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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Electric Energy and Power Consumption by Light-Duty Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. roads alone by 2015. PEVs-- either plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) or pure electric vehicles (EVs)--adopt similar drivetrain configurations as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) [21 Electric Energy and Power Consumption by Light-Duty Plug-in Electric Vehicles Di Wu, Student

Tesfatsion, Leigh

2

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

3

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and ...  

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy ...

4

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

5

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

6

Texas Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electric lighting electric lighting The SNAP House's lighting design aims for elegant simplicity in concept, use, and maintenance. Throughout the house, soft, ambient light is juxtaposed with bright, direct task lighting. All ambient and most task lighting is integrated directly into the architectural design of the house. An accent light wall between the bedroom and bathroom provides a glowing light for nighttime navigation.

7

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate...

8

Madrid Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Page 1 of 2 ELECTRIC LIGHTING QUALITY MAGIC BOX is a versatile home. Its design allows to change the room size by opening and closing the movable walls...

9

Solid-State Lighting: Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The...

10

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

11

Cornell University Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Electric Lighting Quality The CUSD lighting design team utilized energy efficient products that meshed well with our daylighting scheme. We chose to use fluorescent tubes or compact fluorescent bulbs with an energy consumption of between 15 and 30 Watts throughout the house. The ballasts for all lamps dim to a 1% light output, so the interior and exterior lights can be adjusted as the level of available daylight fluctuates. Light sensors have been placed in front of our two largest apertures, allowing us to control how much artificial light is supplied to each space. The control of our ballasts is intricate, but refined and tested to avoid dysfunctional dimming or switching. While automatic controls are included, manual user overrides are provided in case the occupant prefers

12

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).
...

15

Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity Preliminary ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity Preliminary Statistics 2010 June 2011 ... and Job Creation Act of 2010 (H.R. 4853) was signed in December

16

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility (1990-2009) Electricity consumption by Utility company for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight, Industry, Mining & Construction and Total...

17

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Planning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planning Area (1990-2009) Electricity consumption data from the California Energy Commission by planning area for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight,...

18

Table AP2. Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units U.S. Households (millions) Fuels Used (physical units) Electricity (billion kWh)

19

Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of the nation’s renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and State. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type and Fuel Type (trillion Btu) Light-Duty Consumption by Technology Type Conventional Vehicles 1/

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Virginia Tech Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIGHTING Daylight and Electric Careful consideration has been given to the integration of daylight, electric light, and the consequences relative to energy conservation, spatial...

22

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by County  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County (2006-2009) Electricity consumption data from the California Energy Commission sorted by County for Residential and Non-residential from 2006 to 2009.


...

23

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (New York) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as...

24

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

25

Annual Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as...

26

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

27

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

29

Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

Hammerstrom, Donald J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is from renewable energy? EIA estimates that about 10% of world marketed energy consumption is from ...

31

Purifying mixed-use electrical consumption data  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes several analytical techniques for obtaining pure end-use load information from mixed end-use consumption data. This process is frequently necessary to make metered data useful to those involved in electric utility load forecasting and conservation assessment. Analyses based on traditional thermal models can be greatly augmented by these data sets if the measured entities correspond to those for which modeled estimates are necessary. We present two scenarios in which greater end-use resolution was needed than was available in existing data. The first involves segregating measured total HVAC consumption data into its heating, cooling, and ventilation constituents. The second discusses a technique to separate measurements of mixed equipment consumption into equipment type categories. These techniques were successfully applied to a large number of metered commercial buildings. We conclude with suggestions for extending these techniques to applications involving high-time-resolution building total data. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Artificial neural networks for electricity consumption forecasting considering climatic factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work develops Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) models applied to predict the consumption forecasting considering climatic factors. It is intended to verify the influence of climatic factors on the electricity consumption forecasting through the ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, electricity consumption forecasting

Francisco David Moya Chaves

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modeling the Impact of Summer Temperatures on National Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National population-weighted weekly degree day totals, which have been used to model and assess temperature-related natural gas consumption, are compared with summertime electricity consumption. A very close relationship between national cooling ...

Douglas M. Le Comte; Henry E. Warren

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reduced energy consumption by massive thermoelectric waste heat recovery in light duty trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the EC funded HEATRECAR project is to reduce the energy consumption and curb CO2 emissions of vehicles by massively harvesting electrical energy from the exhaust system and re-use this energy to supply electrical components within the vehicle or to feed the power train of hybrid electrical vehicles. HEATRECAR is targeting light duty trucks and focuses on the development and the optimization of a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) including heat exchanger

D. Magnetto; G. Vidiella

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Broad Initiatives/Sharp Focus- Cuts Electricity Consumption 15%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of electrical consumption can payout in reduced energy costs. Continuous monitoring of electrical usage coupled with improvements and optimization in system(s) operations can have a favorable impact on annual operating expenditures. Further, participation in local utility rebate programs to reduce electrical consumption will enhance funding of energy efficient programs.

Gialanella, V.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making...

37

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Appliances &...

38

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure Quality, Management, and Contract Incentives Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager...

39

2001 Consumption and Expenditures -- Electric Air-Conditioning ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CE3-1c. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 2001 : 2: CE3-2c. ...

40

How much of world energy consumption and electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is from renewable energy? EIA estimates that about 10% of world marketed energy ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2011 ... The problem that we focus on, is the minimization of the energy consumption of an electrical vehicle achievable on a given driving cycle.

42

World Net Electricity Consumption, by Region, 1990-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity consumption worldwide increases by 76 percent in the reference case, from 12 trillion kilowatthours in 1997 to 22 trillion kilowatthours in 2020.

43

UK Electricity Consumption at LLSOA level (2007 - 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change (DECC) released experimental statistics on domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Lower Layer Super Output Authority level (LLSOA) for...

44

Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison between electricity consumption and behavioralK. 2013. “Domestic energy consumption-What role do comfort,residential electricity consumption” Energy Policy, 42(2012)

Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative to increases in its consumption at a higher rate than all but two states (in part because California is the lowest user of electricity per capita and per dollar of gross state product in the west). Annual WSCC consumption increased 64% from 1977 to 1998, but California's consumption grew by only 44

California at Berkeley. University of

46

Fuzzy wavelet neural network for prediction of electricity consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a fuzzy wavelet neural network (FWNN) for the prediction of electricity consumption is presented. The fuzzy rules that contain wavelets are constructed. Based on these rules, the structure of FWNN-based system is described. The FWNN ... Keywords: Fuzzy Wavelet Neural Network, Neurofuzzy Modeling, Prediction of Electricity Consumption, Time Series Prediction, Wavelet Network

Rahib h. Abiyev

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T15:57:46Z...

48

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

49

The dubuque electricity portal: evaluation of a city-scale residential electricity consumption feedback system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Dubuque Electricity Portal, a city-scale system aimed at supporting voluntary reductions of electricity consumption. The Portal provided each household with fine-grained feedback on its electricity use, as well as using incentives, ... Keywords: behavior change, consumption feedback systems, ecf, electricity, smart meters, social comparison, sustainability

Thomas Erickson; Ming Li; Younghun Kim; Ajay Deshpande; Sambit Sahu; Tian Chao; Piyawadee Sukaviriya; Milind Naphade

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION TO INFORM DATA-DRIVEN ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Effective demand-side energy efficiency policies are needed to reduce residential electricity consumption and its harmful effects on the environment. The first step to devise such polices is to quantify the potential for energy efficiency by analyzing the factors that impact consumption. This paper proposes a novel approach to analyze large data sets of residential electricity consumption to derive insights for policy making and energy efficiency programming. In this method, underlying behavioral determinants that impact residential electricity consumption are identified using Factor Analysis. A distinction is made between long-term and short-term determinants of consumption by developing separate models for daily maximum and daily minimum consumption and analyzing their differences. Finally, the set of determinants are ranked by their impact on electricity consumption, using a stepwise regression model. This approach is then applied on a large data set of smart meter data and household information as a case example. The results of the models show that weather, location, floor area, and number of refrigerators are the most significant determinants of daily minimum (or idle) electricity consumption in residential buildings,

Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer; Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

52

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a pilot study of electricity consumption in California oilfields that found significant potential for reducing costs through energy efficiency improvements. It offers suggestions for reducing electricity consumption that, if implemented, could result in a system-wide demand reduction and reduce the need for additional generation and power infrastructure capacity. Moreover, reducing oilfield energy costs would reduce the overall cost of oil production, helping marginal wells remain a...

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Flathead Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Retrofit Lighting: $3 - $400 per unit New Construction Lighting: $10 - $50 per unit Provider Flathead Electric Cooperative Flathead Electric Cooperative, in conjunction with Bonneville Power Administration, encourages energy efficiency in the commercial sector by providing a commercial lighting retro-fit rebate program and a new

54

Smart Metering for Smart Electricity Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, the demand for electricity has increased in households with the use of different appliances. This raises a concern to many developed and… (more)

Vadda, Praveen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated ... Gas volumes delivered for use as vehicle fuel are included in the State annual totals through 2010 but not in ...

56

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

57

Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist Last Out of...

58

Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: · Data are for emissions from energy consumption for electricity generation and useful thermal output.

59

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4047 4047 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142254047 Varnish cache server Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

60

Solar Electric Light Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Electric Light Fund Solar Electric Light Fund Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Electric Light Fund Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Electric Light Fund Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Phase: Create Early Successes Resource Type: Publications, Training materials Website: www.self.org/ Locality: US, Africa, Asia, Latin America Cost: Free The mission of the Solar Electric Light Fund (SELF) is to empower people in developing countries to rise from poverty using energy from the sun. What We Do The Solar Electric Light Fund (SELF) has been working in the field of renewable energy, household energy and decentralized rural electrification for over 18 years. We have a proven track record of managing complex, multi-disciplinary international projects and have worked on renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Facebook icon Twitter icon Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program (Alaska) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

62

Electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode(LED) was demonstrated. The nanopyramid arrays were fabricated from a GaN substrate by patterned nanopillar etch

S.-P. Chang; Y.-C. Chen; J.-K. Huang; Y.-J. Cheng; J.-R. Chang; K.-P. Sou; Y.-T. Kang; H.-C. Yang; T.-C. Hsu; H.-C. Kuo; C.-Y. Chang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Central Hudson Gas & Electric's (Central Hudson) Commercial Lighting Rebate Program is for businesses, retailers, institutional customers and non-profit customers of Central Hudson. The progam...

65

Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes  

SciTech Connect

Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Joe Marriott; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Effects of feedback on residential electricity consumption: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews 17 studies assessing the effect of information feedback on residential electricity consumption. Most of the studies were conducted in experimental or quasi-experimental conditions. The studies reviewed used (1) both feedback and incentives, (2) goal setting, (3) cost information feedback, and (4) displays. The study findings, taken together, provide some evidence that feedback is effective in reducing electricity consumption, although questions remain concerning the conditions under which feedback can best be provided. Reductions in consumption found in most of the studies ranged from 5% to 20%. Utility companies are the most likely source of feedback information for residential customers. Three of the studies investigated utility feedback projects. The report discusses the policy implications of these as well as the other studies. The report also lists questions remaining to be researched. 13 refs., 1 tab.

Farhar, B.C.; Fitzpatrick, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 70% of the equipment cost of a qualified efficiency upgrade Provider Central Hudson Gas and Electric Central Hudson Gas and Electric's (Central Hudson) Commercial Lighting Rebate Program is for businesses, retailers, institutional customers and non-profit customers of Central Hudson. The progam utilizes the services of Lime Energy to install new lighting fixtures with Central Hudson covering up to 70% of the cost. The 30 percent of cost remaining can be financed at

68

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear

69

Table AP6. Average Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas LPG Total Refrigerators Other Appliances and Lighting Table AP6. Average Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005

70

Monitoring Electricity Consumption in the Tertiary Sector- A Project within the Intelligent Energy Europe Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electricity consumption in the tertiary sector in the EU is still increasing and a further increase is expected of more than 2 % per year during the next 15 years. This sector includes companies and institutions of public and private services with heterogeneous economic and energy-related characteristics. Building managers and decision-makers are not enough informed about the electricity consumption structure and electricity-saving potentials. Within the EU Intelligent Energy project EL-TERTIARY an overview of existing studies showed that the availability of disaggregated data on electricity consumption and its use by purpose (lighting, office equipment, ventilation, air conditioning, etc.) is poor. The methods of determining the types of end-uses are weak; most studies are based on calculations and estimations, only a few on measurement. In addition, many of the results are not published. EL-TERTIARY developed an internet-based methodology for monitoring electricity consumption. It was applied in more than 120 case studies in 12 EU countries. They cover various types of buildings: offices, schools, universities, kindergartens, hotels, supermarkets, and hospitals evaluating more than 900 technical systems. On the background of ongoing activities on EU level, such as directives, research and implementation projects the paper illustrates the concept of EL-TERTIARY, the newly developed methodology for the documentation of building audits and monitoring as well as selected results.

Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.; Gruber, E.; Schlomann, B.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor- space In Occupied Floor- space In Vacant Floor- space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 5 9 4 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 12 6 6 9 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 13 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 7 14 5 5 7 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 21 10 10 11 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 12 15 8 8 10 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 13 24 10 11 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 13 19 11 11 10 Over 500,000 26 18 18 34

72

Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Pedernales Electric Cooperative - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Expiration Date Installation must be made within one year of the preliminary approval date State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 20-29 kW saved: $75/kW new; $150/kW retrofit 30-39 kW saved: $100/kW new; $200/kW retrofit 40-49 kW saved: $125/kW new; $250/kW retrofit 50 or more kW saved: $150/kW new; $300/kW retrofit Provider Conservation Section For existing and new commercial construction, Pedernales Electric Cooperative provides incentives for kW saved through efficient lighting.

73

Model for electric energy consumption in eastern Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy consumption in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia is modeled as a function of weather data, global solar radiation, population, and gross domestic product per capita. Five years of data have been used to develop the energy consumption model. Variable selection in the regression model is carried out by using the general stepping-regression technique. Model adequacy is determined from a residual analysis technique. Model validation aims to determine if the model will function successfully in its intended operating field. In this regard, new energy consumption data for a sixth year are collected, and the results predicted by the regression model are compared with the new data set. Finally, the sensitivity of the model is examined. It is found that the model is strongly influenced by the ambient temperature.

Al-Garni, A.Z.; Al-Nassar, Y.N.; Zubair, S.M.; Al-Shehri, A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Efficient Electrical Lighting for Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

typically accounts for between 8% and 25% of total electricity use, depending on the percentage of lab area. While not a significant percentage compared to HVAC systems, it...

75

Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: - Data are for emissions from energy consumption for electricity generation and useful thermal output. - See Table 11.5b for electric power sector data.

76

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu)

77

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table ...

78

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b)

79

Chicopee Electric Light- Residential Solar Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Chicopee Electric Light offered rebates to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic systems on their homes. Customer rebates are $0.50 per watt for a maximum of $2,500 per installation.

80

A hybrid simulation-adaptive network based fuzzy inference system for improvement of electricity consumption estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a hybrid adaptive network based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), computer simulation and time series algorithm to estimate and predict electricity consumption estimation. The difficulty with electricity consumption estimation modeling ... Keywords: Adaptive network based fuzzy inference system, Computer simulation, Electricity consumption, Hybrid, Improvement, Time series

A. Azadeh; M. Saberi; A. Gitiforouz; Z. Saberi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program <...

82

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska) Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers...

83

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program Eligibility...

84

Overview of the Electrical Energy Segment of the Energy Information Administration/ Manufacturing Consumption Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the end of 1997, The Energy Information Administration (EIA) published a report titled What Took Place in the Economic Environment Between 1991 and 1994 That Affected the Energy Manufacturers Used? This report contains information gathered from Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys (MECS), representing a sampling of over 250,000 manufacturing establishments in 52 industries and nine geographical Census divisions. Although the report covers natural gas, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas, coke and breeze, coal, and electricity, only the electricity segment is overviewed. Along with pure electrical energy consumption information, newly available data covers methods that manufacturers used to purchase and modify electric motor systems. The report also introduces the US Department of Energy's Motor Challenge Program and the US Environmental Protection Agency's Green Lights and Energy Star Programs. Topics such as changes in the electricity market, technology improvements, price disparities, and lessons learned from the natural gas restructuring as related to the electric utility deregulation relate the changes that are impacting the industrial environment. Although the report details information from many industries, the four major energy consumers in the manufacturing sector are: * Petroleum and Coal Products (SIC 29) * Chemicals and Allied Products (SIC 28) * Paper and Allied Partners (SIC 26) * Primary Metal Industries (SIC 33) These industries are also very proactive in their attempts to promote energy efficiency in all areas, including electrical. For example, the IEEE-841 Standard motor is a result of the work of some of these industries. The impact on the industrial Maintenance, Repair, and Operations (MRO) suppliers and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) markets show the need for increasing awareness in all aspects of electrical energy, especially in light of the implementation of the Energy Policy Act and the deregulation of the utility industry.

Lockhead, S.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

86

Table AP5. Average Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table AP5. Average Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household U.S. Households (millions) Fuels Used

87

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary...

88

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

89

Renewable energy for domestic electricity production and prediction of short-time electric consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern interest in renewable energy development is linked to concerns about exhaustion of fossil fuels and environmental, social and political risks of extensive use of fossil fuels and nuclear energy. It is a form of energy development with a focus ... Keywords: Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps, Photovoltaic Solar Cells, Short-Time Electric Consumption, Time Series, Windmills

Stéphane Grieu; Frédérik Thiery; Adama Traoré; Monique Polit

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Analysis of electricity consumption profiles in public buildings with dimensionality reduction techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the daily electricity consumption profile of a building and its correlation with environmental factors makes it possible to examine and estimate its electricity demand. As an alternative to the traditional correlation analysis, a new ... Keywords: Dimensionality reduction, Electricity consumption profiles, Energy efficiency, Information visualization

Antonio MoráN, Juan J. Fuertes, Miguel A. Prada, SerafíN Alonso, Pablo Barrientos, Ignacio DíAz, Manuel DomíNguez

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing for Optimizing Distribution Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing and investigates the environmental impact of the electrical energy consumer (transportation, buildings, street will be trained to recognize important city events and dynamics which will affect electrical power consumption

Beigl, Michael

92

Table CE3-6.1u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-6.1u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

93

Table CE3-6.2u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-6.2u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Square Feet and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

94

Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011" " (Billion Btu)" "Year",,,"Geothermal 2",,"SolarPV 3",,"Wind 4",,"Biomass",,,,,,"Total" ,"Hydroelectric" ,"Power...

95

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

96

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of ...

97

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion ...

98

U.S. natural gas consumption for electric power tops industrial ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: consumption demand electricity generation industrial natural gas. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

99

Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 ... Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from

100

End-Use Consumption of Electricity by End Use and Appliance  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Residential Home > Special Topics > Figure 1. Percent of Total Electricity Consumption in U.S. Housing Units, 2001 . Contact. Chip Berry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 ...

102

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 9 Wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate—see Table A6).

103

Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes differ from one appliance to another. Referencespeople activities, appliances use, and electric consumption.of use of the three appliances studied. However, variations

Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2012, renewable sources of energy accounted for about 9% of total U.S. energy consumption and 12% of electricity generation. 1. Learn more:

105

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

106

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.7a) ...

107

Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a ...

108

On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The electrical vehicle energy management can be expressed ... Electrical vehicle uses an electrical energy source for its displacement which can.

109

Forecast of the electricity consumption by aggregation of specialized experts; application to Slovakian and French  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast of the electricity consumption by aggregation of specialized experts; application-term forecast of electricity consumption based on ensemble methods. That is, we use several possibly independent base forecasters and design meta-forecasters which combine the base predictions that are output by them

110

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back...

111

Solar Electric Light Company SELCO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light Company SELCO Light Company SELCO Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO) Place Bangalore, Karnataka, India Zip 560078 Sector Services, Solar Product Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO) manufactures photovoltaic products and services targeted especially at end consumers in developing countries who have no access to land electricity. References Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO) is a company located in Bangalore, Karnataka, India . References ↑ "Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Electric_Light_Company_SELCO&oldid=35125

112

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

113

Consumption of Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of natural gas for electricity generation in the...

114

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source Via partnership with whole sale provider Brazos Electric Power, Inc. and escheat funds Start Date 09/01/2009 State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Lighting Upgrade: 0.30/watt saved per fixture T8 Fluorescent Upgrade: 1.50 - 2.25/bulb per fixture Provider CoServ Electric Cooperative CoServ Electric Cooperative provides rebates for commercial and industrial customers who upgrade to high efficiency lighting for the workplace. A rebate of $0.30/watt saved is available on custom lighting upgrades and a

115

Air-Conditioning Effect Estimation for Mid-Term Forecasts of Tunisian Electricity Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Engineering-industry, secondary: Econometrics. 1 Introduction The electric power mid-term loads forecasting: Estimated annual temperature sensitive electricity load components 3 Mid-term load forecasting StatisticalAir-Conditioning Effect Estimation for Mid-Term Forecasts of Tunisian Electricity Consumption

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

117

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Table E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

119

Table E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

120

Persuading consumers to reduce their consumption of electricity in the home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous work has identified that providing real time feedback or interventions to consumers can persuade consumers to change behaviour and reduce domestic electricity consumption. However, little work has investigated what exactly those feedback mechanisms ...

Alan F. Smeaton, Aiden R. Doherty

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table CE3-4c. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-4c. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Type of Housing Unit, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit

122

Table CE3-1c. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-1c. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 2001 RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE Row

123

Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and ...

124

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields: Oilfields Energy Consumption Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High electrical cost has always constituted a major expense item in the operation of oilfields. Such high costs are particularly critical to small oil and gas operators. There are opportunities that can substantially reduce electric cost and improve energy usage efficiency. For small operators, this could mean a difference between premature abandonment and continued recovery. Energy reduction in oil production supports the need for energy reduction across all industries brought on by recent electrical en...

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 • Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth • Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade • Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards • The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s • U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

127

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Contact Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power CFL Bulbs: Up to 10 CFL bulbs at reduced cost Water Heater: $75 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for home energy audits, CFL light bulbs, tank water heaters and refrigerator recycling. Water heater purchases and

128

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of MidAmerican Energy Company. Light-emitting diode and induction types of solid state lighting (SSL) qualify under this program....

129

Cagayan Electric Power and Light Co Cepalco | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Product Provides electricity to Cagayan de Oro City. Has developed a 1MW solar power plant. References Cagayan Electric Power and Light Co (Cepalco)1 LinkedIn Connections...

130

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon CoServ Electric Cooperative - Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (Texas) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being...

131

Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company (Massachusetts) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company (Massachusetts) Jump to: navigation, search Name Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company Place Massachusetts Utility Id 6374 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File...

132

Hawaii Electric Light Company News Release | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Electric Light Company News Release Citation () . () . Hawaii...

133

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Light-Duty Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Light-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle and Charging Infrastructure Testing What's New Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration: Project to...

134

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Light-Duty Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Light-Duty Electric Drive Vehicle and Charging Infrastructure Testing What's New EV Project Overview Report: Project to date...

135

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and...

136

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings New Construction: Varies widely

137

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $200 Air Source Heat Pumps: $100 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $300/ton + $50/EER/ton Fan Motors: $50/unit Programmable Thermostats: $25 Tank Water Heater: $50

138

NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program NYSEG (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Assessment: Free Lighting Retrofit: 70% of cost Provider RG&E and NYSEG NYSEG offers a lighting incentive program designed to serve small business customers with a demand of 100 kilowatts (kW) or less. These small business customers may schedule a free energy assessment and then receive a 70% discount on the installed cost of recommended lighting measures. Eligible lighting measures include the retrofitting of fluorescent fixtures,

139

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Massachusetts) Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Massachusetts) < Back Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $25,000; 30% of total cost if project did not recieve financing from CEL, 20% of total cost if project did recieve financing from CEL Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.17 per annual kWh saved Lighting: $0.17 per annual kWh saved New Construction: $0.17 per annual kWh saved Provider Program Administrator Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a Pilot Energy Efficiency Program to encourage non-residential, commercial, and industrial facilities to pursue

140

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T16:04:28Z 2011-03-31T19:33:44Z...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Farm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas and Electric) - Farm Gas and Electric) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1/1/2012 State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Clothes Washer: $100 Refrigerator Replacement: $50 Dishwasher Replacement: $20 Freezer: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Water Heater: $50 Electric Heat Pump Water Heaters: $100 Circulating Fans: $25 - $75

142

Electric energy savings and light guides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light guides are systems which serve for illumination of internal windowless parts of buildings. Their function is based on the principle of light transport from outdoor to distant indoor places due to multi-reflections on their highly reflective internal ... Keywords: daylight, energy savings, illuminance, light guides, solar energy, solar radiation

Jitka Mohelnikova

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Retrofit Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $20,000 per project Program Info State Alaska Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $1,000/kW or 50% of the project cost Provider Golden Valley Electric Association BusBusiness $ense is a Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) program designed to increase the efficiency with which energy is used on GVEA's system. It provides rebates of up to $20,000 to existing facilities receiving the commercial rate who reduce their lighting loads through energy efficient lighting retrofit projects. Facilities on GVEA's

144

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous EquipmentElectricity Use in New Homes  

SciTech Connect

The "Other" end-uses (appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment) continue to grow. This is particularly true innew homes, where increasing floor area and amenities are leading tohigher saturation of these types of devices. This paper combines thefindings of several field studies to assess the current state ofknowledge about the "Other" end-uses in new homes. The field studiesinclude sub-metered measurements of occupied houses in Arizona, Florida,and Colorado, as well as device-level surveys and power measurements inunoccupied new homes. We find that appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment can consume from 46 percent to 88 percent ofwhole-house electricity use in current low-energy homes. Moreover, theannual consumption for the "Other" end-uses is not significantly lower innew homes (even those designed for low energy use) compared to existinghomes. The device-level surveys show that builder-installed equipment isa significant contributor to annual electricity consumption, and certaindevices that are becoming more common in new homes, such as structuredwiring systems, contribute significantly to this power consumption. Thesefindings suggest that energy consumption by these "Other" end uses isstill too large to allow cost-effective zero-energy homes.

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan,Gregory

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8) 8) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. All data in this set are classified as UK National Statistics. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

147

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Retail Supplier State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction: Varies, see program web site Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings

148

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation: $300 maximum rebate Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $50 Freezer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 Central A/C: Up to $500 Ductless Mini-Split AC: Up to $500 Air Source Heat Pump: Up to $500 Insulation: 30% of installed cost Provider EFI Municipal Rebates Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a variety of incentives for its

150

Central Electric Cooperative- Non-Residential Lighting Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Central Electric Cooperative offers a commercial lighting system improvement incentive for any customer not on a residential utility rate. To use the program and learn how much the rebates can...

151

Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Webinar Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol U.S. DOE WEBINAR ON H2 FUELING PROTOCOLS: PARTICIPANTS Rob Burgess Moderator Jesse Schneider TIR J2601,...

152

Chicopee Electric Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: 0.17 per annual kWh saved Lighting: 0.17 per annual kWh saved New Construction: 0.17 per annual kWh saved...

153

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and less costly than older coal-fired power plants. In addition, technological advances in electricity, supply, trans- mission, and consumption is developed. The model is sufficiently general to handle the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cient

Nagurney, Anna

154

Predicting Future Hourly Residential Electrical Consumption: A Machine Learning Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(e.g., HVAC) for a specific building, optimizing control systems and strategies for a buildingPredicting Future Hourly Residential Electrical Consumption: A Machine Learning Case Study Richard building energy modeling suffers from several factors, in- cluding the large number of inputs required

Tennessee, University of

155

Nearest neighbor technique and artificial neural networks for short-term electric consumptions forecast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Promoting both energy savings and renewable energy development are two objectives of the actual and national French energy policy. In this sense, the present work takes part in a global development of various tools allowing managing energy demand. So, ... Keywords: Kohonen Self-Organizing Map, Multi-Layer Perceptron, Short-Term Electric Consumption, The Nearest Neighbor Technique, Virtual Power Plant

Van Giang Tran; Stéphane Grieu; Monique Polit

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Electric Light Co Inc Place Hawaii Utility Id 8287 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location HI NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png SCHEDULE "F" Street Light Service Lighting SCHEDULE "G" General Service Non-Demand - Single Phase Commercial SCHEDULE "G" General Service Non-Demand - Three Phase Commercial

159

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Commercial Energy Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T8 Fixtures: $5 - $18 /system or $0.50 /lamp Fluorescents: $4 - $125 CFLs: $8 - $25 Indirect Lighting: $16 - $24 Pulse Start Metal Halide Fixtures: $25 - $65 Lighting Controls: $12 - $35 Variable Frequency Drive: $30 /hp Totally Enclosed Fan-Cooled: $10 - $600 Open Drip-Proof: $10 - $600 Custom: Buy down to 2 year pay back or 50% of cost, whichever is less

160

Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NC Utilities Commission These rules shall apply to any person, firm, or corporation (except municipalities, or agents thereof) which is now or may hereafter become engaged as a public utility in the business of furnishing electric current for domestic, commercial or industrial consumers within the State of North Carolina. The rules are intended to define good practice which can normally

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska) Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources Irrigation districts, created in section 46-1xx, are encouraged to

162

Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 6 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 5 5 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 10 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 8 8 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 10 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 11 11 Over 500,000 26 18 18 21 Principal Building Activity Education 8 9 6 6 Food Sales and Service 8 9 8 7 Health Care 14 12 12 9 Lodging 11 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 5 7 7 7 Office 6 10 7 6 Public Assembly 7 12 28 30 Public Order and Safety 18 29 18 18 Religious Worship 10 10 11 11 Warehouse and Storage

163

Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Zhongshan Quanxin Electric Lighting Co Ltd Place Zhongshan, China Zip 528411 Sector Solar Product Chinese light manufactuere who is building a 10MW a-Si thin-film solar cell factory. Coordinates 22.516701°, 113.366699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.516701,"lon":113.366699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

Electric dipole moment of light nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the sensitivity of the deuteron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) to variation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we write the EDM as a sum of two terms, one depends on the target wave function, the second on intermediate multiple scattering states in the {sup 3}P{sub 1} channel. This second contribution is sensitive to off-shell behavior of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} amplitude.

Gibson, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Afnan, I R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Electric dipole moment of light nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the sensitivity of the deuteron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) to variation in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. In particular, we write the EDM as a sum of two terms, one depends on the target wave function, the second on intermediate multiple scattering states in the {sup 3}P{sub 1} channel. This second contribution is sensitive to off-shell behavior of the {sup 3}P{sub 1} amplitude.

Afnan, Iraj R. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001 (Australia); Gibson, Benjamin F. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Relationships between consumers' attitudes and knowledge and the effect of time-of-use rate structures on electricity consumption: North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The North Carolina Time-of-Use (TOU) Rate Demonstration Project examined the effects of various TOU rate schedules on residential consumers' electrical usage, including both total usage and temporal patterns of electricity consumption. This report summarizes the findings of a series of secondary analyses of the data derived from this demonstration project. These secondary analyses focused on the effects of consumers' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the TOU rate structure to which they were assigned on both total electricity usage and temporal patterns of consumption. These analyses were made possible by the provision of an extensive exit interview, which was administered to all participants at the completion of the one year demonstration project. In addition, data on electricity usage, the dependent variable for these analyses, was collected throughout the duration of the demonstration project. After describing the general features of the demonstration project, this report presents the findings of secondary analyses undertaken to determine participants' knowledge of the TOU rate structures to which they were assigned, their attitudes toward TOU rate structures, and the relationships between these attitude and knowledge measures and electricity consumption. Findings are presented separately for the Carolina Power and Light Company (CP and L) and the Blue Ridge Municipal Electric Company.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

168

Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company Place New Hampshire Utility Id 6374 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Fitchburg Gas and Electric Light Company (Massachusetts).

169

Bremen Electric Light & Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bremen Electric Light & Power Co Bremen Electric Light & Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Bremen Electric Light & Power Co Place Indiana Utility Id 2192 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial: Single Phase Commercial Commercial: Three Phase Commercial Industrial: Single Phase Industrial Industrial: Three Phase Industrial Large Power Industrial Mega Industrial Power Industrial Municipal: Single Phase Commercial Municipal: Three Phase Commercial Residential Residential

170

Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Primary Factors that Impact the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles RICHARD ‘BARNEY’ CARLSON, MATTHEW G. SHIRK Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption as compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) by utilizing electrical energy for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEV’s, analysis has shown that the fuel consumption of PHEV’s is more significantly affected than conventional vehicles by either the driver’s input or by the environmental inputs around the vehicle. Six primary factors have been identified that significantly affect the fuel consumption of PHEV’s. In this paper, these primary factors are analyzed from on-road driving and charging data from over 200 PHEV’s throughout North America that include Hymotion Prius conversions and Hybrids Plus Escape conversions. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) tests plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles as part of its conduct of DOE’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). In collaboration with its 75 testing partners located in 23 states and Canada, INL has collected data on 191 PHEVs, comprised of 12 different PHEV models (by battery manufacturer). With more than 1 million PHEV test miles accumulated to date, the PHEVs are fleet, track, and dynamometer tested. Six Primary Factors The six primary factors that significantly impact PHEV fuel consumption are listed below. Some of the factors are unique to plug-in vehicles while others are common for all types of vehicles. 1. Usable Electrical Energy is dictated by battery capacity, rate of depletion as well as when the vehicle was last plugged-in. With less electrical energy available the powertrain must use more petroleum to generate the required power output. 2. Driver Aggressiveness impacts the fuel consumption of nearly all vehicles but this impact is greater for high efficiency powertrains. 3. Accessory Utilization like air conditioner systems or defroster systems can use a significant amount of additional energy that is not contributing to the propulsion of the vehicle. 4. Route Type such as city, highway or mountainous driving can affect the fuel consumption since it can involve stop and go driving or ascending a step grade. 5. Cold Start / Key On includes control strategies to improve cold start emissions as well as control routines to quickly supply cabin heat. These control strategies are necessary for consumer acceptance even though fuel consumption is negatively impacted. 6. Ambient Temperature can reduce the efficiency of many powertrain components by significantly increasing fluid viscosity. For vehicles that utilize battery energy storage systems, the temperature of the battery system can greatly affect the power output capability therefore reducing its system effectiveness. The analysis of the six primary factors that impact fuel economy of PHEV’s helped to identify areas of potential further development as well as may assist in informing drivers of these effects in an effort to modify driving behavior to reduce petroleum consumption.

Richard "Barney" Carlson; Matthew G. Shirk; Benjamin M. Geller

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2005 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 - 5 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The domestic electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. These data are classified as UK National Statistics. Note about spreadsheets: separate tabs exist for each local authority (LA), but the tabs are hidden. To view data, simply 'unhide' the appropriate tab(s). You do not need to "enable macros" to view the data. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

173

Alaska Electric Light&Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light&Power Co Light&Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Alaska Electric Light&Power Co Place Alaska Utility Id 213 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial & Government Dual Fuel Commercial Experimental Off-Peak Electric Vehicle Charging 10:00 pm - 7:00 am Commercial General Residential Residential Large Commercial Commercial Off-Peak/Heat storage from 10pm-6am Large Commercial Commercial

174

The impact of thermostat performance on energy consumption and occupant comfort in residential electric heating systems  

SciTech Connect

A digital computer simulation was used to compare the energy consumption and comfort of an electric baseboard heating system using high performance thermostats (low droop, fast cycling) to that of the same system using poorer performing thermostats (high droop, slow cycling, such as many line voltage types). Since a thermostat which allows the controlled temperature to fall below the setpoint will obviously cause less energy consumption than a thermostat which maintains the controlled temperature closer to the setpoint, the key hypothesis of this study was that the user will reset the thermostat setpoint in some fashion during the heating season to obtain acceptable conditions for all heating loads. The major assumption of this study, therefore, was the mode of this ''user-thermostat interaction''. For every case in which the simulated ''user'' could intervene, the energy consumption using high performance thermostats was found to be less, while a greater degree of comfort was maintained, than systems using poorer performing thermostats. Energy savings ranged from 2% to 18% depending upon the mode of user interaction simulated. Where energy savings were small, the ''user'' was resetting the poorly performing thermostat as often as twice a day; i.e., the ''user'' was performing the function of a better performing thermostat.

Benton, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Barron Electric Cooperative- Energy Star Appliance & Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Barron Electric Cooperative (BEC) offers rebates to any member receiving electrical service for the purchase of Energy Star appliances and energy efficient lighting. All appliance rebates are $25...

176

Predicting Future Hourly Residential Electrical Consumption: A Machine Learning Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole building input models for energy simulation programs are frequently created in order to evaluate specific energy savings potentials. They are also often utilized to maximize cost-effective retrofits for existing buildings as well as to estimate the impact of policy changes toward meeting energy savings goals. Traditional energy modeling suffers from several factors, including the large number of inputs required to characterize the building, the specificity required to accurately model building materials and components, simplifying assumptions made by underlying simulation algorithms, and the gap between the as-designed and as-built building. Prior works have attempted to mitigate these concerns by using sensor-based machine learning approaches to model energy consumption. However, a majority of these prior works focus only on commercial buildings. The works that focus on modeling residential buildings primarily predict monthly electrical consumption, while commercial models predict hourly consumption. This means there is not a clear indicator of which techniques best model residential consumption, since these methods are only evaluated using low-resolution data. We address this issue by testing seven different machine learning algorithms on a unique residential data set, which contains 140 different sensors measurements, collected every 15 minutes. In addition, we validate each learner's correctness on the ASHRAE Great Energy Prediction Shootout, using the original competition metrics. Our validation results confirm existing conclusions that Neural Network-based methods perform best on commercial buildings. However, the results from testing our residential data set show that Feed Forward Neural Networks, Support Vector Regression (SVR), and Linear Regression methods perform poorly, and that Hierarchical Mixture of Experts (HME) with Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM) performs best - a technique not previously applied to this domain.

Edwards, Richard E [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Consumption strategies and tariff coordination for cooperative consumers in a deregulated electricity market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the trend in electricity markets is strongly towards deregulation, new players, new rules and new behaviors will continue to emerge. One of the new phenomena that are developing on the demand side is the purchase by a coalition of agents. When it is worth, a coalition will be constituted. One of the energy needs, especially important in Nordic countries such as Finland, is electrical space heating. We consider here the consumption strategies of individual electricity buyers within a coalition. The decision problem each consumer faces is to find the optimal use of his space heating system with respect to change in electricity price and to his tolerance to indoor temperature variation. A mathematical model for this problem is defined. Physical parameters of example houses were gathered from an experimental field test conducted in Helsinki during the winter 1996. The coalition buys in the market at marginal cost. However, as marginal cost pricing may not always fulfill metering and communication needs of the members of the coalition, we consider Time-Of-Use (TOU) pricing within the coalition. Different groups of consumer behaviour are constructed to simulate this coalition. Optimal marginal tariff is used as a reference point to estimate the nearest TOU tariff within the coalition.

Raimo P. Hämäläinen; Juha Mäntysaari; Jukka Ruusunen; Pierre-olivier Pineau

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

179

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Research on the Best Market Applications for LightLab Energy-Saving Lamps.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Nowadays, lighting represents 20% of the global electricity consumption. Light can be produced using different technologies but more than 100 years after its invention,… (more)

Vilalta Cea, Raul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Consumption Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

182

Load forecasting framework of electricity consumptions for an Intelligent Energy Management System in the user-side  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents an electricity consumption-forecasting framework configured automatically and based on an Adaptative Neural Network Inference System (ANFIS). This framework is aimed to be implemented in industrial plants, such as automotive factories, ... Keywords: ANFIS, Forecasting, Genetic algorithm, Intelligent EMS, Modelling

Juan J. Cárdenas; Luis Romeral; Antonio Garcia; Fabio Andrade

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A new "In-Use Energy consumption" indicator for the design of energy efficient electr(on)ics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new "In-Use Energy consumption" indicator for the design of energy efficient electr(on)ics Lucie(on)ic industry is the development of energy efficient products during their use. Indeed, regulations, standards energy efficiency more effectively during the design process. The indicator combines the power

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

184

Central Electric Cooperative - Non-Residential Lighting Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government, Tribal Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

185

Avista Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities' Commercial Lighting Program provides incentives for lighting upgrades. New construction projects and proved energy saving lighting measures not listed on rebate form are...

186

Avista Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities' Commercial Lighting Program provides incentives for lighting upgrades. New construction projects and proved energy saving lighting measures not listed on rebate form are evaluated...

187

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $25,000 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,500 - $25,000 Provider Customer Service Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy), in conjunction with Wells

188

How much electricity is used for lighting in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA estimates that in 2011, about 461 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity were used for lighting by the residential and commercial sectors.

189

The Effect on Electricity Consumption of the Commonwealth Edison Customer Applications Program: Phase 2 Final Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final Phase 2 analysis of the effects on residential customers' energy consumption patterns of Commonwealth Edison's (ComEd's) Customer Application Program (CAP).

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Reflections in Mutation Research Electric light causes cancer?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. And on a population level, there is a strong international correlation between estimates of per capita fat consumption) wasted energy, (3) harm to animal and plant life, (4) and perhaps increases in some severe human maladies dismayed by the recent reports that dietary fat consumption was unrelated to risk of breast cancer in women

Oliver, Douglas L.

191

Energy and economic efficiency alternatives for electric lighting in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates current efficient alternatives for replacing or supplementing electric lighting systems in commercial buildings. Criteria for establishing the economic attractiveness of various lighting alternatives are defined and the effect of future changes in building lighting on utility capacity. The report focuses on the energy savings potential, economic efficiency, and energy demand reduction of three categories of lighting alternatives: (1) use of a renewable resource (daylighting) to replace or supplement electric lighting; (2) use of task/ambient lighting in lieu of overhead task lighting; and (3) equipment changes to improve lighting energy efficiency. The results indicate that all three categories offer opportunities to reduce lighting energy use in commercial buildings. Further, reducing lighting energy causes a reduction in cooling energy use and cooling capacity while increasing heating energy use. It does not typically increase heating capacity because the use of lighting in the building does not offset the need for peak heating at night.

Robbins, C.L.; Hunter K.C.; Carlisle, N.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program...

193

Envelope & Lighting Technologies to Reduce Electric Demand in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of light shelf reflectors. Deploying Integrated Systems Realizing the full energy-saving potential of envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings means...

194

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% | 9.03 1990 | 65.0% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 9.26 1991 | 65.6% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 9.42 1992 | 64.6% 35.2% 0.2% 100% | 9.43 1993 | 65.7% 34.1% 0.2% 100% | 9.76 1994 | 65.5% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.01 1995 | 66.2% 33.6% 0.2% 100% | 10.28 1996 | 66.5% 33.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.58 1997 | 66.8% 33.0% 0.2% 100% | 10.73 1998 | 67.6% 32.2% 0.2% 100% | 11.14 1999 | 67.9% 32.0% 0.2% 100% | 11.30 2000 | 68.7% 31.1% 0.2% 100% | 11.67 2001 | 70.5% 29.4% 0.2% 100% |

195

A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimate current or future power consumption of telecommunication networks, or that evaluate power.idzikowski@tu-berlin.de, firstname.lastname@orange.com Abstract--Reasonably accurate reference power consumption values are required for any work that evaluates power consump- tion in telecommunication networks. Many existing works pro

Greenberg, Albert

196

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Minimum project size for the full $5,000 grant is 20 fixtures; smaller projects will receive a $250 per-fixture grant. Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to $5,000 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible roadway lighting fixtures. Participants must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of

197

Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 9th International Electric Vehicle symposium, EVS88-072,10th International of Electric Vehicle Symposium, pp.154-International in of Electric Vehicle Symposium, pp.401-410,

Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desktop usage is also highly correlated with lighting loads.usage, as one might expect since most o?ce buildings do not adjust lighting

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Lighting Electricity Rates on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting Electricity Rates on OpenEI Lighting Electricity Rates on OpenEI Home > Groups > Utility Rate Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 31 May, 2013 - 12:04 API Utility Rates I'm pleased to announce that a new lighting rate category and about 10,000 lighting rates are now officially offered in OpenEI's utility rate database! Streetlights and other similar electric lighting uses are typically billed using uniquely designed lighting rates. Illinois State University (ISU) had contributed approximately 10,000 lighting rates, and now these rates have been categorized under a new "lighting" category (in the same dropdown list that contains "residential", "commercial" and "industrial" categories). With the new categorization, users can now query

200

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture for Localized Electrical Energy Reduction, Generation, and Sharing) [46] is the smart-grid

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

202

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks

McGaughey, Alan

203

California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?  

SciTech Connect

During summer 2001, Californians reduced electricity usage by 6 percent and average monthly peak demand by 8 percent, compared to summer 2000. These load reductions played an important role in avoiding the hundreds of hours of rotating power outages predicted several months prior. Many factors affected electricity use and peak demand in summer 2001, including weather, changes in the State's economy, and deliberate consumer responses to a variety of stimuli associated with the crisis. This paper assesses the roles played by these contributing factors, with a special focus on the extraordinary efforts made by Californians to reduce electricity consumption. We review the role of media coverage and informational campaigns on public awareness and the impact of rate increases and a variety of publicly funded programs in reducing electricity consumption. We also draw lessons for other regions that may be faced with the prospect of electricity shortages.

Goldman, Charles A.; Barbose Galen L.; Eto, Joseph H.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Can polarized lighting panels reduce energy consumption and improve visibility in building interiors  

SciTech Connect

The lighting and vision literature, materials on management science and the reflectivity of surfaces are reviewed. The analysis emphasized the connection between lighting design and productivity. It is concluded that polarizing panels should be included among the alternatives normally considered by the lighting designer to utilize energy more efficiently than normal general lighting systems using standard prismatic or diffusing panels. A lighting design using polarizing panels might use 1/4 to 1/3 less energy than a reference system using standard prismatic panels without compromising function. The estimate of the potential energy savings available with polarizing panels is based on the estimate of their efficiency at producing Equivalent Spherical Illumination (ESI). ESI combines the effects of luminance and contrast into a single figure of merit for visibility. A short history and some background of ESI and a discussion of the measured reflectivities of paper and pencil on paper are presented. These data are used in ESI calculations. The problems and limitations of evaluating lighting systems strictly in terms of ESI per watt (or dollar) are discussed. An attempt was made to evaluate polarizing panels in terms of the factors discussed. Additional information is provided in 4 appendices.

Berman, S.; Clear, R.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat pumps, Lighting, Programmable Thermostats, Refrigerators, Water Heaters, Windows, Room Air Conditioners, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Appliance Recycling, Home Energy...

206

Department of Electrical Engineering Spring 2012 Boeing LED Strobe Light System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strobe light system used by Boeing. The current Xenon bulb system is bulky, inefficient, and unreliable other light bulbs, this improves the longevity of the device Excellent frequency response of the LEDsPENNSTATE Department of Electrical Engineering Spring 2012 Boeing LED Strobe Light System Overview

Demirel, Melik C.

207

Table E6. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

208

Table E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

209

Table E5A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for All ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other

210

Table E6A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other

211

Table 10.2c Renewable Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat rate-see Table A6). Notes: - The electric power sector ...

212

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

END?USER’S TOOLS TOWARDS AN EFFICIENT ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION: THE DYNAMIC SMART GRID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing uncontrolled electrical demands have caused increased supply requirements. This causes volatile electrical markets and has detrimental unsustainable environmental impacts. The market is presently characterized by regular daily peak demand conditions associated with high electricity prices. A demand?side response system can limit peak demands to an acceptable level. The proposed scheme is based on energy demand and price information which is available online. An online server is used to communicate the information of electricity suppliers to users

Fouad Kamel; Alexander A. Kist

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights on in a New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Keeping the Lights on in 09: Keeping the Lights on in a New World Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights on in a New World Elertricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Keeping the Lights on in a New World: The purpose of the report is to address current trends with respect to construction of generation and transmission; use of demand-side resources and increased efficiency; and plans for meeting future electricity needs that will result in reliable supplies of electricity, at reasonable cost and with due regard for the environment. The report focuses on specific actions the U.S. Department of Energy can take to meet these challenges. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2009: Keeping the Lights on in a New World More Documents & Publications Chapter 3 Demand-Side Resources

215

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heaters, Windows, Whole House Fans, Room Air Conditioners, Geothermal Heat Pumps, LED Lighting, Heat Pump Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility...

216

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmable Thermostats, Refrigerators, Water Heaters, Windows, Geothermal Heat Pumps, LED Lighting, Heat Pump Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility...

217

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Refrigeration Equipment, Food Service Equipment, Room Air Conditioners, LED Lighting, Tankless Water Heaters, Heat Pump Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes...

218

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residences, farms or ag-related businesses are eligible if Alliant Energy supplies the electricity or natural gas on a retail rate basis for the applicable technology. Interest...

219

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Light-Duty Electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Vehicle Technology Program (VTP) to collect electric drive vehicle and charging infrastructure data for several deployment projects...

220

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Clothes Washer: 100 Refrigerator Replacement: 50 Dishwasher Replacement: 20 Freezer: 25 Room Air Conditioner: 25 Water Heater: 50 Electric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program (Iowa) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on November 9, 2012. Financial Incentive Program Place Iowa Additional Place applies to MidAmerican Energy Name MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program Incentive Type Utility Grant Program Applicable Sector Local Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Induction Lighitng, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Up to $5,000 Equipment Requirements Fixtures must have an efficiency rating equal to or greater than 66 lumens per watt as tested under Illuminating Engineering Society of North America LM-79-08 testing to qualify for a grant.

222

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste ... Data also include a small number of electric utility combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

223

Table 7.4b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.4a) Coala Petroleum Natural Gasf Other Gasesg Biomass Otherj Distillate Fuel Oilb Residual Fuel Oilc

224

Lighting Technology Panel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Panel Technology Panel Federal Utility Partnership Working Group N b 2009 November 1 1 8, 2009 Doug Avery Southern California Edison Southern California Edison National Energy Conservation M d t Mandates * There are Federal and State Mandates to reduce energy consumption - California Investor Owned Electric Utilities are ordered to save around 3 Billion kWh's each y year from 2007-2113 - Federal buildings ordered to reduce electrical Federal buildings ordered to reduce electrical energy consumption 35% by 2012 Energy Consump ption gy Lighting accounts for 42 7% of energy consumption Lighting accounts for 42.7% of energy consumption Data Courtesy of SDG&E Data Courtesy of SDG&E Energy Consump ption gy More than ¾ of the lighting load is non-residential. Data Courtesy of SDG&E

225

Data Visualization for Quality-Check Purposes of Monitored Electricity Consumption in All Office Buildings in the ESL Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report comprises an effort to visualize the monitored electricity consumption in all office buildings (not including the office buildings comprising other functions as classrooms and laboratories, for instance) in the ESL database. This data visualization, basically long-term and short-term time series plots serves as a preliminary quality check of the data available. A preliminary inspection of the data was performed, by viewing the channels to provide a clear identification of creep, missing data gaps, turned-off periods, and sudden big changes that suggest changes in the building operation or an addition to the building.

Sreshthaputra, A.; Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

End-Use Consumption of Electricity by End Use and Appliance  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Furnace Fan: 76.3 . 500 g . 38.2. 3.3. Dishwasher: 56.7 . 512 l. 29.0. 2.5. Electric Range Top c: 59.7 . 536 g . 32.0. 2.8. Electric Oven d: 47.8 . 440 g . 21.0. 1.8 ...

227

RG&E (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program RG&E (Electric) - Small Business Lighting Retrofit Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Assessment: Free Lighting Retrofit: 70% of cost Provider RG&E and NYSEG RG&E offers a lighting incentive program designed to serve small business customers with a demand of 100 kilowatts (kW) or less. These small business customers may schedule a free energy assessment and then receive a 70% discount on the installed cost of recommended lighting measures. Eligible lighting measures include the retrofitting of fluorescent fixtures,

228

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

229

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amount 1,500 - 25,000 Provider Customer Service Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy), in conjunction with Wells Fargo Bank, offers a low-interest loan for residential,...

230

Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Last-Out Energy Conservation Check List Office Symbol Name: Suite Room Number: Date Initials All Lights in Suite are Off? All Printers in Suite are Off? All Scanners in Suite are...

231

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient New Construction: 600-3500home Home Energy Audit: Free CFLs: 50% of cost LED Bulbs: 10 Light Fixtures or Fan: 20unit Water Heaters: 50 Programmable Thermostat: 25...

232

Table AP1. Total Households Using Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Electricity

233

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Energy Box : comparing locally automated control strategies of residential electricity consumption under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Box is an always-on background processor automating the temporal management of one's home or small business electrical energy usage. Cost savings are achieved in a variety of environments, ranging from at pricing ...

Livengood, Daniel James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) energy. Sources: - 1949-1988-Table 8.4b for electric power sector, and Tables 8.1 and A6 for industrial sector.

237

Effect of automotive electrical system changes on fuel consumption using incremental efficiency methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been a continuous increase in automotive electric power usage. Future projections show no sign of it decreasing. Therefore, the automotive industry has a need to either improve the current 12 Volt automotive ...

Hardin, Christopher William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total 5: Wood 8: Waste 9: Thousand ... electric utility data also include a small amount of fuel oil no. 4. 10 ... and other manufactured and waste gases derived from ...

239

Electric dipole moments of light nuclei from {chi}EFT  

SciTech Connect

I present recent calculations of EDMs of light nuclei using chiral effective field theory techniques. At leading-order, we argue that they can be expressed in terms of six CP-violating low-energy constants. With our expressions, eventual non-zero measurements of EDMs of deuteron, helion, and triton can be combined to disentangle the different sources of CP-violation.

Higa, Renato [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

Consumption Strategies and Tariff Coordination for Cooperative Consumers in a Deregulated Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the trend in electricity markets is strongly towards deregulation, new players, new rules and new behaviors will continue to emerge. One of the new phenomena that are developing on the demand side is the purchase by a coalition of agents. When it ...

Juha Mäntysaari; Pierre-Olivier Pineau

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Leaking electricity: Standby and off-mode power consumption in consumer electronics and household appliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses ``leaking`` electricity from consumer electronics and small household appliances when they are in standby mode or turned off, and examines the impacts of these losses. The report identifies trends in relevant product industries and gives technical and policy options for reducing standby and off-mode power loss.

Thorne, J.; Suozzo, M.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Effect on Electricity Consumption of the Commonwealth Edison Customer Application Program Pilot: Phase 1, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides appendices that support Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1022703, which describes the Phase 1 analysis of some aspects of residential customers' response to Commonwealth Edison's Customer Application Plan (CAP). This report contains technical materials that describe in detail all of the methods employed in conducting the Phase 1 analysis and presents the results of the application of those methods.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Non-Space Heating Electrical Consumption in Manufactured Homes: Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes submeter data of the non-space heating electrical energy use in a sample of manufactured homes. These homes were built to Super Good Cents insulation standards in 1988 and 1989 under the auspices of RCDP Cycle 2 of the Bonneville Power Administration. They were designed to incorporate innovations in insulation and manufacturing techniques developed to encourage energy conservation in this important housing type. Domestic water heating (DWH) and other non-space heat energy consumption, however, were not generally affected by RCDP specifications. The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline for energy conservation in these areas and to present a method for estimating total energy saving benefits associated with these end uses. The information used in this summary was drawn from occupant-read submeters and manufacturersupplied specifications of building shell components, appliances and water heaters. Information was also drawn from a field review of ventilation systems and building characteristics. The occupant survey included a census of appliances and occupant behavior in these manufactured homes. A total of 150 manufactured homes were built under this program by eight manufacturers. An additional 35 homes were recruited as a control group. Of the original 185 houses, approximately 150 had some usable submeter data for domestic hot water and 126 had usable submeter data for all other nonheating consumption. These samples were used as the basis for all consumption analysis. The energy use characteristics of these manufactured homes were compared with that of a similar sample of RCDP site-built homes. In general, the manufactured homes were somewhat smaller and had fewer occupants than the site-built homes. The degree to which seasonal variations were present in non-space heat uses was reviewed.

Onisko, Stephen A.; Roos, Carolyn; Baylon, David

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81 Municipal Solid Waste 50 1 1 1 1 1 Wood and Other Biomass 50 5 5 5 5 6 Solar Thermal 100 9 9 9 9 9 Solar Photovoltaic 150 11 11 13 23 52 Wind 100 123 124 153 182 262 Total 277 372 538 760 1,041 Distributed Generation 148 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Cumulative additions after Dec. 31, 2010. 2) Based on current stock average capacity. 3) Combustion turbine/diesel data used.

245

Electric Boosting System for Light Truck/SUV Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems. One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-TurboTM designs do both. The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-TurboTM, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-TurboTM can be used to generate modest amounts of electrical power and supplement the alternator under most load-speed conditions. It is shown that a single (large) e-TurboTM consumes slightly less electrical power for the same steady state torque shaping than a bi-Turbo configuration. However, the transient response of a bi-Turbo configuration in slightly better. It was shown that in order to make full use of additional capabilities of e-TurboTM wide compressor flow range is required. Variable geometry compressor (VGC) technology developed under a separate project was evaluated for incorporation into e-TurboTM designs. It was shown that the combination of these two technologies enables very high torque at low engine speeds. Designs and hardware combining VGC and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. There is concern about high power demands (even though momentary) of e-TurboTM. Reducing the inertia of the turbocharger can reduce power demand and increase battery life. Low inertia turbocharger technology called IBT developed under a separate project was evaluated for synergy with e-TurboTM designs. It was concluded that inertial reduction provided by IBT is very beneficial for e-TurboTM. Designs and hardware combining IBT and e-TurboTM are to be developed in a future project. e-TurboTM provides several additional flexibilities including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for emissions reduction with minimum fuel economy penalty and exhaust temperature control for aftertreatment. In integrated multi-parameter control system is needed to realize the full potential of e-TurboTM performance. Honeywell expertise in process control systems involving hundreds of sensors and actuators was applied to demonstrate the potential benefits of multi-parameter, model based control systems.

Steve Arnold, Craig Balis, Pierre Barthelet, Etienne Poix, Tariq Samad, Greg Hampson, S.M. Shahed

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

246

Profiling Real-Time Electricity Consumption Data for Process Monitoring and Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, smart meters serve as key assets to utilities and their customers because they are capable of recording and communicating real-time energy usage data; thus, enabling better understanding of energy usage patterns. Other potential benefits of smart meters data include the ability to improve customer experience, grid reliability, outage management, and operational efficiency. Despite these tangible benefits, many utilities are inundated by data and remain uncertain about how to extract additional value from these deployed assets outside of billing operations. One way to overcome this challenge is the development of new metrics for classifying utility customers. Traditionally, utilities classified their customers based on their business nature (residential, commercial, and industrial) and/or their total annual consumption. While this classification is useful for some operational functions, it is too limited for designing effective monitoring and control strategies. In this paper, a data mining methodology is proposed for clustering and profiling smart meters data in order to form unique classes of customers exhibiting similar usage patterns. The developed clusters could help utilities in identifying opportunities for achieving some of the benefits of smart meters data.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014 22.2 2015 22.2 2016 22.2 2017 22.2 2018 22.2 2019 22.2 2020 22.2 2021 22.2 2022 22.2 2023 22.2 2024 22.2 2025 22.2 2026 22.2 2027 22.2 2028 22.2 2029 22.2 285.6 87.9 211.3 161.19 114.7 882.9 285.6 87.9 205.3 159.30 114.7 875.0 285.6 88.6 201.8 159.01 114.7 871.8 285.6 88.9 199.6 158.22 114.7 869.2 285.6 89.0 194.5 154.88 114.7 860.8 285.6 89.0 191.9 153.01 113.9 855.6 285.6 89.0 189.2 150.00 113.2

248

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998 318 42 360 154 1999 315 44 359 155 2000 271 45 316 165 2001 214 39 253 170 2002 260 44 304 194 2003 272 45 317 196 2004 265 49 314 184 2005 267 53 320 180 2006 286 62 349 165 2007 246 71 317 177 2008 253 94 347 167 2009 272 113 384 159 2010 289 100 390 165 2011 296 172 468 159 2012 296 148 444 161 2013 297 172 469 158 2014 297 186 483 161 2015 297 197 494 160 2016 297 207 504 160 2017 297 212 510 161 2018 298 224 522 161 2019 298 230 528 161 2020 298 246 544 161 2021

249

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1989 73.6 2.6 1.7 1.1 0.2 N.A. 1.5 1990 73.3 2.7 2.1 1.2 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1991 75.4 2.6 2.5 1.3 0.3 N.A. 1.9 1992 74.2 2.9 2.5 1.4 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1993 76.8 2.9 2.6 1.5 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1994 76.9 3.0 2.7 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1995 77.4 3.0 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1996 75.3 2.9 2.9 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1997 78.3 2.9 2.9 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.6 1998 78.0 2.9 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1999 78.3 2.8 3.0 1.8 0.4 N.A. 2.3 2000 78.2 2.8 3.3 1.7 0.4 N.A. 2.4 2001 77.9 2.2

250

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5% 12.1% 16.8% (1) 100% 1987 10.9% 4.7% 56.5% 9.7% 0.5% 10.2% 17.8% (1) 100% 1988 9.5% 5.6% 56.5% 8.2% 0.4% 8.6% 19.9% (1) 100% 1989 10.5% 5.7% 54.2% 9.4% 1.4% 10.8% 18.8% (1) 100% 1990 10.7% 4.2% 53.4% 9.9% 1.7% 11.6% 20.0% (1) 100% 1991 11.0% 3.9% 52.8% 9.7% 1.8% 11.5% 20.9% (1) 100% 1992 11.5% 3.2% 53.7% 8.4% 2.0% 10.4% 21.1% (1) 100% 1993 11.1% 3.5% 54.2% 9.0% 2.0% 11.0% 20.2% (1) 100% 1994 12.4% 3.3% 53.5%

251

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to predict blower motor electrical power consumption for thegives the blower motor electrical power consumption. BE =the blower motor electrical power consumption. The following

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 and 5, the distributions of electricity consumption among01 Figure 4 – Distribution of Electricity Consumption AmongSample Figure 5 - Distribution of Electricity Consumption

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

254

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated 40 typical air conditioned buildings in Changsha in 2005, including 15 hotel buildings, 6 commercial buildings, 5 office buildings, 6 hospital buildings and 8 synthesis buildings. On this basis we analyze the relation between types of cold and heat sources and the HVAC area of the buildings. Meanwhile the economical and feasible types of cold and heat sources are pointed out, i.e., oil boilers and gas boilers for heat source, and centrifugal and screw water chillers for cold source based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source heat pump will likely be applied. Based on the analysis of energy consumption and energy bills, we determine the feasible measures for energy conservation including the aspects of design, operation and management. Among them, special attention should be paid to energy metering and running time of air conditioning systems in civil buildings in Changsha.

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The USDOE Forrestal Lighting Retrofit: Analysis of Electricity and Thermal Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the lighting retrofit and the resultant electricity and thermal savings. It presents results from the whole-building monitoring effort that show that the measured gross electricity savings accounted for $324,705 or 76% of the total monetary savings. The measured energy savings performed within 90% of the estimated savings. Quite surprisingly, the thermal savings which were not included in initial estimates by the USDOE accounted for $102,824 or 24% of the overall savings and increased the total cost savings to $427,529 (107% of expected electricity cost savings of $399,058). The measured reductions in monthly peak hourly electric demand performed within 68% to 91% of estimated demand reductions depending upon the month of the year.

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation of the assessment recommendations is estimated to be $843,000 with a total implementation cost. Manufacturing at the facility includes both casting and extrusion processes. Process equipment, air compressors productivity. As a result, facility production costs can be reduced and profits can be increased. August 2001

257

Modelling household electricity consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A number of conclusions are drawn, however given the limited and non-representative na- ture of the data on which the model is calibrated, these can… (more)

de la Rue, Philip Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fault Detection of Hourly Measurements in District Heat and Electricity Consumption; Feldetektion av Timinsamlade Mätvärden i Fjärrvärme- och Elförbrukning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Within the next years, the amount of consumption data will increase rapidly as old meters will be exchanged in favor of meters with hourly… (more)

Johansson, Andreas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

62440 Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneousof California. Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, anduses (appliances, lighting, electronics, and miscellaneous

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

262

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

263

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

264

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

265

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

266

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

267

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

268

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

269

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Home Devices and Low-Power Consumption Total Low-plug-in devices to measure their power consumption in low-their low-power consumption. Several devices show higher

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Electricity

271

Table 2.1e Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1e Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Electricity

272

Accounting for the energy consumption of personal computing including portable devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption, questions are also being asked about the contribution of computing equipment. Though studies have documented the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these ... Keywords: computing, electricity, energy, environment, networking, portable devices

Pavel Somavat; Shraddha Jadhav; Vinod Namboodiri

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Mediated White-Light-Emitting Rhodamine Fluorophore Derivatives-Gamma Phase Gallium Oxide Nanostructures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The global lighting source energy consumption accounts for about 22% of the total electricity generated. New high-efficiency solid-state light sources are needed to reduce the… (more)

Chiu, Wan Hang Melanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?  

SciTech Connect

Recurring electricity shortages and rolling blackouts were widely forecasted for summer 2001 in California. Despite these predictions, blackouts were never ordered - in large part, due to the dramatic reductions in electricity use throughout the state. Compared to summer 2000, Californians reduced electricity usage by 6 percent and average monthly peak demand by 8 percent. Our analysis suggests that these reductions were not caused by either the weather or the downturn in the state's economy; rather, they were the result of extraordinary efforts by Californians to reduce electricity consumption. Based on the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) available operating reserve margin during summer 2001, we estimate that the peak load reductions, which ranged between 3,200 and 5,600 MW in the four summer months, potentially avoided between 50 and 160 hours of rolling blackouts. This extraordinary response by Californians can be attributed to several factors including media coverage and informational campaigns that affected public awareness and understanding, real and/or perceived increases in electricity rates, and various policies and programs deployed by state policymakers and regulators to facilitate customer load reductions. Among these programs, we review the state's 20/20 rebate program, the utilities' energy efficiency programs, programs or initiatives implemented by the California Energy Commission and other state agencies, and load management and demand response programs offered by the state's investor-owned electric utilities and the CAISO. We estimate that energy efficiency and onsite generation projects that were initiated in 2001 will account for about 1,100 MW of customer load reductions, once all projects are installed. These savings represent about 25-30 percent of the observed load reductions and are likely to persist for many years. The persistence of the remaining savings, which were due to changes that customers made in their conservation behavior and energy management operations, will be heavily influenced by customers' perception of continuing electricity crises or significant energy problems and price sensitivity to retail rate trends. The State's current demand response (DR) capability enrolled in utility or CAISO programs is somewhat lower than prior to the crisis. However, in the long run, enabling technologies for demand response deployed through the CEC's Demand Responsive Buildings and Real-time Metering programs have the potential to significantly increase demand response capability. While unique factors led to the electricity crisis in California, we believe the lessons learned from electricity customers' response may be useful for other regions faced with the prospect of electricity shortages. During a short-term crisis, a comprehensive set of load reduction programs and policies can make a significant contribution towards maintaining electric system reliability and can be an effective alternative to strategies that rely solely on rationing demand (e.g. rolling blackouts) or dramatic price increases. Information from various media sources contributed to very high customer awareness of the electricity crisis and helped spur customers to take actions to reduce their electricity usage. Customers viewed the media as an important, and in many cases, trusted information source, which appears to have increased their receptivity to participating in various State and utility initiatives. A commitment to ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs and energy efficiency standards for appliances and buildings are critical elements of a long-term strategy to dampen growth in electricity demand. California's energy efficiency services delivery infrastructure, which was strengthened by years of ratepayer and State-funded programs, represents a significant resource that was ramped up quickly to respond to a short-term energy emergency.

Goldman, Charles A.; Eto, Joseph H.; Barbose, Galen L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Whole-house measurements of standby power consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-House Measurements of Standby Power Consumption" InStudy on Miscellaneous Standby Consumption of HouseholdA. , Murakoshi, C. 1997. Standby Electricity Consumption in

Ross, J.P.; Meier, Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viii Figure 4.1: Electrical power usage breakdown for a3:30PM. The total HVAC electrical power consumption for thepower consumption, over Electrical Power Consumption (in kW)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installation Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & PostGWh total Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 2 YearsInstall Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 3 Years

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

279

Lighting retrofit monitoring for the Federal sector-strategies and results at the DOE Forrestal Building  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), and Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) have been conducting short-term monitoring studies at the Forrestal Building, headquarters of the DOE, since 1990. These studies were an integral part of the Shared Energy Savings (SES) lighting retrofit project completed in 1993. The overall goal of the project was to reduce electricity consumption at the Forrestal Building. One objective of the project was to use the building as a model for other federal SES lighting retrofit efforts. A complete short-term monitoring strategy in support of the SES project was developed. The strategy included baseline measurements of electrical consumption, performance measurements of proposed retrofits, and post-retrofit measurements of electricity consumption. Measurements included power consumption, power harmonics, and lighting levels. The results show a 56% reduction in electrical power consumed for lighting, as well as improved power quality and increased lighting levels.

Halverson, M.A.; Schmelzer, J.R.; Keller, J.M.; Stoops, J.L.; Chvala, W.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Power Quality Hotline Call-of-the-Month for November 2009: Failure of a Lighting-Control System Caused by Electrical Fast Transients (EFTs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Call of the Month discusses the basics of lighting-control systems, a recent failure of a lighting-control system caused by a common electrical disturbance, and some solutions to resolving compatibility problems with lighting-control systems.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

283

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity the NAO. ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN NORWAY AND THE NAO The demand for heating oil in Norway

284

The USDOE Forrestal Building Lighting Retrofit: Preliminary Analysis of Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September of 1993 a 36,832 fixture lighting retrofit was completed at the United States Department of Energy Forrestal complex in Washington, D.C. This retrofit represents DOE's largest project to date that utilizes a Shared Energy Savings (SES) agreement as authorized under Public Law 99-272. As DOE's first major SES contract, it was important that every aspect of this project serve as the cornerstone of DOE's Federal Relighting Initiative, including the careful measurement of the electricity and thermal energy savings.

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Vajda, E. J.; Shincovich, M.; D'Angelo III, L.; Harris, L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Whole-house measurements of standby power consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kWh/year of non-heating electricity consumption correlatesof electricity consumption. The home at 20,000 kWh/year has

Ross, J.P.; Meier, Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include:

288

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Technologies: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Tech nologies -- Electronic Fluorescent, High-Intensity Discharge, and Light-Emitting Diode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Report is a compilation of four technical updates that address the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources: EPRI report 1018476 for linear fluorescent ballasts, 1018477 for hot and cold cathode compact fluorescent lamps, 1018479 for electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts, and 1018480 for light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting con...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

289

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

290

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-62440 Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, andUniversity of California. Appliances, Lighting, Electronics,The “Other” end-uses (appliances, lighting, electronics, and

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Industrial lighting handbook  

SciTech Connect

Technological advances in industrial lighting system components now make it possible to reduce lighting system consumption by up to 50% or more without loss of the benefits inherent in good quality electric illumination. Management involvement in decisions about industrial lighting is essential, however, and this document provides generalized information in lay terms to help decision-makers become familiar with the concerns that affect industrial environment and the financial well-being of their companies. The five sections (1) discuss the benefits of good lighting, (2) review certain major lighting issues and terms, (3) identify procedures for developing a lighting energy management plan, (4) identify lighting energy management options (LEMOs), and (5) discuss sources of assistance. 19 figures, 8 tables.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evolution in lighting  

SciTech Connect

Lights consume 20-25% of the nation's electricity, establishing strong incentives to develop more efficient lighting strategies. Attention is turning to where, when, and how we light our environment, and the potential savings add up to half the lighting load nationwide. Some types of lamp are more efficient than others, but characteristics other than energy consumption may dictate where they can be used. Current lighting strategies consider task requirements, light quality, and the potential for daylighting. Energy management systems that control the timing and intensity of light and new types of energy-efficient bulbs and fixtures are increasingly attractive to consumers. The effort will require continued research and the awareness of decision makers. 4 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.; Pertusiello, S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Water and Sustainability (Volume 4): U.S. Electricity Consumption for Water Supply and Treatment -- The Next Half Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast growing demand for clean, fresh water -- coupled with the need to protect and enhance the environment -- has made many areas of the United States and the rest of the world vulnerable to water shortages for various human uses. As they interact with the electricity industry, these uses encompass agricultural irrigation, thermoelectric generation, municipal water/wastewater treatment and distribution, and industrial processes. The dependency of electricity supply and demand on water availability ca...

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F28: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total

295

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWhsquare foot)...

296

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2011 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g...

297

Electric Technologies for Light-duty Vehicles in the United States Abstract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the present status and future projections for emerging technologies that can be utilized in light-duty vehicles in the next five to ten years to significantly reduce their CO2 emissions. The emerging technologies considered are modern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains using batteries and/or ultracapacitors for energy storage. Throughout the study, six classes of vehicles –compact passenger cars to large SUVs-were considered. For each vehicle class, computer simulations (Advisor 2002) and cost analyses were performed for conventional ICE and mild and full parallel hybrids using port-fuel injected and lean burn gasoline engines and direct-injection turbo-charged diesel engines to determine the fuel economy and differential costs for the various vehicle designs using the conventional gasoline PFI engine vehicle as the baseline. CO2 emissions (gmCO2/mi) for each driveline and vehicle case were calculated from the fuel economy values. On a percentage or ratio basis, the analyses indicated that the fuel economy gains, CO2 emissions reductions, and cost/price increases due to the use of the advanced engines and hybrid-electric drivelines were essentially independent of vehicle class. This means that a regulation specifying the same fractional

United States; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles; Andrew Burke; Ethan Abeles

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

State Energy Data System Consumption Estimates Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

299

Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants  

SciTech Connect

Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

Not Available

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

LED Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are semiconductor devices that produce light when an electrical current is applied....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Design, Control and Evaluation of a Prototype Three Phase Inverter in a BLDC Drive System for an Ultra-Light Electric Vehicle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With an evolving vehicle industry there has been an increase in the demand for light electric vehicles. This thesis was conducted in order to gain… (more)

Larsson, Philip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Abstract--It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical vehicles (EV). The storage capacity of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000) could be replaced by electrical car by the year 2025 [8]. It is predicted that EVs will make 641 Abstract-- It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical into account. Index Terms-- Electrical vehicle, smart charging, spot electricity price. I. INTRODUCTION HE

Mahat, Pukar

303

The effects of driving style and vehicle performance on the real-world fuel consumption of U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even with advances in vehicle technology, both conservation and methods for reducing the fuel consumption of existing vehicles are needed to decrease the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of the U.S. ...

Berry, Irene Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

online: www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/esr/esr_sum.html.Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes RichardMiscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes Richard

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

New Lighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical update continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the following product areas—linear LED T8 fluorescent replacements, Edison-based dimmable LED lamps, commercial replacement side-lit LED fixtures, Edison-based reduced-consumption halogen lamps designed to replace 100W incandescent lamps, high bay induction LED lamps, and architectural LED lamps. Many of the products in this year’s report are designed as ...

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Intelligent street lighting application for electric power distribution systems the business case for smartgrid technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research project builds upon previous work related to intelligent and energy efficient lighting in modern street and outdoor lighting systems. The concept of implementing… (more)

Davis, Wesley O'Brian Sr.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers a number of energy efficiency rebates for Minnesota residential customers which implement HVAC, lighting, appliance, window, insulation and water...

308

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for high efficiency lighting equipment, occupancy...

309

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

311

California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar PV systems or virtually eliminating their electricity usage through dramatic changes in their energy-

Goldman, Charles A.; Eto, Joseph H.; Barbose, Galen L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The model electric restaurant  

SciTech Connect

Restaurants are the most intensive users of energy of all types of commercial buildings. As a result, they have some of the highest energy costs. New and existing restaurants are important customers to electric utilities. Many opportunities exist to use electricity to improve restaurant energy performance. This report discusses a project in which computer simulations were used to investigate restaurant energy subsystem performance and to assess the potential for electric equipment to reduce energy consumption, reduce peak demand improve load factors, and reduce energy cost in new all-electric restaurants. The project investigated typical restaurant designs for all-electric and gas/electric facilities and compared them to high efficiency electric options in all-electric restaurants. This analysis determined which investiments in high-efficiency electric equipment are attractive for restaurant operators. Improved equipment for food preparation, heating and cooling, ventilation, sanitation, and lighting subsystem was studied in cafeteria, full menu, fast food, and pizza restaurants in Atlanta, Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Phoenix. In addition to the actual rate structures, four synthetic rate structures were used to calculate energy costs, so that the results can be applied to other locations. The results indicate that high efficiency and improved all-electric equipment have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption, peak demand, and operating costs in almost all restaurants in all locations. The all-electric restaurants, with a combination of improved equipment, also offer the customer a competitive choice in fuels in most locations. 12 refs., 26 figs., 55 tabs.

Frey, D.J.; Oatman, P.A. (Architectural Energy Corp., Boulder, CO (USA)); Claar, C.N. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Electric powertrains : opportunities and challenges in the US light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing impending environmental and energy challenges in the transport sector requires a dramatic reduction in both the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of in-use vehicles. This study quantifies ...

Kromer, Matthew A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities, and national energy consumption. The finaland the effect on our national energy consumption. The majorwill reduce national electrical energy consumption. For an

Verderber, R.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS%20analysis/CBECS%20lighting/lighting_pdf.html[4/28/2009 9:20:44 AM] Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the

316

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Azevedo. 2012, Electricity consumption and energy savingsMcKenney. 2007. Energy consumption by consumer electronicsK. Roth. 2011. Energy Consumption of Consumer Electronics in

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California  

SciTech Connect

Dimming controls for electric lighting have been one of the mainstays of the effort to use daylighting to reduce annual lighting energy consumption. The coincidence of daylighting with electric utility peak demand makes daylighting controls an effective strategy for reducing commercial building peak electric loads. During times of energy shortage, there is a greatly increased need to reduce electricity use during peak periods, both to ease the burden on electricity providers and to control the operating costs of buildings. The paper presents a typical commercial building electric demand profile during summer, and shows how daylighting-linked lighting controls and load shedding techniques can reduce lighting at precisely those times when electricity is most expensive. We look at the importance of dimming for increasing the reliability of the electricity grid in California and other states, as well as examine the potential cost-effectiveness of widespread use of daylighting to save energy and reduce monthly electricity bills.

Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

318

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forTotal) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use for

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar-assisted gas-fired boiler heating, a thermal wall assembly, high performance lighting, and high-efficiency

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hydrocarbon and Electrical Requirements in the Plasma During Treatment of NOx in Light-Duty Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the hydrocarbon (C{sub 1}/NO{sub x} ratio) and electrical energy density (ratio of power to exhaust flow rate) requirements in the plasma during plasma-assisted catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The requirements for treatment of NO{sub x} in heavy-duty and light-duty diesel engines are compared. It is shown that, for light-duty applications, the plasma can significantly enhance the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with little fuel penalty incurred in the plasma process.

Penetrante, B.; Brusasco,R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How can we compare or add up our energy consumption? To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, natural gas, and electricity ...

322

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

323

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

324

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

325

Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms July 29, 2012 - 5:20pm Addthis Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. |...

326

An Estimate of the Cost of Electricity from Light Water Reactors and Fossil Plants with Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

As envisioned in this report, LIFE technology lends itself to large, centralized, baseload (or 'always on') electrical generation. Should LIFE plants be built, they will have to compete in the electricity market with other generation technologies. We consider the economics of technologies with similar operating characteristics: significant economies of scale, limited capacity for turndown, zero dependence on intermittent resources and ability to meet environmental constraints. The five generation technologies examined here are: (1) Light Water Reactors (LWR); (2) Coal; (3) Coal with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); (4) Natural Gas; and (5) Natural Gas with Carbon Capture and Sequestration. We use MIT's cost estimation methodology (Du and Parsons, 2009) to determine the cost of electricity at which each of these technologies is viable.

Simon, A J

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

327

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

328

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers residential energy efficiency rebates and incentives for Iowa customers for a variety of technologies. Rebates are available for certain HVAC...

329

Energy efficient electric lighting for buildings in developed and developing countries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As energy is a fundamental service for human development and economic growth, the demand for it is constantly on the rise worldwide. Lighting energy use… (more)

Bhusal, Pramod

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Residential Electricity Residential Gas Rate ($/therm)Residential customers were on an inverted block rate for electricityelectricity rates by customer (CPUC, 2001a). For residential

Goldman, Charles A.; Eto, Joseph H.; Barbose, Galen L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE AVTA: The EV Project and Other Light-Duty Electric Drive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Committee on Overcoming Barriers to Electric Vehicle Deployment The National Academies, Washington, DC , g , October 29, 2012 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

332

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

334

Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

England. Huber, W. 1997. "Standby Power Consumption in U.S.1997. "Study on miscellaneous standby power consumption ofC. Murakoshi. 1997. " Standby Electricity Consumption in

Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Lighting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

Sue A. Carter

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

336

Use of Computer Simulation to Reduce the Energy Consumption in a Tall Office Building in Dubai-UAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are a major consumer of energy and thus have a significant impact on the environment. The use of artificial lights is a major contributor to the energy usage in a typical office building using electricity to run the lights and also increasing the cooling load due to its heat dissipation. Proper design for the maximization of natural light helps reduce the use of artificial lights and results in reduction in the buildings energy consumption. Computer simulation of the lighting and energy consumption in a typical tall office building in Dubai-UAE is used to optimize the effectiveness of natural lighting penetration and calculate the associated energy savings. Two alternative building designs are proposed and tested. The overall energy savings for the whole building reached 31.4 % for the proposed oval shaped design. This represents a significant reduction in the buildings electricity load and thus its impact on the environment.

Abu-Hijleh, B.; Abu-Dakka, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

338

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- useFigure 3.7: The energy consumption of HVAC during ourSpring 2011 tests - Energy consumption for electricity and

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Heating fuel choice shows electricity and natural gas roughly ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. ... electric power plant emissions. ... computers, electronics and other devices is powered only by electricity.

340

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)- Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy), in conjunction with Wells Fargo Bank, offers a low-interest loan for residential, commercial and agricultural customers who purchase and install energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)- Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy (Interstate Power and Light - IP&L) offers low-interest financing program for the installation of energy efficient improvements. Businesses, Residences, farms or ag-related...

342

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monitoring or device-level metering. Whole-house and “major”study involves long-term metering of electrical consumptionwhole-house level and sub-metering of select “major” end-

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state-led initiatives, such as updating appliance and building energy efficiency standards and financial incentivesState agencies, especially the California Energy Commission, also undertook initiatives designed to reduce electricity demand over the longer term, which included financial incentives

Goldman, Charles A.; Eto, Joseph H.; Barbose, Galen L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Total Light Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Management Light Management Why is saving Energy Important World Electricity Consumption (2007) Top 20 Countries 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 U n i t e d S t a t e s C h i n a J a p a n R u s s i a I n d i a G e r m a n y C a n a d a A f r i c a F r a n c e B r a z i l K o r e a , S o u t h U n i t e d K i n g d o m I t a l y S p a i n A u s t r a l i a T a i w a n S o u t h A f r i c a M e x i c o S a u d i A r a b i a I r a n Billion kWh Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration Lighting Control Strategies 4 5 6 Occupancy/Vacancy Sensing * The greatest energy savings achieved with any lighting fixture is when the lights are shut off * Minimize wasted light by providing occupancy sensing or vacancy sensing 7 8 Daylight Harvesting * Most commercial space has enough natural light flowing into it, and the amount of artificial light being generated can be unnecessary * Cut back on the production of artificial lighting by

345

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliance, lighting, and heating and cooling usage in theseusage in rural households. Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Appliance Cooking lighting

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

347

Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data; ... The major users are residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, and electric power generators.

349

Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels

350

Office worker response to an automated venetian blind and electric lighting system: A pilot study  

SciTech Connect

A prototype integrated, dynamic building envelope and lighting system designed to optimize daylight admission and solar heat gain rejection on a real-time basis in a commercial office building is evaluated. Office worker response to the system and occupant-based modifications to the control system are investigated to determine if the design and operation of the prototype system can be improved. Key findings from the study are: (1) the prototype integrated envelope and lighting system is ready for field testing, (2) most office workers (N=14) were satisfied with the system, and (3) there were few complaints. Additional studies are needed to explain how illuminance distribution, lighting quality, and room design can affect workplans illuminance preferences.

Vine, E.; Lee, E.; Clear, R.; DiBartolomeo, D.; Selkowitz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

352

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

353

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

354

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

355

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

356

Electric Metering | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. The purpose is to measure the electricity used by equipment that building occupants can control. Data is collected and reported by zones throughout Forrestal's north, south and west buildings. See the Forrestal metering zone map, below, for details on the zones.

357

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

358

“Computers Everywhere” Experts in Team 2007 TEAM: [Selfish] Supplementing Electric Lighting For Improving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preface................................................................................................................................. 5 1. Background to the problem............................................................................................. 6 2. Our Solution................................................................................................................... 6 3. Purpose and Product...................................................................................................... 9 The study of the hybrid lighting system has 3 parts....................................................... 9 Why “black box ” concept?........................................................................................... 10 Possible System Applications:...................................................................................... 10 Office spaces:............................................................................................................ 11 Housing:.................................................................................................................... 11 Larger buildings:....................................................................................................... 12

Glenn Bakke; Ryan Bright; Michael Byaruhang; Anna Rongen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Analysis of the Effects of the Application of Solar Water Heater in Building Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the development of the economy, civilian construction in the Changjiang River delta region is rapidly expanding. The boom in the construction industry definitely results in that the proportion of building energy consumption to whole energy consumption in the national economy will increase. The energy consumption of the air conditioning system, lighting system and hot-water system are the main components of the building energy consumption. Theoretically, solar energy can meet the requirements for these systems by changing the technology of photo-electricity and photo-thermal. However, the application of these technologies is on the basis of demand of space and atmospheric clarity conditions. This paper focuses on the specific conditions of city and building construction in the Changjiang River delta region, discusses the applying condition of photo-thermal transformation technology of solar energy, then analyzes the influence of mature applications of this technology on energy consumption.

Wang, J.; Li, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Energy Consumption in California: Data Collection and Analysis,"analysis of electricity requirements for irrigated agri- electrical energy

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

363

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

364

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ESC TN ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average and among the highest in the nation, but spending for electricity is closer to average due to relatively low electricity prices. * Tennessee homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of the country.

365

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Lighting in Commercial Buildings Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

366

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

367

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

368

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and light-emit...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Lighting Market Characterization, Vol. 1: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption Estimate, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,...

371

Sensor Control Unit Light Submitted by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing need to conserve energy, more people are becoming conscious of energy consumption and are looking for ways to reduce costly waste associated with electricity. Though most consumers do not think about lighting until the light bulb fails or the power goes out, expenses incurred due to lighting have been found to be a large part of overall energy consumption and lighting has now become the focus of efforts aimed at reducing the high cost of electricity. The purpose of our project is to design an Automatic Light Control Device (ALCD) to help curb the high cost of internal lighting while creating a convenient effortlessly lighted environment for the consumer. Today, energy saving devices, such as occupancy or motion sensors, is used by a multiple of people for the conservation of power. Motion detectors cause lights to turn on after entering the room and off after no movement is detected for a certain amount of time. This unit is efficient; however, energy is loss due to the presence and absence of movement in a particular room by the sensor continuously activating on or off. Unneeded cycling uses more power and defeats the intended purpose of saving energy. The ALCD will save energy by eliminating false conditions, thereby minimizing light

Professor Joseph Picone; Ece Senior Design I; John Thompson; Marshalia Green; Brad Lowe; Lutrisha Johnson; Automatic Light Control Device

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

"1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220 "3. North Pole","Petroleum","Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",144 "4. Bradley Lake","Hydroelectric","Homer Electric Assn Inc",126 "5. Anchorage 1","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",88 "6. Snettisham","Hydroelectric","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",78 "7. Bernice Lake","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",62 "8. Lemon Creek","Petroleum","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",58

373

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, quiet electrical power for purposes otherHEVWG), led by the Electrical Power Research Institute (section), as well as if electrical power, flowing along the

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Electric and Optical Properties of Doped Small Molecular Organic Light-Emitting Devices  

SciTech Connect

Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) constitute a new and exciting emissive display technology. In general, the basic OLED structure consists of a stack of fluorescent organic layers sandwiched between a transparent conducting-anode and metallic cathode. When an appropriate bias is applied to the device, holes are injected from the anode and electrons from the cathode; some of the recombination events between the holes and electrons result in electroluminescence (EL). Until now, most of the efforts in developing OLEDs have focused on display applications, hence on devices within the visible range. However some organic devices have been developed for ultraviolet or infrared emission. Various aspects of the device physics of doped small molecular OLEDs were described and discussed. The doping layer thickness and concentration were varied systematically to study their effects on device performances, energy transfer, and turn-off dynamics. Low-energy-gap DCM2 guest molecules, in either {alpha}-NPD or DPVBi host layers, are optically efficient fluorophores but also generate deep carrier trap-sites. Since their traps reduce the carrier mobility, the current density decreases with increased doping concentration. At the same time, due to efficient energy transfer, the quantum efficiency of the devices is improved by light doping or thin doping thickness, in comparison with the undoped neat devices. However, heavy doping induces concentration quenching effects. Thus, the doping concentration and doping thickness may be optimized for best performance.

Kwang-Ohk Cheon

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Intelligent lighting control principles. Report for oct 78-apr 79  

SciTech Connect

It is generally recognized that compared to illumination from ceiling-mounted electric lighting, an equal amount of daylight illumination from windows can be about three times more effective in producing visibility. If this is true, then visibility-based lighting controls will result in greater energy conservation than will illumination-based lighting controls. A mathematical technique has been developed suitable for an intelligent microprocessor-based equi-visibility lighting control system. In an example room, a computer simulation compares the energy consumption for on-off, high-low-off, equi-illumination, and equi-visibility lighting controls systems.

Pierpoint, W.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

378

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

379

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

380

Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption was over 10% lower than in the previous year.electricity consumption at the Federal Building remains relatively constant throughout the year.consumption of electricity is relatively constant over a year,

Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ducts Total Electricity Consumption (kWh/year) ity ni x FrDucts Total Electricity Consumption (kWh/year) nt a ni x Fryear. Furnace blowers account for about 80% of the total furnace electricity consumption

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

"1. Labadie","Coal","Union Electric Co",2407 "2. Iatan","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",1555  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "1. Labadie","Coal","Union Electric Co",2407 "2. Iatan","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",1555 "3. Rush Island","Coal","Union Electric Co",1204 "4. Callaway","Nuclear","Union Electric Co",1190 "5. New Madrid","Coal","Associated Electric Coop, Inc",1160 "6. Thomas Hill","Coal","Associated Electric Coop, Inc",1125 "7. Sioux","Coal","Union Electric Co",986 "8. Hawthorn","Coal","Kansas City Power & Light Co",979 "9. Meramec","Coal","Union Electric Co",951 "10. Aries Power Project","Gas","Dogwood Energy LLC",614

383

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

384

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey on Electricity Consumption Characteristics of Homethe stakes for energy consumption are high, as we hope atAir Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption (million BTUs per person) in year t.electricity consumption of 2.09-4.98% for the year 2006.electricity consumption - ranging from 3-5% in the year

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

DOE/EIA-0318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: 1979 Consumption and Expenditures D Part I: Natural Gas and Electricity March 1983 Energy Information Administration...

387

Barron Electric Cooperative - Energy Star Appliance & Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barron Electric Cooperative - Energy Star Appliance & Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Energy Star Appliance & Energy Efficient Lighting...

388

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Markets for Hybrid Electric Vehicles," University ofof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Power Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles, and Plug-In Hybrid

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Renewable Energy Laboratory for Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays, the electric lighting is an important part of our lives and also represents a significant part of the electric power consumption. Alternative solutions such as renewable energy applied in this domain are thus welcomed. This paper presents a workstation conceived for the study of photovoltaic solar energy for lighting systems by students of power engineering and civil engineering faculty. The proposed system is realized to study the generated photovoltaic solar energy parameters for lighting systems. For an easier way to study the most relevant parameters virtual instrumentation is implemented. National Instruments LabWindows CVI environment is used as a platform for virtual instrumentation. For future developments remote communication feature intends to be added on which currently remote monitoring of solar photovoltaic energy and electric energy parameters are monitored.

Cristian, Dumitru

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Renewable Energy Laboratory for Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays, the electric lighting is an important part of our lives and also represents a significant part of the electric power consumption. Alternative solutions such as renewable energy applied in this domain are thus welcomed. This paper presents a workstation conceived for the study of photovoltaic solar energy for lighting systems by students of power engineering and civil engineering faculty. The proposed system is realized to study the generated photovoltaic solar energy parameters for lighting systems. For an easier way to study the most relevant parameters virtual instrumentation is implemented. National Instruments LabWindows CVI environment is used as a platform for virtual instrumentation. For future developments remote communication feature intends to be added on which currently remote monitoring of solar photovoltaic energy and electric energy parameters are monitored.

Dumitru Cristian; Gligor Adrian

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

392

Solid-state lighting technology perspective.  

SciTech Connect

Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

394

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goals for automotive fuel cell power systems hydrogen vs.a comparative assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles."plug-out hydrogen-fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity"

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

396

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State: Questions/comments: Electricity data experts. Latest Electricity Trends.

397

Saving Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

perform a number of electrical functions, including measuring the power and energy consumption of plug-in electrical appliances and devices. November 30, 2009 Energy Efficiency...

398

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

399

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Small Business Energy Solutions < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 50% of the cost Provider New Hampshire Electric Co-Op New Hampshire Electric Co-Op offers incentives for its small commercial customers (those using less than 100 kW) through the Small Business Energy Solutions Program. The Co-op will conduct a free assessment of a company's energy consumption, recommend efficiency improvements to reduce consumption, and provide rebates of up to 50% toward the cost of implementing the recommendations. Eligible improvements include: lighting

400

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $50,000 Provider Incentive Programs Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and industrial customers. Rebates of up to $50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

402

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

403

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity, and transmission and distribution losses asof electricity, and transmission and distribution losses astotal electricity consumption by distribution transformers

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

406

Lighting the Night: Technology, Urban Life and the Evolution of Street Lighting [Light in Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical 16. "Highway Lighting by So­ dium Vapor Lamps,"Possibilities of Street: Lighting Improve­ ments," TheLaunches Broad Street Lighting Promotion Campaign," The

Holden, Alfred

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

408

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

409

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas restructuring, gas pipelines were opened to multiple users. Manufacturers or their representatives could go directly to the wellhead to purchase their natural gas, arrange the transportation, and have the natural gas delivered either by the local distribution company or directly through a connecting pipeline. More recently, the electricity markets have been undergoing change. When Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992, requirements were included not only to open access to the ownership of electricity generation, but also to open access to the transmission lines so that wholesale trade in electricity would be possible. Now several States, including California and

410

Prospects for LED lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state lighting using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has the potential to reduce energy consumption for lighting by 50% while revolutionizing the way we illuminate our homes, work places, and public spaces. Nevertheless, substantial technical challenges remain in order for solid-state lighting to significantly displace the well-developed conventional lighting technologies. We review the potential of LED solid-state lighting to meet the long-term cost goals.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Gee, James Martin; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

412

Consumption of alternative transportation fuels held steady in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The consumption of propane in heavy duty vehicles has ... Many fleets have replaced their light duty vehicles with flexible fueled and gasoline hybrid vehicles ...

413

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... 423 and FERC-423) Contains data on electricity generation, fuel consumption, useful thermal output, fossil fuel stocks, fuel deliveries, quantity delivered, ...

415

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. States. State energy information, detailed and ... 2010 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 ... Table 5.7 By Region with Total Consumption of Electricity (physical ...

416

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 23 Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu) End-Use Sectors Electric

417

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power ...

418

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings account for 73% of the total electricity consumption in the US. To get an in depth view of where this energy is consumed within… (more)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric ...

420

All Consumption Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Consumption Summary Tables. Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2010 (Trillion Btu) ... Ranked by State, 2010

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 76. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic Table 3. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 4. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 5. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 6. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 7. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central Table 8. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain Table 9. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity

422

Predicting summer energy consumption from homeowners attitudes  

SciTech Connect

Two surveys examined the relationship between homeowners attitudes toward energy use and their actual summer electric consumption. In Survey 1, 56 couples filled out questionnaires concerning their energy attitudes. A factor analysis of their responses revealed four factors: comfort and health concerns, effort to conserve and monetary savings, role of the individual, and legitimacy of the energy crisis. The factors were entered into a multiple regression analysis to predict actual summer electric consumption. The attitudinal factors together significantly accounted for 55% of the variance in summer electric consumption. The comfort and health factor by itself explained 30% of the consumption variance. Survey 2, consisting of 69 couples, was conducted to elaborate the meaning of the factors. The results of the factor analysis of Survey 2 revealed six factors: comfort, health, individual's role, belief in science, legitimacy of the energy crisis, and effort to conserve. An overall regression analysis showed that the factors significantly explained nearly 60% of the summer consumption variance. The comfort factor was again the best predictor of summer electric consumption, accounting for 42% of the variance. It was concluded that attitudes about one's comfort are significantly related to household energy consumption (primarily air conditioning). The implications for energy conservation campaigns were discussed. 10 references, 3 tables.

Seligman, C.; Kriss, M.; Darley, J.M.; Fazio, R.H.; Becker, L.J.; Pryor, J.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

424

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

425

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

426

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

427

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

428

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

430

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to calculate national energy consumption and savings. Theto calculate national energy consumption and savings. Thenational electricity generation and primary energy consumption

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Does EIA have city or county-level energy consumption and price ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity sales (a proxy for end-use consumption) and prices for distribution utilities. ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

432

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

433

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

434

Comparison of ELCAP data with lighting and equipment load levels and profiles assumed in regional models  

SciTech Connect

The analysis in this report was driven by two primary objectives: to determine whether and to what extent the lighting and miscellaneous equipment electricity consumption measured by metering in real buildings differs from the levels assumed in the various prototypes used in power forecasting; and to determine the reasons for those differences if, in fact, differences were found. 13 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

436

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

438

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

439

www.mdpi.com/journal/jlpea/ Multi-Functional Micro Projection Device as Screen Substitute for Low Power Consumption Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: One of the major power consuming components in a computer is its display unit. On average the screen consumes ten times more power than the DSP processor itself. Thus, reducing the power consumption should be one of the most important tasks in the development of low power consumption computing systems. In this paper we present one possible solution involving micro projection device based upon lasers and a digital light processing (DLP) matrix which is a matrix of electrically controllable mirrors capable of translating electrical signal to a time varying projected image. It can serve to substitute a screen and consume ten times less power than a conventional screen. The described device is a multifunctional highly efficient customized DLP light engine being capable of serving as an image projector and simultaneously to support range and topography estimation measurements.

Low Power Electronics; Yuval Kapellner; Zeev Zalevsky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is 4-wheeled vehicle, larger than a golf cart but smaller than most light-duty passenger vehicles. NEVs are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

442

Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whose electricity consumption remains stable over the year,electricity generation and fuel consumption for both the 1990 and 1999 test years,

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes Title Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in...

444

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

Analysis of federal incentives used to stimulate energy consumption  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions of an analysis which identifies and quantifies Federal incentives that have increased the consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity are summarized. Data on estimated cost of incentives used to stimulate energy consumption by incentive type and energy source are tabulated for coal, oil, gas, and electricity. It is suggested that the examination of past incentives can be useful in developing guidelines and limits for the use of incentives to stimulate consumption of solar energy. (MCW)

Cole, R.J.; Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Huelshoff, M.; Lenerz, D.E.; Marcus, A.; Morris, F.A.; Sheppard, W.J.; Sommers, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Electricity - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity...

447

Mobile lighting apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary; Sales (consumption), revenue, ... Electric power plants generating capacity;

449

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes ...

450

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. ... More Tables on New Hampshire's Electricity Profile: Formats;

451

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.5.A. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, July 2013 and July 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector ; Census Division

452

Activity: Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for their dependency on electricity and (2) learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. Activity: Conserving Electric Energy More...

453

Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for their dependency on electricity, and learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. Conserving Electric Energy - Elementary...

454

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Russell, A. , Electric Vehicles and the Environment:Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle ---An All-Electric Hybrid8th International Electric Vehicle Symposium, Washington,

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

UK Energy Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following...

457

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

electricity.gif (3233 bytes) electricity.gif (3233 bytes) Electricity continues to be the most rapidly growing form of energy consumption in the IEO99 projections. The strongest long-term growth in electricity consumption is projected for the developing countries of Asia. Long-term growth in electricity consumption is expected to be strongest in the developing economies of Asia, followed by Central and South America (Figure 64). In the reference case for the International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), the projected growth rates for electricity consumption in the developing Asian nations average nearly 5 percent per year from 1996 to 2020 (Table 17). Electricity consumption growth in Central and South America is projected to exceed 4 percent between 1996 and 2020. The projected increases in electricity use are based on expectations of rapid

458

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

459

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

460

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Lighting energy efficiency opportunities at Cheyenne Mountain Air Station  

SciTech Connect

CMAS is an intensive user of electricity for lighting because of its size, lack of daylight, and 24-hour operating schedule. Argonne National Laboratory recently conducted a lighting energy conservation evaluation at CMAS. The evaluation included inspection and characterization of existing lighting systems, analysis of energy-efficient retrofit options, and investigation of the environmental effects that these lighting system retrofits could have when they are ready to be disposed of as waste. Argonne devised three retrofit options for the existing lighting systems at various buildings: (1) minimal retrofit--limited fixture replacement; (2) moderate retrofit--more extensive fixture replacement and limited application of motion detectors; and (3) advanced retrofit--fixture replacement, reduction in the number of lamps, expansion of task lighting, and more extensive application of motion detectors. Argonne used data on electricity consumption to analyze the economic and energy effects of these three retrofit options. It performed a cost analysis for each retrofit option in terms of payback. The analysis showed that lighting retrofits result in savings because they reduce electricity consumption, cooling load, and maintenance costs. The payback period for all retrofit options was found to be less than 2 years, with the payback period decreasing for more aggressive retrofits. These short payback periods derived largely from the intensive (24-hours-per-day) use of electric lighting at the facility. Maintenance savings accounted for more than half of the annual energy-related savings under the minimal and moderate retrofit options and slightly less than half of these savings under the advanced retrofit option. Even if maintenance savings were excluded, the payback periods would still be impressive: about 4.4 years for the minimal retrofit option and 2 years for the advanced option. The local and regional environmental impacts of the three retrofit options were minimal.

Molburg, J.C.; Rozo, A.J.; Sarles, J.K.; Haffenden, R.A.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Cavallo, J.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Connected Consumption: The hidden networks of consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the Connected Consumption Network (CCN) that allows a community of consumers to collaboratively sense the market from a mobile device, enabling more informed financial decisions in geo-local ...

Reed, David P.

463

The design and evaluation of integrated envelope and lighting control strategies for commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates control strategies for coordinating the variable solar-optical properties of a dynamic building envelope system with a daylight controlled electric lighting system to reduce electricity consumption and increase comfort in the perimeter zone of commercial buildings. Control strategy design can be based on either simple, instantaneous measured data, or on complex, predictive algorithms that estimate the energy consumption for a selected operating state of the dynamic envelope and lighting system. The potential benefits of optimizing the operation of a dynamic envelope and lighting system are (1) significant reductions in electrical energy end-uses - lighting, and cooling due to solar and lighting heat gains - over that achieved by conventional static envelope and lighting systems, (2) significant reductions in peak demand, and (3) increased occupant visual and thermal comfort. The DOE-2 building energy simulation program was used to model two dynamic envelope and lighting systems, an automated venetian blind and an electrochromic glazing system, and their control strategies under a range of building conditions. The energy performance of simple control strategies are compared to the optimum performance of a theoretical envelope and lighting system to determine the maximum potential benefit of using more complex, predictive control algorithms. Results indicate that (1) predictive control algorithms may significantly increase the energy-efficiency of systems with non-optimal solar-optical properties such as the automated venetian blind, and (2) simpler, non-predictive control strategies may suffice for more advanced envelope systems 1 incorporating spectrally selective, narrow-band electrochromic coatings.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Results from the investigations on leaking electricity in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a standby electricity consumption of 5.4 TWh per year. Thereelectricity consumption in the standby mode compared to the on mode in kWh per year.

Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Results from the investigations on leaking electricity in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paper presents measurements of standby energy consumption ofin the U.S. Abstract Standby electricity use or leakingaccounts for 25% of standby consumption, and communication

Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of… (more)

Royal, Emily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

468

Secretary Chu's Message about Forrestal Electric Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Dear Colleagues, The Department of Energy has a responsibility and an opportunity to lead by example in promoting sustainable energy practices. As many of you have heard me say, energy efficiency is one of our best and most immediate opportunities to save energy, cut utility bills and decrease carbon pollution. I want to thank you for the steps many of you have already taken to reduce energy consumption. Today, I'm asking all employees at the Forrestal Building to take these efforts to the next level by participating in a competition to save money by saving energy. We recently divided the Forrestal complex into five zones and installed electric meters to measure the daily electricity consumption of overhead lights and power outlets in each zone. You've probably seen

469

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

470

An Engineering-Economic Analysis of White Light-Emitting Diodes for General  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Engineering-Economic Analysis of White Light-Emitting Diodes for General An Engineering-Economic Analysis of White Light-Emitting Diodes for General Illumination for the U.S. Residential and Commercial Sectors Speaker(s): Inês Magarida Lima de Azevedo Date: February 15, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Because lighting constitutes more than 20% of total US electricity consumption, and many current lighting technologies are highly inefficient, improved technologies for lighting hold great potential for energy savings and for reducing associated greenhouse gas emissions. Solid-state lighting is a technology that shows great promise as a source of efficient, affordable, color-balanced white light in the near future. Indeed, under a pure engineering-economic analysis, solid-state lighting already performs better than incandescent bulbs and is expected to surpass the most

471

World energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling, and industrial drive power represent large and growing end uses of electricity in Texas. Designing effective conservation programs requires cooperation among a variety of groups with varying perspectives.

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6,841,408 6,668,379 6,872,533 7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 6,841,408 6,668,379 6,872,533 7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 1997-2012 Alabama 175,736 164,266 227,015 281,722 342,841 401,306 1997-2012 Alaska 40,901 43,199 38,078 39,732 41,738 39,758 1997-2012 Arizona 280,156 283,817 261,904 224,430 180,966 228,818 1997-2012 Arkansas 63,594 64,188 83,266 96,553 107,014 129,059 1997-2012 California 834,286 857,867 808,928 736,092 616,564 855,342 1997-2012 Colorado 123,788 106,454 115,234 92,657 85,015 86,309 1997-2012 Connecticut 73,627 59,354 70,864 85,144 107,897 114,054 1997-2012 Delaware 13,493 11,181 10,990 24,383 38,984 53,295 1997-2012 District of Columbia -- -- -- -- 1,003 W 1997-2012 Florida 772,968 797,266 913,672 981,750 1,043,786 1,138,771 1997-2012 Georgia

476

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

563,306 614,637 735,693 906,613 899,337 749,910 2001-2013 563,306 614,637 735,693 906,613 899,337 749,910 2001-2013 Alabama 22,145 21,858 29,207 30,646 33,364 26,650 2001-2013 Alaska 3,075 2,783 2,821 2,544 3,068 2,326 2001-2013 Arizona 11,182 9,607 23,660 32,289 32,627 25,375 2001-2013 Arkansas 5,244 5,913 10,480 10,623 10,213 7,597 2001-2013 California 49,432 54,781 66,503 83,228 83,193 83,324 2001-2013 Colorado 6,213 6,120 8,902 10,615 10,089 8,938 2001-2013 Connecticut 8,518 9,607 8,698 11,622 10,062 9,318 2001-2013 Delaware 2,642 3,411 4,471 5,115 4,230 3,887 2001-2013 District of Columbia -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013 Florida 79,903 86,424 96,667 97,039 107,430 95,668 2001-2013 Georgia 20,533 21,175 26,102 24,963 28,053 26,086 2001-2013 Hawaii -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013

477

Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

613,004 733,992 905,868 898,441 749,379 636,285 2001-2013 613,004 733,992 905,868 898,441 749,379 636,285 2001-2013 Alabama 21,814 29,325 30,779 33,496 26,773 26,791 2001-2013 Alaska 2,660 2,667 2,549 2,509 2,322 2,440 2001-2013 Arizona 9,608 23,656 32,223 32,612 25,355 15,157 2001-2013 Arkansas 5,777 10,363 10,497 10,091 7,482 6,116 2001-2013 California 56,457 66,002 82,047 82,511 82,139 69,457 2001-2013 Colorado 6,136 8,848 10,258 9,801 8,839 5,479 2001-2013 Connecticut 9,363 8,491 11,393 9,827 9,182 8,042 2001-2013 Delaware 3,353 3,645 5,026 4,157 3,895 3,483 2001-2013 District of Columbia -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013 Florida 86,344 96,637 96,912 107,377 95,708 93,341 2001-2013 Georgia 21,096 26,054 24,911 28,011 26,038 24,806 2001-2013 Hawaii -- -- -- -- -- -- 2001-2013

478

Renewable Energy Trends in Consumption and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar Thermal/PV 575,155 550,294 507,706 611,793 ... Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," and predecessor forms: Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report ...

479

Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity Preliminary 2007 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nevada generated from central station solar power for the first time in 2007 with the opening of the 64 MW Nevada Solar One plant in Boulder City.

480

Renewable Energy Trends in Consumption and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ireds113 _fnt1 _fnt2 _fnt3 _fntref1 _fntref2 _fntref3 Total New England -Middle Atlantic East North Central

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Renewable Energy Trends in Consumption and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ireds112 _fnt1 _fnt2 _fnt3 _fntref1 _fntref2 _fntref3 Total Renewable Total Biomass Waste Landfill Gas Geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Thermal/PV

482

Reducing Transient and Steady State Electricity Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning-Based Model-Predictive Control Energy efficiency improvement in HVAC systems is investigated in this paper; a model-predictive control strategy is proposed to maintain comfortable temperature. By Anil a control strategy that uses learning-based model-predictive control (MPC) to learn and compensate

California at Berkeley, University of

483

Table 2.5 Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appliances, 2 Electronics, and Lighting : Natural Gas: Elec-tricity 3: Fuel Oil 4: LPG 5: Total: Electricity 3: Natural Gas: Elec-tricity 3: Fuel Oil ...

484

Lighting in Commercial Buildings (1986 data) -- Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary 6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary Executive Summary Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration's(EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

485

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

486

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption for 2006 by five-digit zipelectricity consumption by zip code for the periods 2020 toSummary statistics for zip codes in and out of

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, quiet electrical power for purposes otherHEVWG), led by the Electrical Power Research Institute (section), as well as if electrical power, flowing along the

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, quiet electrical power for purposes otherHEVWG), led by the Electrical Power Research Institute (section), as well as if electrical power, flowing along the

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. E. Letendre, "Electric Vehicles as a New Power Sourceassessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :at 20th International Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS-20),

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment for fuel cell electric vehicles." Argonne, Ill. :of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets,"Recharging and Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Near-

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid -Electric Vehicles ..11 Figure 3 Sales of Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the U.S. to

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

493

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

494

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

Philip E. MacDonald

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.J. , The Future of Hybrid- Electric Vehicles and FuelsWith the emergence of hybrid-electric vehicles from JapaneseTechnologies 2.1 Hybrid-electric vehicles Hybrid-electric

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A24. A24. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of Energy- Management Program, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 285 SIC Management Any Type of Sponsored Self-Sponsored Sponsored Sponsored Code Industry Group and Industry Program Sponsorship Involvement Involvement Involvement Involvement a No Energy Electric Utility Government Third Party Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs (1992 through 1994) RSE Row Factors Federal, State, or Local RSE Column Factors: 0.7 1.1 1.0 0.7 1.9 0.9 20-39 ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs . .

498

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

499

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Natural gas consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas consumption gas consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035