Sample records for lighting control sensors

  1. Lighting Controls/Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design Jump to: navigation, search

  2. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network Matthew in smart lighting, energy efficiency, and ubiquitous sensing, we present the design of polychromatic solid-state energy. Keywords: Solid state lighting, energy efficiency, sensor networks, optimization, spectral

  3. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paradiso, Joseph A.

    Motivated by opportunities in smart lighting, energy efficiency, and ubiquitous sensing, we present the design of polychromatic solid-state lighting controlled using a sensor network. We developed both a spectrally tunable ...

  4. Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

  5. Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Betty Lise

    1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if://blogs.stthomas.edu/realestate/2011/01/24/residential-real-estate-professionals-how-do-you- develop feedback! There is a connection between the output and the input! Therefore forces inputs to same voltage

  6. Adaptive Street Lighting Controls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This two-partDOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of...

  7. How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions Daylight dimming employs sensors that detect ambient light levels and then allow ballasts to...

  8. A Model for Evaluation of Life-Cycle Energy Savings of Occupancy Sensors for Control of Lighting and Ventilation in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, L. O.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used...

  9. A Model for Evaluation of Life-Cycle Energy Savings of Occupancy Sensors for Control of Lighting and Ventilation in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, L. O.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used...

  10. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 4 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each

  11. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 3 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: "Dimmability." Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light

  12. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 5 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each area 3. Shut

  13. Experiential lighting : development and validation of perception-based lighting controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, Matthew (Matthew Henry)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting, and its emergence as a digital and networked medium, represents an ideal platform for conducting research on both sensor and human-derived methods of control. Notably, solid-state lighting makes possible the ...

  14. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION level of each multi-tier garage. · General lighting must have occupant sensing controls with at least one control step between 20% and 50% of design lighting power · No more than 500 watts of rated

  15. Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls - 2015 Peer Review Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls - 2015 Peer Review...

  16. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION 5 Additions and Alterations Any alteration that increases the connected lighting load must meet all No measures required OUTDOOR LIGHTING11/20/2014 #12;SECTION 5 BACKLIGHT, UPLIGHT, AND GLARE (BUG) RATINGS

  17. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  18. Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on an embedded server, and temperature sensors that were distributed throughout the house. The residence is divided into four Control Zones. Zone 1 contains the downstairs living, dining, and kitchen area. Zone 2 contains the bathrooms and laundry... radiation. The temperature and humidity sensors are manufactured by Sensirion, models SH11 and SH15. The light sensors consist of a thermally sensitive radiation sensor (TSR) and a photosynthetic active radiation sensor, manufactured by Hamamatsu...

  19. LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verderber, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REFERENCES Task Report to Lighting Systems Research,Berkeley Laboratory, "Lighting Control System Market1980). Task Report to Lighting Systems Research, Lawrence

  20. WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK BASED CONTROL SYSTEM CONCIDERING COMMUNICATION COST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK BASED CONTROL SYSTEM CONCIDERING COMMUNICATION COST Yutaka Iino* Takeshi for wireless sensor network based control system, minimizing communication energy consumption. Some control, wireless sensor network technology has been developed rapidly, and various applications to control system

  1. Lumental : web-based tunable lighting control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Harrison King

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamically adjusting the light spectrum of spectrum-tunable light fixtures promises significant energy savings over binary or incremental dimming control. To enable this level of controllability, lighting must evolve from ...

  2. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  3. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

  4. Monitor and control of cockroach locomotion with piezoelectric sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Rodrigo Alejandro

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    sensors; laboratory in vitro testing of sensors and cockroaches; and methodology to control them. This research successfully built an experimental foundation for sensor and roach testing and developed a methodology for roach locomotion control...

  5. Monitor and control of cockroach locomotion with piezoelectric sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Rodrigo Alejandro

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    sensors; laboratory in vitro testing of sensors and cockroaches; and methodology to control them. This research successfully built an experimental foundation for sensor and roach testing and developed a methodology for roach locomotion control...

  6. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

  7. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  8. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

  9. Co-simulation Based Building Controls Implementation with Networked Sensors and Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors and actuators. This implementation has demonstrated an up to 57% savings in lighting electricity, WA, USA. Copyright 2011 ACM 978-1-4503-0749-9 ...$10.00 Keywords Integrated controls, lighting in the U.S. in 2010 while lighting alone in buildings is responsible for 18% of site electricity usage

  10. Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network Deployment and Topology Control Based on Irregular Sensor Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network Deployment and Topology Control Based on Irregular Sensor Introduction Wireless sensor network (WSN) is a key element of the pervasive/ubiquitous computing sensor network (heterogeneous WSN) consists of sensor nodes with different ability, such as different

  11. Sensors and Controls Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Maley; Robert R. Romanosky

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher operating efficiencies, emission reductions, improved reliability, and lower operating costs are benefits that the power industry can realize with the utilization of sensors and controls. However, for the power industry to derive the maximum benefit from sensors and controls, improvements in existing technologies and novel approaches to challenging measurements are needed. Recognizing the importance of sensors and controls, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a sensors and controls workshop on April 17 to 18, 2001, in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on identifying technology needs in sensors and controls for existing fossil-energy power plants as well as future facilities conceived under the Vision 21 Program. Forty-six experts from 29 organizations, including private industry, research laboratories, academia, and government agencies, attended the workshop. The meeting opened with keynote speakers from NETL and the private sector. NETL officials spoke of the Vision 21 and advanced research programs. Speakers from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Delphi Automotive Systems Research Laboratory discussed the improvements realized with their respective operation through the use of sensors and controls. NETL keynote speakers Robert Romanosky and Carl Bauer emphasized that developing sensor and control systems plays a critical role in DOE Office of Fossil Energy Vision 21 Program, clean coal activities under the Power Plant Improvement Initiative, and the proposed Clean Coal Power Initiative. The Vision 21 Program is aimed at providing technologies for ultra-clean fossil-fuel-based energy production with 60- to 75-percent efficiencies and near zero emissions. The program also uses a modular approach to present opportunities to not only generate power, but also co-produce clean fuels, chemicals, steam, and other useful products. The ultra-high efficiency and environmental performance goals of the Vision 21 Program mean that facilities must operate at optimum conditions, while adapting in real-time to changes in load and feedstock. These are challenging performance goals. They will require advanced control and sensing systems that can be adapted and optimized in real time. To improve the overall plant performance of existing power plants, one of the most cost-effective methods is to update the sensor and control systems.

  12. Advanced Light Source control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Cork, C.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Ritchie, A.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation 1--2 GeV synchrotron radiation source designed to provide ports for 60 beamlines. It uses a 50 MeV electron linac and 1.5 GeV, 1 Hz, booster synchrotron for injection into a 1--2 GeV storage ring. Interesting control problems are created because of the need for dynamic closed beam orbit control to eliminate interaction between the ring tuning requirements and to minimize orbit shifts due to ground vibrations. The extremely signal sensitive nature of the experiments requires special attention to the sources of electrical noise. These requirements have led to a control system design which emphasizes connectivity at the accelerator equipment end and a large I/O bandwidth for closed loop system response. Not overlooked are user friendliness, operator response time, modeling, and expert system provisions. Portable consoles are used for local operation of machine equipment. Our solution is a massively parallel system with >120 Mbits/sec I/O bandwidth and >1500 Mips computing power. At the equipment level connections are made using over 600 powerful Intelligent Local Controllers (ILC-s) mounted in 3U size Eurocard slots using fiber-optic cables between rack locations. In the control room, personal computers control and display all machine variables at a 10 Hz rate including the scope signals which are collected though the control system. Commercially available software and industry standards are used extensively. Particular attention is paid to reliability, maintainability and upgradeability. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  13. ERROR MODELS FOR LIGHT SENSORS BY STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF RAW SENSOR MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    silicon solar cell that converts light impulses directly into electrical charges that can easily-based systems including calibration, sensor fusion and power management. We developed a system of statistical the standard procedure is to use error models to enable calibration, in a variant of our approach, we use

  14. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical sensors are generally used as one-dimensional devices, where one measures the sensors response at a fixed setting, e.g., infrared absorption at a specific wavelength, or conductivity of a solid-state sensor at a specific operating...

  15. Data Transport Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongwei; Naik, Vinayak S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Congestion in Wireless Sensor Networks. ACM SenSys SandeepJohn Anderson (2002). Wireless Sensor Networks for HabitatWorkshop on Wireless Sensor Networks and Applications Miklos

  16. Threshold-Controlled Global Cascading in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Threshold-Controlled Global Cascading in Wireless Sensor Networks Qiming Lu and G. Korniss is a challenging task. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) provide an example where understanding dynamical processes and other wireless ad- hoc networks. First, sensor nodes are often densely deployed (typically 20 sensor per

  17. Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Rubinstein, Nesrin Colak, Judith Jennings, and Danielle Neils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Introduction Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings [1 sensors for reducing peak demand, 2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting

  18. Controls for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

  19. Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  20. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    EXTERIOR SPACES COMPLY WITH TITLE 24 There are two major steps for exterior spaces to comply with Title 24 for exterior space. A space complies with these requirements if the actual lighting power used in the space. Backlight Backlight includes all illumination that is in the space between the ground and 80 degrees above

  1. Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    individual control service Easy to connect with other management systems #12;9 Energy Savings & User Lighting accounts for 25-30% of energy usage in building electrical systems Energy savings can be generated-space office Real occupants Dimmable linear fluorescent lights Energy usage monitoring and comparison

  2. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  3. Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark 94720, USA Abstract Digital addressable, dimmable lighting controls were introduced to the US market

  4. Simulation for Pre-Visualizing and Tuning Lighting Controller Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radke, Rich

    daylighting and lighting control algorithms for a given space. Keywords: smart buildings, smart lighting, glazing, and shading devices have been decided. This prevents the early exploration of lighting

  5. Model-Driven Dynamic Control of Embedded Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.

    Model-Driven Dynamic Control of Embedded Wireless Sensor Networks Paul G. Flikkema1 , Pankaj K-generation wireless sensor networks may revolution- ize understanding of environmental change by assimilating heteroge of wireless sensor networks is now becoming a mature research field. As a result, the discipline is undergoing

  6. Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams, Barbara Atkinson, Karina Garbesi and Francis savings. Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings

  7. Using Simple Light Sensors to Achieve Smart Daylight Harvesting Jiakang Lu, Dagnachew Birru, Kamin Whitehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Using Simple Light Sensors to Achieve Smart Daylight Harvesting Jiakang Lu, Dagnachew Birru, Kamin demonstrate how to improve the effectiveness of daylight harvesting with a sin- gle light sensor on each sky to predict the incoming daylight and set window transparency accordingly. We evaluate our system

  8. Innovative, lower cost sensors and controls yield better energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and controls yield better energy efficiency ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors....

  9. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  10. Sandia Energy - Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using the Capacitance of Metamaterial Nanocavities Home Highlights - Energy Research Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using the...

  11. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the problem of estimating concentrations of the constituents in a gas mixture using a tunable sensor. We formulate this multicomponent-analysis problem as that of probabilistic state estimation, where each state represents a different concentration profile. We...

  12. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy and Emissions Estimates | Department ofControls

  13. Multi-Sensor Single-Actuator Control of HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.; Auslander, D.; Federspiel, C.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is common to control several rooms in a building with a single sensor in one of the rooms and a single actuator driving just one control element such as an air damper. New, low-cost, wireless sensor technology now offers the opportunity...

  14. Multi-Sensor Single-Actuator Control of HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.; Auslander, D.; Federspiel, C.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is common to control several rooms in a building with a single sensor in one of the rooms and a single actuator driving just one control element such as an air damper. New, low-cost, wireless sensor technology now offers the opportunity...

  15. LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 5.4 DALI Lighting Control Device Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 5.4 DALI Lighting Control Device Standard Development FINAL CONTROL DEVICE STANDARD PROPOSED BY NEMA ......10 TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Electronics Co.; Al Lombardi, Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc.; Mike Stein, Universal Lighting Technologies

  16. LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verderber, R.R.; Rubinstein, F.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes the impact of lighting management systems that dynamically control lights in accordance with the needs of occupants. Various control strategies are described: scheduling, tuning, lumen depreciation, and daylighting. From initial experimental results, the energy savings provided by each of the above strategies are estimated to be 26, 12, 14, and 15%, respectively. Based upon a cost of $0.05-0.10 per kWh for electric energy and a 2-, 3-, or 4-yr payback, target costs for a simple and a sophisticated lighting management system are found to be $0.24 and 1.89 per ft{sup 2}, respectively, for a cost-effective investment. A growth model, based upon an extrapolation of the increase in building stock since 1975, indicates that the commercial and industrial (C and I) building stock will grow from 40 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} in 1980 to about 67 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} by the year 2000. Even with the use of more efficient lighting components, the energy required for this additional C and I stock will be 307 x 10{sup 9} kWh, an increase of only 13 x 10{sup 9} kWh above current use. The specified information is used to analyze the economic impacts that using these systems will have on the lighting industry, end users, utility companies, and the nation's economy. A $1 - 4 x 10{sup 9} annual lighting control industry can be generated, creating many jobs. The estimated return on investment (ROI) for controls for end users would be between 19 and 38%. Utilities will be able to make smaller additions to capacity and invest less capital at 7-10% ROI. Finally, the annual energy savings, up to $3.4 x 10{sup 9} for end users and about $5 x 10{sup 9} for utilities, representing unneeded generating capacity, will be available to capitalize other areas of the economy.

  17. Advanced Sensors, Control, Platforms, and Modeling

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    112 productivity and safety, and boost the U.S. sensor and automation industry. 113 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 114 2.1 Performance advances 115 DRAFT -...

  18. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  19. Congestion Avoidance based on Light-Weight Buffer Management in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shigang

    , congestion may occur as data packets converge toward a sink. Congestion causes energy waste, throughput1 Congestion Avoidance based on Light-Weight Buffer Management in Sensor Networks Shigang Chen, and above all, energy supply. When a critical event triggers a surge of data generated by the sensors

  20. Control of Light-matter Interaction Using Dispersion Engineered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and non-classical light sources using quantum dots, metamaterials for controlling light-matter interaction, and engineered nonlinear optical materials using hybrid nanocomposites...

  1. MEDIUM ACCESS CONTROL LAYER FOR UNDERWATER SENSOR NETWORKS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    sensor networks, energy-efficient reliable MAC protocol, and slotted FAMA MAC protocol and low1 CHAPTER 1 MEDIUM ACCESS CONTROL LAYER FOR UNDERWATER SENSOR NETWORKS* Yanping Zhang* , Yang Xiao of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0290 USA E-mail: yangxiao@ieee.org + Dept. of Electrical and Computer

  2. Opportunities of Wireless Sensors and Controls for Building Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper characterizes commercially available wireless technologies that are suitable for use in commercial buildings. It describes two demonstration projects of wireless sensors and their integration into existing control networks, and discusses their cost per sensor, their ease of installation, and their reliability. The author will discuss the operational and energy benefits of the wireless sensors and report on the energy and cost savings estimates. The paper will conclude with some practical considerations for the installation of wireless sensors and provide a future outlook for wireless technologies in buildings applications.

  3. Power Control for Mobile Sensor Networks: An Experimental Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Power Control for Mobile Sensor Networks: An Experimental Approach JeongGil Ko Department--Techniques for controlling the transmission power of wireless mobile devices have been widely studied in ad-hoc and cellular characteristics of these networks, such as severe resource constraints, suggest that transmission power control

  4. Adaptive Power Controlled Routing for Underwater Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    Adaptive Power Controlled Routing for Underwater Sensor Networks Manal Al-Bzoor, Yibo Zhu, Jun Liu of an in- terest packet sent by sink nodes. We use adaptive power control to send at high power level the sink nodes using shortest end to end paths. By using adaptive power control over concentric layered

  5. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

  6. Shulman Auditorium Lectern The CRESTRON system controls the lights,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    Shulman Auditorium Lectern The CRESTRON system controls the lights, blinds, louvres, projector. The College crest now appears. Touch the screen to continue Lights and Blinds (and Louvres) control panel Select what type of lighting you need. For a laptop presentation we recommend: Lights = Present Louvres

  7. LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verderber, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Floors Floor Area Lighting Power Density Light Output Lampenergy den- sity and power density for lighting to 3.5 kWh/Lighting Level (Lumens/Watt) (Footcandles) Power Density (

  8. Lighting Control Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  9. Partially Controlled Deployment Strategies for Wireless Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santi, Paolo

    be formed and used in several application scenarios: smart home environ- ments, intrusion detection a certain set of grid-like strategies that reflect the (one- or two-dimensional) symmetry of the region years. By con- necting tiny, smart sensor nodes by means of wireless transceivers, large WSNs Part

  10. CONVERGING REDUNDANT SENSOR NETWORK INFORMATION FOR IMPROVED BUILDING CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing how many people occupy a building, and where they are located, is a key component of building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, however, current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of both energy management and security systems. This topical report describes results from the first phase of a project to design, implement, validate, and prototype new technologies to monitor occupancy, control indoor environment services, and promote security in buildings. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In this project phase a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Analysis tools based on Bayesian probability theory were applied to the occupancy data generated by the sensor network. The inference of primary importance is a probability distribution over the number of occupants and their locations in a building, given past and present sensor measurements. Inferences were computed for occupancy and its temporal persistence in individual offices as well as the persistence of sensor status. The raw sensor data were also used to calibrate the sensor belief network, including the occupancy transition matrix used in the Markov model, sensor sensitivity, and sensor failure models. This study shows that the belief network framework can be applied to the analysis of data streams from sensor networks, offering significant benefits to building operation compared to current practice.

  11. A Distributed Power Control and Routing Scheme for Rechargeable Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    A Distributed Power Control and Routing Scheme for Rechargeable Sensor Networks Amitangshu Pal power control and quality aware routing scheme for rechargeable wireless sensor networks (WSNs consumption based on estimated energy resources. Transmission power control has been widely researched

  12. A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams;ABSTRACT Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings and Garbesi 2011). Lighting represents approximately one-third of electricity use in commercial buildings

  13. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  14. Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal, Emily

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of lighting ordinances in preventing light pollution. Using an industry-accepted lighting...

  15. Advanced Sensors, Control, Platforms, and Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2Partners in the Spotlight Novelis2Advanced Sensors

  16. Model Specification for Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium's Model Specification for Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems is a tool designed to help cities, utilities, and other local agencies...

  17. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

  18. A Systems Integration Approach To Lighting Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, S.; Renner, R. A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, the lighting industry is experiencing renewed development and implementation of advanced technologies. One of the most striking advances is the implementation of system solutions in lighting control. This approach promises to contribute...

  19. Shedding light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    light on Nature's nanoscale control of solar energy July 30, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Across billions of years of evolution, nature has retained a common light-absorbing hexameric...

  20. Split PID control: two sensors can be better than one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Znaimer, Leith

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm for regulation suffers from a tradeoff: placing the sensor near the sample being regulated ensures that its steady-state temperature matches the desired setpoint. However, the propagation delay (lag) between heater and sample can limit the control bandwidth. Moving the sensor closer to the heater reduces the lag and increases the bandwidth but introduces offsets and drifts into the temperature of the sample. Here, we explore the consequences of using two probes---one near the heater, one near the sample---and assigning the integral term to the sample probe and the other terms to the heater probe. The \\textit{split-PID} algorithm can outperform PID control loops based on one sensor.

  1. Surface Plasmon Sensor Based on the Enhanced Light Transmission through Arrays of Nanoholes in Gold Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    Surface Plasmon Sensor Based on the Enhanced Light Transmission through Arrays of Nanoholes in Gold upon the resonant surface plasmon enhanced transmission through the array of nanoholes. The sensitivity was found to be 400 nm per refractive index unit, which is comparable to other grating-based surface plasmon

  2. Finite Energy and Bounded Attacks on Control System Sensor Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control system networks are increasingly being connected to enterprise level networks. These connections leave critical industrial controls systems vulnerable to cyber-attacks. Most of the effort in protecting these cyber-physical systems (CPS) has been in securing the networks using information security techniques and protection and reliability concerns at the control system level against random hardware and software failures. However, besides these failures the inability of information security techniques to protect against all intrusions means that the control system must be resilient to various signal attacks for which new analysis and detection methods need to be developed. In this paper, sensor signal attacks are analyzed for observer-based controlled systems. The threat surface for sensor signal attacks is subdivided into denial of service, finite energy, and bounded attacks. In particular, the error signals between states of attack free systems and systems subject to these attacks are quantified. Optimal sensor and actuator signal attacks for the finite and infinite horizon linear quadratic (LQ) control in terms of maximizing the corresponding cost functions are computed. The closed-loop system under optimal signal attacks are provided. Illustrative numerical examples are provided together with an application to a power network with distributed LQ controllers.

  3. Quantum control and manipulations with stationary three-color lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Moiseev; B. S. Ham

    2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic quantum control of three-color lights in an optically dense medium is presented. We discuss how effectively to stop traveling three-color light pulses in the medium by using three control laser fields at near resonant transitions satisfying electromagnetically induced transparency. This opens a door to the quantum coherent control of multiple traveling light pulses for quantum memory and quantum switching, which are essential components in multi-party quantum optical communications.

  4. Topology Control in Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor PAOLO SANTI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

    - works to reduce energy consumption, which is essential to extend the network operational time. The goal, with the purpose of maintaining some global graph property (e.g., connectivity) while reducing energy consumption and Phrases: Connectivity, Energy consumption, Sensor networks, Topol- ogy control, Wireless ad hoc networks 1

  5. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point would improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In Phase I, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. In phase II of the project, described in this report, we demonstrate that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. We also establish that analysis algorithms can be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications, and show that it may be possible to use sensor network pulse rate to distinguish the number of occupants in a space. Finally, in this phase of the project we also developed a prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy. This basic capability will be extended in the future by applying an algorithm-based inference to the sensor network data stream, so that the web page displays the likelihood that each monitored office or area is occupied, as a supplement to the actual status of each sensor.

  6. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003, Jose Gutierrez, Eaton Corporation March 22, 2005 PageBuses for Lighting Control Applications Eaton CorporationEaton Corporation is a global $7.3 billion diversified

  7. Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of Occupancy-Based Lighting Control Systems: AReview. Lighting Residential Technology 42:415-431. Itron,Information Template Indoor Lighting Controls. Pacific Gas

  8. The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2514E The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings F for Offices and Commercial Buildings Francis Rubinstein and Dmitriy Bolotov, Lawrence Berkeley National 25% of the electrical energy used in US commercial buildings (DOE 2007). Advanced lighting controls

  9. Fiber optic sensor: Feedback control design and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, D.; Bertram, L.; Hillaire, R.; Anderson, S.; Leonard, S.; Marburger, S.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital feedback control of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) has been demonstrated on a tube sample of stainless steel and titanium alloy. A fiber optic sensor returns a signal proportional to backside radiance from the workpiece; that signal is used by the controller to compute a compensation weld current. The controller executes 10 times a second on an Intel 486 chip. For travel speeds of 3 to 6 inches per minute and thicknesses between 0.025 and 0.10 inches, constant backside bead width was maintained within 0.02 inches, from startup to tie-in.

  10. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  11. Frost sensor for use in defrost controls for refrigeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick D. (ADA Technologies, Inc. 8100 Shaffer Pkwy., Suite 130, Littleton, CO 80127-4107); Butz, James R. (ADA Technologies, Inc. 8100 Shaffer Pkwy., Suite 130, Littleton, CO 80127-4107); Veatch, Bradley D. (ADA Technologies, Inc. 8100 Shaffer Pkwy., Suite 130, Littleton, CO 80127-4107); O'Connor, Michael W. (ADA Technologies, Inc. 8100 Shaffer Pkwy., Suite 130, Littleton, CO 80127-4107)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring the total thermal resistance to heat flow from the air to the evaporative cooler fins of a refrigeration system. The apparatus is a frost sensor that measures the reduction in heat flow due to the added thermal resistance of ice (reduced conduction) as well as the reduction in heat flow due to the blockage of airflow (reduced convection) from excessive ice formation. The sensor triggers a defrost cycle when needed, instead of on a timed interval. The invention is also a method for control of frost in a system that transfers heat from air to a refrigerant along a thermal path. The method involves measuring the thermal conductivity of the thermal path from the air to the refrigerant, recognizing a reduction in thermal conductivity due to the thermal insulation effect of the frost and due to the loss of airflow from excessive ice formation; and controlling the defrosting of the system.

  12. Improving the performance of photo-electrically controlled lighting systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, F.; Ward, G.; Verderber, R.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of a photo-electrically controlled lighting system to maintain a constant total light level on a task surface by responding to changing daylight levels is affected by the control algorithm used to relate the photosensor signal to the supplied electric light level and by the placement and geometry of the photosensor. We describe the major components of a typical control system, discuss the operation of three different control algorithms, and derive expressions for each algorithm that express the total illuminance at the task as a function of the control photosensor signal. Using a specially-designed scale model, we measured the relationship between the signal generated by various ceiling-mounted control photosensors and workplane illuminance for two room geometries under real sky conditions. The measured data were used to determine the performance of systems obeying the three control algorithms under varying daylight conditions. Control systems employing the commonly-used integral reset algorithm supplied less electric light than required, failing to satisfy the control objective regardless of the control photosensor used. Systems employing an alternative, closed-loop proportional control algorithm achieved the control objective under virtually all tested conditions when operated by a ceiling-mounted photosensor shielded from direct window light.

  13. Beyond the Replacement Paradigm: Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Switches Smart Building & Grid Interfaces Efficient full spectrum LEDs without droop Versatile, low - Visible Light Communications Integration of smart fixtures, networked sensors and control systemsBeyond the Replacement Paradigm: Smart Lighting Robert F. Karlicek, Jr. Director, Smart Lighting

  14. Fig. 1. Teleoperated slave robot. Optical Torque Sensors for Local Impedance Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Fig. 1. Teleoperated slave robot. Optical Torque Sensors for Local Impedance Control Realization_teterukov@ipc.i.u-tokyo.ac.jp We recently developed an optical torque sensor to replace expensive strain-gauge-based sensor on the anthropomorphic robot arm and realize local impedance control in individual joints. Keywords: Optical torque

  15. EGR Control for Emisson Reduction Using Fast Response Sensors - Phase 1A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gravel, Roland; Conley, Jason; Kittelson, David

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to develop exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) control strategies using fast-response Particulate Matter (PM) sensors and NOx sensors to improve the quality of particulate and gaseous emissions from diesel engines. This project initially comprised three phases: (1) Phase IA - sensor requirements to meet PM sensor specifications, NOx sensor assessment, and initial model development for EGR control; (2) Phase IB - continue development on PM and NOx sensors, integrate the sensor signals into the control simulations, and finalize model development for control strategies; and (3) Phase II - validation testing of the control strategies. Only Phase 1A was funded by DOE and executed by Honeywell. The major objectives of Phase 1A of the project included: (1) Sensor validation and operation of fast-response PM and NOx sensors; (2) Control system modeling of low-pressure EGR controls, development of control strategies, and initial evaluation of these models and strategies for EGR control in diesel engines; (3) Sensor testing to understand applicability of fast-response PM sensors in determining loading rates of the particle trap; and (4) Model validation and sensor testing under steady-state and transient operational conditions of actual engines. In particular, specific objectives included demonstration of: (1) A PM sensor response time constant (T10 - T90) of better than 100 milliseconds (msec); (2) The ability to detect PM at concentrations from 0.2 to 2 Bosch smoke number (BSN) or equivalent; (3) PM sensor accuracy to within 20% BSN over the entire range of operation; and (4) PM sensor repeatability to within 10% over the PM entire sensor range equivalent to a BSN of 0.2 to 2.

  16. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  17. Phase controlled light switching at low power levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoonsoo Kang; Gessler Hernandez; Jiepeng Zhang; Yifu Zhu

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report experimental observations of interference between three-photon and one-photon excitations, and phase control of light attenuation/transmission in a four-level system. Either constructive interference or destructive interference can be obtained by varying the phase and/or frequency of a weak control laser. The interference enables absorptive switching of one field by another field at different frequencies and ultra-low light levels.

  18. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s ambient and task lighting components, 2) occupancy

  19. Interference-Aware Fair Rate Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangwala, Sumit; Gummadi, Ramakrishna; Govindan, Ramesh; Psounis, Konstantinos

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protocol For Wireless Sensor Networks. In WSNA 02. [30]Congestion in Wireless Sensor Networks. In SenSys 04. [12]Y. Lei. A Two-Tier Wireless Sensor Network Architecture for

  20. Lighting Control Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing | Department ofEnergy NuclearLighting

  1. Fault tolerant control of homopolar magnetic bearings and circular sensor arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ming-Hsiu

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fault tolerant control can accommodate the component faults in a control system such as sensors, actuators, plants, etc. This dissertation presents two fault tolerant control schemes to accommodate the failures of power ...

  2. A Bayesian Network for Autonomous Sensor Control during Polar Ice Sheet Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    of environmental and sensor- related factors. The PRISM sensors are placed on autonomous robotic vehicles ("roversA Bayesian Network for Autonomous Sensor Control during Polar Ice Sheet Measurements Sudha sheets. An important component of PRISM is an intelligent, autonomous Synthetic Aperture Radar that can

  3. On Power Control for Wireless Sensor Networks: System Model, Middleware Component and Experimental Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    On Power Control for Wireless Sensor Networks: System Model, Middleware Component and Experimental: Power Control, Wireless Sensor Networks, Networked Embedded Systems. I. INTRODUCTION The design be applied due to low signal bandwidths in the control loop, highly nonlinear and uncertain system models

  4. PERFORMANCE MODELING OF DAYLIGHT INTEGRATED PHOTOSENSOR- CONTROLLED LIGHTING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jain; R. R. Creasey; J. Himmelspach; K. P. White; M. Fu; Richard G. Mistrick

    Some building energy codes now require the incorporation of daylight into buildings and automatic photosensor-controlled switching or dimming of the electric lighting system in areas that receive daylight. This paper describes enhancements to the open-source Daysim daylight analysis software that permit users to model a photosensor control system as it will perform in a real space, considering the directional sensitivity of the photosensor, its mounting position, the space and daylight aperture geometry, window shading configuration; the electric lighting equipment and control zones; exterior obstructions; and site weather conditions. System output includes assessment of the daylight distribution in a space throughout the year, the photosensors ability to properly track the daylight and modify electric lighting system output, and the energy savings provided by the modeled control system. The application of daylight coefficients permits annual simulations to be conducted efficiently using hourly or finer weather data time increments. 1

  5. List of Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,LakefrontLighthouseEvaporativesource

  6. Medium Access Control in Wireless Sensor Kurtis Kredo II a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    monitoring or target track- ing. End users typically desire to deploy sensor nodes randomly throughout

  7. CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU New requirements for lighting controls constitute one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU New requirements for lighting controls constitute one of the biggest changes to Title 24 standards. The latest of controls commissioning. All lighting control systems with two or more components --in both residential

  8. Directional Sensor Control for Maximizing Information Gain Shankarachary Ragia, Hans D. Mittelmannb, and Edwin K. P. Chonga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittelmann, Hans D.

    , infrared sensors, and ultrasound sensors. These sensors are becoming increasingly important due to a wide locations are evaluated. Our goal is to assign each sensor to a particular direction such that the overallDirectional Sensor Control for Maximizing Information Gain Shankarachary Ragia, Hans D. Mittelmannb

  9. Electrochromic control of thin film light scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstroem, T.; Kullman, L.; Roennow, D.; Ribbing, C.; Granqvist, C.G. [Department of Technology, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, S-752 21, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Technology, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, S-752 21, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total and diffuse reflectance spectra were measured on Al surfaces covered with electrochromic W oxide films in colored and bleached states. Vector perturbation theory was used for analyzing the spectra. The diffuse reflectance appeared to originate from correlated (uncorrelated) interface roughness when the W oxide film was fully colored (bleached). Assuming partially correlated interfaces led to agreement between experimental and calculated spectra. The use of an electrochromic film appears a promising method to control the relative contributions of the interfaces to the resulting scattering. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Manipulating Light Pulses via Dynamically Controlled Photonic Bandgap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andre; M. D. Lukin

    2002-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    When a resonance associated with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in an atomic ensemble is modulated by an off-resonant standing light wave, a band of frequencies can appear for which light propagation is forbidden. We show that dynamic control of such a bandgap can be used to coherently convert a propagating light pulse into a stationary excitation with non-vanishing photonic component. This can be accomplished with high efficiency and negligble noise even at a level of few-photon quantum fields thereby facilitating possible applications in quantum nonlinear optics and quantum information.

  11. Design of a Personalized Lighting Control System Enabled by a Space Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suter, G.; Petrushevski, F.; Sipetic, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a research effort to develop a prototype of a personalized lighting control system that adjusts the visual environment based on user preferences. Lighting controllers query a space model to retrieve lighting objects...

  12. NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP FOR A FLEXIBLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP Recently, a modal domain optical fiber sensor has been demonstrated as a sensor in a control system the region of linear operation in terms of the optical fiber sensor parameters. #12;2 1. INTRODUCTION

  13. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josten, N.E.; Svoboda, J.M.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency. 13 figs.

  14. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josten, Nicholas E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency.

  15. A Software System for Modeling and Controlling Accelerator Physics Parameters at the Advanced Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schachinger, L.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Controlling Accelerator Physics Parameters at theLight Source for accelerator physics studies and accelerator

  16. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3831E Achieving Energy Savings with Highly- Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Author-Controlled Lighting 1 of 50 April 19, 2010 Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open Berkeley National Laboratory #12;Highly-Controlled Lighting 2 of 50 April 19, 2010 DISCLAIMER This document

  17. Energy-aware 3-level coding and control co-design for sensor network systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Energy-aware 3-level coding and control co-design for sensor network systems CARLOS CANUDAS energy consumption (energy-aware). To this aim, we propose to use a coding strategy with the ability that this coding algorithm preserves closed loop stability. Index Terms-- Control of sensor networks, energy-aware

  18. Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    shortage risk. (2) Adaptive optimal operation point tracking considering harvested energy variability. (3Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control Ryo-- In this paper, we present a software control method that maximizes the sensing rate of wireless sensor networks

  19. A congestion control scheme for wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Yunli

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In wireless sensor networks (WSN), nodes have very limited power due to hardware constraints. Packet losses and retransmissions resulting from congestion cost precious energy and shorten the lifetime of sensor nodes. This problem motivates the need...

  20. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borer, Elizabeth T. [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota; et al, et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles1,2 and herbivore communities37 are affecting global biodiversity dramatically2. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems8,9. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light.

  1. CONTROLLED SCATTERING OF LIGHT WAVES: OPTIMAL DESIGN OF DIFFRACTIVE OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, David C.

    CONTROLLED SCATTERING OF LIGHT WAVES: OPTIMAL DESIGN OF DIFFRACTIVE OPTICS DAVID C. DOBSON 1. Introduction. Di ractive optics is a vigorously growing technol- ogy in which optical components functions unattainable with conventional optics. These devices have great advantages in terms of size

  2. Optimal Demand Response Capacity of Automatic Lighting Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    . To remedy this problem, different demand side management programs have been proposed to shape the energy prior studies have extensively studied the capacity of offering demand response in buildings and office buildings. Keywords: Demand response, automatic lighting control, commercial and office buildings

  3. Overcoming Common Pitfalls: Energy Efficient Lighting Projects...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    require light levels to go off after 2 am. This regular series would be easily set. Daylight based controls use sensors to figure out when more light is needed. Photo cells are...

  4. Innovative, Lower Cost Sensors and Controls Yield Better Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors. ORNLs Pooran Joshi shows how the process enables...

  5. Queue and Power Control for Rechargeable Sensor Networks under SINR Interference Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koksal, Can Emre

    Queue and Power Control for Rechargeable Sensor Networks under SINR Interference Model Zhoujia Mao buffers to maximize the throughput with renewable energy sources under protocol interference model@ece.osu.edu Abstract--Renewable energy sources can be attached to sensor nodes to substantially improve the performance

  6. An architecture for intelligent sensors and fuzzy inputs for fuzzy logic controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Charles Wayne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in situations where an adequate model of the system is not available. But the controller may only be as good as the quality of the sensor values that provide input to it. The quality of the sensor values is of great concern for designers. Just as in the cases...

  7. Adaptive Control of Duty Cycling in Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Adaptive Control of Duty Cycling in Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks Christopher M wireless sensor network deployments are using harvested environmental energy to extend system lifetime. Because the temporal profiles of such energy sources exhibit great variability due to dynamic weather

  8. Miniaturized optical sensor for cursor control Michael Linde Jakobsen, Henning Larsen, Finn Pedersen, Henrik Pedersen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    20 Miniaturized optical sensor for cursor control Michael Linde Jakobsen, Henning Larsen, Finn and Jrgen Korsgaard OPDI Technologies, Denmark A miniaturized optical displacement sensor that can information of the movement but also to optically establish a dynamic high-pass filtering, thus removing

  9. A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lighting in existing non-residential buildings: a comparisonComparison of control options in private offices in an advanced lightingLighting Energy Only Actual Installation Only Fig. 7. Comparison

  10. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If you could change the lighting in your office, what wouldapply. Highly-Controlled Lighting 50 of 50 April 19, 2010Europa 2009, 11th European Lighting Conference, Istanbul,

  11. Simulating the operation of photosensor-based lighting controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, Charles; Papamichael, Konstantinos; Lai, Judy; Revzan, Kenneth

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy savings from the use of daylighting in commercial buildings are realized through implementation of photoelectric lighting controls that dim electric lights when sufficient daylight is available to provide adequate workplane illumination. The dimming level of electric lighting is based on the signal of a photosensor. Current simulation approaches for such systems are based on the questionable assumption that the signal of the photosensor is proportional to the task illuminance. This paper presents a method that simulates the performance of photosensor controls considering the acceptance angle, angular sensitivity, placement of the photosensor within a space, and color correction filter. The method is based on the multiplication of two fisheye images: one generated from the angular sensitivity of the photosensor and the other from a 180- or 360-degree fisheye image of the space as ''seen'' by the photosensor. The paper includes a detailed description of the method and its implementation, example applications, and validation results based on comparison with measurements in an actual office space.

  12. RealTime SpatioTemporal Query Processing in Mobile AdHoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes,

  13. Combustion Control Using Infrared and Visible Light Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, S. E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the boiler controller, while other heat inputs and useful heat outputs which remain relatively constant can be entered on the control panel. Wasteful heat output such as stack losses are not to be included; only useful heat outputs such as space heating... to the boiler controller at the speed of light, time lag in the combustion analysis system is 78 7.69 6.41 5.13 3.85 2.56 1.28 reduced to nil. Thus, the infrared flame monitor 79 8.86' 7.59 6.33 5.06 3.80 2.S3 1.27 ing system is capable of holding...

  14. Empirical Analysis of Transmission Power Control Algorithms for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Empirical Analysis of Transmission Power Control Algorithms for Wireless Sensor Networks Jaein power control, but the experimental platforms and the workloads did not reflect the reality of WSNs. We present a dynamic transmission-power-control algorithm based on previous studies and evaluate

  15. The Role of Pressure Sensors in the Servo Control of Pneumatic Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.

    The Role of Pressure Sensors in the Servo Control of Pneumatic Actuators Jianhui Wu, Michael suited to the use of nonlinear control methods requiring measurement of the full state, such as sliding mode control. The requirement of pressure measurement, however, is particularly burdensome, due

  16. An Optimal Resource Control Scheme under Fidelity and Energy Constraints in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanyong

    1 An Optimal Resource Control Scheme under Fidelity and Energy Constraints in Sensor Networks control under the fidelity and energy constraints, we present a resource increase and decrease algorithm networks, Resource control, Fidelity, Energy efficiency I. INTRODUCTION As the technologies in MEMS

  17. Feedback control of the squeezing of the fluorescence light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Barchielli; Matteo Gregoratti

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the formulations of the theory of quantum measurements in continuous time, quantum trajectory theory is very suitable for the introduction of measurement based feedback and closed loop control of quantum systems. In this paper we present such a construction in the concrete case of a two-level atom stimulated by a coherent, monochromatic laser. In particular, we show how fast feedback \\`a la Wiseman and Milburn can be introduced in the formulation of the theory. Then, the spectrum of the free fluorescence light is studied and typical quantum phenomena, squeezing and sub-natural line-narrowing, are presented.

  18. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byungkun

    The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting - united with the rich details offered by sensor networks - prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we propose several techniques for ...

  19. Redundancy Control in Large Scale Sensor Networks via Compressive Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongcai

    . R. China 2 NEC Labs, Beijing, P. R. China Abstract: In wireless sensor networks for smart city 1 Introduction & background With the growing demands of "smart planet" and "smart city" applications or smart planet applications, massive volumes of real-time sensory data are being generated in every second

  20. An Adaptive Coordinated Medium Access Control for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    , Damla Turgut Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Central Florida Orlando, FL 32816 Email the adaptive duty cycle scheme within the framework of sensor-MAC (S-MAC). The novelty of our protocol latency and throughput are always trying to follow the classic IEEE 802.11 MAC (no duty cycle), which

  1. Multifunctional (NOx/CO/O2) Solid-State Sensors For Coal Combustion Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state sensors were developed for coal combustion control and the understanding of sensing mechanisms was advanced. Several semiconducting metal oxides (p-type and n-type) were used to fabricate sensor electrodes. The adsorption/desorption characteristics and catalytic activities of these materials were measured with Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPR) experiments. The sensitivity, selectivity, and response time of these sensors were measured for steps of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O vapor in simple N{sub 2}-balanced and multi-component, simulated combustion-exhaust streams. The role of electrode microstructure and fabrication parameters on sensing performance was investigated. Proof for the proposed sensing mechanism, Differential Electrode Equilibria, was demonstrated by relating the sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities) of the various electrode materials to their gas adsorption/desorption behaviors and catalytic activities. A multifunctional sensor array consisting of three sensing electrodes and an integrated heater and temperature sensors was fabricated with tape-casting and screen-printing and its NO{sub x} sensing performance was measured. The multifunctional sensor demonstrated it was possible to measure NO{sub 2} independent of NO by locally heating one of the sensing electrodes. The sensor technology was licensed to Fuel FX International, Inc. Fuel FX has obtained investor funding and is developing prototype sensors as a first step in their commercialization strategy for this technology.

  2. Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

  3. Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The New York Times Headquarters Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Luis L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. , DHerdt, P. , 2008, Lighting energy savings in officesLux Europa, 11 th European Lighting Conference, Istanbul,evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and

  4. DSP-Based Sensor Fault-Tolerant Control of Electric Vehicle Powertrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Universit de

    DSP-Based Sensor Fault-Tolerant Control of Electric Vehicle Powertrains Bekhera Tabbache, Mohamed-tolerant control for a high performance induction motor drive that propels an electrical vehicle. The proposed and simulations on an electric vehicle are carried-out using a European urban and extra urban driving cycle

  5. Model-Based Control of Nonlinear Systems Subject to Sensor Data Losses: A Chemical Process Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Model-Based Control of Nonlinear Systems Subject to Sensor Data Losses: A Chemical Process Case, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1592, USA, davidmps@ucla.edu, pdc@seas.ucla.edu. Controller Process x Data feedback control of nonlinear uncertain systems subject to sensor data losses. We compare three different

  6. Sensor Fault-Tolerant Control of an Induction Motor Based Electric Vehicle Bekhera Tabbache1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Sensor Fault-Tolerant Control of an Induction Motor Based Electric Vehicle Bekhera Tabbache1://www.lbms.fr Keywords Electric Vehicle (EV), Induction motor, Sensor fault, Fault-tolerant control (FTC), Direct torque a reconfigurable direct torque control of an induction motor-based electric vehicle. The proposed strategy concerns

  7. Design Techniques for Sensor Appliances: Foundations and Light Compass Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    sensors of the appliance, and (2) error minimization-based sensor data interpretation middleware. We have University of California, Los Angeles jwong@cs.ucla.edu Seapahn Megerian University of California, Los Angeles seapahn@cs.ucla.edu Miodrag Potkonjak University of California, Los Angeles miodrag

  8. Time varying voltage combustion control and diagnostics sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Thornton, Jimmy D. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, E. David (Morgantown, WV); Fincham, William (Fairmont, WV)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-varying voltage is applied to an electrode, or a pair of electrodes, of a sensor installed in a fuel nozzle disposed adjacent the combustion zone of a continuous combustion system, such as of the gas turbine engine type. The time-varying voltage induces a time-varying current in the flame which is measured and used to determine flame capacitance using AC electrical circuit analysis. Flame capacitance is used to accurately determine the position of the flame from the sensor and the fuel/air ratio. The fuel and/or air flow rate (s) is/are then adjusted to provide reduced flame instability problems such as flashback, combustion dynamics and lean blowout, as well as reduced emissions. The time-varying voltage may be an alternating voltage and the time-varying current may be an alternating current.

  9. Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial building operation, along with increased comfort and control for occupants, through the implementation of advanced technologies. This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies. This paper is actually a synthesis of five other white papers: the first describes the market assessment including estimates of market potential and energy savings for sensors and control strategies currently on the market as well as a discussion of market barriers to these technologies. The other four cover technology pathways: (1) current applications and strategies for new applications, (2) sensors and controls, (3) networking, security, and protocols and standards, and (4) automated diagnostics, performance monitoring, commissioning, optimal control and tools. Each technology pathway chapter gives an overview of the technology or application. This is followed by a discussion of needs and the current status of the technology. Finally, a series of research topics is proposed.

  10. Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the self-correction algorithms developed in the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls project funded jointly by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The algorithms address faults for temperature sensors, humidity sensors, and dampers in air-handling units and correction of persistent manual overrides of automated control systems. All faults considered create energy waste when left uncorrected as is frequently the case in actual systems.

  11. Lighting energy savings potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6152E Lighting energy savings potential of split- pane electrochromic windows controlled potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort L was conducted to evaluate lighting energy savings of split-pane electrochromic (EC) windows controlled

  12. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Geoffrey C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphics that allowed facility operators to choose which server temperature data points were used for control.graphics that allowed facility operators to choose which server temperature data points were used for control.

  13. Vision and Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Haifei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control of a flexible robot arm, in 2007 IEEE Internationalreachable area of the robot arm, the reference joint angle

  14. Real-time combustion controls and diagnostics sensors (CCADS)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jimmy D. (Morgantown, WV); Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Dodrill, Keith A. (Fairmont, WV); Nutter, Jr., Roy S. (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas (Morgantown, WV)

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for the monitoring of the combustion process within a combustion system. The apparatus comprises; a combustion system, a means for supplying fuel and an oxidizer, a device for igniting the fuel and oxidizer in order to initiate combustion, and a sensor for determining the current conducted by the combustion process. The combustion system comprises a fuel nozzle and an outer shell attached to the combustion nozzle. The outer shell defines a combustion chamber. Preferably the nozzle is a lean premix fuel nozzle (LPN). Fuel and an oxidizer are provided to the fuel nozzle at separate rates. The fuel and oxidizer are ignited. A sensor positioned within the combustion system comprising at least two electrodes in spaced-apart relationship from one another. At least a portion of the combustion process or flame is between the first and second electrodes. A voltage is applied between the first and second electrodes and the magnitude of resulting current between the first and second electrodes is determined.

  15. Improving Control System Cyber-State Awareness using Known Secure Sensor Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Miles McQueen

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AbstractThis paper presents design and simulation of a low cost and low false alarm rate method for improved cyber-state awareness of critical control systems - the Known Secure Sensor Measurements (KSSM) method. The KSSM concept relies on physical measurements to detect malicious falsification of the control systems state. The KSSM method can be incrementally integrated with already installed control systems for enhanced resilience. This paper reviews the previously developed theoretical KSSM concept and then describes a simulation of the KSSM system. A simulated control system network is integrated with the KSSM components. The effectiveness of detection of various intrusion scenarios is demonstrated on several control system network topologies.

  16. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  17. Vision and Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Haifei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Most industrial robot applications require a robotwelding guns. Industrial robot applications usually requireIn the applications of industrial robot manipulators, it is

  18. Vision and Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Haifei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Block diagram of encoder feedback system for single jointBlock diagram of KKF feedback system for single jointtrajectory. Joint Space Control The block diagram of vision

  19. Vision and Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Haifei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Symposium on Industrial Robots, March 1979. [In the applications of industrial robot manipulators, it isand Control Most industrial robot applications require a

  20. Temperature Control Framework Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Geostatistical Analysis for Total Spatial Awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jeffrey

    cooling and heating mechanisms in buildings at every location for improved user comfort. Keywords Smart presents a novel framework for intelligent temperature control in smart homes using Wireless Sensor Analysis; Classical Variography; Ordinary Point Kriging I. INTRODUCTION Research involving smart homes has

  1. Modular Topology Control and Energy Model for Wireless Ad Hoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Yang, Shanchieh

    Modular Topology Control and Energy Model for Wireless Ad Hoc Sensor Networks Niranjan in a harsh terrain typically are battery operated and, therefore, require energy efficient network protocols. In order to ease the analysis of the energy usage of proposed network protocols, this paper proposes

  2. Error Control Coding in Low-Power Wireless Sensor Networks: When is ECC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Sheryl

    Error Control Coding in Low-Power Wireless Sensor Networks: When is ECC Energy-Efficient? Sheryl L. Interference is not considered; it would lower dCR. Analog decoders are shown to be the most energy-efficient at the decoder outweighs the transmitted power savings due to using ECC, then ECC would not be energy-efficient

  3. Reducing Turfgrass Water Consumption using Sensor Nodes and an Adaptive Irrigation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Ramon

    sensor and irrigation control system that reduces water consumption for residential turfgrass irrigation. It has been estimated that 50- 75% of residential water use is for irrigation. Current systems are exceptionally poor at adapting irrigation to meet demand, pri- marily due to incomplete information for system

  4. Demo: BACChat: A Building Automation Control Client for Sensor Data Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    Demo: BACChat: A Building Automation Control Client for Sensor Data Collection Abraham Hang-yat Lam that data loss occurs when we are using existing software; but we are short of tools to diagnose the problem regions like Hong Kong, where the industrial sector is relatively small, the impact of commercial

  5. H Loop shaping control for PLL-based mechanical resonance tracking in NEMS resonant mass sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    problem that rejects the disturbance described by the resonance frequency shift, attenuates the phase the measurement scheme to a disturbance rejection control issue which considers the resonance frequency variation--A simple dynamic detection of the resonance frequency shift in NEMS resonant mass sensors is described

  6. A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    daylighting control for low energy buildings. Proceedings ofAIVC Conference on Building Low Energy Cooling and Advancedlow, federal energy conservation standards do not include lighting controls, and state and local building

  7. Integration of Sensors with Embedded Data Acquisition for Automation of Lighting Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrill, T. J.; Bay, C. J.; Rasmussen, B. P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Overview -Overview of Energy Assessments -Autonomous Energy Audits -Lighting Assessment Identify and Analyze Lighting Lighting Simulation ESL-IE-14-05-41 Proceedings... Simple, Time- consuming Tasks Initial Capital Cost ESL-IE-14-05-41 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Autonomous Energy Auditors Ground and aerial vehicles autonomously navigate...

  8. Kalman filtering of IMU sensor for robot balance control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angelosanto, Gina (Gina C.)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the use of Kalman filtering of measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to provide information on the orientation of a robot for balance control. A test bed was created to characterize the ...

  9. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Geoffrey C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to control the cooling system in the data center, energyfor input to the data center cooling system devices. Goal 2:for input to the data center cooling system devices. See

  10. iLamp: A Sensor-Enhanced Lamp with Surface-Tracking Capability Based on Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    . The lamp has a robot arm and some LEDs as light sources. When finding that the sensed light intensity robot arm, to a better location and then adjust its LEDs to satisfy the bookmark's need. Central to our interface. This lamp is composed of a ZigBee module, a microprocessor, and a robot arm holding four sets

  11. MEMS `SMART DUST MOTES' FOR DESIGNING, MONITORING AND ENABLING EFFICIENT LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    -based lighting system has the potential to achieve many environmental benefits in comparison to existing sensorMEMS `SMART DUST MOTES' FOR DESIGNING, MONITORING AND ENABLING EFFICIENT LIGHTING Alice M. Agogino focused on office lighting monitoring and control based on the new MEMS `smart dust mote' sensor

  12. Closed loop control of the induction heating process using miniature magnetic sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for providing real-time, closed-loop control of the induction hardening process. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  13. Practical Control of Transmission Power for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    with online parameter estimation. P- TPC's robustness and energy savings are demonstrated through trace-driven simulations and real-world experiments in a campus building and residential environments. I. INTRODUCTION are four-fold. · A highly efficient feedback control algorithm that main- tains a desired link quality

  14. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS) and OLED-based structurally integrated optical sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yuankun

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    General introduction to OLED basics and OLED-based structurally integrated sensors was provided in chapter 1 and chapter 2. As discussed in chapter 3, OLEDs were developed or improved using novel engineering methods for better charge injection (increased by over 1 order of magnitude) and efficiency. As the excitation sources, these OLEDs have preferred characteristics for sensor applications, including narrowed emission, emission at desired wavelength, and enhanced output for reduced EL background, higher absorption and improved device lifetime. In addition to OLEDs with desired performance, sensor integration requires oxidase immobilization with the sensor film for O{sub 2}-based biological and chemical sensing. Nanoparticles such as ZnO have large surface area and high isoelectric point ({approx}9.5), which favors enzyme immobilization via physical adsorption as well as Coulombic bonding. In chapter 4, it was demonstrated that ZnO could be used for this purpose, although future work is needed to further bond the ZnO to the sensor film. In chapter 5, single unit sensor was extended to multianalyte parallel sensing based on an OLED platform, which is compact and integrated with silicon photodiodes and electronics. Lactate and glucose were simultaneously monitored with a low limit of detection 0.02 mM, fast response time ({approx} 1 minute) and dynamic range from 0-8.6 ppm of dissolved oxygen. As discovered in previous work, the dynamic range covers 0-100% gas phase O{sub 2} or 0-40 ppm dissolved oxygen at room temperature. PL decay curve, which is used to extract the decay time, is usually not a simple exponential at high O{sub 2} concentration, which indicates that O{sub 2} is not equally accessible for different luminescent sites. This creates a challenge for data analysis, which however was successfully processed by stretched exponential as shown in chapter 6. This also provides an insight about the distribution of O{sub 2}:dye collisional quenching rate due to microheterogeneity. Effect of TiO{sub 2} doping was also discussed. Stretched exponential analysis also generates calibration curves with higher sensitivity, which is preferred from the operational point of view. The work of enhanced integration was shown in chapter 7 with a polymer photodetector, which enables the preferred operation mode, decay time measurement, due to fast reponse (<20 {mu}s). Device thickness was enlarged for maximum absorption of the PL, which was realized by slow spincoating rate and shorter spincoating time. Film prepared this way shows more crystalline order by Raman spectra, probably due to slow evaporation. This also ensures charge transport is not affected even with a thick film as indicated in the response time. Combination of OLEDs and polymer photodetectors present opportunities for solution processed all-organic sensors, which enables cheap processing at large scale. Future development can focus on monolithically integration of OLEDs and organic photodetectors (OPD) on the same substrate at a small scale, which could be enabled by inkjet printing. As OLED and OPD technologies continue to advance, small-sized, flexible and all-organic structurally integrated sensor platforms will become true in the near future.

  15. Controls for Solid-State Lighting Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Energy Technology Laboratory and James Brodrick Building Technologies Program Office of Energy-State Lighting Final Report Prepared for: Joel Chaddock National Energy Technology Laboratory and James Brodrick

  16. Sensors, Controls, and Transactive Energy Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of Energy Advisory10MEASUREMENTSensors, Controls, and

  17. Spin Wave Diffraction Control and Read-out with a Quantum Memory for Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Htet; David Gury-Odelin

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme for control and read-out of diffracted spins waves to propagating light fields is presented. Diffraction is obtained via sinusoidally varying lights shifts and ideal one-to-one mapping to light is realized using a gradient echo quantum memory. We also show that dynamical control of the diffracted spin waves spatial orders can be implemented to realize a quantum pulse sequencer for temporal modes that have high time-bandwidth products. Full numerical solutions suggest that both co-propagating and couterpropagating light shift geometries can be used, making the proposal applicable to hot and cold atomic vapours as well as solid state systems with two-level atoms.

  18. Combustion Control Using Infrared and Visible Light Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, S. E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics and overall experience have acted against the installation of infrared carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide analyzers on smaller systems for air fuel ratio control. This paper discusses an interesting control signal which can be derived from...

  19. Abstract The process control industry has shown great interest in implementation of low cost, low power wireless sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power transmission through metal walls using piezoelectric transducers [1], electromechanical network, low power wireless sensor networks. Such networks are much easier to deploy and reconfigure compared Wireless sensing and control networks have given machinery designers the flexibility to place network

  20. Danny Byrd Controlling Lights with PWM and Motion Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    been used to save power by turning off a light when no motion is detected for many decades now. Just a machine that will taper down the power consumption as time goes by, saving energy by the second to shine will slowly slowed, saving energy in the meantime. Though it will not be a huge save in energy

  1. Application of Odor Sensors to Ore Sorting and Mill Feed Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Nelson

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of the feed provided to mineral processing facilities is a continuing challenge. Much effort is currently being devoted to overcoming these problems. These projects are usually described under the general headings of Mine-to-Mill Integration or Mine-Mill Optimization. It should be possible to combine the knowledge of ore type, mineralogy, and other characteristics (located in the mine modeling system), with the advanced capabilities of state-of-the-art mill control systems, to achieve an improved level of control in mineral processing that will allow optimization of the mill processes on an almost real-time basis. This is not happening because mill feed it is often treated as a uniform material, when in reality it varies in composition and characteristics. An investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of odor sensors for maintaining traceability in ore production and processing. Commercially available sensors are now used in food processing, environmental monitoring, and other applications and can detect the presence of very small amounts (0.1-500 ppm) of some molecules. An assortment of such molecules could be used to ''tag'' blocks of ore as they are mined, according to their respective characteristics. Then, as the ore came into the mill, an array of ''electronic noses'' could be used to assess its characteristics in real time. It was found that the Cyranose 320{trademark}, a commercially available odor sensor, can easily distinguish among samples of rock marked with almond, cinnamon, citronella, lemon, and orange oils. Further, the sensor could detect mixtures of rocks marked with various combinations of these oils. Treatment of mixtures of galena and silica with odorant compounds showed no detrimental effects on flotation response in laboratory tests. Additional work is recommended to determine how this concept can be extended to the marking of large volumes of materials.

  2. Continuous Controls: Lighting Energy Management for Retrofit and New Construction Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuett, R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rising interest of specifiers and end-users in Lighting Energy Management (LEM) control equipment has led to an increased need for further education in the selection, capabilities and applications of such equipment. This paper addresses...

  3. Municipal Consortium Releases Updated Model Specification for Networked Outdoor Lighting Control Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium (MSSLC) has released an update to its Model Specification for Adaptive Control and Remote Monitoring of LED Roadway...

  4. SPEED LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE AT UC SANTA BARBARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and WattStopper Occupancy Sensor Lagoon Road NETWORKED RAODWAY LED Cree XSP Luminaire with LumewaveSwap with Lumewave Controls & WattStopper Occupancy Sensor ROADWAY LIGHTING Lagoon Road Initial pilot utilized Luminaire with Lumewave Controls Photo:zeronetenergy.blogspot.com ABOUT THE STATE PARTNERSHIP FOR ENERGY

  5. The Effect of Personal Lighting Controls on Energy use and Occuplant Weel-Being in Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veitch, J. A.; Newsham, G. R.; Mancini, S.; Arsenault, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of personal lighting controls on d t ll b i i ffi Jennifer A Veitch Guy R Newsham energy use an occupan we - e ng n o ces . , . , Sandra Mancini, Chantal Arsenault Building the Evidence ? Highly-controlled laboratory studies 15...?yrs m ? Quasi-realistic laboratory study a l i s m R e a ? Field study Prior NRC Research ? First laboratory experiment Direct parabolic (ceiling perimeter) Direct parabolic (ceiling centre) Task light (undershelf) Indirect...

  6. Controlling Light to Make the Most Energy From the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, Dennis; Corcoran, Chris; Eisler, Carissa; Flowers, Cris; Goodman, Matt; Hofmann, Carrie; Sadtler, Bryce

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Representing the Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of LMI to tailor the morphology, complex dielectric structure, and electronic properties of matter so as to sculpt the flow of sunlight and heat, enabling light conversion to electrical and chemical energy with unprecedented efficiency.

  7. Evaluation of Miniaturized Infrared Sensors for Process Control of the Palladium Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascola, R. J.; Howard, D. W.

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested the suitability of a miniaturized infrared sensor for measurements of CO and H{sub 2}O in the inlet stream to the Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR). We demonstrated that both analytes can be measured with absolute accuracies of 2-4% at the process inlet conditions of 120-140 C and approximately 1 atm of each gas. This accuracy must be improved to 1-1.5% for effective PMR process control. The use of a reference detector and independent temperature and pressure measurements to correct the raw signals will improve the accuracy to a level that will approach, if not meet, this goal. With appropriate bandpass filters, the infrared sensors may be used for other gas analysis applications.

  8. Millimeter-wave radar sensor for automotive intelligent cruise control (ICC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M.E.; Crain, A.; Curran, A.; Campbell, R.A.; Drubin, C.A.; Miccioli, W.F. [Raytheon, Tewksbury, MA (United States)] [Raytheon, Tewksbury, MA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If automotive intelligent cruise-control (ICC) systems are to be successful in the marketplace, they must provide robust performance in a complex roadway environment. Inconveniences caused by reduced performance during inclement weather, interrupted performance due to dropped tracks, and annoying nuisance alarms will not be tolerated by the consumer, and would likely result in the rejection of this technology in the marketplace. An all-weather automotive millimeter-wave (MMW) radar sensor is described that uses a frequency-modulation coplanar-wave (FMCW) radar design capable of acquiring and tracking all obstacles in its field of view. Design tradeoffs are discussed and radar-sensor test results are presented along with the applicability of the radar to collision-warning systems.

  9. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Query Processing in Mobile Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo- tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes, and pa

  10. Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance. Validation of the TDL measurement on the EAF was confirmed by comparison with extractive sampling CO measurements.

  11. IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Zhang

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

  12. Optical control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Arijit; Sawant, Rahul V; Sheikholeslami, G; Budker, D; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the manipulation of transmitted light through an optical Fabry-Perot cavity, built around a spectroscopy cell containing enriched rubidium vapor. Light resonant with the $^{87}$Rb D$_{2}$ ($F=2/F=1$) $\\leftrightarrow F'$ manifold, is controlled by transverse intersection of the cavity mode by another resonant light beam. The cavity transmission can be suppressed or enhanced depending on the coupling of atomic states due to the intersecting beams. The extreme manifestation of cavity mode control is the precipitious destruction (negative logic switching) or buildup (positive logic switching) of the transmitted light intensity, on intersection of the transverse control beam with the cavity mode. Both the steady state and transient response are experimentally investigated. The mechanism behind the change in cavity transmission is discussed in brief.

  13. Measuring barometric pressure with a manifold pressure sensor in a microprocessor based engine control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauwels, M.A.; Wright, D.O.

    1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microprocessor based electronic engine control system is described for an internal combustion engine, a method for updating the stored ambient pressure signal by measuring the ambient barometric pressure during engine operation using a manifold pressure sensor. The method consists of: generating timing signals indicating the rotational position of an engine member and including a signal indicating a predetermined rotational position in the rotation of the engine member; generating a pressure signal from the manifold pressure sensor representing the pressure surrounding the sensor in response to the predetermined rotational position; reading the value of ambient barometric pressure stored in the memory of the microprocessor; comparing the value of the barometric pressure stored in the memory of the microprocessor and the value of the pressure signal; increasing the value of the barometric pressure by one unit to generate a new barometric pressure value when the value of the pressure signal is greater than the value of the barometric pressure; comparing the new barometric pressure value with a predetermined fixed constant representing the maximum barometric pressure; and storing in the memory of the microprocessor either the new barometric pressure value if equal to or less than the fixed constant or the value of the maximum barometric pressure if the new barometric pressure value is greater than the fixed constant.

  14. Improving the Science Return from Coastal Sensor Webs Using Autonomous Predictive Control and Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panangadan, Anand

    of underwater unmanned vehicles, and wireless communication parameters. The system operates on data obtained from a variety of sources including static sensors, unmanned underwater vehicles, and sensors attached

  15. Controlling of grid connected photovoltaic lighting system with fuzzy logic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saglam, Safak; Ekren, Nazmi; Erdal, Hasan [Technical Education Faculty, Marmara University, Istanbul 34722 (Turkey)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, DC electrical energy produced by photovoltaic panels is converted to AC electrical energy and an indoor area is illuminated using this energy. System is controlled by fuzzy logic algorithm controller designed with 16 rules. Energy is supplied from accumulator which is charged by photovoltaic panels if its energy would be sufficient otherwise it is supplied from grid. During the 1-week usage period at the semester time, 1.968 kWh energy is used from grid but designed system used 0.542 kWh energy from photovoltaic panels at the experiments. Energy saving is determined by calculations and measurements for one education year period (9 months) 70.848 kWh. (author)

  16. Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  17. REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 85, 106105 (2014) Note: Split PID control--Two sensors can be better than one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechhoefer, John

    REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 85, 106105 (2014) Note: Split PID control--Two sensors can online 17 October 2014) The traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm for regulation to the sample probe and the other terms to the heater probe. The split-PID algorithm can outperform PID control

  18. Undergraduate Project: Implementing a Graphical User Interface for Real-Time Wireless Sensor Network Control and Data Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be tasked with designing, implementing, and testing a graphical user interface (GUI) to control a customUndergraduate Project: Implementing a Graphical User Interface for Real-Time Wireless Sensor Network Control and Data Visualization Marc J. Rubin and Tracy Camp In this project, the undergraduate

  19. Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  20. D. A. Cohen, Y. Chang, A. F. J. Levi, H. Fetterman, and I. Newberg: `Optically-controlled serially-fed phased array sensor' page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    -fed phased array sensor' page IEEE Photonics Technol. Lett. 8, 1683-1685 (1996). 1 Optically Newberg Abstract A new type of RF-photonic sensor design which uses an optical serially-fed phased array. Fetterman, and I. Newberg: `Optically-controlled serially-fed phased array sensor' page IEEE Photonics

  1. System and Battery Charge Control for PV-Powered AC Lighting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, G.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews a number of issues specific to stand-alone AC lighting systems. A review of AC lighting technology is presented, which discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various lamps. The best lamps for small lighting systems are compact fluorescent. The best lamps for intermediate-size systems are high- or low-pressure sodium. Specifications for battery charging and load control are provided with the goal of achieving lamp lifetimes on the order of 16,000 to 24,000 hours and battery lifetimes of 4 to 5 years. A rough estimate of the potential domestic and global markets for stand-alone AC lighting systems is presented. DC current injection tests were performed on high-pressure sodium lamps and the test results are presented. Finally, a prototype system was designed and a prototype system controller (with battery charger and DC/AC inverter) was developed and built.

  2. SENVM: Server Environment Monitoring and Controlling System for a Small Data Center Using Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choochaisri, Supasate; Jenjaturong, Saran; Intanagonwiwat, Chalermek; Ratanamahatana, Chotirat Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, efficient energy utilization becomes an essential requirement for data centers, especially in data centers of world-leading companies, where "Green Data Center" defines a new term for an environment-concerned data center. Solutions to change existing a data center to the green one may vary. In the big company, high-cost approaches including re-planning server rooms, changing air-conditioners, buying low-powered servers, and equipping sophisticating environmental control equipments are possible, but not for small to medium enterprises (SMEs) and academic sectors which have limited budget. In this paper, we propose a novel system, SENVM, used to monitor and control air temperature in a server room to be in appropriate condition, not too cold, where very unnecessary cooling leads to unnecessary extra electricity expenses, and also inefficient in energy utilization. With implementing on an emerging technology, Wireless Sensor Network (WSN), Green Data Center is feasible to every small data center...

  3. EXTERIOR LIGHTING CASE STUDY For more information, visit PARTNERSHIPDEMONSTRATIONS.ORG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    EXTERIOR LIGHTING CASE STUDY » For more information, visit PARTNERSHIPDEMONSTRATIONS.ORG In 2013, UC Santa Barbara partnered with the SPEED team to demonstrate network controlled LED lighting sensors. These lighting controls allowed all the units to be incorporated into an adaptive mesh network

  4. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks Byungkun, MA 02139, USA ABSTRACT The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting ­ united with the rich details offered by sensor networks ­ prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we

  5. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  6. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  7. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  8. Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

  9. DAINTREE NETWORKS PARTNERS WITH CLTC TO ADVANCE LIGHTING CONTROLS UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and Daintree team up to increase adoption with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    the ease of system integration and illustrate energy efficiency gains through intelligent data analytics Technology Center is a not-for-profit RD&D facility dedicated to developing and commercializing energy-efficient of networked lighting controls. The widespread adoption of energy-efficient technologies such as lighting

  10. Method and system for controlling the position of a beam of light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F. (San Francisco, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Ruggiero, Anthony J. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An method and system for laser beam tracking and pointing is based on a conventional position sensing detector (PSD) or quadrant cell but with the use of amplitude-modulated light. A combination of logarithmic automatic gain control, filtering, and synchronous detection offers high angular precision with exceptional dynamic range and sensitivity, while maintaining wide bandwidth. Use of modulated light enables the tracking of multiple beams simultaneously through the use of different modulation frequencies. It also makes the system resistant to interfering light sources such as ambient light. Beam pointing is accomplished by feeding back errors in the measured beam position to a beam steering element, such as a steering mirror. Closed-loop tracking performance is superior to existing methods, especially under conditions of atmospheric scintillation.

  11. Looking at pollution control in a new light: Photochemistry for a cleaner environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This phamphet, from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory, describes a major new development in the field of photochemistry. The NREL/Sandia team has developed a pollution control technique - photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) that uses the energy in light to destroy environmental contaminants. Applicable as both a waste clean-up and a pollution control technique, PCP could help thousands of businesses comply with environmental regulations.

  12. Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Sign In About | Careers |

  13. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georges Bruegger; Luis Froufe-Perez; Frank Scheffold; Juan Jose Saenz

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with "optical tweezers" as well as to induce significant "optical binding" forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  14. Wind-driven Sediment Suspension Controls Light Availability in a Shallow Coastal Lagoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGlathery, Karen

    by a conceptual model that describes an increase in nutrient availability leading to an increase in pelagic resuspension of sediments, and low pelagic and high benthic primary productivity because most of the sediment resuspension, not increased pelagic pro- ductivity, may be the dominant control on light availability

  15. 2005 Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, The Johns Hopkins University, March 1618, 2005 Power Control for Target Tracking in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristescu, Razvan

    18, 2005 Power Control for Target Tracking in Sensor Networks Jean-Paul Wagner EPFL Lausanne, CH-1015 model of mobility. The sensor nodes have adjustable power levels and the precision of the measurement of a measurement and the power used to do that measure- ment. We define our problem as a control policy op

  16. A Multi-Channel DS-CDMA Media Access Control Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    in sensor network design. This may lead to sensor network MAC protocols which prioritize energy savings over are transmit- ted in the network, our system consumes only 10% of communication energy than the contention, on-board energy, with location awareness and organized in an ad hoc multi-hop network. Sensors

  17. RealTime Scheduling of SensorBased Control Systems David B. Stewart and Pradeep K. Khosla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scheduler has been implemented as the default scheduler of CHIMERA II, a real­time operating system being­deadline­first, minimum­laxity­first, CHIMERA II Real­Time Operating System. 1 Introduction Many sensor­based control. Section 4 describes our implementation of the MUF scheduler as the default scheduler of the CHIMERA II

  18. Lighting energy savings potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Software, Anyhere; Fernandes, Luis; Lee, Eleanor; Ward, Greg

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate lighting energy savings of split-pane electrochromic (EC) windows controlled to satisfy key visual comfort parameters. Using the Radiance lighting simulation software, interior illuminance and luminance levels were computed for a south-facing private office illuminated by a window split into two independently-controlled EC panes. The transmittance of these was optimized hourly for a workplane illuminance target while meeting visual comfort constraints, using a least-squares algorithm with linear inequality constraints. Blinds were successively deployed until visual comfort criteria were satisfied. The energy performance of electrochromics proved to be highly dependent on how blinds were controlled. With hourly blind position adjustments, electrochromics showed significantly higher (62percent and 53percent, respectively without and with overhang) lighting energy consumption than clear glass. With a control algorithm designed to better approximate realistic manual control by an occupant, electrochromics achieved significant savings (48percent and 37percent, respectively without and with overhang). In all cases, energy consumption decreased when the workplace illuminance target was increased. In addition, the fraction of time during which the occupant had an unobstructed view of the outside was significantly greater with electrochromics: 10 months out of the year versus a handful of days for the reference case.

  19. A review of the environmental survivability of telerobotic control sensor systems for use in nuclear waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, D.E.; Burks, B.L.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). During the next few years field deployment of remotely operated systems in nuclear waste cleanup operations will increase dramatically as DOE strives to efficiently and safely remediate the many waste storage sites. Typically, the most fragile components in remote systems are the sensors that provide feedback to the operators or to computer control algorithms. The purpose of this review is to determine the availability of environmentally hardened sensors to support control of a manipulator or vehicle system in a waste tank environment. The emphasis of the report is on the environmental ruggedness of currently available sensors. For the purpose of this review a set of nominal requirements for survivability were adopted conditions in the single-shell tanks at Hanford. This report is designed to be a practical guide to the state of the art in commercially available environmentally tolerant sensors for use with robotic systems. It is neither intended to be an exhaustive review of the technical literature on potential measurement techniques nor a complete physical review of the functioning of particular sensor systems. This report is intended to be a living document. As additional, corrected, or updated information is received from sensor manufacturers, it will be incorporated into the report database. The physical report will then be periodically revised and released in updated format. The authors wish to apologize to any sources of environmentally hardened sensors that were omitted during this review and encourage submission of new or updated data.

  20. Phase-controllable spin wave generation in iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimine, Isao; Iida, Ryugo; Shimura, Tsutomu [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Satoh, Takuya, E-mail: satoh@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Stupakiewicz, Andrzej; Maziewski, Andrzej [Laboratory of Magnetism, Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Bialystok 15-424 (Poland)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A phase-controlled spin wave was non-thermally generated in bismuth-doped rare-earth iron garnet by linearly polarized light pulses. We controlled the initial phase of the spin wave continuously within a range of 180 by changing the polarization azimuth of the excitation light. The azimuth dependences of the initial phase and amplitude of the spin wave were attributed to a combination of the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect and photoinduced magnetic anisotropy. Temporally and spatially resolved spin wave propagation was observed with a CCD camera, and the waveform was in good agreement with calculations. A nonlinear effect of the spin excitation was observed for excitation fluences higher than 100 mJ/cm{sup 2}.

  1. Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers incentives for non-residential customers to install energy efficient lights and sensors in existing facilities. In addition to rebates for the...

  2. Fiber-optic, anti-cycling, high pressure sodium street light control. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Final Technical Progress Report on a project to develop and market a Fiber-Optic Anti-Cycling High Pressure Sodium Street Light Control. The field test units are now being made with a single vertical PC board design and contains a computer-on-a-chip or PROM IC to take the place of the majority of the components previously contained on the upper logic board. This will reduce the final costs of the unit when it is in production and increase the control`s flexibility. The authors have finished the soft tooling and have made the 400 plastic cases for the field test units. The new configuration of the cases entails a simplified design of the control shell which will have the lenses cast in place. The shell and base plastics are now finished and in final assembly awaiting the completion of the PC boards.

  3. High Precision Control of Indirect Drive Systems Based on End-effector Sensor Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Cheng-Huei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimal control theories such as linear quadratic control and ? control usually provide appropriate controller gains for a given system

  4. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 1 of 6: Optical Sensors and Controls for Improved Basic Oxygen Furnace Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Allendorf; David Ottesen; Donald Hardesty

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an optical sensor for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) off-gas composition and temperature in this Advanced Process Control project has been a laboratory spectroscopic method evolve into a pre-commercialization prototype sensor system. The sensor simultaneously detects an infrared tunable diode laser ITDL beam transmitted through the process off-gas directly above the furnace mouth, and the infrared greybody emission from the particulate-laden off-gas stream. Following developmental laboratory and field-testing, the sensor prototype was successfully tested in four long-term field trials at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore, MD> The resulting optical data were analyzed and reveal correlations with four important process variables: (1) bath turndown temperature; (2) carbon monoxide post-combustion control; (2) bath carbon concentration; and (4) furnace slopping behavior. The optical sensor measurement of the off-gas temperature is modestly correlated with bath turndown temperature. A detailed regression analysis of over 200 heats suggests that a dynamic control level of +25 Degree F can be attained with a stand-alone laser-based optical sensor. The ability to track off-gas temperatures to control post-combustion lance practice is also demonstrated, and may be of great use in optimizing post-combustion efficiency in electric furnace steelmaking operations. In addition to the laser-based absorption spectroscopy data collected by this sensor, a concurrent signal generated by greybody emission from the particle-laden off-gas was collected and analyzed. A detailed regression analysis shows an excellent correlation of a single variable with final bath turndown carbon concentration. Extended field trials in 1998 and early 1999 show a response range from below 0.03% to a least 0.15% carbon concentration with a precision of +0.0007%. Finally, a strong correlation between prolonged drops in the off-gas emission signal and furnace slopping events was observed. A simple computer algorithm was written that successfully predicts furnace slopping for 90% of the heats observed; over 80% are predicted with at least a 30-second warning prior to the initial slopping events,

  5. Performance Control in Wireless Sensor Networks C. J. Sreenan, U. Roedig, J. Brown, C. A. Boano, A. Dunkels, Z. He, T. Voigt, V. Vassiliou, J. Sa Silva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roedig, Utz

    SAP AG Walldorf, Germany Abstract--Most of the currently deployed wireless sensor networks applications do not require performance control. The goal of the GINSENG project is sensor networks that meet scenarios within the GALP oil refinery where the system will be deployed and some initial technical insights

  6. A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: 131-142. California Lighting Technology Center. Hybrid2011 01 July. California Lighting Technology Center.2007. Lighting research program project 4.1 hotel and

  7. Lighting energy savings potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Luis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daylight Coefficients, Lighting Research and Technology,America, 1999, The IESNA lighting handbook: reference andcontrol of electric lighting and blinds, Solar Energy, 77(

  8. Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE (information may be distributed without restriction, subject to copyright controls.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    the event for their gain. The Threats: Internet watch groups and cyber security experts have already potential cyber threats please visit the Center for Internet Security website at CISecurity.org. #12;Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE Traffic Light Protocol: WHITE (information may be distributed without

  9. Control of the positional relationship between a sample collection instrument and a surface to be analyzed during a sampling procedure using a laser sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J. (Clinton, TN); Kertesz, Vilmos (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method utilizes distance-measuring equipment including a laser sensor for controlling the collection instrument-to-surface distance during a sample collection process for use, for example, with mass spectrometric detection. The laser sensor is arranged in a fixed positional relationship with the collection instrument, and a signal is generated by way of the laser sensor which corresponds to the actual distance between the laser sensor and the surface. The actual distance between the laser sensor and the surface is compared to a target distance between the laser sensor and the surface when the collection instrument is arranged at a desired distance from the surface for sample collecting purposes, and adjustments are made, if necessary, so that the actual distance approaches the target distance.

  10. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    peak demand management. Photo sensors for daylight drivenare done by local photo-sensors and control hardwaresensing device in a photo sensor is typically a photodiode,

  11. Initial Study of Solar Control Film in a Hotel Guest Room in Winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, W. C.; Chen, Y.; Mak, B.; Li, D.; Huang, Y.; Xie, H.; Hou, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies about energy performance and its related financial savings and environmental improvement brought by those facilities, such as heat pumps, solar-control film on the window, sensor and dimmer for lighting control, etc. Nevertheless, there is a lack...

  12. Robust design evolution and impact of In-Cylinder Pressure Sensors to combustion control and optimization : a systems and strategy perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eftekhari Shahroudi, Kamran, 1965-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-Cylinder Pressure Sensors (ICPS) today are close to satisfying the robustness, performance and cost requirements for application to closed loop control and monitoring of production automotive engines. Using the Robust ...

  13. Accepted for publication in Algorithmica, to appear VisibilityBased Planning of Sensor Control Strategies \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, Amy

    strategies. An Error Detection and Recovery (EDR) strategy is one that is guaranteed to achieve a specified be used in conjunction with an EDR planner to compute where a sensor should be placed in order

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (OHara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to serve as a template for other utilities projects for control room modernization.

  15. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Optical Sensors for Post Combustion Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking (TRP 9851)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah W. Allendorf; David K. Ottesen; Robert W. Green; Donald R. Hardesty; Robert Kolarik; Howard Goodfellow; Euan Evenson; Marshall Khan; Ovidiu Negru; Michel Bonin; Soren Jensen

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Working in collaboration with Stantec Global Technologies, Process Metrix Corporation, and The Timken Company, Sandia National Laboratories constructed and evaluated a novel, laser-based off-gas sensor at the electric arc furnace facility of Timken's Faircrest Steel Plant (Canton, Ohio). The sensor is based on a mid-infrared tunable diode laser (TDL), and measures the concentration and temperature of specific gas species present in the off-gas emanating from the EAF. The laser beam is transmitted through the gas stream at the fourth hole of the EAF, and provides a real-time, in situ measurement that can be used for process optimization. Two sets of field tests were performed in parallel with Stantec's extractive probe off-gas system, and the tests confirm the TDL sensor's operation and applicability for electric steel making. The sensor measures real-time, in situ line-of-sight carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations between 5% and 35% CO, and measures off-gas temperature in the range of 1400 to 1900 K. In order to achieve commercial-ready status, future work is required to extend the sensor for simultaneous CO and CO{sub 2} concentration measurements. In addition, long-term endurance tests including process optimization must be completed.

  17. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

  18. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    continuous rows, a lighting power density (LPD) of 0.83W/ftThis results in a lighting power density (LPD)of 0.83 wattsfixture (ft 2 ) Lighting power density (W/ft 2 ) Hours per

  19. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wall switches. Lighting power density equals 0.88 watts/switching only. Lighting power density is 1.4 watts/squareMaximum Installed Lighting Power Density (w/sf) Total kWh

  20. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  1. Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

  2. Decentralized Estimation and Control of Graph Connectivity in Mobile Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    buoys to clean up oil spills. In many situations, auxiliary constraints, such as connectivity between in wireless communications and elec- tronics have enabled the development of low-cost sensor networks [1 power iteration algorithm that estimates the eigenvector correspond- ing to the second smallest

  3. A Simple Algorithm for Fault-Tolerant Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    . There have been several research efforts recently on the- oretically studying the necessary condition for k and tiny sensors are even easy to fail accidently. Therefore, it is necessary to design a fault Grant U0735003, the SRFDP under Grant 20050335020, the R&D Program of Zhejiang Province under Grant No

  4. Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The switch helps with cost effective energy savings by turning off the lights when an occupancy sensor says the room is empty.

  5. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Inst. of Resource Ecology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Galperin, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  6. Controlled Synthesis of Organic/Inorganic van de Waals Solid for Tunable Light-matter Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Lin; Cong, Chunxiao; Wu, Chunyang; Wu, Di; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Wang, Xingli; Fu, Wei; Yu, Peng; Fu, Qundong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Yakobson, Boris I; Tay, Beng Kang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Sum, Tze Chien; Jin, Chuanhong; He, Haiyong; Yu, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Van de Waals (vdW) solids, as a new type of artificial materials that consisting of alternative layers bonded by weak interactions, have shed light on fantastic optoelectronic devices. As a result, a large variety of shining vdW devices have been engineered via layer-by-layer stacking of two-dimensional materials, although shadowed by the difficulties of fabrication. Alternatively, direct growth of vdW solids have been proved a scalable and swift way towards vdW solids, reflected by the successful synthesis of graphene/h-BN and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) vertical heterostructures from controlled vapor deposition. Enlightened by it, with a three-step deposition and reaction, we realize high-quality organic and inorganic vdW solids, using methylammonium lead halide as the organic part (organic perovskite) and 2D monolayers inorganic as counterpart. Being a perfect light absorbent, the electrons and holes generated in organic perovskite couple with its inorganic 2D companions, and behave dramaticall...

  7. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  8. Foundations and Light Compass Foundations and Light Compass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jennifer L.

    Foundations and Light Compass Case Study Foundations and Light Compass Case Study Jennifer L. WongQuantitative Sensor--centric Designcentric Design Light CompassLight Compass Models and Abstractions Contaminant Transport Marine Microorganisms Ecosystems, Biocomplexity What is a Light Compass?What is a Light

  9. 2003: Energy performance of daylight-linked automatic lighting control systems in large atrium spaces: report on two field-monitored case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Galasiu; Morad R. Atif; Anca D. Galasiu

    This paper presents the field-measured energy performance of two common types of daylight-linked lighting control systems, continuous dimming and automatic on/off installed in two existing large atrium spaces located in Canada. The daylighting performance was evaluated based on the daylight contribution to the indoor illuminance and the amount of electrical lighting displaced by daylighting via the daylight-linked lighting control systems. Measured daylighting contribution to the space indicates that significant lighting energy savings can be achieved in atrium spaces if the daylight-linked lighting control system is appropriately selected, installed and commissioned throughout its existence. Results extrapolated from measurements collected during summer and winter indicate that as installed, the continuous dimming lighting control system provides 46% annual savings in electrical lighting consumption, while the automatic on/off saves between 11-17% in lighting energy. These savings account for 68% of the lighting energy consumed during main occupancy for the continuous dimming system, and 31.5% for the automatic on/off. Operation irregularities such as a reduced dimming linearity and an incorrect adjustment of the phases of the dimming control system, as well as the inadequate location of the photocell controlling the automatic on/off lighting system, the improper maintenance of the skylight during winter and the oversizing of the lighting system reduced the energy efficiency of the lighting control systems by 30-65%.

  10. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Hydrogen Safety Sensor Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -of-plant components such as air compressors, and sensors and controls." #12;Safety Sensor Performance Goals

  11. An architecture for intelligent sensors and fuzzy inputs for fuzzy logic controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Charles Wayne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have shown that fuzzy logic can be successfully applied to problems that are nonlinear in nature. Specifically in the area of control, many fuzzy logic controllers (FLCS) have been shown to be excellent means of control, most notably...

  12. 2011 Quantum Control of Light & Matter Gordon Research Conference (July 31-August 5, 2011, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Weinacht

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum control of light and matter is the quest to steer a physical process to a desirable outcome, employing constructive and destructive interference. Three basic questions address feasibility of quantum control: (1) The problem of controllability, does a control field exist for a preset initial and target state; (2) Synthesis, constructively finding the field that leads to the target; and (3) Optimal Control Theory - optimizing the field that carries out this task. These continue to be the fundamental theoretical questions to be addressed in the conference. How to realize control fields in the laboratory is an ongoing challenge. This task is very diverse viewing the emergence of control scenarios ranging from attoseconds to microseconds. How do the experimental observations reflect on the theoretical framework? The typical arena of quantum control is an open environment where much of the control is indirect. How are control scenarios realized in dissipative open systems? Can new control opportunities emerge? Can one null decoherence effects? An ideal setting for control is ultracold matter. The initial and final state can be defined more precisely. Coherent control unifies many fields of physical science. A lesson learned in one field can reflect on another. Currently quantum information processing has emerged as a primary target of control where the key issue is controlling quantum gate operation. Modern nonlinear spectroscopy has emerged as another primary field. The challenge is to unravel the dynamics of molecular systems undergoing strong interactions with the environment. Quantum optics where non-classical fields are to be generated and employed. Finally, coherent control is the basis for quantum engineering. These issues will be under the limelight of the Gordon conference on Quantum Control of Light and Matter.

  13. Multispectral polarimetric sensor for glucose monitoring utilizing a digital closed-loop control system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorde, Harshal Wasudeo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    disadvantages of conventional methods is the invasive nature of the tests that raise the risk of patient infection and discomfort. The polarimetric approach is currently being researched to determine glucose levels in the body non-invasively. Polarized light...

  14. arXiv:1112.6136v2[physics.optics]8Mar2012 Controlled manipulation of light by cooperative response of atoms in an optical lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    arXiv:1112.6136v2[physics.optics]8Mar2012 Controlled manipulation of light by cooperative response resonant imaging and may also be employed to form a metamaterial for precise control and manipulation response in an optical lattice to resonant incident light can be employed for precise control

  15. Cross-Database Evaluation Using an Open Finger Vein Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , transmitting NIR light around 850nm through the finger appears to be a suitable technique to image the vein. in 2001 and obtained in 2004 [4]. Commercial physical access control devices based on finger vein were]. As a consequence, research on finger vein recognition requires both to develop and build sensors as well

  16. Abstract--Mobile devices are becoming increasingly sophisti-cated and now incorporate many diverse and powerful sensors.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gary

    sensors, direc- tion sensors (compasses), and acceleration sensors. In this paper we describe and evaluate diverse and powerful sensors. The latest generation of smart phones is especially laden with sensors, including GPS sensors, vision sensors (cameras), audio sensors (microphones), light sensors, temperature

  17. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  18. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  19. Sensors and Controls Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|SecurityDepartment of Energy SeniorFacilitySensors

  20. Daylight control system, device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paton, John Douglas

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  1. Daylight control system device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paton, John Douglas

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  2. Daylight control system device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paton, John Douglas

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  3. 2007 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.286286 Rational Design of Light-Controllable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yue

    2007 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.286286 Rational Design of Light offering control over when and where the release of loaded agents takes place. 2007 The Japan Chemical r M i c e l l e s 287 2007 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. arrived

  4. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 25 OCTOBER 2009 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1430 Controlling X-rays with light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    in these latter experiments. All of these examples use light to modify the target system and X-rays to monitor that use shaped electromagnetic pulses to drive a system along a specified dynamical pathway19 . Similarly-wavelength probes to the X-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response

  5. Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: The development of in situ sensors for ultratrace detection applications in process control and environmental monitoring remains a significant challenge. Such sensors...

  6. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar to the gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.

  7. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar tomorethe gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.less

  8. Image Processing and control of a programmable spatial light modulator for optic damage protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awwal, A; Leach, R; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Matone, J; Heebner, J

    2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The heart of the National Ignition Facility is a megajoule-class laser system consisting of 192 beams used to drive inertial confinement fusion reactions. A recently installed system of programmable, liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulators adds the capability of arbitrarily shaping the spatial beam profiles in order to enhance operational flexibility. Its primary intended use is for introducing 'blocker' obscurations shadowing isolated flaws on downstream optical elements that would otherwise be damaged by high fluence laser illumination. Because an improperly shaped blocker pattern can lead to equipment damage, both the position and shape of the obscurations must be carefully verified prior to high-fluence operations. An automatic alignment algorithm is used to perform detection and estimation of the imposed blocker centroid positions compared to their intended locations. Furthermore, in order to minimize the spatially-varying nonlinear response of the device, a calibration of the local magnification is performed at multiple sub-image locations. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing of this device that helps to enhance the safety and longevity of the overall system.

  9. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  10. A wireless soil moisture smart sensor web using physics-based optimal control: Concept and initial demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moghaddam, Mahta

    This paper introduces a new concept for a smart wireless sensor web technology for optimal measurements of surface-to-depth profiles of soil moisture using in-situ sensors. The objective of the technology, supported by the ...

  11. Electrospun Carbon Nanofiber Webs with Controlled Density of States for Sensor Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Xianwen

    Electrospun carbon nanofiber (CNF) webs with controlled density of states (DOS) are synthesized through varying the carbonization conditions to manipulate the concentration of nanosized graphite domains. These materials ...

  12. High Precision Control of Indirect Drive Systems Based on End-effector Sensor Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Cheng-Huei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    path control of industrial robots with joint elasticity,not available for industrial robots due to cost and assemblyrequirements for industrial robots are becoming more and

  13. Raman Scattering Sensor for Control of the Acid Alkylation Process in Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uibel, Rory, H.; Smith, Lee M.; Benner, Robert, E.

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasoline refineries utilize a process called acid alkylation to increase the octane rating of blended gasoline, and this is the single most expensive process in the refinery. For process efficiency and safety reasons, the sulfuric acid can only be used while it is in the concentration range of 98 to 86 %. The conventional technique to monitor the acid concentration is time consuming and is typically conducted only a few times per day. This results in running higher acid concentrations than they would like to ensure that the process proceeds uninterrupted. Maintaining an excessively high acid concentration costs the refineries millions of dollars each year. Using SBIR funding, Process Instruments Inc. has developed an inline sensor for real time monitoring of acid concentrations in gasoline refinery alkylation units. Real time data was then collected over time from the instrument and its responses were matched up with the laboratory analysis. A model was then developed to correlate the laboratory acid values to the Raman signal that is transmitted back to the instrument from the process stream. The instrument was then used to demonstrate that it could create real-time predictions of the acid concentrations. The results from this test showed that the instrument could accurately predict the acid concentrations to within ~0.15% acid strength, and this level of prediction proved to be similar or better then the laboratory analysis. By utilizing a sensor for process monitoring the most economic acid concentrations can be maintained. A single smaller refinery (50,000 barrels/day) estimates that they should save over $120,000/year, with larger refineries saving considerably more.

  14. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation. As an initial step in accomplishing this effort, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies was held March 2021, 2009, in Columbus, Ohio, to enable industry stakeholders and researchers in identification of the nuclear industrys needs in the areas of future I&C technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. Approaches for collaboration to bridge or fill the technology gaps were presented and R&D activities and priorities recommended. This report documents the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for the plan under development to achieve the goals of the I&C research pathway.

  15. Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

  16. Fuzzy Enhanced Control of an Underactuated Finger Using Tactile and Position Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birglen, Lionel

    to control underactuated hands. This finger has only one motor to close and open the three phalanges. Shape coefficient estimation, vibration detection, internal efforts control, contact geometry estimation, grasp to be prone to noise and to have limited range of measure. This paper proposes to discuss their application

  17. Redundant Sensor Calibration and Estimation for Monitoring and Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Asok Ray and Robert M. Edwards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Redundant Sensor Calibration and Estimation for Monitoring and Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin@engr.psu.edu INTRODUCTION Performance, reliability and safety of nuclear power plants depend upon validity and accuracy are installed with redundancy in nuclear power plants. Redundancy can be classified into two groups: direct

  18. On the robustness of clustered sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jung Jin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart devices with multiple on-board sensors, networked through wired or wireless links, are distributed in physical systems and environments. Broad applications of such sensor networks include manufacturing quality control and wireless sensor...

  19. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous mobile sensor networks consist of a number of autonomous mobile robots equipped with various sensors and tasked with a common mission. This thesis considers the topology control of such an ad hoc mobile sensor network. In particular, I...

  20. Performance of Personal Workspace Controls Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila; Loffeld, John; Pettler,Pete; Snook, Joel

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key deliverables for the DOE-funded controls research at LBNL for FY04 was the development of a prototype Personal Workspace Control system. The successful development of this system is a critical milestone for the LBNL Lighting Controls Research effort because this system demonstrates how IBECS can add value to today's Task Ambient lighting systems. LBNL has argued that by providing both the occupant and the facilities manager with the ability to precisely control the operation of overhead lighting and all task lighting in a coordinated manner, that task ambient lighting can optimize energy performance and occupant comfort simultaneously [Reference Task Ambient Foundation Document]. The Personal Workspace Control system is the application of IBECS to this important lighting problem. This report discusses the development of the Personal Workspace Control to date including descriptions of the different fixture types that have been converted to IBECS operation and a detailed description of the operation of PWC Scene Controller, which provides the end user with precise control of his task ambient lighting system. The objective, from the Annual Plan, is to demonstrate improvements in efficiency, lighting quality and occupant comfort realized using Personal Workspace Controls (PWC) designed to optimize the delivery of lighting to the individual's workstation regardless of which task-ambient lighting solution is chosen. The PWC will be capable of controlling floor-mounted, desk lamps, furniture-mounted and overhead lighting fixtures from a personal computer and handheld remote. The PWC will use an environmental sensor to automatically monitor illuminance, temperature and occupancy and to appropriately modulate ambient lighting according to daylight availability and to switch off task lighting according to local occupancy. [Adding occupancy control to the system would blunt the historical criticism of occupant-controlled lighting - the tendency of the occupant to leave lights on]. The PWC will be an entirely open networking system in which all manufacturers of task lights, furniture-mounted lighting and ballast manufacturers can participate and have a business position.

  1. Reimagining Building Sensing and Control (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polese, L.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings are responsible for 40% of US energy consumption, and sensing and control technologies are an important element in creating a truly sustainable built environment. Motion-based occupancy sensors are often part of these control systems, but are usually altered or disabled in response to occupants' complaints, at the expense of energy savings. Can we leverage commodity hardware developed for other sectors and embedded software to produce more capable sensors for robust building controls? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) 'Image Processing Occupancy Sensor (IPOS)' is one example of leveraging embedded systems to create smarter, more reliable, multi-function sensors that open the door to new control strategies for building heating, cooling, ventilation, and lighting control. In this keynote, we will discuss how cost-effective embedded systems are changing the state-of-the-art of building sensing and control.

  2. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200700251 Control of Specular and Diffuse Reflection of Light Using Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ilsoon

    reflectors are widely used in the back-light units of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels,[1­4] light-emitting diodes (LED)[5,6] and solar cell devices.[7,8] A perfect diffuse reflector is matter that reflects and low solar absorption, metals easily satisfy the general requirements for diffuse reflectors

  3. DISPLACEMENT SENSORS AND ACTUATORS NEEDED TO CONTROL A SEGMENTED PRIMARY MIRROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabor, George

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48. References to a comp~~YEnergy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER This documentof Under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 rgy TO CONTROL A MIRROR

  4. WristQue : a personal sensor wristband for smart infrastructure and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayton, Brian D. (Brian Dean)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the rapid expansion of computers beyond desktop systems into devices and systems in the environment around us, the control interfaces to these systems are often basic and inadequate, particularly for infrastructure ...

  5. High Precision Control of Indirect Drive Systems Based on End-effector Sensor Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Cheng-Huei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Block diagram of a single-joint indirect drive train witha Figure 4.4: Block diagram of a single-joint indirect driveBlock diagram of the control system given in Section 3.6. Single-Joint

  6. Engineered sensors and genetic regulatory networks for control of cellular metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moser, Felix, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex synthetic genetic programs promise unprecedented control over cellular metabolism and behavior. In this thesis, I describe the design and development of a synthetic genetic program to detect conditions underlying ...

  7. Synthetic Control and Bioconjugation of Magnetite Nanoparticles for the Development of an in vivo Glucose Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gingrich, Phillip

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    (Fe3O4) nanoparticles was investigated utilizing the thermal decomposition method and iron (III) stearate as a readily available and economical precursor. Nucleation periods were observed to be kinetically controlled by and directly proportional...

  8. Topical viscosity control for light hydrocarbon displacing fluids in petroleum recovery and in fracturing fluids for well stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heller, John P. (Socorro, NM); Dandge, Dileep K. (Socorro, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solvent-type flooding fluids comprising light hydrocarbons in the range of ethane to hexane (and mixtures thereof) are used to displace crude oil in formations having temperatures of about 20 degrees to about 150 degrees Centigrade and pressures above about 650 psi, the light hydrocarbons having dissolved therein from about 0.05% to about 3% of an organotin compound of the formula R.sub.3 SnF where each R is independently an alkyl, aryl or alkyaryl group from 3 to 12 carbon atoms. Under the pressures and temperatures described, the organotin compounds become pentacoordinated and linked through the electronegative bridges, forming polymers within the light hydrocarbon flooding media to render them highly viscous. Under ambient conditions, the viscosity control agents will not readily be produced from the formation with either crude oil or water, since they are insoluble in the former and only sparingly soluble in the latter.

  9. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  10. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  11. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  12. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  13. Coherent control of light transport in a dense and disordered atomic ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Sheremet; D. F. Kornovan; L. V. Gerasimov; B. Gouraud; J. Laurat; D. V. Kupriyanov

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Light transport in a dense and disordered cold atomic ensemble, where the cooperation of atomic dipoles essentially modifies their coupling with the radiation modes, offers an alternative approach to light-matter interfacing protocols. Here, we show how the cooperativity and quasi-static dipole interaction affect the process of light propagation under the conditions of electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We perform comparative analysis of the self-consistent approach with ab-initio microscopic calculations and emphasize the role of the interatomic interaction in the dipoles' dynamics. Our results show that in such a dense and strongly disordered system the EIT-based light storage protocol stays relatively insensitive to configuration variations and can be obtained with essentially less atoms than it is normally needed for dilute configurations.

  14. Sensor-network-based robust distributed control and estimation P. Milln a,n,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    control strategies typically rely on the assumption of centrality: the information collected about, such as traffic systems, water delivery channels, oil/gas pipelines, electrical power grids water, manufacturing these cases the centrality assumption no longer holds, and a decentralized or distributed strategy is often

  15. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated interferometric sensor depends on an appropriate performance function (e.g., desired displacement range, accuracy, robustness, etc.). In this dissertation, the performance limitations of a bundled differential intensity-modulated displacement sensor are analyzed, where the bundling configuration has been designed to optimize performance. The performance limitations of a white light Fabry-Perot displacement sensor are also analyzed. Both these sensors are non-contacting, but they have access to different regions of the performance-space. Further, both these sensors have different degrees of sensitivity to experimental uncertainty. Made in conjunction with careful analysis, the decision of which sensor to deploy need not be an uninformed one.

  16. Multi-dimensional position sensor using range detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small, non-contact optical sensor uses ranges and images to detect its relative position to an object in up to six degrees of freedom. The sensor has three light emitting range detectors which illuminate a target and can be used to determine distance and two tilt angles. A camera located between the three range detectors senses the three remaining degrees of freedom, two translations and one rotation. Various range detectors, with different light sources, e.g. lasers and LEDs, different collection options, and different detection schemes, e.g. diminishing return and time of flight can be used. This sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines, e.g. it can instruct a robot how to adjust automatically to different positions and orientations of a part.

  17. Technology Development: Wireless Sensors and Controls BT0201 Review of Energy Scavenging Schemes and Recommended Order of Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.; Olsen, Larry C.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the characteristics of four candidate concepts that extract and convert ambient energy to provide electrical power for wireless sensors.

  18. Lighting and Daylight Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bos, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposing us to the latest products and technologies. Daylight Harvesting A system of controlling the direction and the quantity of light both natural and artificial within a given space. This implies: Control of fenestration in terms of size..., transmission and direction. Control of reflected light within a space. Control of electric light in terms of delivery and amount Daylight harvesting systems are typically designed to maintain a minimum recommended light level. This light level...

  19. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  20. Lighting energy savings potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Luis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Performance of Electrochromic Windows Controlled forenergy performance of electrochromic windows. Proceedingssignal for daylight (electrochromic window, no overhang).

  1. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisner, R.; Melin, A.; Burress, T.; Fugate, D.; Holcomb, D.; Wilgen, J.; Miller, J.; Wilson, D.; Silva, P.; Whitlow, L.; Peretz, F.

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate improved reliability and increased performance made possible by deeply embedding instrumentation and controls (I&C) in nuclear power plant (NPP) components and systems. The project is employing a highly instrumented canned rotor, magnetic bearing, fluoride salt pump as its I&C technology demonstration platform. I&C is intimately part of the basic millisecond-by-millisecond functioning of the system; treating I&C as an integral part of the system design is innovative and will allow significant improvement in capabilities and performance. As systems become more complex and greater performance is required, traditional I&C design techniques become inadequate and more advanced I&C needs to be applied. New I&C techniques enable optimal and reliable performance and tolerance of noise and uncertainties in the system rather than merely monitoring quasistable performance. Traditionally, I&C has been incorporated in NPP components after the design is nearly complete; adequate performance was obtained through over-design. By incorporating I&C at the beginning of the design phase, the control system can provide superior performance and reliability and enable designs that are otherwise impossible. This report describes the progress and status of the project and provides a conceptual design overview for the platform to demonstrate the performance and reliability improvements enabled by advanced embedded I&C.

  2. Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

  3. Real-time combustion control and diagnostics sensor-pressure oscillation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, E. David (Morgantown, WV); Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV)

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and controlling the combustion process in a combustion system to determine the amplitude and/or frequencies of dynamic pressure oscillations during combustion. An electrode in communication with the combustion system senses hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by the combustion process and calibration apparatus calibrates the relationship between the standard deviation of the current in the electrode and the amplitudes of the dynamic pressure oscillations by applying a substantially constant voltage between the electrode and ground resulting in a current in the electrode and by varying one or more of (1) the flow rate of the fuel, (2) the flow rate of the oxidant, (3) the equivalence ratio, (4) the acoustic tuning of the combustion system, and (5) the fuel distribution in the combustion chamber such that the amplitudes of the dynamic pressure oscillations in the combustion chamber are calculated as a function of the standard deviation of the electrode current. Thereafter, the supply of fuel and/or oxidant is varied to modify the dynamic pressure oscillations.

  4. Evaluation of Manufacturability of Embedded Sensors and Controls with Canned Rotor Pump System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Silva, Pamela C [ORNL; Cruz Molina, Carola [ORNL

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the current status of fabrication and assembly planning for the magnetic bearing, canned rotor pump being used as a demonstration platform for deeply integrating I&C into nuclear power plant components. The report identifies material choices and fabrication sequences for all of the required parts and the issues that need to be either resolved or accommodated during the manufacturing process. Down selection between material options has not yet been performed. Potential suppliers for all of the necessary materials have also been identified. The assembly evaluation begins by logically subdividing the pump into modules, which are themselves decomposed into individual parts. Potential materials and fabrication processes for each part in turn are then evaluated. The evaluation process includes assessment of the environmental compatibility requirements and the tolerances available for the selected fabrication processes. A description of the pump power/control electronics is also provided. The report also includes exploded views of the modules that show the integration of the various parts into modules that are then assembled to form the pump. Emphasis has been placed on thermal environment compatibility and the part dimensional changes during heat-up. No insurmountable fabrication or assembly challenges have been identified.

  5. Optical humidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  6. Design of a Personalized Lighting Control System Enabled by a Space Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suter, G.; Petrushevski, F.; Sipetic, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    user may specify a target illuminance of 450 - 550 lx. 2. Target ceiling to desk lighting ratio according to user preference. For laptop work a user may specify a target ratio of 40 % to 60 %. 3. Distance of ceiling luminaires to the user?s desk... of the Eleventh International Conference Enhanced Building Operations, New York City, October 18-20, 2011 Figure 2. Sequence diagram of system module interactions for the scenario. Figure 3...

  7. Controlled light localisation and nonlinear-optical interactions of short laser pulses in holey fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Golovan', Leonid A; Kashkarov, Pavel K [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tarasevitch, A P; Podshivalov, Alexey A [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alfimov, Mikhail V; Ivanov, Anatoliy A [Photochemistry Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Beloglazov, V I [Institute of Technology and Processing of Glass Structures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov (Russian Federation); Haus, J W [University of Dayton, Dayton, OH (United States); Linde, D von der [Institut fur Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Universitat Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the structure of holey-fibre cladding on the effective waveguide mode area and the spectral broadening of femtosecond pulses of titanium-sapphire and forsterite lasers is experimentally studied. These experiments demonstrate that the increase in the air-filling fraction of the holey-fibre cladding may substantially enhance the spectral broadening of laser pulses due to the increase in the degree of light localisation in the fibre core. (femtosecond technologies)

  8. Sensors & Measurement | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    elements. The nexus of sensors, signal processing and analysis, modeling, and advanced control algorithms and architectures underpin this important field of technology at ORNL....

  9. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  10. Morphology-controlled synthesis of Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolkshell structure titanium oxide with superior photocatalytic activity under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shixiong [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China); Yang, Xiangjun, E-mail: 573134536@qq.com [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China); Wang, Yapeng; Liu, Lixiang; Guo, Yuanyuan [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China); Guo, Hong, E-mail: guohongcom@126.com [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qujing Normal University, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolkshell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates are fabricated through an environmental template-free route and the reduction reaction at low temperature subsequently. After the Ti{sup 3+} doping, the reduced TiO{sub 2} sample exhibits a wide visible-light absorption ranged from 400 nm to 800 nm. The intrinsic hollow coreshell microstructure can make multiple reflections of light within the chamber, and thus results in more efficient use of the light source compared with solid structure. Besides, the large surface area can render the sample with a high activity. Therefore, Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolkshell structure titanium oxide exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. This strategy is simple, cheap and mass-productive, which may shed light on a new avenue for large scale production of self-doped yolkshell structural nano functional materials for catalyst, sensors, energy storage and other new applications. - Graphical abstract: A facile generic strategy is employed to prepare Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolkshell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. - Highlights: Yolkshell TiO{sub 2} mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolkshell structure titanium oxide is obtained at low temperature. It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity.

  11. How the Number and Placement of Sensors Controlling Room Air Distribution Systems Affect Energy Use and Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Arens, E.; Webster, T.; Shi, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the impact of sensor number and placement on the energy needed to condition a typical office using several likely variants of an underfloor air distribution system (UFAD). The study uses an empirical-based room stratification...

  12. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  13. Filamantation and White Light Generation with Spatially and Temporally Controlled Femtosecond Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaya, Necati

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    or crossing two femtosecond laser beams in a medium. Additionally, as the first step toward coherent control and manipulation of the interaction of femtosecond radiation with molecular systems, a reconstruction of the momentum fragment distribution of laser...

  14. Measurement and control of exciton spin in organic light emitting devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Michael, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic semiconductors are a promising new material set for electronic and optoelectronic devices. Their properties can be precisely controlled through chemistry, and they are well-suited for large-area, flexible, and ...

  15. Effects of Biodiesel Operation on Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Emission Control Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Nanjundaswamy, H.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents the impact of biodiesel blends on engine-out emissions as well as overall system performance in terms of emissions control system calibration and overall system efficiency.

  16. Functionalized Nanoparticles and Surfaces for Controlled Chemical Catalysis and Effective Light Harvesting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marye Anne Fox, James K. Whitesell

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have prepared a range of such arrays as key components for biotechnology and photonic applications. These involve self-assembled arrays of increasing complexity with three-dimensionally disposed multilayer interactions. These arrays also include dendrimers as the distinguishing structural building blocks. These photoactive integrated systems have a regular, highly-branched, three-dimensional architecture. Structural modifications of these units include variation of the core, bridging layers, and terminal groups. These modifications result in a large array of dendritic molecules with potential applications for light harvesting.

  17. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls Norma Isahakian, City of Los Angeles Bureau of Street Lighting San Jose's "Smart" LED Streetlights: Controlled Amy Olay, City of San Jose Adaptive Lighting Controls...

  18. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  19. Sensor for Individual Burner Control of Coal Firing Rate, Fuel-Air Ratio and Coal Fineness Correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Demler

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate, cost-efficient monitoring instrumentation has long been considered essential to the operation of power plants. Nonetheless, for the monitoring of coal flow, such instrumentation has been sorely lacking and technically difficult to achieve. With more than half of the electrical power in the United States currently supplied by coal, energy generated by this resource is critical to the US economy. The demand for improvement in this area has only increased as a result of the following two situations: First, deregulation has produced a heightened demand for both reduced electrical cost and improved grid connectivity. Second, environmental concerns have simultaneously resulted in a need for both increased efficiency and reduced carbon and NOx emissions. A potential approach to addressing both these needs would be improvement in the area of combustion control. This would result in a better heat rate, reduced unburned carbon in ash, and reduced NOx emissions. However, before feedback control can be implemented, the ability to monitor coal flow to the burners in real-time must be established. While there are several ''commercially available'' products for real-time coal flow measurement, power plant personnel are highly skeptical about the accuracy and longevity of these systems in their current state of development. In fact, following several demonstration projects of in-situ coal flow measurement systems in full scale utility boilers, it became obvious that there were still many unknown influences on these instruments during field applications. Due to the operational environment of the power plant, it has been difficult if not impossible to sort out what parameters could be influencing the various probe technologies. Additionally, it has been recognized for some time that little is known regarding the performance of coal flow splitters, even where rifflers are employed. Often the coal flow distribution from these splitters remains mal-distributed. There have been mixed results in the field using variable orifices in coal pipes. Development of other coal flow control devices has been limited. An underlying difficulty that, to date, has hindered the development of an accurate instrument for coal flow measurements is the fact that coal flow is characterized by irregular temporal and spatial variation. However, despite the inherent complexity of the dynamic system, the system is in fact deterministic. Therefore, in principle, the coal flow can be deduced from the dynamics it exhibits. Nonetheless, the interactions are highly nonlinear, rendering standard signal processing approaches, which rely on techniques such as frequency decomposition, to be of little value. Foster-Miller, Inc. has developed a methodology that relates the complex variation in such systems to the information of interest. This technology will be described in detail in Section 2. A second concern regarding the current measurement systems is installation, which can be labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive. A process that does not require the pulverizer to be taken off line would be highly desirable. Most microwave and electrostatic methods require drilling up to 20 holes in the pipe, all with a high degree of precision so as to produce a proper alignment of the probes. At least one electrostatic method requires a special spool piece to be fitted into each existing coal pipe. Overall, these procedures are both difficult and very expensive. An alternative approach is pursued here, namely the development of an instrument that relies on an acoustic signal captured by way of a commercial accelerometer. The installation of this type of sensor is both simpler and less invasive than other techniques. An accelerometer installed in a pipe wall need not penetrate through the wall, which means that the system may be able to remain on line during the installation. Further, due to the fact that the Dynamical Instruments technology, unlike other systems, does not rely on uniformity of the air or coal profile, the installation location need not be on a long, straight run

  20. Research report of street lighting controls for the City of Portland, Oregon: References

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 220 units were tested in the City of Philadelphia. Every control carries its own serial number of identification and test purposes. The units were installed in March of 1978 and to date we show zero failures. Data on burning time consistancy will be available from their engineering staff and will be made available to interested engineers with the City of Philadelphia's permission. Th basic design of the unit and current 20 month filed evaluation indicated that our solid state control is living up to expectations. We feel that a unit warranted at 6 times the current period that offers substantial savings in line service calls at a 100% bonus by our rough calculations, deserves a chance to prove itself in the field.

  1. Electrochromic-photovoltaic film for light-sensitive control of optical transmittance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO); Crandall, Richard S. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable transmittance optical component includes an electrochromic material and a photovoltaic device-type thin film solar cell deposited in a tandem type, monolithic single coating over the component. A bleed resistor of a predetermined value is connected in series across the electrochromic material and photovoltaic device controlling the activation and deactivation of the electrochromic material. The electrical conductivity between the electrochromic material and the photovoltaic device is enhanced by interposing a transparent electrically conductive layer.

  2. Electrochromic-photovoltaic film for light-sensitive control of optical transmittance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H.M.; Crandall, R.S.; Tracy, C.E.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable transmittance optical component includes an electrochromic material and a photovoltaic device-type thin film solar cell deposited in a tandem type, monolithic single coating over the component. A bleed resistor of a predetermined value is connected in series across the electrochromic material and photovoltaic device controlling the activation and deactivation of the electrochromic material. The electrical conductivity between the electrochromic material and the photovoltaic device is enhanced by interposing a transparent electrically conductive layer. 5 figures.

  3. FEMTOSECOND TIMING DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR NEXT GENERATION ACCELERATORS AND LIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Li-Jin [Idesta Quantum Electronics, LLC

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond Timing Distribution At LCLS Free-electron-lasers (FEL) have the capability of producing high photon flux from the IR to the hard x-ray wavelength range and to emit femtosecond and eventually even at-tosecond pulses. This makes them an ideal tool for fundamental as well as applied re-search. Timing precision at the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) between the x-ray FEL (XFEL) and ultrafast optical lasers is currently no better than 100 fs RMS. Ideally this precision should be much better and could be limited only by the x-ray pulse duration, which can be as short as a few femtoseconds. An increasing variety of science problems involving electron and nuclear dynamics in chemical and material systems will become accessible as the timing improves to a few femtoseconds. Advanced methods of electron beam conditioning or pulse injection could allow the FEL to achieve pulse durations less than one femtosecond. The objec-tive of the work described in this proposal is to set up an optical timing distribution sys-tem based on modelocked Erbium doped fiber lasers at LCLS facility to improve the timing precision in the facility and allow time stamping with a 10 fs precision. The primary commercial applications for optical timing distributions systems are seen in the worldwide accelerator facilities and next generation light sources community. It is reasonable to expect that at least three major XFELs will be built in the next decade. In addition there will be up to 10 smaller machines, such as FERMI in Italy and Maxlab in Sweden, plus the market for upgrading already existing facilities like Jefferson Lab. The total market is estimated to be on the order of a 100 Million US Dollars. The company owns the exclusive rights to the IP covering the technology enabling sub-10 fs synchronization systems. Testing this technology, which has set records in a lab environment, at LCLS, hence in a real world scenario, is an important corner stone of bringing the technology to market.

  4. Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Stork; R. Poola

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM{sub 2.5}). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO{sub x} and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles.

  5. Prevention of ice formation in light-aircraft-engine induction systems by using an automatic control to operate the carburetor-air heater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenhunt, Garland Bishop

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A A III COLLEGE OF TEXAS PREVENTION OF ICE FORMATION IN LIGHT-AIRCRAFT-EIEIINE INDUCTION SYSTEMS BY USING AN AUTOMATIC CONTROL TO OPERATE THE CARBURETOB AIR HEATER A Thesis GARLAND BISHOP MHISENHUNT & JR SuIm&itted to the Graduate... School of the Agricultural and Mechanioal College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1955 MAJOR SUBJECT ' MECHANICAL ENGINEERING& PREVENTION OF ICE FORMATION IN LIGHT...

  6. Utilizing Daylighting Controls in a Manufacturing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, S. S.; Maxwell, G. M.

    Utilizing Daylighting Controls in a Manufacturing Facility Som S. Shrestha Dr. Gregory M. Maxwell PhD Candidate Associate Professor som@iastate.edu gmaxwell@iastate.edu Iowa State University Ames, IA ABSTRACT Opportunities exist... to reduce artificial lighting in manufacturing facilities which have skylights and/or fenestration that provide sufficient quantities of daylight to the work space. Using photometric sensors to measure the illuminance in the space, artificial lights can...

  7. Soft Sensors for Process Monitoring of Complex Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serpas, Mitchell Roy

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft sensors are an essential component of process systems engineering schemes. While soft sensor design research is important, investigation into the relationships between soft sensors and other areas of advanced monitoring and control is crucial...

  8. Sensor Compendium - A Snowmass Whitepaper-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Battaglia, M. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bolla, G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Bortoletto, D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Caberera, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Carlstrom, J E [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, C. L. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cooper, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Da Via, C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Demarteau, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fast, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frisch, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States), et al.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  9. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  10. Progress In Electromagnetics Research M, Vol. 37, 1120, 2014 Energy Optimized Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring inside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    , lighting, cooling, humidity levels and ventilation systems in a building using the electronic devicesProgress In Electromagnetics Research M, Vol. 37, 1120, 2014 Energy Optimized Wireless Sensor. INTRODUCTION Building Automation System (BAS) challenges to monitor and have automatic control of the security

  11. Building Automation and Controls Systems: Integrated Room Control for Personalized Comfort and Increased ROI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14-17, 2014 Smart Room Control Solution Architecture Example HVAC Master Controller 1 Light Module Blind Module Power Multisensors Room Sensors Power Mobile App ESL-IC-14-09-05 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building... Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 An End-to-End Solution ? Simplified design, installation and integration of integrated room control solutions ? Increased reliability of integrated systems ? Simplified architecture = simpler design...

  12. Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

  13. A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

  14. Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

  15. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  16. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  17. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  18. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  19. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  20. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  1. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM); Lentine, Anthony L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  2. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  3. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  4. Bathroom lights generally operate between five to eight hours per occupied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -specific luminaire that integrates a low-wattage light-emitting diode (LED) nightlight and an occupancy sensor

  5. Fiber sensors for molecular detection using Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xuan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compact and reliable sensors for gas detection in applications for environmental control. While global

  6. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (Tijeras, NM); Michie, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems.

  7. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Michie, R.B.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems. 8 figs.

  8. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  9. Main Canal, Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District above Central Power and Light hydro-electric plant, at Maverick and Kinney Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledbetter, John J

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BAIN CANAL NA~ICK COUNTY WATW CONTROL AND INPROllZXBZ DISTRICT ABOVE C~ POWER AND LION HYDRO ELECTRIC PLANT& AT, SIAVERICK AND KINNEY COUNT'S, T~~S By John J. Ledbetter, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: (Che man Committee Heed of pa... ment or Student Advisor May l952 MAIN CANAL RIA~ICK C01E1TY EATER CONTROL AND INPROVZGiWZ DISTRICT ABOVE G~ F01' AND LIGHT HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT, AT MAVERICK AND KINNEY GGKJZIES ~ TEXAS By John J. Ledbetter, Jr, A Thesis Submitted...

  10. 444 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2013 Flexible Sputter-Deposited Carbon Strain Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    - ventional sensors [1]. This new generation of light, flexible, and low cost polymeric sensors are very444 IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2013 Flexible Sputter-Deposited Carbon Strain on a flexible polyimide substrate. Amorphous carbon was sputter-deposited onto a 125-m-thick polyimide film

  11. Preliminary Call for Papers SNA-2011 The Third International Symposium on Sensor Networks and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Fei

    -organization Congestion control and traffic models Mobile sensor and actor networks Underwater/acoustic sensor networks Pollution /air quality monitoring Building automation / visitors' guiding system Plant / farm monitoring

  12. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry...

  13. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  14. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenholz, Elke; Belkacem, Ali; Cocke, Lew; Corlett, John; Falcone, Roger; Fischer, Peter; Fleming, Graham; Gessner, Oliver; Hasan, M. Zahid; Hussain, Zahid; Kevan, Steve; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Nelson, Keith; Neumark, Dan; Nilsson, Anders; Siegmann, Hans; Stocks, Malcolm; Schafer, Ken; Schoenlein, Robert; Spence, John; Weber, Thorsten

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past quarter century, light-source user facilities have transformed research in areas ranging from gas-phase chemical dynamics to materials characterization. The ever-improving capabilities of these facilities have revolutionized our ability to study the electronic structure and dynamics of atoms, molecules, and even the most complex new materials, to understand catalytic reactions, to visualize magnetic domains, and to solve protein structures. Yet these outstanding facilities still have limitations well understood by their thousands of users. Accordingly, over the past several years, many proposals and conceptual designs for"next-generation" x-ray light sources have been developed around the world. In order to survey the scientific problems that might be addressed specifically by those new light sources operating below a photon energy of about 3 keV and to identify the scientific requirements that should drive the design of such facilities, a workshop"Science for a New Class of Soft X-Ray Light Sources" was held in Berkeley in October 2007. From an analysisof the most compelling scientific questions that could be identified and the experimental requirements for answering them, we set out to define, without regard to the specific technologies upon which they might be based, the capabilities such light sources would have to deliver in order to dramatically advance the state of research in the areas represented in the programs of the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). This report is based on the workshop presentations and discussions.

  15. Modelling, simulation and analysis of low-cost direct torque control of PMSM using hall-effect sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Salih Baris

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    +steady-state)........................................................175 8.27. Agitation speed control test-bed...................................................................176 8.28. Load torque ( L ), , , and at a 0.35 second ramp time emref emest emact when the PI integrator initial value is 7... N?m................................................182 8.29. s? (Reference Stator Flux), _s est and _s act at a 0.35 second ramp time when the PI integrator initial value is 7 N?m................................................183 8...

  16. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design, Implementation, and EvaluationImplementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim Bolbrock, Guohong Cao, and Tom La of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview Sensor networks mobile sensor mobile robot Mote sensor relocation

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 22, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 557 Illumination Balancing Algorithm for Smart Lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    issues (e.g., ozone depletion, global warming) point to the necessity of research that aims to avoid. It consumes close to 15% and 35% of the electricity used in residential and commercial buildings, respectively% of the electricity. Commercial buildings account for close to 71%, 18% of which is overall lighting electricity use

  18. Evaluation of surfactants as steam diverters/mobility control agents in light oil steamfloods: Effect of oil composition, rates and experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of commercially available surfactants for steam-foam EOR applications in light oil reservoirs. The experiments were performed in a 3-ft long, 1-1/2 in.-diameter cylindrical sandpack of about 1 darcy permeability. The sandpack and injected fluids were preheated to 430{degree}F at 155 psi. The main objective of these tests was to investigate the effectiveness of several surfactants in providing mobility control under a variety of conditions expected in light-oil steamfloods. Thus, maximum pressure-rise and foam-bank buildup/decay were noted as operating conditions were changed in a test or in various tests. Tests were performed with various oil types, sacrificial salts, injection rates, injection strategies, vapor-to-liquid fractions (VLF), and steam/N{sub 2} ratios (SNR).

  19. Identifying Lights with their Switches Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Identifying Lights with their Switches Jayadev Misra 09/07/2012 Problem Description Given are N switches and N lights where each switch controls exactly one light and each light is controlled by exactly of selecting some number of switches and turning them on, and, presumably, noting the lights that come

  20. DRIVE CYCLE EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS ESTIMATES FOR REACTIVITY CONTROLLED COMPRESSION IGNITION IN A MULTI-CYLINDER LIGHT-DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The RCCI concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that by varying both the percent of premixed gasoline and EGR rate, stable combustion can be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. Changing the percent premixed gasoline changes the fuel reactivity stratification in the cylinder providing further control of combustion phasing and pressure rise rate than the use of EGR alone. This paper examines the combustion and emissions performance of light-duty diesel engine using direct injected diesel fuel and port injected gasoline to carry out RCCI for steady-state engine conditions which are consistent with a light-duty drive cycle. A GM 1.9L four-cylinder engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure EGR system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline. Engine-out emissions, engine performance and combustion behavior for RCCI operation is compared against both CDC and a premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) strategy which relies on high levels of EGR dilution. The effect of percent of premixed gasoline, EGR rate, boost level, intake mixture temperature, combustion phasing and pressure rise rate is investigated for RCCI combustion for the light-duty modal points. Engine-out emissions of NOx and PM were found to be considerably lower for RCCI operation as compared to CDC and PCCI, while HC and CO emissions were higher. Brake thermal efficiency was similar or higher for many of the modal conditions for RCCI operation. The emissions results are used to estimate hot-start FTP-75 emissions levels with RCCI and are compared against CDC and PCCI modes.

  1. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  2. LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SECTION 3 LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology 2. Sources & luminaires 3. Controls #12;SECTION 3SECTION 3 DISCUSSION: COMMON LIGHTING TERMINOLOGY 1. What are the definitions of the following lighting terms? 2. Do you use these terms in professional practice? 3. What other lighting terminology do you use

  3. LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology 2. Sources and luminaires 3. Controls #12;SECTION 2 DISCUSSION: COMMON LIGHTING TERMINOLOGY 1. What are the definitions of the following lighting terms? 2. Do you use these terms in professional practice? 3. What other lighting terminology do you use on the job? SLIDE 14

  4. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  5. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  6. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  7. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  8. SICS: A Sensor-based in-line control system for the surfaces of continuously cast slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh [OG Technologies, Inc.

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase II project has been carried out in accordance to the proposed tasks and budget, based on the original and extended schedule. The R&D team designed and implemented the test unit for the full width coverage, installed the unit in a caster. The development work further included enhanced image processing, in-depth defect study and process control models. The function, operation, and maintenance of the SICS was thoroughly studied during the Phase II research. The experience indicates additional hardware and procedures are required to make the SICS a commercially ready product in operation and maintenance aspect. Such developments have been finished and the team is contacting potential customers for the first commercial installation of SICS. Additionally, OGT is exploring the possibility to team up with a US company that specializes in surface cleaning for slabs/blooms/billets such that the in-line surface inspection can be integrated with in-line surface clean up for the maximum benefit to the steel industry.

  9. A Biologically Inspired Networking Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charalambous, Charalambos

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    in sensor nodes demand energy-aware network control. In this thesis, we propose an energy- efficient topology management model inspired by biological inter-cellular signaling schemes. The model allows sensor nodes to cluster around imminent targets in a...

  10. Proposal -Interactive City Lighting LED based lighting systems have enabled radically new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposal - Interactive City Lighting Abstract LED based lighting systems have also be integrated with sensors and smart environments. This has opened up a new world. The use of the LED as a potential means for providing interactive city lighting for social

  11. Mixed potential sensors for CO monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, R. (Rangachary); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon monoxide sensor based on the phenomenon of 'mixed-potential' has been developed. The sensor consists of platinum and gold wire-electrodes embedded in a Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} electrolyte. The sensor response to 500 ppm of CO in room air is {approx} 100 mV at 400 C. The response time to 90% of level is < 5 sec and the response is stable over a period of several months. Moreover, the sensor to sensor reproducibility of these controlled-interface sensors is excellent. The sensor in combination with an activated carbon filter shows great promise for application as a room air CO monitor.

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  13. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenholz, Elke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polarization control is the slicing beamline at BESSY.Recent BESSY results on ferromagnetic Ni have unambiguously200 eV) NSLS-II (10 keV) BESSY FEL (1 keV) 3rd Generation

  14. Controlled synthesis of T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} and enhanced visible light responsive photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Shuying; Yu, Chongfei; Li, Yukun [School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Li, Yihui [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Sun, Jianhui, E-mail: sunjh@htu.cn [School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Geng, Xiaofei [School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Key Laboratory for Yellow River and Huai River Water Environment and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Henan Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} microcrystal photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal method with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant SDBS in the present study. Having received well characterization with the aid of various techniques and the results showed that the SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}, which had a unique T shape and belonged to the monoclinic family. The fast exchange dynamics between the surfactants bound to the Bi{sup 3+} seed surface and the free VO{sub 3}{sup ?} in the solution significantly increase the rate of heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of the prepared T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was evaluated by the degradation of Methylene Blue solution under visible light irradiation, 17% and 47% higher decolorization rates than the commercial P25 and BiVO{sub 4} synthesized without SDBS, respectively. Meanwhile, it has been found that the degradation kinetics of MB fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} also displayed high photocatalytic performance for metronidazole degradation. -- Graphical abstract: H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecules function as electron trapping reagent to react with e{sup ?} to enhance the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of MB in the BiVO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system under visible light irradiation. Highlights: T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} was synthesized using SDBS as a structure-directing surfactant. SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO{sub 4}. The T-shaped BiVO{sub 4} had a better visible-light photocatalytic activity. Degradation kinetics of MB by BiVO{sub 4} fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics.

  15. Technologies and policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the U. S. automobile and light truck fleet.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The message conveyed by the above discussion is that there are no shortages of technologies available to improve the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet of autos and light trucks. It clearly is technically feasible to improve greatly the fuel economy of the average new light-duty vehicle. Many of these technologies require tradeoffs, however, that manufacturers are unwilling or (as yet) unable to make in today's market and regulatory environment. These tradeoffs involve higher costs (that might be reduced substantially over time with learning and economies of scale), technical risk and added complexity, emissions concerns (especially for direct injection engines, and especially with respect to diesel engine technology), and customer acceptance issues. Even with current low U.S. oil prices, however, many of these technologies may find their way into the U.S. market, or increase their market share, as a consequence of their penetration of European and Japanese markets with their high gasoline prices. Automotive technology is ''fungible'' that is, it can be easily transported from one market to another. Nevertheless, it probably is unrealistic to expect substantial increases in the average fuel economy of the U.S. light-duty fleet without significant changes in the market. Without such changes, the technologies that do penetrate the U.S. market are more likely to be used to increase acceleration performance or vehicle structures or enable four wheel drive to be included in vehicles without a net mpg penalty. In other words, technology by itself is not likely to be enough to raise fleet fuel economy levels - this was the conclusion of the 1995 Ailomar Conference on Energy and Sustainable Transportation, organized by the Transportation Research Board's Committees on Energy and Alternative Fuels, and it is one I share.

  16. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  17. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  18. Hybrid Solar Lighting Provides Energy Savings and Reduces Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Earl, Dennis Duncan [ORNL; Beshears, David L [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Parks, James Edgar [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dish and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.

  19. Application of x-ray tomography to optimization of new NOx/NH3 mixed potential sensors for vehicle on-board emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Mark A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed potential sensors for the detection of hydrocarbons, NO{sub x}, and NH{sub 3} have been previously developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The LANL sensors have a unique design incorporating dense ceramic-pelletlmetal-wire electrodes and porous electrolytes. The performance of current-biased sensors using an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and platinum and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CrO{sub 3} electrodes is reported. X-ray tomography has been applied to non-destructively examine internal structures of these sensors. NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon response of the sensors under various bias conditions is reported, and very little NO{sub x} response hysteresis was observed. The application of a 0.6 {mu}A bias to these sensors shifts the response from a hydrocarbon response to a NO{sub x} response equal for both NO and NO{sub 2} species at approximately 500 {sup o}C in air.

  20. Energy-efficient lighting system for television

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawthorne, Duane C. (Amarillo, TX)

    1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A light control system for a television camera comprises an artificial light control system which is cooperative with an iris control system. This artificial light control system adjusts the power to lamps illuminating the camera viewing area to provide only sufficient artificial illumination necessary to provide a sufficient video signal when the camera iris is substantially open.

  1. Smart lighting: New Roles for Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Smart lighting: New Roles for Light in the Solid State Lighting World Robert F. Karlicek, Jr. Director, Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center Professor, Electrical, Systems and Computer Lighting What is Smart Lighting Technology Barriers to Smart Lighting Visible Light Communications

  2. Commercial Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial lighting accounts for more than 20 percent of total commercial building energy use. The Energy Department works to reduce lighting energy use through research and deployment.

  3. Management and monitoring of public buildings through ICT based systems: control rules for energy saving of lighting , J. Virgone2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    The presented work addresses the topic of energy savings in existing public buildings, when no significant reduction in energy usage and CO2 footprint in existing public buildings and spaces by implementingTitle Management and monitoring of public buildings through ICT based systems: control rules

  4. Thermal sensor with an improved coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

  5. Optical Sensor Technology Development and Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. G. Parker

    2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this ESP (Enhanced Surveillance) project are to evaluate sensor performance for future aging studies of materials, components and weapon systems. The goal of this project is to provide analysis capability to experimentally identify and characterize the aging mechanisms and kinetics of Core Stack Assembly (CSA) materials. The work on fiber optic light sources, hermetic sealing of fiber optics, fiber optic hydrogen sensors, and detection systems will be discussed.

  6. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  7. Controlled mobility in sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugihara, Ryo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Example: Structural Health Monitoring 2.2.2 Systems andworkshop on Structural Health Monitoring, 2007. [TPS + 05]target tracking, structural health monitoring, and so on.

  8. Controlled mobility in sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugihara, Ryo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between node energy consumption and data delivery latency.o? between energy consumption and data delivery latency. We7.4: Data delivery latency for varying energy consumption

  9. Controlled mobility in sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugihara, Ryo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reception, and a supercapacitor to store the energy. Eacha few minutes to charge a supercapacitor through microwave

  10. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Clarke, Jr., Willis L. (San Ramon, CA); Ciarlo, Dino R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  11. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  12. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  13. Laser cooling of infrared sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselbeck, M. P. (Michael P.); Sheik-Bahae, M (Mansoor); Thiede, J. (Jared); Distel, J. R. (James R.); Greenfield, S. R. (Scott R.); Patterson, Wendy M.; Bigotta, S.; Imangholi, B.; Seletskiy, D. (Denis); Bender, D.; Vankipuram, V.; Vadiee, N.; Epstein, Richard I.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of laser cooling of solids. In this all-solid-state approach to refrigeration, heat is removed radiatively when an engineered material is exposed to high power laser light. We report a record amount of net cooling (88 K below ambient) that has been achieved with a sample made from doped fluoride glass. Issues involved in the design of a practical laser cooler are presented. The possibility of laser cooling of semiconductor sensors is discussed.

  14. Evaluating complex MAC protocols for sensor networks with APMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    AVoCS 2006 Evaluating complex MAC protocols for sensor networks with APMC Michael Cadilhac1 Thomas present an analysis of a MAC (Medium Access Control) protocol for wireless sensor net- works. The purpose insights about it performance. Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, approximate verification 1 Introduction

  15. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  16. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) sensor using vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to achieve PD Coupler Terminated 6 internal mirror reflectances as high as 86% [11]. Low coherent interferometery (LCI) using broadband light sources such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) has been researched [12,13]. FFPI sensor systems have been...

  17. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  18. Universal signal processing method for multimode reflective sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Robert Eugene

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity, but the sensor configuration is complicated and requires the use of expensive lasers and single mode fibers. Amplitude modulation trades sensitivity for low cost and ease of configuration by using light emitting diodes and multimode fibers. A... fiber optic based sensor using amplitude modulation would provide a simple, low cost solution to the interference problem inherent in the use of composite materials. CHAPTER II BACKGROUND Development of optical fiber sensors started around 1977 [1...

  19. Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

    2008-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.

  20. Localized Pipeline Encroachment Detector System Using Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Xiaoxi 1986-

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NOMENCLATURE WSN Wireless Sensor Network ROW Right of Way WIFI Wireless Fidelity PC Personal Computer LED Light Emitting Diode USB Universal Serial Bus IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers A/D Analog to Digital WPAN Wireless...

  1. Microfabricated Optical Sensor Probe for the Detection of Esophageal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinna Balareddy, Karthik Reddy

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    spectrometry. The sensor probe consists of a lithographically patterned polymer waveguides chip and three micromachined positioning substrates and source/collection fibers to achieve 45 degree light incidence and collection of spatially resolved diffuse...

  2. advanced robot control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symposium on Measurement and Control in Robotics -Toward Advanced Robots: Design, Sensors, Control and Applications - Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

  3. PHOTOSWITCHR Photoelectric Sensors General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gale

    (Sensor) DC Micro For NPN type tie the load to Brown (+). For PNP type tie the load to Blue Beam Load Load Load Load Load Load Light Source Unit Protection Supply Voltage Current Consumption Photoelectric Sensors 42CA General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style R146 Typical Response Curve 100 1 0.1 0 1 (3

  4. Universal signal processing method for multimode reflective sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Robert Eugene

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensitivity, but the sensor configuration is complicated and requires the use of expensive lasers and single mode fibers. Amplitude modulation trades sensitivity for low cost and ease of configuration by using light emitting diodes and multimode fibers. A... method for reflective sensors using optical fibers as the data transmission media. The proposed transmitter - receiver unit was based on the amplitude modulation of reflected optical signals. This involves the use of an light emitting diode (LED...

  5. Light-Tracking in a Noisy Environment An Experiment in Autonomous Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jennifer S.

    Light-Tracking in a Noisy Environment An Experiment in Autonomous Robotics Tony Kristovich, Issa, no data is perfect. Tracking a single point of light requires the robot to ignore sunlight, overhead light's light sensor does not merely detect light and dark, but approximately 250 distinct levels of brightness

  6. Creating Value Through Controls

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE SSL R&D Workshop 2014 Sensors and controls Qualitative: Occupant comfort & productivity Positive PR: "going green" Greater consistency in energy savings Easy...

  7. Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light is a "wave packet" A photon is a "light particle" #12;Electromagnetic Radiation and You Light is sometimes

  8. Toward a high-fidelity wireless sensor network for rehabilitation supervision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Toward a high-fidelity wireless sensor network for rehabilitation supervision Abdelkrim Hadjidj and the implementation of a new light-weight and easy to use wireless sensor network for high-fidelity rehabilitation performance through intensive real world experimentations and simulations. Keywords: wireless sensor networks

  9. Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlachos, Kyriakos G.

    Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer C. Markos1 , K *gkakaran@eie.gr Keywords: white-light interferometer, fibre-optic pressure sensor, PDMS-based Fabry progress in fiber-optic extrinsic FabryPerot interferometric sensors ", Optical Fiber Technology, 23, p

  10. Design, fabrication, and characterization of controllable conducting polymer actuation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paster, Eli (Eli Travis)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geometric, hierarchal, multifunctional composition of mammalian skeletal muscle and the neuromuscular system consists of actuation elements, length sensors, force sensors, localized energy storage, controlled energy ...

  11. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  12. Wireless sensor networks and environmental monitoring applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Borgne, Yann-Aël

    by the Human Resources and Mobility program of the European community (MEST-CT-2004-505079) #12;ULB Machine Radio: 4kbps, 180m Sensors: Light and accelerometer Energy: Solar powered Golem and deputy dust 16mm3 ­ Remote or non invasive monitoring ·... #12;Solbosch greenhouses ·Greenhouses used by different research

  13. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Kukwon [ORNL] [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

  15. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  16. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  17. Laser interferometry force-feedback sensor for an interfacial force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houston, Jack E.; Smith, William L.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning force microscope is provided with a force-feedback sensor to increase sensitivity and stability in determining interfacial forces between a probe and a sample. The sensor utilizes an interferometry technique that uses a collimated light beam directed onto a deflecting member, comprising a common plate suspended above capacitor electrodes situated on a substrate forming an interference cavity with a probe on the side of the common plate opposite the side suspended above capacitor electrodes. The probe interacts with the surface of the sample and the intensity of the reflected beam is measured and used to determine the change in displacement of the probe to the sample and to control the probe distance relative to the surface of the sample.

  18. Evaluation of infrasound sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kromer, R.P.; McDonald, T.S.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia is evaluating the performance of various infrasound sensors that could be used as part of the International Monitoring Systems (IMS). Specifications for infrasound stations are outlined in CTBT/PC/II/1/Add.2. This document specifies minimum requirements for sensor, digitizer and system. The infrasound sensors evaluation task has the following objectives: provide an overview of the sensors presently in use; evaluate these sensors with respect to the requirements of the IMS.

  19. Decentralized TDOA Sensor Pairing in Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Wei; Lihua, Xie; Wendong, Xiao

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    localization in wireless sensor networks, IEEE Signallocalization in wireless sensor networks, IEEE Trans.techniques for wireless sensor networks: A survey, IEEE

  20. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Anbo (Blacksburg, VA)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

  1. Sensor network and soft sensor design for stable nonlinear dynamic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Abhay Kumar

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In chemical processes, online measurements of all the process variables and parameters required for process control, monitoring and optimization are seldom available. The use of soft sensors or observers is, therefore, highly significant as they can...

  2. Lighting Control Console Operations Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    and Blind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 HTP vs. LTP

  3. Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Channel-Specific Wireless Sensor Network Path Data. In:Average Power in Wireless Sensor Networks through Data Ratedesign space of wireless sensor networks. In: IEEE Wireless

  4. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gale et al. (2006) and evaluation of sensor performance byConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systemsConclusions from evaluation of representative sensor systems

  5. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  6. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  7. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  8. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  9. Tape-cast sensors and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Rangachary (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM); Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

  10. Integrating event detection system operation characteristics into sensor placement optimization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, William Eugene; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Murray, Regan Elizabeth (US Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH); Hart, David Blaine

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of placing sensors in a municipal water network when we can choose both the location of sensors and the sensitivity and specificity of the contamination warning system. Sensor stations in a municipal water distribution network continuously send sensor output information to a centralized computing facility, and event detection systems at the control center determine when to signal an anomaly worthy of response. Although most sensor placement research has assumed perfect anomaly detection, signal analysis software has parameters that control the tradeoff between false alarms and false negatives. We describe a nonlinear sensor placement formulation, which we heuristically optimize with a linear approximation that can be solved as a mixed-integer linear program. We report the results of initial experiments on a real network and discuss tradeoffs between early detection of contamination incidents, and control of false alarms.

  11. Vehicle Traffic Control Signal Heads Light Emitting Diode Circular Signal Supplement (VTCSH-LED). This replaced the so-called Interim LED Purchase Specifications,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Behura

    Engineers (ITE) specification for light-emitting diode (LED) circular traffic signals recently was updated (June 27, 2005) and published under the name

  12. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation. The solar radiation data, in W/m 2 , werelight sensor and solar radiation data are shown in Figure 2-exceed those of the solar radiation data. Figure 2-3. Light

  13. Energy Star Lighting Fixtures: How Does THAT Work? | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or include other special features, like motion sensors or automatic shut-off in daylight, to further help you reduce your lighting energy use. And the best part is that...

  14. Image Recognition System for Automated Lighting Retrofit Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venable, K.; Bhatia, D.; Coverick, R.; Gutierrez, C.; Knight, J.; McGarry, D.; McGee, K.; Smith, Z.; Terrill, T. J.; Vanderford, B.; Weiser, R.; Wightman, K.; Rasmussen, B. P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a prototype system that can enumerate and classify the lighting in a building using an optical camera, accelerometer, spectrometer, and distance sensor. As the aerial vehicle navigates throughout a room, the prototype system captures images...

  15. Ivan Stojmenovic! 1! IoT/CPS with sensors and robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    ! ! Vehicular networks! ! Smart cameras! ! Smart power grids! ! Smart city (bus arrival time, crowd certain action ! ! Single sensor controlled! ! Networked sensor controlled! ! Smart building (temperature? Coordination ? GreenOrbs Tianmu mountains Lin'an City 1000+ sensors in Lin'An and WuXi Collaborative monitoring

  16. Feedback-Controlled LED Photobioreactor for Photophysiological Studies of Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnicki, Matthew R.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Stolyar, Sergey; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A custom photobioreactor (PBR) was designed to enable automatic light adjustments using computerized feedback control. A black anodized aluminum enclosure, constructed to surround the borosilicate reactor vessel, prevents the transmission of ambient light and serves as a mount for arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The high-output LEDs provide narrow-band light of either 630 or 680 nm for preferential excitation of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting pigments, phycobilin or chlorophyll a, respectively. Custom developed software BioLume provides automatic control of optical properties and a computer feedback loop can automatically adjust the incident irradiance as necessary to maintain a fixed transmitted light through the culture, based on user-determined set points. This feedback control serves to compensate for culture dynamics which have optical effects, (e.g., changing cell density, pigment adaptations) and thus can determine the appropriate light conditions for physiological comparisons or to cultivate light-sensitive strains, without prior analyses. The LED PBR may also be controlled as a turbidostat, using a feedback loop to continuously adjust the rate of media-dilution based on the transmitted light measurements, with a fast and precise response. This cultivation system gains further merit as a high-performance analytical device, using non-invasive tools (e.g., dissolved gas sensors, online mass spectrometry) to automate real-time measurements, thus permitting unsupervised experiments to search for optimal growth conditions, to monitor physiological responses to perturbations, as well as to quantitate photophysiological parameters using an in situ light-saturation response routine.

  17. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElfresh, Michael (Livermore, CA); Lucas, Matthew (Pittsburgh, PA); Silveira, Joseph P. (Tracy, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  18. artificial lighting good: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adaptive predictive lighting controllers for daylight artificial light integrated schemes. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  19. Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors Appendix D -Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors, card access, and building automation systems. Terminals on the controller allow connection.1 Schneider Electric/Square D Power Link G3 Control System The Square D Powerlink G3 offers programmable Combines the control, input, and scheduling features of the other systems with the added benefit

  20. Pupillary efficient lighting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Jewett, Don L. (Mill Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination.

  1. The development and application of a diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for nitric oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas Nathan

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development of a new type of sensor for nitric oxide (NO) that can be used in a variety of combustion diagnostics and control applications. The sensor utilizes the absorption of ultraviolet (UV) ...

  2. How to upgrade your incandescent light bulbs Many people are choosing replacements for their standard incandescent light bulbs to save money or energy, because they've heard of new LED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    or building a new home, work wi efficient light fixture, use occupancy or vacancy sensors, or if you are renovating your home

  3. Millimeter-wave sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seoktae

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    New millimeter wave interferometric, multifunctional sensors have been studied for industrial sensing applications: displacement measurement, liquid-level gauging and velocimetry. Two types of configuration were investigated to implement the sensor...

  4. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  5. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  6. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  7. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  8. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a full-range, low cast humidity sensor has led Honeywell to develop a capacitive relative humidity (RH) sensor with resistance to environmental contaminants. The sensor is used in a bridge circuit to give either a voltage or a current...

  9. Sensor Networks and Consensus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    3 Dic 2009 1/32 Sensor Networks and Consensus An application: Localization and Tracking Distributed Sensors Calibration Randomized Kalman Filter Distributed Kalman Smoother Simone Del Favero PhD Thesis: Localization and Tracking Distributed Sensors Calibration Randomized Kalman Filter Distributed Kalman Smoother

  10. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  11. Polyimide Capacitive Humidity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofgren, H.; Mills, F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for a full-range, low cast humidity sensor has led Honeywell to develop a capacitive relative humidity (RH) sensor with resistance to environmental contaminants. The sensor is used in a bridge circuit to give either a voltage or a current...

  12. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  13. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  14. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  15. Battery-free Wireless Sensor Network For Advanced Fossil-Fuel Based Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Jia

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the project supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG26-07NT4306. The aim of the project was to conduct basic research into battery-free wireless sensing mechanism in order to develop novel wireless sensors and sensor network for physical and chemical parameter monitoring in a harsh environment. Passive wireless sensing platform and five wireless sensors including temperature sensor, pressure sensor, humidity sensor, crack sensor and networked sensors developed and demonstrated in our laboratory setup have achieved the objective for the monitoring of various physical and chemical parameters in a harsh environment through remote power and wireless sensor communication, which is critical to intelligent control of advanced power generation system. This report is organized by the sensors developed as detailed in each progress report.

  16. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  17. Light-shift modulated photon-echo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanelire, Thierry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the AC-Stark shift (light-shift) is a powerful and versatile tool to control the emission of a photon-echo in the context of optical storage. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate that the photon-echo efficiency can be fully modulated by applying light-shift control pulses in an erbium doped solid. The control of the echo emission is attributed to the spatial gradient induced by the light-shift beam.

  18. Light-shift modulated photon-echo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Chanelire; Gabriel Htet

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the AC-Stark shift (light-shift) is a powerful and versatile tool to control the emission of a photon-echo in the context of optical storage. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate that the photon-echo efficiency can be fully modulated by applying light-shift control pulses in an erbium doped solid. The control of the echo emission is attributed to the spatial gradient induced by the light-shift beam.

  19. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  20. Autonomous Robot System for Sensor Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Bruemmer; Douglas Few; Frank Carney; Miles Walton; Heather Hunting; Ron Lujan

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses an innovative application of new Markov localization techniques that combat the problem of odometry drift, allowing a novel control architecture developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to be utilized within a sensor characterization facility developed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) in Nevada. The new robotic capability provided by the INEEL will allow RSL to test and evaluate a wide variety of sensors including radiation detection systems, machine vision systems, and sensors that can detect and track heat sources (e.g. human bodies, machines, chemical plumes). By accurately moving a target at varying speeds along designated paths, the robotic solution allows the detection abilities of a wide variety of sensors to be recorded and analyzed.

  1. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Bakhtiari, Sasan (Bolingbrook, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL); Dieckman, Stephen L. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, SIGN LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, SIGN LIGHTING CEC-SLTG-1C (Revised 10/10) CALIFORNIA Lighting) (Page 1 of 4) SLTG-1C Project Name: Date: Project Address: Location of Sign Phase of Sign Construction Type of Lighting Control Outdoor Signs New Signs New Lighting Controls Indoor Signs Sign

  3. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  4. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  5. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  6. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  7. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  8. 978-1-4244-4439-7/09/$25.00 2009 IEEE ECTC: Energy effiCient Topology Control Algorithm for Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    select a subset of nodes to be active among all nodes in the neighborhood, to ensure connectivity978-1-4244-4439-7/09/$25.00 2009 IEEE ECTC: Energy effiCient Topology Control Algorithm. A good energy saving technique in this direction is to schedule nodes sleep interval

  9. Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    Sensor Grid: Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Grid Hock Beng Lim1 , Yong Meng Teo1 Microsystems, Inc. E-mail: [limhb, teoym]@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Wireless sensor networks have emerged to the sharing of sensor resources in wireless sensor networks. There are several issues and challenges

  10. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grace, Karen M. (Ranchos de Taos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Honkanen, Seppo (Tucson, AZ)

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  11. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  12. An Energy-efficient Wireless Sensor Network for Precision Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    An Energy-efficient Wireless Sensor Network for Precision Agriculture Herman Sahota Ratnesh Kumar and control technologies in application areas such as precision agriculture. We design MAC and Network layers for a wireless sensor network deployed for a precision agriculture application which requires periodic collection

  13. Wireless Sensor Networks: The Protocol Stack Iowa State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Wireless Sensor Networks: The Protocol Stack Mat Wymore Iowa State University Wind Energy Science Protocol Stack March 26, 2014 1 / 15 #12;One-Slide Refresher Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) Could be used;Wireless access point network Layers Application Google Chrome Transport Transmission Control Protocol (TCP

  14. Intensity Histogram CMOS Image Sensor for Adaptive Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauwenberghs, Gert

    Intensity Histogram CMOS Image Sensor for Adaptive Optics Yu M. Chi, Gary Carhart , Mikhail AAODisturbanceSource Update/Optimize Fig. 1. Intended real-time optical control application. The sensor computes histogram of Bioengineering University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 Intelligent Optics Lab U.S. Army Research

  15. Shaping the Next - Buildings and Energy: Advanced Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    short bit on advanced lighting for the future relating specifically to controls and new tech such as LEDs

  16. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  17. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  18. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  19. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  20. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  1. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  2. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  3. 6189-47, Session 10 Optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensor for real-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6189-47, Session 10 Optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensor for real-time in-plane vibration-contact, low-cost optical sensor for real time detection and active vibration control of mechanical devices sensitivity to any translational vibration. The calibration of the sensor is independent of the optical

  4. All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures

  5. Modeling a Prototype Optical Collision Avoidance Sensor For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    Modeling a Prototype Optical Collision Avoidance Sensor For Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Cyrus Minwalla) are essential in controlled airspace under visual flight rules (VFR). A prototype optical sensor accomplishes and evaluation of the prototype sensor are presented here, as are preliminary measurements to clarify the roles

  6. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Smart Power Management for an Onboard Wireless Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    Sensors and Actuators Network R. Amini* , G. Gaydadjiev and E. Gill Delft University of Technology, Delft determination and control sensors and actuators. Still, providing energy efficient data collection is of paramount importance to such an onboard wireless sensors and actuators network (OWSAN). This paper proposes

  7. Psychophysical evaluations of modulated color rendering for energy performance of LED-based architectural lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Maria do Rosrio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focused on the visual perception evaluation of colors within an environment of a highly automated lighting control strategy. Digitally controlled lighting systems equipped with light emitting diodes, LEDs, ...

  8. Sensitive And Selective Chemical Sensor With Nanostructured Surfaces.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical sensor is provided which includes an optical resonator including a nanostructured surface comprising a plurality of nanoparticles bound to one or more surfaces of the resonator. The nanoparticles provide optical absorption and the sensor further comprises a detector for detecting the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment. In particular, a selective chemical interaction is provided which modifies the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment, and an analyte is detected based on the modified optical absorption. A light pulse is generated which enters the resonator to interrogate the modified optical absorption and the exiting light pulse is detected by the detector.

  9. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Lawless; C. Clark

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NO{sub x} sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NO{sub x} from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5-$10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NO{sub x}. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650-700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NO{sub x} sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NO{sub x} sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NO{sub x} and oxygen sensors yields the NO{sub x} content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  10. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  11. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B&W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  12. Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Morante

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

  13. Airborne Infrared Target Tracking with the Nintendo Wii Remote Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckett, Andrew 1984-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    entirely. This research presents a solution to the target tracking problem which reliably provides automatic target detection and tracking with low expense and computational overhead by making use of the infrared sensor from a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller....

  14. A Biologically Inspired Networking Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charalambous, Charalambos

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have emerged in strategic applications such as target detection, localization, and tracking in battlefields, where the large-scale na- ture renders centralized control prohibitive. In addition, the finite batteries...

  15. Low-Cost Wireless Sensors for Building Monitoring Applications...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ORNL estimates that advanced sensors and controls have the potential to save 20-30% energy consumed by buildings. The target market for this project is all commercial buildings;...

  16. Physiological Sensor System for a wireless tactile display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deo, Nikhila

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on the development of a wearable Physiological Sensor System (PSS) that can be used with a wireless tactile control unit to monitor the physiological status of a mobile user. Two physiological variables, ...

  17. Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Motor VFDs, Motors, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Control Sensors, Economizers Active Incentive Yes...

  18. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical squestionnairesquestionnaires AgreementLighting

  19. HCH-1000 Series Capacitive Humidity Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowe, Anthony

    www.honeywell.com/sensing SPECIFICATIONS (TA= 25 C [77 F], Input Voltage = 1 VRMS, Frequency = 20 k: TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTICS (At 1 VRMS and 20 kHz) #12;Capacitive Humidity Sensors Honeywell Sensing TEST SYSTEM DIAGRAM #12;Sensing and Control 1985 Douglas Drive North Minneapolis, MN 55422 www.honeywell

  20. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) sensor using vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research represents the first effort to apply vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) to the monitoring of interferometric fiber optic sensors. Modulation of the drive current causes thermal tuning of the laser light frequency...