the best energy-efficient lighting options for your home, you should understand basic lighting principles and terms. Light Quantity Illumination The distribution of light on a horizontal surface. The purpose of all lighting is to produce illumination. Lumen A measurement of light emitted by a lamp. As reference, a 100-watt

435

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

436

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

437

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

438

Lighting Group: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview of the Lighting Research Group The Lighting Research Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes, throughout the State of California and across the Nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research in the Lighting Group falls into three main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems and Controls and Communications. Click on a link below for more information about each of these research areas. Sources and Ballasts investigates next generation light sources, such as

439

US MidAtl PA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MidAtl PA MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also spend 16% more than the average U.S. households for energy consumed in their homes. * Average electricity consumption in Pennsylvania homes is 10,402 kWh per year, which is lower than the national average, but 58% more than New York households and 17% more than New Jersey residents.

440

US MidAtl PA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MidAtl PA MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also spend 16% more than the average U.S. households for energy consumed in their homes. * Average electricity consumption in Pennsylvania homes is 10,402 kWh per year, which is lower than the national average, but 58% more than New York households and 17% more than New Jersey residents.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Amicalola Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amicalola Electric Member Corp Amicalola Electric Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Amicalola Electric Member Corp Place Georgia Utility Id 562 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Security Lights Acorn 100 W Lighting Security Lights Acorn 150 W Lighting Security Lights Cobra 100 W Lighting Security Lights Cobra 150 W Lighting Security Lights Cobra 250 W Lighting Security Lights Cobra 400 W Lighting Security Lights Cobra MH 250 W Lighting Security Lights Cobra MH 400 W Lighting Security Lights Flood 250 W Lighting

442

Coal consumption and economic growth in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to re-examine the relationship between coal consumption and real GDP of China with the use of panel data. This paper applies modern panel data techniques to help shed light on the importance of the heterogeneity among different regions within China. Empirical analyses are conducted for the full panel as well as three subgroups of the panel. The empirical results show that coal consumption and GDP are both I(1) and cointegrated in all regional groupings. Heterogeneity is found in the GDP equation of the full panel. The regional causality tests reveal that the coal consumptionGDP relationship is bidirectional in the Coastal and Central regions whereas causality is unidirectional from GDP to coal consumption in the Western region. Thus, energy conservation measures will not adversely affect the economic growth of the Western region but such measures will likely encumber the economy of the Coastal and Central regions, where most of the coal intensive industries are concentrated.

Raymond Li; Guy C.K. Leung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Energy Department Provides $7 Million for Solid-State Lighting...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

incandescent and fluorescent lamps, solid-state lighting creates light without producing heat. A semi-conducting material converts electricity directly into light, which maximizes...

444

PP-78 Minnesota Power & Light Company | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Minnesota Power & Light Company PP-78 Minnesota Power & Light Company Presidential Permit authorizing Minnesota Power & Light Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric...

445

PP-94 Central Power & Light Company | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 Central Power & Light Company PP-94 Central Power & Light Company Presidental Permit authorizing Central Power & Light Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric...

446

Electric Services in Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Institution of Electrical Engineers on October 22. In the early days, electrical installations in buildings were for lighting and bells. Wood casing was used, and, so far as ... equipment were placed anywhere where they would be out of sight. Now new and larger buildings are being erected all over the country, and electrical contractors are having difficulty in ...

1936-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

448

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

449

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

450

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

451

Indexes of Consumption and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Source: Energy Information Administration and Federal Reserve Board. History of Shipments This chart presents indices of 14 years (1980-1994) of historical data of manufacturing production indexes and Purchased (Offsite-Produced) Energy consumption, using 1992 as the base year (1992 = 100). Indexing both energy consumption and production best illustrates the trends in output and consumption. Taken separately, these two indices track the relative growth rates within the specified industry. Taken together, they reveal trends in energy efficiency. For example, a steady increase in output, coupled with a decline in energy consumption, represents energy efficiency gains. Likewise, steadily rising energy consumption with a corresponding decline in output illustrates energy efficiency losses.

452

Demand response in wholesale electricity markets: the choice of customer baseline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given a hybrid electricity market structure, demand response (DR) in wholesale electricity markets depends ... counterfactual consumption levels that would have prevailed without demand-response programs. However...

Hung-po Chao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

York Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop Inc Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name York Electric Coop Inc Place South Carolina Utility Id 21002 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting Backyard Lighting Outdoor Lighting Baxter Lighting Outdoor Lighting Shoebox 1 Light Lighting Outdoor Lighting Shoebox 2 Lights Lighting Outdoor Lighting Traditional Lighting Outdoor Lighting Ultra-Flood HPS/ MH 400 W 2 Lights Wood Pole Lighting Outdoor Lighting Ultra-Flood HPS/MH 1000 W Fiberglass Pole Lighting

454

Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

Lin, Jiang

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

457

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Analysis and Representation of Miscellaneous Electric Loads in NEMS Release date: January 6, 2014 Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) comprise a growing portion of delivered energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Recently, the growth of MELs has offset some of the efficiency gains made through technology improvements and standards in major end uses such as space conditioning, lighting, and water heating. Miscellaneous end uses, including televisions, personal computers, security systems, data center servers, and many other devices, have continued to penetrate into building-related market segments. Part of this proliferation of devices and equipment can be attributed to increased service demand for entertainment, computing, and convenience appliances.

458

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

459

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

460

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

462

Scenario Analysis on the Impact of Diffusion of Next Generation Vehicles on Material Consumption and GHG Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we developed an automobile cohort model to evaluate the effect of the diffusion of next generation vehicles such as hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles on material consumption and GHG em...

Yuta Higuchi; Naoki Wada; Toyohiko Nakakubo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

464

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

465

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

466

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

467

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

468

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

469

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

470

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

471

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

472

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

473

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

474

Electricity - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel consumption, sales, prices and customers. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Summary electricity statistics 2001-2011 › XLS Supply and disposition of electricity 2002-2011 › XLS Electricity overview › Generation, retail sales, electricity trade, losses PDF XLS Consumption for electricity generation › Fossil and renewable fuel consumption for electricity generation PDF XLS Generating capacity › Electric net summer capacity by specific energy source more on electricity PDF XLS Monthly electricity overview - back to 1973 CSV PDF XLS Latest month total electric power industry summary statistics › Overview XLS Year-to-date total electric power industry summary statistics ›

475

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002. EPRI, "Advanced Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles:12 2.2.2.1 PHEV uncertainties: Batteries andwith big propulsion batteries. However, recent activities (

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

ECE 466: LED Lighting Systems -Incandescent lightings rise and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

versus cost - Power Electronic Drives for CFL and LED light sources to achieve dimmable operation - Basic electric AC and DC circuits at Sophomore level or equivalents Absolutes Lighting System Requirements index as a metric of a light source - Power Electronic Energy sources driving light sources in a compact

Schumacher, Russ

477

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

478

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

479

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas...

480

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

vehicle aging have an additional but unknown effect on the MPG of individual vehicles. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 27 Of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

482

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

483

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

484

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

485

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

486

Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon September 28, 2011 - 10:57am Addthis The Team Tidewater Virginia smart meter, as seen on opening day, indicates the team generated 5 kW hours of electricity in the first several hours of the competition. | Image courtesy of Lachlan Fletcher, Studio 18a The Team Tidewater Virginia smart meter, as seen on opening day, indicates the team generated 5 kW hours of electricity in the first several hours of the competition. | Image courtesy of Lachlan Fletcher, Studio 18a Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Clouds, rain, thunderstorms... at Solar Decathlon Village? Oh my, you may say. But less-than-ideal weather conditions are no match for this year's

487

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

488

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration