National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for light-duty vehicle miles

  1. Registrations and vehicle miles of travel of light duty vehicles, 1985--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, P.S.; Davis, S.C.; Schmoyer, R.L.

    1998-02-01

    To obtain vehicle registration data that consistently and accurately reflect the distinction between automobiles and light-duty trucks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was asked by FHWA to estimate the current and historical vehicle registration numbers of automobiles and of other two-axle four-tire vehicles (i.e., light-duty trucks), and their associated travel. The term automobile is synonymous with passenger car. Passenger cars are defined as all sedans, coupes, and station wagons manufactured primarily for the purpose of carrying passengers. This includes taxicabs, rental cars, and ambulances and hearses on an automobile chassis. Light-duty trucks refer to all two-axle four-tire vehicles other than passenger cars. They include pickup trucks, panel trucks, delivery and passenger vans, and other vehicles such as campers, motor homes, ambulances on a truck chassis, hearses on a truck chassis, and carryalls. In this study, light-duty trucks include four major types: (1) pickup truck, (2) van, (3) sport utility vehicle, and (4) other 2-axle 4-tire truck. Specifically, this project re-estimates statistics that appeared in Tables MV-1 and MV-9 of the 1995 Highway Statistics. Given the complexity of the approach developed in this effort and the incompleteness and inconsistency of the state-submitted data, it is recommended that alternatives be considered by FHWA to obtain vehicle registration data. One alternative is the Polk`s NVPP data (via the US Department of Transportation`s annual subscription to Polk). The second alternative is to obtain raw registration files from individual states` Departments of Motor Vehicles and to decode individual VINs.

  2. Light-duty vehicle MPG (miles per gallon) and market shares report, Model year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, L.S. ); Hu, P.S. )

    1990-04-01

    This issue of Light-Duty Vehicle MPG and Market Shares Report: Model Year 1989 reports the estimated sales-weighted fuel economies, sales, market shares, and other vehicle characteristics of automobiles and light trucks. The estimates are made on a make and model basis (e.g., Chevrolet is a make and Corsica is a model), from model year 1976 to model year 1989. Vehicle sales data are used as weighting factors in the sales-weighted estimation procedure. Thus, the estimates represent averages of the overall new vehicle fleet, reflecting the composition of the fleet. Highlights are provided on the trends in the vehicle characteristics from one model year to the next. Analyses are also made on fuel economy changes to determine what caused the changes. Both new automobile and new light truck fleets experienced fuel economy losses of 0.5 mpg from the previous model year, dropping to 28.0 mpg for automobiles and 20.2 mpg for light trucks. This is the first observed decline in fuel economy of new automobiles since model year 1983 and the largest decline since model year 1976. The main reason for the fuel economy decline in automobiles was that every automobile size class showed either losses or no change in their fuel economies. The fuel economy decline in light trucks was primarily due to the fact that two popular size classes, large pickup and small utility vehicle, both experienced losses in their fuel economies. Overall, the sales-weighted fuel economy of the entire light-duty vehicle fleet (automobiles and light trucks) dropped to 25.0 mpg, a reduction of 0.5 mpg from model year 1988. 9 refs., 32 figs., 50 tabs.

  3. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Demand, Demographics, and Travel Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For EIA Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Trisha Hutchins, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Light-duty vehicle energy demand, demographics, and travel behavior Examining changes in light-duty vehicle travel trends 2 EIA Conference: Light-duty vehicle energy demand, demographics, and travel behavior July 15, 2014 * Recent data indicate possible structural shift in travel behavior, measured as vehicle miles traveled (VMT) - VMT per licensed driver, vehicles per

  4. Light-duty vehicle summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, L.S. ); Hu, P.S. )

    1990-07-01

    This document brings you up to date on the most recent fuel economy and market share data for the new light-duty vehicle fleet. Model year 1990 fuel economies are weighted based on the sales of the first six months of model year 1990 (from September 1989 to March 1990). Sales-weighted fuel economy of all new automobiles decreased in the first six months of model year 1990, from 28.0 mpg in model year 1989 to 27.7 mpg. The compact, midsize, and large size classes, which together claimed 75% of the new automobile market, each showed fuel economy declines of 0.4 mpg or more. Unlike automobiles, new 1990 light trucks showed an overall 0.4 mpg gain from model year 1989. This increase was primarily due to the increased fuel economy of the small van size class. In the first half of model year 1990, small van replaced small pickup as the second most popular light truck size class. Although the fuel economy of light trucks improved, the larger market share of automobiles in the light-duty vehicle market (automobiles and light trucks combined) and the decreased fuel economy in automobiles resulted in an overall reduction of 0.2 mpg for the entire light-duty vehicle fleet in the first half of model year 1990. Also, in the first half of model year 1990, light trucks claimed more than 33% of the light-duty vehicle market--a considerable increase from the 19.8% share in 1976. 9 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. Light Duty Vehicle Pathways | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Duty Vehicle Pathways Light Duty Vehicle Pathways Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. on July 26, 2010. PDF icon lightduty_vehicle_studies.pdf More Documents & Publications Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 Framing Document for the Second Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR 2015) CAAFI Progress Update

  6. WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and ...

  7. Emissions from the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During DPF Regeneration Events Emissions from the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During DPF Regeneration Events Repeated partial ...

  8. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Download the webinar slides from the U.S. Department ...

  9. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions ...

  10. alternative fuel light-duty vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Light-Duty Vehicles T O F E N E R G Y D E P A R T M E N U E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C A M SUMMARY OF RESULTS FROM THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S VEHICLE EVALUATION DATA COLLECTION EFFORTS Alternative Fuel Light-Duty Vehicles SUMMARY OF RESULTS FROM THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S VEHICLE EVALUATION DATA COLLECTION EFFORTS PEG WHALEN KENNETH KELLY ROB MOTTA JOHN BRODERICK MAY 1996 N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Summary

  11. Light Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks Dane A. Boysen, PhD Program Director Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, US DOE dane.boysen@doe.gov Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Advanced Manufacturing Office, EERE, US DOE Arlington VA, January 13, 2014 Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Can I put my luggage in the trunk? Uh, sorry no Commercial CNG Tanks Tank Type I Type IV Material steel carbon fiber Capacity 12 gallon 12 gallon Weight 490 lb 190 lb Cost $1,700 $4,300 50% less

  12. Tier 2 Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Results for a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

    2006-05-01

    Investigates the emission control system performance and system desulfurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions in a light-duty diesel engine.

  13. ADOPT: A Historically Validated Light Duty Vehicle Consumer Choice Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Lopp, S.; Ward, J.

    2015-05-04

    The Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) is a light-duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light-duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas emissions. ADOPT uses techniques from the multinomial logit method and the mixed logit method estimate sales. Specifically, it estimates sales based on the weighted value of key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations are enforced. The sales feed into the ADOPT stock model. It captures key aspects for summing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions This includes capturing the change in vehicle miles traveled by vehicle age, the creation of new model options based on the success of existing vehicles, new vehicle option introduction rate limits, and survival rates by vehicle age. ADOPT has been extensively validated with historical sales data. It matches in key dimensions including sales by fuel economy, acceleration, price, vehicle size class, and powertrain across multiple years. A graphical user interface provides easy and efficient use. It manages the inputs, simulation, and results.

  14. Overview of Light-Duty Vehicle Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicle Studies Overview of Light-Duty Vehicle Studies Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. on July 26, 2010. PDF icon ldv_pathways.pdf More Documents & Publications Support for Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Impact Analysis: VTO Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities Overview of Propulsion Materials

  15. Thermoelectric HVAC for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace047_maranville_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric HVAC for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications

  16. Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Combined Potential of Hybrid Technology and Behavioral Adaptation Title Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

  17. Emissions from the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During DPF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regeneration Events | Department of Energy the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During DPF Regeneration Events Emissions from the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During DPF Regeneration Events Repeated partial regenerations may cause changes in the mechanical and chemical properties of the PM in the DPF. PDF icon deer09_dwyer.pdf More Documents & Publications A Study of Emissions from a Light Duty Diesel Engine with the European Particulate Measurement Programme Measurement of

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Data | Department of Energy Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Data Vehicle Technologies Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Data The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports testing and data collection on a wide range of advanced and alternative fuel vehicles and technologies through the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) . The following table has downloadable performance, reliability, and driver behavior data for selected

  19. Thermoelectric HVAC for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace047_maranville_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Thermoelectric HVAC for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal design, and thermoelectric devices

  20. Thermoelectric Opportunities in Light-Duty Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Light-Duty Vehicles Thermoelectric Opportunities in Light-Duty Vehicles Overview of thermoelectric (TE) vehicle exhaust heat recovery, TE HVAC systems, and OEM role in establishing guidelines for cost, power density, systems integration, and durability. PDF icon maranville.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicular Thermoelectrics: A New Green Technology Vehicular Thermoelectrics: A New Green Technology Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems

  1. Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Dynamic model of organic Rankine cycle with R245fa working fluid and conservative component efficiencies predict power generation in excess of electrical accessory load demand under highway drive cycle PDF icon deer11_hussain.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Automotive Thermoelectric Generator Design Issues

  2. Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric Devices and Comfort Modeling Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric ...

  3. The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) ...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty

  5. Fuel Economy of the Light-Duty Vehicle Fleet (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. fleet of light-duty vehicles consists of cars and light trucks, including minivans, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and trucks with gross vehicle weight less than 8,500 pounds. The fuel economy of light-duty vehicles is regulated by the (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) CAFE standards set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Currently, the CAFE standard is 27.5 miles per gallon (mpg) for cars and 20.7 mpg for light trucks. The most recent increase in the CAFE standard for cars was in 1990, and the most recent increase in the CAFE standard for light trucks was in 1996.

  6. NREL: Transportation Research - Light-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management Image of a semi-transparent car with parts of the engine highlighted in green. NREL evaluates technologies and methods such as advanced window glazing, cooling heat-pipe systems, parked car ventilation, and direct energy recovery. Illustration by Josh Bauer, NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers are focused on improving the thermal efficiency of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) while maintaining the thermal comfort that drivers expect.

  7. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Webinar Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol U.S. DOE WEBINAR ON H2 FUELING PROTOCOLS: PARTICIPANTS Rob Burgess Moderator Jesse Schneider TIR J2601, Hydrogen Fueling Guideline Steve Mathison Development Fueling-MC Method Jesse Schneider (BMW) SAE J2601 & J2799 Sponsor SAE TIR J2601 Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol Guideline SAE TIR J2601 CURRENT USES AND SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS 4 US (DOE,CaFCP/ CARB, CEC) EU CEP/ H2 Mobility/ NOW

  8. Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat Recovery System for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing a low and high temperature dual thermoelectric generation waste heat recovery system for light-duty vehicles.

  9. Fueling U.S. Light Duty Diesel Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fueling U.S. Light Duty Diesel Vehicles Fueling U.S. Light Duty Diesel Vehicles 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_kaufman.pdf More Documents & Publications Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel Biodiesel_Fuel_Management_Best_Practices_Report.pdf Future Fuels: Issues and Opportunities

  10. The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Volkwagen AG, Wolfsburg, Germany PDF icon 2004_deer_schindler.pdf More Documents & Publications Accelerating Light-Duty Diesel Sales in the U.S. Market Marketing Light-Duty Diesels to U.S. Consumers Clean Diesel: The Progress, The Message, The Opportunity

  11. Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Light-Duty Natural-Gas-Fueled Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staunton, R.H.; Thomas, J.F.

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and make recommendations concerning technologies that promise to improve the efilciency of compressed natural gas (CNG) light-duty vehicles. Technical targets for CNG automotive technology given in the March 1998 OffIce of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan were used as guidance for this effort. The technical target that necessitates this current study is to validate technologies that enable CNG light vehicles to have at least 10% greater - fuel economy (on a miles per gallon equivalent basis) than equivalent gasoline vehicles by 2006. Other tar- gets important to natural gas (NG) automotive technology and this study are to: (1) increase CNG vehicle range to 380 miles, (2) reduce the incremental vehicle cost (CNG vs gasoline) to $1500, and (3) meet the California ultra low-emission vehicle (ULEV) and Federal Tier 2 emission standards expected to be in effect in 2004.

  12. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  13. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations. View a detailed explanation of

  14. DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations. View

  15. Desulfurization Effects on a Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle NOx Adsorber Exhaust Emission Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Tyrer, H.; Thornton, M.; Kubsh, J.

    2006-05-01

    Analyzes the effects on gaseous emissions, before and after desulfurization, on a light-duty diesel vehicle with a NOx adsorber catalyst.

  16. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table lists the technical targets for onboard hydrogen storage for light-duty vehicles in the FCT Program’s Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan.

  17. Light Duty Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Systems Analysis Light Duty Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Systems Analysis 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vss_08_markel.pdf More Documents & Publications Real-World PHEV Fuel Economy Prediction Advanced HEV/PHEV Concepts Heavy-Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations

  18. WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweight and Propulsion Materials | Department of Energy Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials PDF icon wr_ldvehicles.pdf More Documents & Publications WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Ultra Efficient Light Duty Powertrain with Gasoline Low Temperature Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Powertrain at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ultra efficient light duty...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about light-duty...

  1. Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Outlook for Light-Duty-Vehicle Fuel Demand Gasoline and distillate demand impact of the Energy Independance and Security Act of 2007 PDF icon deer08_shore.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power - Committee on Energy and Commerce Drop In Fuels: Where the Road Leads Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power

  2. Impact of Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions on 21st Century Carbon Dioxide Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page

    2007-08-04

    The impact of light-duty passenger vehicle emissions on global carbon dioxide concentrations was estimated using the MAGICC reduced-form climate model combined with the PNNL contribution to the CCSP scenarios product. Our central estimate is that tailpipe light duty vehicle emissions of carbon-dioxide over the 21st century will increase global carbon dioxide concentrations by slightly over 12 ppmv by 2100.

  3. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

  4. Economic Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the U.S. Market | Department of Energy Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles in the U.S. Market Economic Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles in the U.S. Market 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company PDF icon 2004_deer_hoard.pdf More Documents & Publications Laboratory and Vehicle Demonstration of a "2nd-Generation" LNT+in-situ SCR Diesel NOx Emission Control Concept NH3

  5. Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric Devices and Comfort Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summarizes results from a study to identify and demonstrate technical and commercial approaches necessary to accelerate the deployment of zonal TE HVAC systems in light-duty vehicles

  6. Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Jeff Sessions for an analysis of the environmental and energy efficiency attributes of light-duty diesel vehicles. Specifically, the inquiry asked for a comparison of the characteristics of diesel-fueled vehicles with those of similar gasoline-fueled, E85-fueled, and hybrid vehicles, as well as a discussion of any technical, economic, regulatory, or other obstacles to increasing the use of diesel-fueled vehicles in the United States.

  7. TEST: DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations.

  8. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document, revised in May 2015, describes the basis for the technical targets for onboard hydrogen storage for light-duty fuel cell vehicles in the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan and includes a detailed explanation of each target.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office AVTA: Light Duty Alternative Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The following table has downloadable performance, reliability, and driver behavior data for selected models of all-electric vehicles (electric cars or AEVs), compressed natural gas ...

  10. DOE Light Duty Vehicle Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wang, Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory An Energy Evolution: Alternative Fueled Vehicle Comparisons (PDF 2.3 MB), Patrick Serfass, National ...

  11. Light-Duty Lean GDI Vehicle Technology Benchmark

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  12. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles Revised May 2015 This target explanation is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Fiat Chrysler Automotive, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America,

  13. WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    VEHICLES TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WORKSHOP REPORT: Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials February 2013 FINAL REPORT This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  14. Advanced Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental concern in projecting the future attributes of light-duty vehicles-passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and minivans-is how to represent technological change and the market forces that drive it. There is always considerable uncertainty about the evolution of existing technologies, what new technologies might emerge, and how consumer preferences might influence the direction of change. Most of the new and emerging technologies expected to affect the performance and fuel use of light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years are represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS); however, the potential emergence of new, unforeseen technologies makes it impossible to address all the technology options that could come into play. The previous section of Issues in Focus discussed several potential technologies that currently are not represented in NEMS. This section discusses some of the key technologies represented in NEMS that are expected to be implemented in light-duty vehicles over the next 25 years.

  15. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

  16. Clean Cities Strategic Planning White Paper: Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saulsbury, Bo; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Greene, David; Gibson, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Increasing the energy efficiency of motor vehicles is critical to achieving national energy goals of reduced petroleum dependence, protecting the global climate, and promoting continued economic prosperity. Even with fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards and various economic incentives for clean and efficient vehicles, providing reliable and accurate fuel economy information to the public is important to achieving these goals. This white paper reviews the current status of light-duty vehicle fuel economy in the United States and the role of the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Cities Program in disseminating fuel economy information to the public.

  17. Light-duty vehicle mpg and market shares report, model year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, P.S.; Williams, L.S.; Beal, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    This issue of Light-Duty Vehicle MPG and Market Shares Report: Model Year 1988 reports the estimated sales-weighted fuel economies, sales, market shares, and other vehicle characteristics of automobiles and light trucks. The estimates are made on a make and model basis, from model year 1976 to model year 1988. Vehicle sales data are used as weighting factors in the sales-weighted estimation procedure. Thus, the estimates represent averages of the overall new vehicle fleet, reflecting the composition of the fleet. Highlights are provided on the trends in the vehicle characteristics from one model year to the next. Analyses are also made on the fuel economy changes to determine the factors which caused the changes. The sales-weighted fuel economy for the new car fleet in model year 1988 showed an improvement of 0.1 mpg from model year 1987, while light trucks showed a 0.2 mpg loss. The 0.2 mpg loss by the light trucks can be attributed to the fact that every light truck size class experienced either losses or no change in their fuel economies from the previous model year, except for the large van size class. Overall, the sales-weighted fuel economy of the entire light-duty vehicle fleet (automobiles and light trucks combined) has remained relatively stable since model year 1986. Domestic light-duty vehicles began to gain popularity over their import counterparts; and light trucks increased their market shares relative to automobiles. Domestic cars regained 0.3% of the automobile market, reversing the previous trend. Similar to the automobile market, domestic light trucks continued to gain popularity over their import counterparts, partly due to the increasing popularity of domestic small vans. 3 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs.

  18. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-02-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  20. Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Chapter 3. Vehicle-Miles Traveled Vehicle-miles traveled--the number of miles that residential vehicles are driven--is probably the most important...

  1. Global warming impact of gasoline and alcohol use in light-duty highway vehicles in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uria, L.A.B.; Schaeffer, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper examines the direct and indirect global warming impact of gasoline and alcohol use in light-duty highway vehicles in Brazil. In order to do that, it quantifies emissions of CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} HC and NO{sub x} in terms of CO{sub 2}-equivalent units for time spans of 20, 100 and 500 years. It shows that the consideration of CO{sub 2} HC and NO{sub x} emissions in addition to CO{sub 2} provides an important contribution for better understanding the total warming impact of transportation fuels in Brazil.

  2. Predicting Light-Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy as a Function of Highway Speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, John F; Hwang, Ho-Ling; West, Brian H; Huff, Shean P

    2013-01-01

    The www.fueleconomy.gov website offers information such as window label fuel economy for city, highway, and combined driving for all U.S.-legal light-duty vehicles from 1984 to the present. The site is jointly maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and also offers a considerable amount of consumer information and advice pertaining to vehicle fuel economy and energy related issues. Included with advice pertaining to driving styles and habits is information concerning the trend that as highway cruising speed is increased, fuel economy will degrade. An effort was undertaken to quantify this conventional wisdom through analysis of dynamometer testing results for 74 vehicles at steady state speeds from 50 to 80 mph. Using this experimental data, several simple models were developed to predict individual vehicle fuel economy and its rate of change over the 50-80 mph speed range interval. The models presented require a minimal number of vehicle attributes. The simplest model requires only the EPA window label highway mpg value (based on the EPA specified estimation method for 2008 and beyond). The most complex of these simple model uses vehicle coast-down test coefficients (from testing prescribed by SAE Standard J2263) known as the vehicle Target Coefficients, and the raw fuel economy result from the federal highway test. Statistical comparisons of these models and discussions of their expected usefulness and limitations are offered.

  3. Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

  4. Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel ...

  5. Miles Electric Vehicles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Name: Miles Electric Vehicles Place: Santa Monica, California Zip: 90405 Sector: Vehicles Product: California-based developer of...

  6. Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-12-15

    On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, we are pleased to introduce the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The mission of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that enable Americans to use less petroleum for their vehicles. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program supports this mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines for light-, medium-, and heavy-duty highway vehicles that meet future Federal and state emissions regulations. The primary objective of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program is to improve the brake thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines from 30 to 45 percent for light-duty applications by 2010; and 40 to 55 percent for heavy-duty applications by 2012; while meeting cost, durability, and emissions constraints. R&D activities include work on combustion technologies that increase efficiency and minimize in-cylinder formation of emissions, as well as aftertreatment technologies that further reduce exhaust emissions. Work is also being conducted on ways to reduce parasitic and heat transfer losses through the development and application of thermoelectrics and turbochargers that include electricity generating capability, and conversion of mechanically driven engine components to be driven via electric motors. This introduction serves to outline the nature, current progress, and future directions of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The research activities of this Sub-Program are planned in conjunction with the FreedomCAR Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership and are carried out in collaboration with industry, national laboratories, and universities. Because of the importance of clean fuels in achieving low emissions, R&D activities are closely coordinated with the relevant activities of the Fuel Technologies Sub-Program, also within the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies. Research is also being undertaken on hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines to provide an interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology that promotes the longer-range FreedomCAR Partnership goal of transitioning to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system. Hydrogen engine technologies being developed have the potential to provide diesel-like engine efficiencies with near-zero emissions.

  7. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Validation Data. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jelen, Deborah; Odom, Sara

    2015-04-30

    Electricore, along with partners from Quong & Associates, Inc., Honda R&D Americas (Honda), Nissan Technical Center North America (Nissan), and Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing North America, Inc. (Toyota), participated in the Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Validation Data program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0005968). The goal of this program was to provide real world data from the operation of past and current FCEVs, in order to measure their performance and improvements over time. The program was successful; 85% of the data fields requested were provided and not restricted due to proprietary reasons. Overall, the team from Electricore provided at least 4.8 GB of data to DOE, which was combined with data from other participants to produce over 33 key data products. These products included vehicle performance and fuel cell stack performance/durability. The data were submitted to the National Renewable Energy Laboratorys National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NREL NFCTEC) and combined with input from other participants. NREL then produced composite data products (CDP) which anonymized the data in order to maintain confidentiality. The results were compared with past data, which showed a measurable improvement in FCEVs over the past several years. The results were presented by NREL at the 2014 Fuel Cell Seminar, and 2014 and 2015 (planned) DOE Annual Merit Review. The project was successful. The team provided all of the data agreed upon and met all of its goals. The project finished on time and within budget. In addition, an extra $62,911 of cost sharing was provided by the Electricore team. All participants believed that the method used to collect, combine, anonymize, and present the data was technically and economically effective. This project helped EERE meet its mission of ensuring Americas security and prosperity by documenting progress in addressing energy and environmental challenges. Information from this project will be used by the hydrogen and vehicle industries to help advance the introduction of FCEVs and associated hydrogen infrastructure.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lean Miller Cycle System Development for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about lean miller cycle system...

  9. Feebates and Fuel Economy Standards: Impacts on Fuel Use in Light-Duty Vehicles and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential impacts of a national feebate system, a market-based policy that consists of graduated fees on low-fuel-economy (or high-emitting) vehicles and rebates for high-fuel-economy (or lowemitting) vehicles. In their simplest form, feebate systems operate under three conditions: a benchmark divides all vehicles into two categories-those charged fees and those eligible for rebates; the sizes of the fees and rebates are a function of a vehicle's deviation from its benchmark; and placement of the benchmark ensures revenue neutrality or a desired level of subsidy or revenue. A model developed by the University of California for the California Air Resources Board was revised and used to estimate the effects of six feebate structures on fuel economy and sales of new light-duty vehicles, given existing and anticipated future fuel economy and emission standards. These estimates for new vehicles were then entered into a vehicle stock model that simulated the evolution of the entire vehicle stock. The results indicate that feebates could produce large, additional reductions in emissions and fuel consumption, in large part by encouraging market acceptance of technologies with advanced fuel economy, such as hybrid electric vehicles.

  10. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and ...

  11. Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; Curran, Scott; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

  12. Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P; West, Brian H; Norman, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8. A turbocharged inline 4-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine powered vehicle was the fourth modern gasoline vehicle tested. A vintage 1972 vehicle equipped with a carburetor (open-loop control) was also examined. Results reveal insignificant fuel economy and emissions sensitivity of modern vehicles to air filter condition, but measureable effects on the 1972 vehicle. All vehicles experienced a measured acceleration performance penalty with clogged intake air filters.

  13. Advanced Combustion Concepts- Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  16. DOE Issues Request for Information on Fuel Cells for Continuous On-Board Recharging for Battery Electric Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The USDOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued an RFI seeking feedback from the research community and relevant stakeholders about fuel cell technology validation, commercial acceleration, and potential deployment strategies for continuous fuel cell rechargers on board light-duty electric vehicle fleets.

  17. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rate of adoption of new vehicle technologies and related reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions rely on how rapidly technology innovations enter the fleet through new vehicle purchases. New technologies often increase vehicle price, which creates a barrier to consumer purchase, but other barriers to adoption are not due to increased purchase prices. For example, plug-in vehicles, dedicated alternative fuel vehicles, and other new technologies face non-cost barriers such as consumer unfamiliarity or requirements for drivers to adjust behavior. This report reviews recent research to help classify these non-cost barriers and determine federal government programs and actions with the greatest potential to overcome them.

  18. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secretary, U.S. Department of Transportation Dr. Tom Turrentine, Director, Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Research Center and Research Anthropologist, University of California...

  19. Rebound 2007: Analysis of U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Travel Statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2010-01-01

    U.S. national time series data on vehicle travel by passenger cars and light trucks covering the period 1966 2007 are used to test for the existence, size and stability of the rebound effect for motor vehicle fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. The data show a statistically significant effect of gasoline price on vehicle travel but do not support the existence of a direct impact of fuel efficiency on vehicle travel. Additional tests indicate that fuel price effects have not been constant over time, although the hypothesis of symmetry with respect to price increases and decreases is not rejected. Small and Van Dender (2007) model of a declining rebound effect with income is tested and similar results are obtained.

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Light-Duty Diesel Combuston

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia Natonal Laboratories and  University of Wisconsin at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  1. Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phase 3; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, K.

    2014-05-01

    This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light - duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use. This report covers the exhaust emissions testing of 15 light-duty vehicles with 27 E0 through E20 test fuels, and 4 light-duty flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) on an E85 fuel, as part of the EPAct Gasoline Light-Duty Exhaust Fuel Effects Test Program. This program will also be referred to as the EPAct/V2/E-89 Program based on the designations used for it by the EPA, NREL, and CRC, respectively. It is expected that this report will be an attachment or a chapter in the overall EPAct/V2/E-89 Program report prepared by EPA and NREL.

  2. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  3. Drive cycle analysis of butanol/diesel blends in a light-duty vehicle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miers, S. A.; Carlson, R. W.; McConnell, S. S.; Ng, H. K.; Wallner, T.; LeFeber, J.; Energy Systems; Esper Images Video & Multimedia

    2008-10-01

    The potential exists to displace a portion of the petroleum diesel demand with butanol and positively impact engine-out particulate matter. As a preliminary investigation, 20% and 40% by volume blends of butanol with ultra low sulfur diesel fuel were operated in a 1999 Mercedes Benz C220 turbo diesel vehicle (Euro III compliant). Cold and hot start urban as well as highway drive cycle tests were performed for the two blends of butanol and compared to diesel fuel. In addition, 35 MPH and 55 MPH steady-state tests were conducted under varying road loads for the two fuel blends. Exhaust gas emissions, fuel consumption, and intake and exhaust temperatures were acquired for each test condition. Filter smoke numbers were also acquired during the steady-state tests.

  4. Evaluation of aftermarket CNG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazek, C.F.; Rowley, P.F.; Grimes, J.W.

    1995-07-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) was contracted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate three compressed natural gas (CNG) conversion systems using a 1993 Chevrolet Lumina baseline vehicle. A fourth conversion system was added to the test matrix through funding support from Brooklyn Union. The objective of this project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of the different conversion systems, and to compare the performance to gasoline-fueled operation and each other. Different natural gas compositions were selected to represent the 10th percentile, mean, and 90th percentile compositions distributed in the Continental United States. Testing with these different compositions demonstrated the systems` ability to accommodate the spectrum of gas found in the United States. Each compressed natural gas conversion system was installed and adjusted according to the manufacturer`s instructions. In addition to the FTP testing, an evaluation of the comparative installation times and derivability tests (based on AGA and CRC guidelines) were conducted on each system.

  5. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Combustion Concepts- Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Robert Bosch at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced combustion concepts -...

  7. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the ...

  8. Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad; Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric; Wang, Mr. Michael; Ruth, Mr. Mark; Andress, Mr. David; Ward, Jacob; Joseck, Fred; Nguyen, Tien; Das, Sujit

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

  9. Marketing Light-Duty Diesels to U.S. Consumers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marketing Light-Duty Diesels to U.S. Consumers Marketing Light-Duty Diesels to U.S. Consumers Overview of Volkswagens approach in introducing light-duty diesels to the U.S. passenger vehicle market. PDF icon deer08_krause.pdf More Documents & Publications Accelerating Light-Duty Diesel Sales in the U.S. Market The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow Future Directions in Engines and Fuels

  10. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  11. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, Donald W

    2011-06-03

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energys Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over todays state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  12. Economic Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles in the U.S. Market Economic Comparison of LNT Versus Urea SCR for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles in the U.S. Market ...

  13. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles This table lists the technical targets ...

  14. Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

  15. Impacts of ethanol fuel level on emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants from a fleet of gasoline light-duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zheng, Zhongqing; Villella, Phillip M.; Jung, Hee-Jung

    2012-03-30

    The study investigated the impact of ethanol blends on criteria emissions (THC, NMHC, CO, NOx), greenhouse gas (CO2), and a suite of unregulated pollutants in a fleet of gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles. The vehicles ranged in model year from 1984 to 2007 and included one Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV). Emission and fuel consumption measurements were performed in duplicate or triplicate over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle using a chassis dynamometer for four fuels in each of seven vehicles. The test fuels included a CARB phase 2 certification fuel with 11% MTBE content, a CARB phase 3 certification fuel with a 5.7% ethanol content, and E10, E20, E50, and E85 fuels. In most cases, THC and NMHC emissions were lower with the ethanol blends, while the use of E85 resulted in increases of THC and NMHC for the FFV. CO emissions were lower with ethanol blends for all vehicles and significantly decreased for earlier model vehicles. Results for NOx emissions were mixed, with some older vehicles showing increases with increasing ethanol level, while other vehicles showed either no impact or a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease. CO2 emissions did not show any significant trends. Fuel economy showed decreasing trends with increasing ethanol content in later model vehicles. There was also a consistent trend of increasing acetaldehyde emissions with increasing ethanol level, but other carbonyls did not show strong trends. The use of E85 resulted in significantly higher formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions than the specification fuels or other ethanol blends. BTEX and 1,3-butadiene emissions were lower with ethanol blends compared to the CARB 2 fuel, and were almost undetectable from the E85 fuel. The largest contribution to total carbonyls and other toxics was during the cold-start phase of FTP.

  16. Quantifying the Effects of Idle-Stop Systems on Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Passenger Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Wishart; Matthew Shirk

    2012-12-01

    Vehicles equipped with idle-stop (IS) systems are capable of engine shut down when the vehicle is stopped and rapid engine re-start for the vehicle launch. This capability reduces fuel consumption and emissions during periods when the engine is not being utilized to provide propulsion or to power accessories. IS systems are a low-cost and fast-growing technology in the industry-wide pursuit of increased vehicle efficiency, possibly becoming standard features in European vehicles in the near future. In contrast, currently there are only three non-hybrid vehicle models for sale in North America with IS systems and these models are distinctly low-volume models. As part of the United States Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, ECOtality North America has tested the real-world effect of IS systems on fuel consumption in three vehicle models imported from Europe. These vehicles were chosen to represent three types of systems: (1) spark ignition with 12-V belt alternator starter; (2) compression ignition with 12-V belt alternator starter; and (3) direct-injection spark ignition, with 12-V belt alternator starter/combustion restart. The vehicles have undergone both dynamometer and on-road testing; the test results show somewhat conflicting data. The laboratory data and the portion of the on-road data in which driving is conducted on a prescribed route with trained drivers produced significant fuel economy improvement. However, the fleet data do not corroborate improvement, even though the data show significant engine-off time. It is possible that the effects of the varying driving styles and routes in the fleet testing overshadowed the fuel economy improvements. More testing with the same driver over routes that are similar with the IS system-enabled and disabled is recommended. There is anecdotal evidence that current Environmental Protection Agency fuel economy test procedures do not capture the fuel economy gains that IS systems produce in real-world driving. The program test results provide information on the veracity of these claims.

  17. High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines 2010 DOE Vehicle ...

  18. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  20. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  1. Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 43 Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994...

  2. Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 (Continued) 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor:...

  3. Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

    2012-08-01

    Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

  4. Light Duty Vehicle CNG Tanks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agency-Energy, US DOE dane.boysen@doe.gov Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing ... Uh, sorry no Commercial CNG Tanks Tank Type I Type IV Material steel carbon fiber Capacity ...

  5. Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles When a household has more than one vehicle, the secondary vehicles travel fewer miles than the primary vehicle. In a two-vehicle household, the second vehicle travels less than half of the miles that the primary vehicle travels in a day. In a six-vehicle household, the sixth vehicle travels fewer than five miles a day. Daily Vehicle

  6. Opportunity Assessment Clean Diesels in the North American Light Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market | Department of Energy Opportunity Assessment Clean Diesels in the North American Light Duty Market Opportunity Assessment Clean Diesels in the North American Light Duty Market Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_mcmahon.pdf More Documents & Publications

  7. Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace_34_stanton.pdf More Documents & Publications Enabling High Efficiency Clean Combustion Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC Low-Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High-Efficiency Clean Combustion

  8. Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phases 4, 5, & 6; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, K.; Shoffner, B.

    2014-06-01

    This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires the EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light-duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use.

  9. Business Case for Light-Duty Diesel in the U.S. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel in the U.S. Business Case for Light-Duty Diesel in the U.S. 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_mcmanus.pdf More Documents & Publications Cleaning Up Non-Road Diesel Vehicles: A Public Health Imperative Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market Opportunity Assessment Clean Diesels in the North American Light Duty Market

  10. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact 903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 File fotw903web.xlsx More Documents ...

  11. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications ...

  12. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the U.S. transportation sector. Technical report fourteen: Market potential and impacts of alternative fuel use in light-duty vehicles -- A 2000/2010 analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    In this report, estimates are provided of the potential, by 2010, to displace conventional light-duty vehicle motor fuels with alternative fuels--compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol from natural gas, ethanol from grain and from cellulosic feedstocks, and electricity--and with replacement fuels such as oxygenates added to gasoline. The 2010 estimates include the motor fuel displacement resulting both from government programs (including the Clean Air Act and EPACT) and from potential market forces. This report also provides an estimate of motor fuel displacement by replacement and alterative fuels in the year 2000. However, in contrast to the 2010 estimates, the year 2000 estimate is restricted to an accounting of the effects of existing programs and regulations. 27 figs., 108 tabs.

  13. Fact #670: April 11, 2011 Vehicle-Miles of Travel Rises in 2010 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: April 11, 2011 Vehicle-Miles of Travel Rises in 2010 Fact #670: April 11, 2011 Vehicle-Miles of Travel Rises in 2010 The preliminary estimates from the Federal Highway Administration show that vehicle-miles of travel (VMT) increased slightly in 2010 over the previous year, but have not surpassed the peak of 3.03 trillion miles in 2007. Total U.S. VMT declined during the economic downturns in the mid-70's, early 80's, and in 2008. Total Vehicle-Miles of Travel,

  14. Light-duty diesel engine development status and engine needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This report reviews, assesses, and summarizes the research and development status of diesel engine technology applicable to light-duty vehicles. In addition, it identifies specific basic and applied research and development needs in light-duty diesel technology and related health areas where initial or increased participation by the US Government would be desirable. The material presented in this report updates information provided in the first diesel engine status report prepared by the Aerospace Corporation for the Department of Energy in September, 1978.

  15. Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State | Department of Energy 2: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles of Travel by State SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week In the United States, the U.S. Department of Transportation classifies 3.9 million miles of roadway as rural and 1.2 million miles of roadway as urban. Each state has a different travel pattern affecting the proportion of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) on rural versus urban roads.

  16. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dataset | Department of Energy 3: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 File fotw#903_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications 2015 GTO Peer Review U.S. LNG Imports and Exports (2004-2012) 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Main Report)

  17. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Price of Gasoline - Dataset | Department of Energy 60 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline File fotw#860_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact #906: January 4, 2016 VMT and the Price of Gasoline Typically Move in Opposition -

  18. Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 Fact #903: December 14, 2015 Vehicle Miles of Travel is up in 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Daily vehicle miles of travel (VMT) have been higher in 2015 than in any of the last ten years. Since April 2015, VMT has averaged 8.9 billion miles per day or more - levels not reached in any month over the last ten years. The cyclical nature of VMT shows that the summer months tend to have the highest vehicle

  19. Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Market | Department of Energy Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory PDF icon 2004_deer_greene.pdf More Documents & Publications Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with HyTrans Fact #869: April 20, 2015 Gasoline Direct Injection

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Computational Design and Development of a New, Lightweight Cast Alloy for Advanced Cylinder Heads in High-Efficiency, Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

  1. Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aftertreatment Systems | Department of Energy Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Results of the NOx adsorber system with catalyst aged to useful life conditions (simulated 120k miles), comparing performance betweem B20 fuel blend and base ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel PDF icon deer08_tatur.pdf More Documents & Publications Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light Duty

  2. Will We Drive Less? A White Paper on U.S. Light Duty Travel ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vehicle travel in the U.S. and other developed nations, with VMT likely stagnating or dropping in the future. This report examines a variety of issues surrounding light-duty travel...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Analyzing Real...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analyzing Real-World Light Duty Vehicle Efficiency Benefits Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Analyzing Real-World Light Duty Vehicle Efficiency Benefits Presentation ...

  4. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace016_curran_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Impacts of Advanced Combustion

  5. Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel Fact #640: September 13, 2010 Monthly Trends in Vehicle Miles of Travel Vehicle travel in the U.S. varies by month. There are many reasons for this, including the fact that some months are shorter than others. The vehicle miles of travel (VMT) recorded in February is always the lowest of the year. February 2010 was the lowest in this data series, which is likely weather-related (snowstorms in the Northeast).

  6. Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

    2008-01-31

    The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

  7. Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle Fuel Economy and Emissions Estimates Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle Fuel ...

  8. Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  9. Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market 2005 ...

  10. Emission Control Strategy for Downsized Light-Duty Diesels |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategy for Downsized Light-Duty Diesels Emission Control Strategy for Downsized Light-Duty Diesels This poster discusses the combustion aspects and control challenges of a high ...

  11. High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engines | Department of Energy High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace016_wagner_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Combustion and Emissions Performance of Dual-Fuel Gasoline and Diesel HECC on a Multi-Cylinder Light Duty

  12. Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_lambert.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks

  13. Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_leister.pdf More Documents & Publications Fueling U.S. Light Duty Diesel Vehicles Biodiesel_Fuel_Management_Best_Practices_Report.pdf A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select

  14. Fact #552: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region Fact #552: January 5, 2009 Vehicle Miles of Travel by Region Total vehicle miles of travel (VMT) in the U.S. have declined from 2007 to 2008. The latest data available, September 2008, shows a 4.4% decline in travel that varies by region. Comparing September 2007 to September 2008, the South Atlantic and South Gulf regions experienced VMT declines of more than 5%. Total U.S. cumulative VMT for 2008 (January-September) is 3.5%

  15. Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 6: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose In 2009, getting to and from work accounted for about 27% of household vehicle-miles of travel (VMT). Work-related business was 8.4% of VMT in 2001, but declined to 6.7% in 2009, possibly due to advancements in computing technology making it possible for more business to be handled electronically. VMT for shopping was almost

  16. Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  18. Light Duty Utility Arm System hot test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howden, G.F.; Conrad, R.B.; Kiebel, G.R.

    1996-02-01

    This Engineering Task Plan describes the scope of work and cost for implementing a hot test of the Light Duty Utility Arm System in Tank T-106 in September 1996.

  19. Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light Duty Tier 2 Engine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aftertreatment Systems | Department of Energy Light Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Presentation given at 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_tatur.pdf More Documents &

  20. Thermoelectric Opportunities for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of thermoelectrics for automotive applications and role of automakers in setting guidelines and technology attributes needed for the global product, regulatory, and market environment

  1. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Previous Year's Monthly Total and Average 3-month moving average Month-Year Gas price change from previous year Vehicle travel change from previous year Feb-01 5.1% 0.9%...

  2. Light duty utility arm startup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-09-01

    This plan details the methods and procedures necessary to ensure a safe transition in the operation of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The steps identified here outline the work scope and identify responsibilities to complete startup, and turnover of the LDUA to Characterization Project Operations (CPO).

  3. Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_lambert.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE

  4. Vehicle routing for the last mile of power system restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W; Coffrin, Carleton; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2010-11-23

    This paper studied a novel problem in power system restoration: the Power Restoration Vehicle Routing Problem (PRVRP). The goal of PRVRPs is to decide how coordinate repair crews effectively in order to recover from blackouts as fast as possible after a disaster has occurred. PRVRPs are complex problems that combine vehicle routing and power restoration scheduling problems. The paper proposed a multi-stage optimization algorithm based on the idea of constraint injection that meets the aggressive runtime constraints necessary for disaster recovery. The algorithms were validated on benchmarks produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, using the infrastructure of the United States. The disaster scenarios were generated by state-of-the-art hurricane simulation tools similar to those used by the National Hurricane Center. Experimental results show that the constraint-injection algorithms can reduce the blackouts by 50% or more over field practices. Moreover, the results show that the constraint-injection algorithm using large neighborhood search over a blackbox simulator provide competitive quality and scales better than using a MIP solver on the subproblems.

  5. Cummins Work Toward Successful Introduction of Light-Duty Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Work Toward Successful Introduction of Light-Duty Clean Diesel Engines in US Cummins Work Toward Successful Introduction of Light-Duty Clean Diesel Engines in US 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  6. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications through technical advances in system optimization. PDF icon deer09_stanton.pdf More Documents & Publications Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Enduran

  7. Business Case for Light-Duty Diesels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesels Business Case for Light-Duty Diesels 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_godwin.pdf More Documents & Publications Clean Diesel: The Progress, The Message, The Opportunity Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America Accelerating Light-Duty Diesel Sales in the U.S. Market

  8. Design criteria for the light duty utility arm system end effectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardini, A.F.

    1995-01-03

    This document provides the criteria for the design of end effectors that will be used as part of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The LDUA System consists of a deployment vehicle, a vertical positioning mast, a light duty multi-axis robotic arm, a tank riser interface and confinement, a tool interface plate, a control system, and an operations control trailer. The criteria specified in this document will apply to all end effector systems being developed for use on or with the LDUA system at the Hanford site. The requirement stipulated in this document are mandatory.

  9. Urea SCR Durability Assessment for Tier 2 Light-Duty Truck | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Durability Assessment for Tier 2 Light-Duty Truck Urea SCR Durability Assessment for Tier 2 Light-Duty Truck Summarizes progress toward development of a durable urea SCR system to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 on 3780 lb light truck PDF icon deer08_dobson.pdf More Documents & Publications Laboratory and Vehicle Demonstration of a "2nd-Generation" LNT+in-situ SCR Diesel NOx Emission Control Concept Future Trends for DPFƒSCR On-Filter (SCRF) Combination and Integration of DPF-SCR

  10. A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Thomas E; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Curran, Scott; Nafziger, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

  11. Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System Light duty diesel aftertreatment system consisting of a DOC and selective catalytic reduction catalyst on filter (SCRF), close coupled to the engine with direct gaseous ammonia delivery is designed to reduce cold start NOx and HC emissions PDF icon deer12_henry.pdf More Documents & Publications Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Cummins' Next

  12. Mixture Formation in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents quantitative measurements of evolution of in-cylinder equivalence ratio distributions in a light-duty engine where wall interactions and strong swirl are significant

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Computational design and development of a new, lightweight cast alloy for advanced cylinder heads in high-efficiency, light-duty engines FOA 648-3a

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about computational design and...

  14. Light duty utility arm walkdown report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalley, J.L.

    1998-09-25

    This document is a report of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) drawing walkdown. The purpose of this walkdown was to validate the essential configuration of the LDUA in preparation of deploying the equipment in a Hanford waste tank. The LDUA system has, over the course of its development, caused the generation of a considerable number of design drawings. The number of drawings is estimated to be well over 1,000. A large number consist of vendor type drawings, furnished by both Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and SPAR Aerospace Limited (SPAR). A smaller number, approximately 200, are H-6 type drawing sheets in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) document control system. A preliminary inspection of the drawings showed that the physical configuration of the LDUA did not match the documented configuration. As a result of these findings, a scoping walkdown of 20 critical drawing sheets was performed to determine if a problem existed in configuration management of the LDUA system. The results of this activity showed that 18 of the 20 drawing sheets were found to contain errors or omissions of varying concern. Given this, Characterization Engineering determined that a walkdown of the drawings necessary and sufficient to enable safe operation and maintenance of the LDUA should be performed. A review team was assembled to perform a review of all of the drawings and determine the set which would need to be verified through an engineering walkdown. The team determined that approximately 150 H-6 type drawing sheets would need to be verified, 12 SPAR/PNNL drawing sheets would need to be verified and converted to H-6 drawings, and three to six new drawings would be created (see Appendix A). This report documents the results of that walkdown.

  15. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements ... Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market US ...

  16. Test report light duty utility arm power distribution system (PDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.A.

    1996-03-04

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Power Distribution System has completed vendor and post-delivery acceptance testing. The Power Distribution System has been found to be acceptable and is now ready for integration with the overall LDUA system.

  17. Decontamination trade study for the Light Duty Utility Arm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1994-09-29

    Various methods were evaluated for decontaminating the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). Physical capabilities of each method were compared with the constraints and requirements for the LDUA Decontamination System. Costs were compared and a referred alternative was chosen.

  18. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles

  19. Fact #913: February 22, 2016 The Most Common Warranty for Plug-In Vehicle Batteries is 8 Years/100,000 Miles- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for The Most Common Warranty for Plug-In Vehicle Batteries is 8 Years/100,000 Miles

  20. First Semi-Annual Report AFDC Light Duty Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

  1. Light Duty Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Hydrogen Fueling Protocol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar slides from the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, "Hydrogen Refueling Protocols," held February 22, 2013.

  2. Fact #860 February 16, 2015 Relationship of Vehicle Miles of Travel and the Price of Gasoline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The prices of gasoline and diesel fuel affect the transportation sector in many ways. For example, fuel prices can impact the number of miles driven and affect the choices consumers make when...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electric Vehicle Mile Traveled (eVMT): On-road Results and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Idaho National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting about Electric Vehicle...

  4. Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine ORNL and UW collaboration in ...

  5. Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light-Duty Tier 2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Results of the NOx adsorber ...

  6. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines High ...

  7. Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light Duty Tier 2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems Presentation given at 2007 Diesel ...

  8. A Study of Emissions from a Light Duty Diesel Engine with the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Study of Emissions from a Light Duty Diesel Engine with the European Particulate Measurement Programme A Study of Emissions from a Light Duty Diesel Engine with the European ...

  9. Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a ...

  10. Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Six different fuels were investigated to study the ...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty ...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty ...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency Clean

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines | Department of Energy High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about clean combustion in multi-cylinder light-duty engines.

  14. Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US Market | Department of Energy Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_greaney.pdf More Documents & Publications Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market US Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Research

  15. Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Six different fuels were investigated to study the influence of fuel properties on engine out emissions and performance of low temperature premixed compression ignition combustion light-duty HSDI engines PDF icon deer10_tatur.pdf More Documents & Publications An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines Use of Low

  16. Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a light-duty diesel engine, which require utilization of the waste energy found in the coolant, EGR, and exhaust streams, may be increased through the development of a Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system PDF icon deer09_briggs.pdf More Documents & Publications Performance of an Organic

  17. Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America | Department of Energy Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_pinson.pdf More Documents & Publications Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America Diesel Technology - Challenges & Opportunities for North America Comparison of Conventional Diesel and

  18. Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Emission Control Technology Review Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Analyzing Real-World Light

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Duty Vehicle Efficiency Benefits | Department of Energy Analyzing Real-World Light Duty Vehicle Efficiency Benefits Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Analyzing Real-World Light Duty Vehicle Efficiency Benefits Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about analyzing real-world light duty vehicle efficiency benefits. PDF icon

  20. Light Duty Utility Arm System applications for tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carteret, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System is being developed by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Technology Development (OTD, EM-50) to obtain information about the conditions and contents of the DOE`s underground storage tanks. Many of these tanks are deteriorating and contain hazardous, radioactive waste generated over the past 50 years as a result of defense materials production at a member of DOE sites. Stabilization and remediation of these waste tanks is a high priority for the DOE`s environmental restoration program. The LDUA System will provide the capability to obtain vital data needed to develop safe and cost-effective tank remediation plans, to respond to ongoing questions about tank integrity and leakage, and to quickly investigate tank events that raise safety concerns. In-tank demonstrations of the LDUA System are planned for three DOE sites in 1996 and 1997: Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper provides a general description of the system design and discusses a number of planned applications of this technology to support the DOE`s environmental restoration program, as well as potential applications in other areas. Supporting papers by other authors provide additional in-depth technical information on specific areas of the system design.

  1. Fuel Savings from Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.; Thornton, M.

    2009-03-01

    NREL's study shows that hybrid electric vehicles can significantly reduce oil imports for use in light-duty vehicles, particularly if drivers switch to smaller, more fuel-efficient vehicles overall.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Use of Low Cetane...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Enable Low Temperature Combustion Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Sandia Optical...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Combustion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced combustion concepts - enabling systems and solutions for high efficiency light duty...

  4. An Energy Evolution:Alternative Fueled Vehicle Comparisons

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. on July 26, 2010.

  5. Flex Fuel Vehicle Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Systems Flex Fuel Vehicle Systems 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ft_13_yilmaz.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit

  6. 2015 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    Drivers and fleets are increasingly turning to the hundreds of light-duty, alternative fuel, and advanced technology vehicle models that reduce petroleum use, save on fuel costs, and cut emissions. This guide provides a comprehensive list of the 2015 light-duty models that use alternative fuels or advanced fuel-saving technologies.

  7. Impact of Fuel Properties on Light-Duty Engine Performance and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Describes the effects of seven fuels with significantly different fuel properties on a state-of-the-art light-duty diesel engine. Cetane numbers range between 26 and 76 for the ...

  8. Impact of Fuel Properties on Light-Duty Engine Performance and Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Describes the effects of seven fuels with significantly different fuel properties on a state-of-the-art light-duty diesel engine. Cetane numbers range between 26 and 76 for the investigated fuels.

  9. APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Light-Duty Passenger Car Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomazic, D; Tatur, M; Thornton, M

    2003-08-24

    A 1.9L turbo direct injection (TDI) diesel engine was modified to achieve the upcoming Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standard in combination with a NOx adsorber catalyst (NAC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The primary objective for developing this test bed is to investigating the effects of different fuel sulfur contents on the performance of an advanced emission control system (ECS) in a light-duty application. During the development process, the engine-out emissions were minimized by applying a state-of-the-art combustion system in combination with cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The subsequent calibration effort resulted in emission levels requiring 80-90 percent nitrogen-oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) conversion rates by the corresponding ECS. The strategy development included ean/rich modulation for NAC regeneration, as well as, the desulfurization of the NAC and the regeneration of the DPF. Two slightly different ECS were investigated and calibrated. The initial vehicle results in an Audi A4 station wagon over the federal test procedure (FTP), US 06, and the highway fuel economy test (HFET) cycle indicate the potential of these configuration to meet the future Tier 2 emission standard.

  10. Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Potential in North America Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_freese.pdf More Documents & Publications Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market Diesel Technology - Challenges & Opportunities for North America Diesel Engine Strategy & North American Market Challenges, Technology and Growth

  11. APBF-DEC Light-duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project APBF-DEC Light-duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: FEV Technology, Inc. PDF icon deer_2003_tomazic.pdf More Documents & Publications Status of APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Projects APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: SUV/Pick-Up Platform APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study

  12. Cummins Work Toward Successful Introduction of Light-Duty Clean Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engines in US | Department of Energy Work Toward Successful Introduction of Light-Duty Clean Diesel Engines in US Cummins Work Toward Successful Introduction of Light-Duty Clean Diesel Engines in US 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_stang.pdf More Documents & Publications Cummins Light Truck Clean Diesel Cummins/DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress R

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency Clean

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines | Department of Energy High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high efficiency clean combustion in multi-cylinder

  14. Safety equipment list for the light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-03-02

    The initial issue (Revision 0) of this Safety Equipment List (SEL) for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) requires an explanation for both its existence and its being what it is. All LDUA documentation leading up to creation of this SEL, and the SEL itself, is predicated on the LDUA only being approved for use in waste tanks designated as Facility Group 3, i.e., it is not approved for use in Facility Group 1 or 2 waste tanks. Facility Group 3 tanks are those in which a spontaneous or induced hydrogen gas release would be small, localized, and would not exceed 25% of the LFL when mixed with the remaining air volume in the dome space; exceeding these parameters is considered unlikely. Thus, from a NFPA flammable gas environment perspective the waste tank interior is not classified as a hazardous location. Furthermore, a hazards identification and evaluation (HNF-SD-WM-HIE-010, REV 0) performed for the LDUA system concluded that the consequences of actual LDUA system postulated accidents in Flammable Gas Facility Group 3 waste tanks would have either NO IMPACT or LOW IMPACT on the offsite public and onsite worker. Therefore, from a flammable gas perspective, there is not a rationale for classifying any of SSCs associated with the LDUA as either Safety Class (SC) or Safety Significant (SS) SSCs, which, by default, categorizes them as General Service (GS) SSCs. It follows then, based on current PHMC procedures (HNF-PRO-704 and HNF-IP-0842, Vol IV, Section 5.2) for SEL creation and content, and from a flammable gas perspective, that an SEL is NOT REQ@D HOWEVER!!! There is both a precedent and a prudency to capture all SSCS, which although GS, contribute to a Defense-In-Depth (DID) approach to the design and use of equipment in potentially flammable gas environments. This Revision 0 of the LDUA SEL has been created to capture these SSCs and they are designated as GS-DID in this document. The specific reasons for doing this are listed.

  15. Overview of Vehicle Test and Analysis Results from NREL's A/C Fuel Use Reduction Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.; Chaney, L.; Farrington, R. B.; Lustbader, J.; Keyser, M.; Rugh, J. P.

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes results of air-conditioning fuel use reduction technologies and techniques for light-duty vehicles evaluated over the last 10 years.

  16. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. on July 26, 2010.

  17. Clean Cities 2015 Vehicle Buyer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-02-11

    Drivers and fleets are increasingly turning to the hundreds of light-duty, alternative fuel, and advanced technology vehicle models that reduce petroleum use, save on fuel costs, and cut emissions. This guide provides a comprehensive list of the 2015 light-duty models that use alternative fuels or advanced fuel-saving technologies.

  18. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tessum, Christopher W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.

  19. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tessum, Christopher W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozonemore » (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.« less

  20. Light Duty Diesels in North America A Huge Opportunity | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy North America A Huge Opportunity Light Duty Diesels in North America A Huge Opportunity Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_schmidt.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Technology - Challenges & Opportunities for North America Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport

  1. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements of the U.S. Market | Department of Energy EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Ricardo, Inc. PDF icon 2004_deer_greaney.pdf More Documents & Publications Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market US Tier

  2. Light-Duty Diesels in the U.S. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Diesels in the U.S. Light-Duty Diesels in the U.S. Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_simon.pdf More Documents & Publications EPA Diesel Update State-of-the-Art and Emergin Truck Engine Technologies Ensuring the Availability and Reliability of Urea Dosing For On-Road and Non-Road

  3. SCReaming for Low NOx - SCR for the Light Duty Market | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy SCReaming for Low NOx - SCR for the Light Duty Market SCReaming for Low NOx - SCR for the Light Duty Market Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_traver.pdf More Documents & Publications Validated SCR Concept Development Simulation and Analysis of HP/LP EGR for Heavy-Duty Applications New Demands on Heavy Duty Engine Management

  4. Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engines | Department of Energy Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February 26, 2015 - 11:47am Addthis Multi-mode RCCI (Reactivity-Controlled Compression Ignition), a promising advanced combustion process, has the potential to improve fuel economy of passenger cars by at least 15%, according to a recent study performed by a team at Oak Ridge National

  5. NREL: Transportation Research - Vehicle Thermal Management Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Explore NREL's recent publications about light- and heavy-duty vehicle thermal management. For the complete collection of NREL's vehicle thermal management publications, search the NREL Publications Database. All Light-Duty Electric-Drive Light-Duty Conventional Heavy-Duty 2015 Combined Fluid Loop Thermal Management for Electric Drive Vehicle Range Improvement. Leighton, D. (2015). SAE Int. J. Passeng. Cars - Mech. Syst. 8(2):711-720. (Presented at the SAE 2015 World Congress and

  6. Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on the Durability of a Light-Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R. L.; Toops, T.; Wereszczak, A. A.; Fox, E. E.; Lance, M. J.; Cavataio, G.; Dobson, D.; Warner, J.; Brezny, R.; Nguyen, K.; Brookshear, D. W.

    2013-04-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth metal impurities found in diesel fuels are potential poisons for diesel exhaust catalysts. A set of diesel engine production exhaust systems was aged to 150,000 miles. These exhaust systems included a diesel oxidation catalyst, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Four separate exhaust systems were aged, each with a different fuel: ultralow sulfur diesel containing no measureable metals, B20 (a common biodiesel blend) containing sodium, B20 containing potassium, and B20 containing calcium, which were selected to simulate the maximum allowable levels in B100 according to ASTM D6751. Analysis included Federal Test Procedure emissions testing, bench-flow reactor testing of catalyst cores, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and measurement of thermo-mechanical properties of the DPFs. EPMA imaging found that the sodium and potassium penetrated into the washcoat, while calcium remained on the surface. Bench-flow reactor experiments were used to measure the standard nitrogen oxide (NOx) conversion, ammonia storage, and ammonia oxidation for each of the aged SCR catalysts. Vehicle emissions tests were conducted with each of the aged catalyst systems using a chassis dynamometer. The vehicle successfully passed the 0.2 gram/mile NOx emission standard with each of the four aged exhaust systems.

  7. Post-Delivery test report for light duty utility arm high resolution stereoscopic video system (HRSVS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardini, A.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-07

    This report documents the post delivery testing of the High Resolution Stereoscopic Video Camera System (HRSVS) LDUA system,designed for use by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) project.The post delivery test shows by demonstration that the high resolution stereoscopic video camera system is fully operational to perform the task of aligning the LDUA arm and mast with the entry riser during deployment operations within a Hanford Site waste tank.

  8. Post delivery test report for light duty utility arm optical alignment system (OAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardini, A.F.

    1996-04-18

    This report documents the post delivery testing of the Optical Alignment System (OAS) LDUA system, designed for use by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) project. The post delivery test shows by demonstration that the optical alignment system is fully operational to perform the task of aligning the LDUA arm and mast with the entry riser during deployment operations within a Hanford Site waste tank.

  9. Light duty remote manipulator for underground storage tank inspection and characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, P.W.; Carteret, B.A.

    1994-12-31

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) is a remote manipulator which is being designed and fabricated to perform surveillance and characterization activities in support of the remediation of underground storage tanks at the Hanford site as well as other DOE sites. The LDUA is a highly dexterous manipulator which utilizes an advanced control system to safely and reliably deploy a series of sensors to characterize underground storage tanks.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Results | Department of Energy Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Data and Results Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Data and Results The Vehicle Technologies Office supports work to collect extensive data on light-duty, medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles through the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Idaho National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) test and evaluate medium and heavy-duty fleet vehicles that use hybrid

  11. Word Pro - S1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 1.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase a Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase b Heavy-Duty Trucks c All Motor Vehicles d Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per

  12. Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fuel Use Reporting Methods and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2009-07-01

    The Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Fuel Use Reporting Methods and Results report provides real world test results from PHEV operations and testing in 20 United States and Canada. Examples are given that demonstrate the significant variations operational parameters can have on PHEV petroleum use. In addition to other influences, PHEV mpg results are significantly impacted by driver aggressiveness, cold temperatures, and whether or not the vehicle operator has charged the PHEV battery pack. The U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) has been testing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) for several years. The AVTA http://avt.inl.gov/), which is part of DOEs Vehicle Technology Program, also tests other advanced technology vehicles, with 12 million miles of total test vehicle and data collection experience. The Idaho National Laboratory is responsible for conducting the light-duty vehicle testing of PHEVs. Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation also supports the AVTA by conducting PHEV and other types of testing. To date, 12 different PHEV models have been tested, with more than 600,000 miles of PHEV operations data collected.

  13. Evaluation of aftermarket LPG conversion kits in light-duty vehicle applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, E.A.

    1993-06-01

    SwRI was contracted by NREL to evaluate three LPG conversion kits on a Chevrolet Lumina. The objective of the project was to measure the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions and fuel economy of these kits, and compare their performance to gasoline-fueled operation and to each other. Varying LPG fuel blends allowed a preliminary look at the potential for fuel system disturbance. The project required kit installation and adjustment according to manufacturer`s instructions. A limited amount of trouble diagnosis was also performed on the fuel systems. A simultaneous contract from the Texas Railroad Commission, in cooperation with NREL, provided funds for additional testing with market fuels (HD5 propane and industry average gasoline) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions speciation to determine the ozone-forming potential of LPG HC emissions. This report documents the procurement, installation, and testing of these LPG conversion kits.

  14. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The path to 45 percent peak BTE in FY 2010 includes modern base engine plus enabling technologies demonstrated in FY 2008 plus the recovery of thermal energy from the exhaust and EGR systems

  15. Fact #843: October 20, 2014 Cumulative Plug-in Electric Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates Total annual light vehicle sales data in the text are from the Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 33. Table 3.1

  16. Alternative fuel vehicles: The emerging emissions picture. Interim results, Summer 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    In this pamphlet, program goal, description, vehicles/fuels tested, and selected emissions results are given for light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. Other NREL R&D programs and publications are mentioned briefly.

  17. Selection of Light Duty Truck Engine Air Systems Using Virtual Lab Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Houshun

    2000-08-20

    An integrated development approach using seasoned engine technology methodologies, virtual lab parametric investigations, and selected hardware verification tests reflects today's state-of-the-art R&D trends. This presentation will outline such a strategy. The use of this ''Wired'' approach results in substantial reduction in the development cycle time and hardware iterations. An example showing the virtual lab application for a viable design of the air-exhaust-turbocharger system of a light duty truck engine for personal transportation will be presented.

  18. Describing Current & Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Provider Fleet Vehicles Fleet Vehicle Miles Traveled Propane Provider Survey In the analysis of annual vehicle miles traveled, the diesel vehicles tended to stand out. On...

  19. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  20. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    This report provides newly available national and regional data and analyzes the nation's energy use by light-duty vehicles. This release represents the analytical component of the report, with a data component having been released in early 2005.

  1. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon deer08brodt-giles.pdf More Documents & Publications The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow EPA Diesel Update Hybrid and Plug-In Electric ...

  2. 2010 Vehicle Technologies Market Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    them. The report opens with a summary of the economic sector, including sector-wide energy consumption trends. The second section includes a discussion on light-duty vehicles,...

  3. Advances in Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles Advances in Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Volkswagen AG PDF icon 2002_deer_schindler.pdf More Documents & Publications Accelerating Light-Duty Diesel Sales in the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America Meeting the CO2 Challenge DEER 2002

  4. Clean Cities 2011 Vehicle Buyer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Clean Cities Light-Duty Vehicle Buyer's Guide is a consumer publication that provides a comprehensive list of commercially available alternative fuel and advanced vehicles in model year 2011. The guide allows for side-by-side comparisons of fuel economy, price, emissions, and vehicle specifications.

  5. Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    This annual guide features a comprehensive list of 2014 light-duty alternative fuel and advanced vehicles, grouped by fuel and technology. The guide provides model-specific information on vehicle specifications, manufacturer suggested retail price, fuel economy, energy impact, and emissions. The information can be used to identify options, compare vehicles, and help inform purchase decisions.

  6. Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011 Reviews regulatory requirements and general technology approaches for heavy- and light-duty vehicle emissions control - filter technology, new catalysts, NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters PDF icon deer11_johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Diesel Emission Control Review Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control

  7. Piston Bowl Optimization for RCCI Combustion in a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Reed M; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M; Reitz, Rolf; Kokjohn, Sage

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an engine combustion strategy that that produces low NO{sub x} and PM emissions with high thermal efficiency. Previous RCCI research has been investigated in single-cylinder heavy-duty engines. The current study investigates RCCI operation in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine at 3 operating points. These operating points were chosen to cover a range of conditions seen in the US EPA light-duty FTP test. The operating points were chosen by the Ad Hoc working group to simulate operation in the FTP test. The fueling strategy for the engine experiments consisted of in-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel-injection (PFI) of gasoline and early-cycle, direct-injection (DI) of diesel fuel. At these 3 points, the stock engine configuration is compared to operation with both the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and custom machined pistons designed for RCCI operation. The pistons were designed with assistance from the KIVA 3V computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. By using a genetic algorithm optimization, in conjunction with KIVA, the piston bowl profile was optimized for dedicated RCCI operation to reduce unburned fuel emissions and piston bowl surface area. By reducing these parameters, the thermal efficiency of the engine was improved while maintaining low NOx and PM emissions. Results show that with the new piston bowl profile and an optimized injection schedule, RCCI brake thermal efficiency was increased from 37%, with the stock EURO IV configuration, to 40% at the 2,600 rev/min, 6.9 bar BMEP condition, and NOx and PM emissions targets were met without the need for exhaust after-treatment.

  8. Sizes, graphitic structures and fractal geometry of light-duty diesel engine particulates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K. O.; Zhu, J.; Ciatti, S.; Choi, M. Y.; Energy Systems; Drexel Univ.

    2003-01-01

    The particulate matter of a light-duty diesel engine was characterized in its morphology, sizes, internal microstructures, and fractal geometry. A thermophoretic sampling system was employed to collect particulates directly from the exhaust manifold of a 1.7-liter turbocharged common-rail direct-injection diesel engine. The particulate samples collected at various engine-operating conditions were then analyzed by using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an image processing/data acquisition system. Results showed that mean primary particle diameters (dp), and radii of gyration (Rg), ranged from 19.4 nm to 32.5 nm and 77.4 nm to 134.1 nm, respectively, through the entire engine-operating conditions of 675 rpm (idling) to 4000 rpm and 0% to 100% loads. It was also revealed that the other important parameters sensitive to the particulate formation, such as exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rate, equivalence ratio, and temperature, affected particle sizes significantly. Bigger primary particles were measured at higher EGR rates, higher equivalence ratios (fuel-rich), and lower exhaust temperatures. Fractal dimensions (D{sup f}) were measured at a range of 1.5 - 1.7, which are smaller than those measured for heavy-duty direct-injection diesel engine particulates in our previous study. This finding implies that the light-duty diesel engine used in this study produces more stretched chain-like shape particles, while the heavy-duty diesel engine emits more spherical particles. The microstructures of diesel particulates were observed at high TEM magnifications and further analyzed by a Raman spectroscope. Raman spectra revealed an atomic structure of the particulates produced at high engine loads, which is similar to that of typical graphite.

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, Selected Years, 1949-2010 Year Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1 Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2 Heavy-Duty Trucks 3 All Motor Vehicles 4 Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per Vehicle Gallons per Vehicle Miles per Gallon Miles per vehicle

  10. Idling Reduction for Personal Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    - Idling Reduction for Personal Vehicles Idling your vehicle-running your engine when you're not driving it-truly gets you nowhere. Idling reduces your vehicle's fuel economy, costs you money, and creates pollution. Idling for more than 10 seconds uses more fuel and produces more emissions that contribute to smog and climate change than stopping and restarting your engine does. Researchers estimate that idling from heavy-duty and light- duty vehicles combined wastes about 6 billion gallons of

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries » Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries Improving the batteries for electric drive vehicles, including hybrid electric (HEV) and plug-in electric (PEV) cars, is key to improving vehicles' economic, social, and environmental sustainability. In fact, transitioning to a light-duty fleet of HEVs and PEVs could reduce U.S. foreign oil dependence by 30-60% and greenhouse gas

  12. Light-Duty Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Drive Cycle Fuel Economy and Emissions Estimates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vehicle systems simulations using experimental data demonstrate improved modeled fuel economy of 15% for passenger vehicles solely from powertrain efficiency relative to a 2009 PFI gasoline baseline.

  13. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Howell Acting Director, Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE June 8, 2015 2  Transportation is responsible for 69% of U.S. petroleum usage  28% of GHG emissions  On-Road vehicles responsible for 85% of transportation petroleum usage Oil Dependency is Dominated by Vehicles  16.4M LDVs sold in 2014  240 million light-duty vehicles on the road in the U.S.  10-15 years for annual sales penetration  10-15

  15. 2015 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    5 Vehicle Buyer's Guide Clean Cities Propane Natural Gas Biodiesel Electric Hybrid Ethanol Flex-Fuel Drivers and fleets are increasingly turning to the hundreds of light-duty, alternative fuel, and advanced tech- nology vehicle models that reduce petroleum use, save on fuel costs, and cut emissions. This guide provides a comprehensive list of the 2015 light- duty models that use alternative fuels or advanced fuel-saving technologies. Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  16. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-25

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  17. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    The Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide is an annual guide which features a comprehensive list of 2014 light-duty alternative fuel and advanced vehicles, grouped by fuel and technology. The guide provides model-specific information on vehicle specifications, manufacturer suggested retail price, fuel economy, energy impact, and emissions. The information can be used to identify options, compare vehicles, and help inform purchase decisions.

  20. EV Everywhere: Find Electric Vehicle Models | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Find Electric Vehicle Models EV Everywhere: Find Electric Vehicle Models Search Car: Year: -- ALL -- Make: -- ALL -- Market Class: -- ALL -- All-Electric Range: Min -- ALL -- 10 miles 20 miles 30 miles 40 miles 50 miles 60 miles 70 miles 80 miles 90 miles 100 miles 110 miles 120 miles 130+ miles Gasoline Back-Up Available: -- ALL -- No Yes Reset To find out if a plug-in electric vehicle (EV) will work for you, use the menus to the left to sort the available EV models on the market by year, make,

  1. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  2. Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Briggs, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

  3. 2013 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Williams, Susan E; Boundy, Robert Gary; Moore, Sheila A

    2014-03-01

    This is the fifth edition of this report, which details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. The first section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. For example, Figures 12 through 14 discuss the connections between global oil prices and U.S. GDP, and Figures 21 and 22 show U.S. employment in the automotive sector. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. Figures 24 through 51 offer snapshots of major light-duty vehicle brands in the U.S. and Figures 56 through 64 examine the performance and efficiency characteristics of vehicles sold. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales (Figures 73 through 75) and fuel use (Figures 78 through 81). The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure (Figures 84 through 95), and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard (Figures 106 through 110). In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible nuggets.

  4. Local government energy management: liquid petroleum gas (LPG) as a motor vehicle fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, G.A.; Kerstetter, J.

    1983-10-01

    The retrofit or conversion of automotive engines to operate on liquid petroleum gas (LPG) or propane fuel is one of many potentially cost-effective strategies for reducing a local government's annual fleet operating and maintenance costs. The cost effectiveness of an LPG conversion decision is highly dependent on the initial conversion cost, vehicle type, current and projected fuel costs, vehicle fuel economy (miles per gallon), and yearly average mileage. A series of plots have been developed which indicate simple paybacks for the conversion of several vehicle types (passenger car, small and standard pickups, and two and three ton trucks) over a wide range of fuel economies and annual usage patterns. A simple payback of less than three years can be achieved for vehicles with poor fuel economy and high annual use. The figures provided in this report may be used by fleet management personnel as a screening tool to identify those passenger cars, small or standard pickups, or light duty trucks which are candidates for LPG conversion. In addition to examining the benefits of an LPG conversion, local governments should also consider the competing energy management strategies of downsizing, and the acquisition of fuel efficient, diesel powered vehicles.

  5. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace016curran2012o.pdf More Documents &...

  6. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace016curran2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  7. 2014 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary; Moore, Sheila A

    2015-03-01

    This is the sixth edition of this report, which details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. The first section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales and technologies specific to heavy trucks. The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards. In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible tables and figures.

  8. Fuel Spray Research on Light-Duty Injection Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace010_powell_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

  9. Fact #842: October 13, 2014 Vehicles and Vehicle Travel Trends...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reflecting that the average driver is driving more miles in 2012 than in 1950. However, the trends have changed for vehicle miles traveled and number of vehicles in operation. ...

  10. Fuel Spray Research on Light-Duty Injection Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace_10_powell.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics Ultrafast X-ray Phase-Enhanced Microimaging for Visualizing Fuel Injection Process and Diesel Sprays

  11. Evaluation of unthrottled combustion system options for light duty applications with future syncrude derived fuels. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Needham, J. R.; Cooper, B. M.; Norris-Jones, S. R.

    1982-12-01

    An experimental program examining the interaction between several fuel and light duty automotive engine combinations is detailed. Combustion systems addressed covered indirect and direct injection diesel and spark ignited stratified charge. Fuels primarily covered D2, naphtha and intermediate broadcut blends. Low ignition quality diesel fuels were also evaluated. The results indicate the baseline fuel tolerance of each combustion system and enable characteristics of the systems to be compared. Performance, gaseous and particulate emissions aspects were assessed. The data obtained assists in the selection of candidate combustion systems for potential future fuels. Performance and environmental penalties as appropriate are highlighted relative to the individual candidates. Areas of further work for increased understanding are also reviewed.

  12. Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Advanced Natural Gas Engine Technology for Heavy Duty Vehicles Natural gas engine technology has evolved to meet the requirements of HD vehicle applications. PDF icon deer09_kamel.pdf More Documents & Publications Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America The Potential of GTL Diesel to Meet Future Exhaust Emission Limits Advances in Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap Vehicle Technologies Office: US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap The Materials Technical Team (MTT) of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership focuses primarily on reducing the mass of structural systems such as the body and chassis in light-duty vehicles (including passenger cars and light trucks). Mass reduction also enables improved vehicle efficiency regardless of the vehicle size or propulsion system employed. This roadmap lays out

  14. Chapter 8 - Advancing Clean Transportation and Vehicle Systems and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technologies | Department of Energy 8 - Advancing Clean Transportation and Vehicle Systems and Technologies Chapter 8 - Advancing Clean Transportation and Vehicle Systems and Technologies Chapter 8 - Advancing Clean Transportation and Vehicle Systems and Technologies Transportation is a complex sector composed of light duty, medium duty, heavy duty, and non-highway vehicles; rail; aircraft; and ships used for personal transport, movement of goods, construction, agriculture, and mining as

  15. Miles Hand Grenade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrington, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Maish, Alex B. (Corrales, NM); Page, Ray R. (Albuquerque, NM); Metcalf, Herbert E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-11-15

    A simulated grenade for MILES-type simulations generates a unique RF signal and a unique audio signal. A detector utilizes the time between receipt of the RF signal and the slower-traveling audio signal to determine the distance between the detector and the simulated grenade.

  16. miles-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Velocity Statistics as Derived from 94-GHz Radar Measurements N. L. Miles, D. M. Babb, and J. Verlinde The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction Profiles of millimeter-wavelength radar Doppler spectra contain information about both the mean vertical velocities and cloud microphysics. In order to obtain this information, it is necessary to remove the effects of turbulence. Stratocumulus clouds often contain various species of ice and liquid, including

  17. Federal certification test results for 1992 model year. Control of air pollution from new motor vehicles and new motor vehicle engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Each manufacturer of a passenger car, (light-duty-vehicle), light-duty truck, motorcycle, heavy-duty gasoline engine, and heavy-duty diesel engine is required to demonstrate compliance with the applicable exhaust emission standard. This report contains all of the individual tests that were required by the certification-procedures found in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations in Part 86. These data were submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency's Certification Division at the National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory.

  18. DRIVE CYCLE EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS ESTIMATES FOR REACTIVITY CONTROLLED COMPRESSION IGNITION IN A MULTI-CYLINDER LIGHT-DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Briggs, Thomas E; Cho, Kukwon; Wagner, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The RCCI concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that by varying both the percent of premixed gasoline and EGR rate, stable combustion can be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. Changing the percent premixed gasoline changes the fuel reactivity stratification in the cylinder providing further control of combustion phasing and pressure rise rate than the use of EGR alone. This paper examines the combustion and emissions performance of light-duty diesel engine using direct injected diesel fuel and port injected gasoline to carry out RCCI for steady-state engine conditions which are consistent with a light-duty drive cycle. A GM 1.9L four-cylinder engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure EGR system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline. Engine-out emissions, engine performance and combustion behavior for RCCI operation is compared against both CDC and a premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) strategy which relies on high levels of EGR dilution. The effect of percent of premixed gasoline, EGR rate, boost level, intake mixture temperature, combustion phasing and pressure rise rate is investigated for RCCI combustion for the light-duty modal points. Engine-out emissions of NOx and PM were found to be considerably lower for RCCI operation as compared to CDC and PCCI, while HC and CO emissions were higher. Brake thermal efficiency was similar or higher for many of the modal conditions for RCCI operation. The emissions results are used to estimate hot-start FTP-75 emissions levels with RCCI and are compared against CDC and PCCI modes.

  19. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16.8 17.4 18.6 18.9 1.7 2.2 0.6 1.5 Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 15 Vehicle Miles Traveled per Vehicle (Thousand) . . . . . . . . ....

  20. 2011 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Boundy, Robert Gary; Diegel, Susan W

    2012-02-01

    This report details the major trends in U.S. light-duty vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), and, in accord with its mission, pays special attention to the progress of high-efficiency and alternative-fuel technologies. This third edition since this report was started in 2008 offers several marked improvements relative to its predecessors. Most significantly, where earlier editions of this report focused on supplying information through an examination of market drivers, new vehicle trends, and supplier data, this edition uses a different structure. After opening with a discussion of energy and economics, this report features a section each on the light-duty vehicle and heavy/medium truck markets, and concluding with a section each on technology and policy. In addition to making this sectional re-alignment, this year s edition of the report also takes a different approach to communicating information. While previous editions relied heavily on text accompanied by auxiliary figures, this third edition relies primarily on charts and graphs to communicate trends. Any accompanying text serves to introduce the trends communication by the graphic and highlight any particularly salient observations. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national (and even international) scale. For example, Figures 11 through 13 discuss the connections between global oil prices and U.S. GDP, and Figures 20 and 21 show U.S. employment in the automotive sector. The following section examines Light-Duty Vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. Figures 26 through 33 offer snapshots of major light-duty vehicle brands in the U.S. and Figures 38 through 43 examine the performance and efficiency characteristics of vehicles sold. The discussion of Medium and Heavy Trucks offers information on truck sales (Figures 58 through 61) and fuel use (Figures 64 through 66). The Technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure (Figures 68 through 77), and the Policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Cash for Clunkers program (Figures 87 and 88) and the Corporate Automotive Fuel Economy standard (Figures 90 through 99) and. In total, the information contained in this report is intended to communicate a fairly complete understanding of U.S. highway transportation energy through a series of easily digestible nuggets.

  1. A computational investigation of diesel and biodiesel combustion and NOx formation in a light-duty compression ignition engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zihan; Srinivasan, Kalyan K.; Krishnan, Sundar R.; Som, Sibendu

    2012-04-24

    Diesel and biodiesel combustion in a multi-cylinder light duty diesel engine were simulated during a closed cycle (from IVC to EVO), using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE, coupled with detailed chemical kinetics. The computational domain was constructed based on engine geometry and compression ratio measurements. A skeletal n-heptane-based diesel mechanism developed by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and a reduced biodiesel mechanism derived and validated by Luo and co-workers were applied to model the combustion chemistry. The biodiesel mechanism contains 89 species and 364 reactions and uses methyl decanoate, methyl-9- decenoate, and n-heptane as the surrogate fuel mixture. The Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) spray breakup model for diesel and biodiesel was calibrated to account for the differences in physical properties of the fuels which result in variations in atomization and spray development characteristics. The simulations were able to capture the experimentally observed pressure and apparent heat release rate trends for both the fuels over a range of engine loads (BMEPs from 2.5 to 10 bar) and fuel injection timings (from 0???° BTDC to 10???° BTDC), thus validating the overall modeling approach as well as the chemical kinetic models of diesel and biodiesel surrogates. Moreover, quantitative NOx predictions for diesel combustion and qualitative NOx predictions for biodiesel combustion were obtained with the CFD simulations and the in-cylinder temperature trends were correlated to the NOx trends."

  2. Impact Assessment of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the U.S. Power Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Nguyen, Tony B.; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-09-30

    The US electricity grid is a national infrastructure that has the potential to deliver significant amounts of the daily driving energy of the US light duty vehicle (cars, pickups, SUVs, and vans) fleet. This paper discusses a 2030 scenario with 37 million plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on the road in the US demanding electricity for an average daily driving distance of about 33 miles (53 km). The paper addresses the potential grid impacts of the PHEVs fleet relative to their effects on the production cost of electricity, and the emissions from the electricity sector. The results of this analysis indicate significant regional difference on the cost impacts and the CO2 emissions. Battery charging during the day may have twice the cost impacts than charging during the night. The CO2 emissions impacts are very region-dependent. In predominantly coal regions (Midwest), the new PHEV load may reduce the CO2 emission intensity (ton/MWh), while in others regions with significant clean generation (hydro and renewable energy) the CO2 emission intensity may increase. Discussed will the potential impact of the results with the valuation of carbon emissions.

  3. Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles using gasoline-powered internal combustion engines (ICEs).

  4. Additional Development of a Dedicated Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (ULEV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IMPCO Technologies

    1998-10-28

    This report describes the last in a series of three projects designed to develop a commercially competitive LPG light-duty passenger car that meets California ULEV standards and corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) energy efficiency guidelines for such a vehicle. In this project, IMPCO upgraded the vehicle's LPG vapor fuel injection system and performed emissions testing. The vehicle met the 1998 ULEV standards successfully, demonstrating the feasibility of meeting ULEV standards with a dedicated LPG vehicle.

  5. Exhaust particle characterization for lean and stoichiometric DI vehicles operating on ethanol-gasoline blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse; Barone, Teresa L; Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P

    2012-01-01

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet the U.S. fuel economy standards for 2016. Furthermore, lean-burn GDI engines can offer even higher fuel economy than stoichiometric GDI engines and have overcome challenges associated with cost-effective aftertreatment for NOx control. Along with changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the current 10% due to the recent EPA waiver allowing 15% ethanol. In addition, the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) mandates the use of biofuels in upcoming years. GDI engines are of environmental concern due to their high particulate matter (PM) emissions relative to port-fuel injected (PFI) gasoline vehicles; widespread market penetration of GDI vehicles may result in additional PM from mobile sources at a time when the diesel contribution is declining. In this study, we characterized particulate emissions from a European certified lean-burn GDI vehicle operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. Particle mass and particle number concentration emissions were measured for the Federal Test Procedure urban driving cycle (FTP 75) and the more aggressive US06 driving cycle. Particle number-size distributions and organic to elemental carbon ratios (OC/EC) were measured for 30 MPH and 80 MPH steady-state operation. In addition, particle number concentration was measured during wide open throttle accelerations (WOTs) and gradual accelerations representative of the FTP 75. Fuels included certification gasoline and 10% (E10) and 20% (E20) ethanol blends from the same supplier. The particle mass emissions were approximately 3 and 7 mg/mile for the FTP75 and US06, respectively, with lower emissions for the ethanol blends. The data are compared to a previous study on a U.S.-legal stoichiometric GDI vehicle operating on the same ethanol blends. The lean-burn GDI vehicle emitted a higher number of particles, but had an overall smaller average size. Particle number per mile decreased with increasing ethanol content for the transient tests. For the 30 and 80 mph tests, particle number concentration decreased with increasing ethanol content, although the shape of the particle size distribution remained the same. Engine-out OC/EC ratios were highest for the stoichiometric GDI vehicle with E20, but tailpipe OC/EC ratios were similar for all vehicles.

  6. EERE Success Story- Chrysler and Partners Achieve 25% Fuel Economy Improvement in Light-Duty Advanced Technology Powertrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Internal combustion engines have the potential to become substantially more efficient, with laboratory tests indicating that new technologies could increase passenger vehicle fuel economy by more...

  7. New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation July 29, 2011 - 1:48pm Addthis President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and Transportation Secretary

  8. vehicles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vehicles - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  9. Vehicle Data for Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs) and Hybrid Fuel Vehicles (HEVs) from the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFCD)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AFDC provides search capabilities for many different models of both light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. Engine and transmission type, fuel and class, fuel economy and emission certification are some of the facts available. The search will also help users locate dealers in their areas and do cost analyses. Information on alternative fuel vehicles and on advanced technology vehicles, along with calculators, resale and conversion information, links to incentives and programs such as Clean Cities, and dozens of fact sheets and publications make this section of the AFDC a valuable resource for car buyers.

  10. 2012 Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2013-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Center for Transportation Analysis developed and published the first Vehicle Technologies Market Report in 2008. Three editions of the report have been published since that time. This 2012 report details the major trends in U.S. light vehicle and medium/heavy truck markets as well as the underlying trends that caused them. The opening section on Energy and Economics discusses the role of transportation energy and vehicle markets on a national scale. The following section examines light-duty vehicle use, markets, manufacture, and supply chains. The discussion of medium and heavy trucks offers information on truck sales and fuel use. The technology section offers information on alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and the policy section concludes with information on recent, current, and near-future Federal policies like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards.

  11. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials | Department of Energy Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials PDF icon wr_trucks_hdvehicles.pdf More Documents & Publications WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials Summary of the Output

  12. Clean Cities 2013 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Propane Electric Hybrid Ethanol Flex-Fuel Biodiesel Vehicle Buyer's Guide Clean Cities 2013 Today's auto manufacturers offer hundreds of light-duty vehicle models that take advantage of alternative fuels and advanced technologies in order to help drivers and fleets reduce petroleum use, cut emissions, and save on fuel costs. This guide features a comprehensive list of such vehicles set to arrive in Model Year 2013. Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 About This

  13. Low-Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion Low-Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace002_miles_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Mixture Formation in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Light-Duty Diesel Combustion Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Light-Duty Diesel Combuston

  14. Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kean, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; Harley, R.A.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Lunden, M. M.

    2008-07-15

    Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 {+-} 6%, from 640 {+-} 40 to 400 {+-} 20 mg kg{sup -1}. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

  15. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Choose a vehicle to compare fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select Fuel/Technology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Propane (LPG) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle 0 City 0 Hwy (mi/gal) 0 City 0 Hwy (kWh/100m) Gasoline Vehicle 0 City 0 Hwy (mi/gal) Normal Daily Use 30.5 Total miles/day City 55 % Hwy 45 % Other Trips 3484 Total miles/year City 20 % Hwy 80 % Fuel Cost Emissions Annual Fuel Cost $ $/gal Annual

  16. Effect of E85 on RCCI Performance and Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine - SAE World Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of E85 on load expansion and FTP modal point emissions indices under reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) operation on a light-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine. A General Motors (GM) 1.9L four-cylinder diesel engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline or E85. Controlling the fuel reactivity in-cylinder by the adjustment of the ratio of premixed low-reactivity fuel (gasoline or E85) to direct injected high reactivity fuel (diesel fuel) has been shown to extend the operating range of high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) compared to the use of a single fuel alone as in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) or premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The effect of E85 on the Ad-hoc federal test procedure (FTP) modal points is explored along with the effect of load expansion through the light-duty diesel speed operating range. The Ad-hoc FTP modal points of 1500 rpm, 1.0bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP); 1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP; 2000rpm, 2.0bar BMEP; 2300rpm, 4.2bar BMEP; and 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP were explored. Previous results with 96 RON unleaded test gasoline (UTG-96) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) showed that with stock hardware, the 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP modal point was not obtainable due to excessive cylinder pressure rise rate and unstable combustion both with and without the use of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency and emissions performance of RCCI operation with E85 and ULSD is explored and compared against conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI operation with UTG 96 and ULSD.

  17. Analysis of the Relationship Between Vehicle Weight/Size and Safety, and Implications for Federal Fuel Economy Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, Thomas P.

    2010-03-02

    This report analyzes the relationship between vehicle weight, size (wheelbase, track width, and their product, footprint), and safety, for individual vehicle makes and models. Vehicle weight and footprint are correlated with a correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) of about 0.62. The relationship is stronger for cars (0.69) than for light trucks (0.42); light trucks include minivans, fullsize vans, truck-based SUVs, crossover SUVs, and pickup trucks. The correlation between wheelbase and track width, the components of footprint, is about 0.61 for all light vehicles, 0.62 for cars and 0.48 for light trucks. However, the footprint data used in this analysis does not vary for different versions of the same vehicle model, as curb weight does; the analysis could be improved with more precise data on footprint for different versions of the same vehicle model. Although US fatality risk to drivers (driver fatalities per million registered vehicles) decreases as vehicle footprint increases, there is very little correlation either for all light vehicles (0.01), or cars (0.07) or trucks (0.11). The correlation between footprint and fatality risks cars impose on drivers of other vehicles is also very low (0.01); for trucks the correlation is higher (0.30), with risk to others increasing as truck footprint increases. Fatality risks reported here do not account for differences in annual miles driven, driver age or gender, or crash location by vehicle type or model. It is difficult to account for these factors using data on national fatal crashes because the number of vehicles registered to, for instance, young males in urban areas is not readily available by vehicle type or model. State data on all police-reported crashes can be used to estimate casualty risks that account for miles driven, driver age and gender, and crash location. The number of vehicles involved in a crash can act as a proxy of the number of miles a given vehicle type, or model, is driven per year, and is a preferable unit of exposure to a serious crash than the number of registered vehicles. However, because there are relatively few fatalities in the states providing crash data, we calculate casualty risks, which are the sum of fatalities and serious or incapacitating injuries, per vehicle involved in a crash reported to the police. We can account for driver age/gender and driving location effects by excluding from analysis crashes (and casualties) involving young males and the elderly, and occurring in very rural or very urban counties. Using state data on all police-reported crashes in five states, we find that excluding crashes involving young male and elderly drivers has little effect on casualty risk; however, excluding crashes that occurred in the most rural and most urban counties (based on population density) increases casualty risk for all vehicle types except pickups. This suggests that risks for pickups are overstated unless they account for the population density of the county in which the crashes occur. After removing crashes involving young males and elderly drivers, and those occurring in the most rural and most urban counties, we find that casualty risk in all light-duty vehicles tends to increase with increasing weight or footprint; however, the correlation (R{sup 2}) between casualty risk and vehicle weight is 0.31, while the correlation with footprint is 0.23. These relationships are stronger for cars than for light trucks. The correlation between casualty risk in frontal crashes and light-duty vehicle wheelbase is 0.12, while the correlation between casualty risk in left side crashes and track width is 0.36. We calculated separately the casualty risks vehicles impose on drivers of the other vehicles with which they crash. The correlation between casualty risk imposed by light trucks on drivers of other vehicles and light truck footprint is 0.15, while the correlation with light truck footprint is 0.33; risk imposed on others increases as light truck weight or footprint increases. Our analysis indicates that, after excluding crashes involving young m

  18. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  19. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garetson, Thomas

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy?s (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations. Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing. Testing and evaluations were conducted in the following phases: ? Development of test procedures, which established testing procedures; ? Baseline performance testing, which established a performance baseline; ? Accelerated reliability testing, which determined vehicle reliability; ? Fleet testing, used to evaluate vehicle economics in fleet operation, and ? End of test performance evaluation. Test results are reported by two means and posted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to their website: quarterly progress reports, used to document work in progress; and final test reports. This final report documents work conducted for the entirety of the contract by the Clarity Group, Inc., doing business as ECOtality North America (ECOtality). The contract was performed from 1 October 2005 through 31 March 2013. There were 113 light-duty on-road (95), off-road (3) and low speed (15) vehicles tested.

  20. AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe testing results of the 2010 Electric Vehicles International neighborhood electric vehicle. Neighborhood electric vehicles reach speeds of no more than 35 miles per hour and are only allowed on roads with speed limits of up to 35 miles per hour. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  1. Low Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion Low Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace002_miles_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion Mixture Formation in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

  2. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, L.C.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Harley, R.A.; Hammond, S.K.; Miguel, A.H.; Hering, S.V.

    1999-09-15

    Motor vehicles are a significant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions. Improved understanding of the relationship between fuel composition and PAH emissions is needed to determine whether fuel reformulation is a viable approach for reducing PAH emissions. PAH concentrations were quantified in gasoline and diesel fuel samples collected in summer 1997 in northern California. Naphthalene was the predominant PAH in both fuels, with concentrations of up to 2,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in gasoline and 1,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in diesel fuel. Particle-phase PAH size distributions and exhaust emission factors were measured in two bores of a roadway tunnel. Emission factors were determined separately for light-duty vehicles and for heavy-duty diesel trucks, based on measurements of PAHs, CO, and CO{sub 2}. Particle-phase emission factors, expressed per unit mass of fuel burned, ranged up to 21 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for benzo[ghi]perylene for light-duty vehicles and up to {approximately} 1,000 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for pyrene for heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Light-duty vehicles were found to be a significant source of heavier (four- and five-ring) PAHs, whereas heavy-duty diesel engines were the dominant source of three-ring PAHs, such as fluoranthene and pyrene. While no correlation between heavy-duty diesel truck PAH emission factors and PAH concentrations in diesel fuel was found, light-duty vehicle PAH emission factors were found to be correlated with PAH concentrations in gasoline, suggesting that gasoline reformulation may be effective in reducing PAH emissions from motor vehicles.

  3. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  4. Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Fuel Characteristics on High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Kukwon; Han, Manbae; Wagner, Robert M; Sluder, Scott

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to understand fuel property effects on low temperature combustion (LTC) processes in a light-duty diesel engine. These types of combustion modes are often collectively referred to as high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A statistically designed set of research fuels, the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE), were used for this study. Engine conditions consistent with low speed cruise (1500 rpm, 2.6 bar BMEP) were chosen for investigating fuel property effects on HECC operation in a GM 1.9-L common rail diesel engine. The FACE fuel matrix includes nine combinations of fuel properties including cetane number (30 to 55), aromatic contents (20 to 45 %), and 90 % distillation temperature (270 to 340 C). HECC operation was achieved with high levels of EGR and adjusting injection parameters, e.g. higher fuel rail pressure and single injection event, which is also known as Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion. Engine performance, pollutant emissions, and details of the combustion process are discussed in this paper. Cetane number was found to significantly affect the combustion process with variations in the start of injection (SOI) timing, which revealed that the ranges of SOI timing for HECC operation and the PM emission levels were distinctively different between high cetane number (55) and low cetane number fuels (30). Low cetane number fuels showed comparable levels of regulated gas emissions with high cetane number fuels and had an advantage in PM emissions.

  5. Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle ParticleEmissions And Their Implications for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Hallar, A.G.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; McLaughlin, J.P.; Harley, R.A.; Lunden, M.M.

    2009-01-23

    During the summers of 2004 and 2006, extinction and scattering coefficients of particle emissions inside a San Francisco Bay Area roadway tunnel were measured using a combined cavity ring-down and nephelometer instrument. Particle size distributions and humidification were also measured, as well as several gas phase species. Vehicles in the tunnel traveled up a 4% grade at a speed of approximately 60 km h{sup -1}. The traffic situation in the tunnel allows the apportionment of emission factors between light duty gasoline vehicles and diesel trucks. Cross-section emission factors for optical properties were determined for the apportioned vehicles to be consistent with gas phase and particulate matter emission factors. The absorption emission factor (the absorption cross-section per mass of fuel burned) for diesel trucks (4.4 {+-} 0.79 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}) was 22 times larger than for light-duty gasoline vehicles (0.20 {+-} 0.05 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}). The single scattering albedo of particles - which represents the fraction of incident light that is scattered as opposed to absorbed - was 0.2 for diesel trucks and 0.3 for light duty gasoline vehicles. These facts indicate that particulate matter from motor vehicles exerts a positive (i.e., warming) radiative climate forcing. Average particulate mass absorption efficiencies for diesel trucks and light duty gasoline vehicles were 3.14 {+-} 0.88 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1} and 2.9 {+-} 1.07 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1}, respectively. Particle size distributions and optical properties were insensitive to increases in relative humidity to values in excess of 90%, reinforcing previous findings that freshly emitted motor vehicle particulate matter is hydrophobic.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Vehicle Systems Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Vehicle Systems subprogram. The Vehicle Systems research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to advancing light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle systems to help maximize the number of electric miles driven and increase the energy efficiency of transportation vehicles.

  7. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Wagner, Robert M; Parks, II, James E; Cho, Kukwon; Sluder, Scott; Kokjohn, Sage; Reitz, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Kukwon; Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Sluder, Scott; Parks, II, James E; Wagner, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

  9. Vehicle purchase and use data matrices: J. D. Power/DOE New Vehicle Owner Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, R.; Dulla, R.

    1981-04-01

    Vehicle purchase and use data collected in two recent surveys from buyers of new 1978 and 1979 cars and light-duty trucks are presented. The survey information is broad in scope, extending from the public awareness of fuel economy information to decision-making in the purchase process, to in-use fuel economy. The survey data consequently have many applications in transportation studies. The objective of this report is to make a general summary of the data base contents available to interested individuals and organizations.

  10. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an FFV? An FFV, as its name implies, has the flex- ibility of running on more than one type of fuel. FFVs can be fueled with unleaded gasoline, E85, or any combination of the two. Like conventional gasoline vehicles, FFVs have a single fuel tank, fuel system, and engine. And they are available in a wide range of models such as sedans, pickups, and minivans. Light-duty FFVs are designed to operate with at least 15% gasoline in the fuel, mainly to ensure they start in cold weather. FFVs are

  11. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    What is an FFV? An FFV, as its name implies, has the flex- ibility of running on more than one type of fuel. FFVs can be fueled with unleaded gasoline, E85, or any combination of the two. Like conventional gasoline vehicles, FFVs have a single fuel tank, fuel system, and engine. And they are available in a wide range of models such as sedans, pickups, and minivans. Light-duty FFVs are designed to operate with at least 15% gasoline in the fuel, mainly to ensure they start in cold weather. FFVs

  12. Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103) | Department of Energy 5 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_lambert.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks

  13. Electric Vehicle Workplace Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicle Workplace Charging 2  Vertically integrated Vermont utility  We serve  260,000 Customers  202 towns covering 7,500 square miles of service territory  We operate  32 Hydro Plants  6 Peaking Plants  12 Solar Projects  2 Wind Farms  2 100KW Wind Turbines  1 Joint-Owned Biomass Plant (McNeil)  We maintain  976 miles of transmission lines  11,273 miles of distribution lines  185 substations  Started in 2010 with Prius HyMotion

  14. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in lightduty vehicles.

  15. Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Yimin Zhu, PD/PI OneD Material, LLC (former Nanosys Energy Storage) Palo Alto, California June 16 ~20, 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies AMR 2014 ES130_zhu_2014_p This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information TM * Barriers addressed - Performance: Low Wh/kg & Wh/L - Life: Poor deep discharge cycles - Cost: High $/kWh * Targets Anode: >700 mAh/g 1,600 mAh/g >800 cycles

  16. Fact #902: December 7, 2015 Rural versus Urban Vehicle Miles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    46,996 Louisiana 41.4% 58.6% 47,758 Maine 72.4% 27.6% 14,129 Maryland 18.6% 81.4% 56,688 Massachusetts 4.6% 95.4% 56,311 Michigan 29.5% 70.5% 95,132 Minnesota 40.9% 59.1%...

  17. Summary of results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s vehicle evaluation data collection efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; Motta, R.; Broderick, J.

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a data collection project for light-duty, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) for about 4 years. The project has collected data on 10 vehicle models (from the original equipment manufacturers) spanning model years 1991 through 1995. Emissions data have also been collected from a number of vehicles converted to natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the vehicles involved in the data collection and evaluation are part of the General Services Administration`s fleet of AFVs. This evaluation effort addressed the performance and reliability, fuel economy, and emissions of light- duty AFVs, with comparisons to similar gasoline vehicles when possible. Driver-reported complaints and unscheduled vehicle repairs were used to assess the performance and reliability of the AFVs compared to the comparable gasoline vehicles. Two sources of fuel economy were available, one from testing of vehicles on a chassis dynamometer, and the other from records of in-service fuel use. This report includes results from emissions testing completed on 169 AFVs and 161 gasoline control vehicles.

  18. Mile High: Order (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Mile High Equipment, LLC to pay a $17,525 civil penalty after finding Mile High had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. approximately 109 units of lce-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW, a noncompliant product.

  19. Compressed natural gas fueled vehicles: The Houston experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the experience of the City of Houston in defining the compressed natural gas fueled vehicle research scope and issues. It details the ways in which the project met initial expectations, and how the project scope, focus, and duration were adjusted in response to unanticipated results. It provides examples of real world successes and failures in efforts to commercialize basic research in adapting a proven technology (natural gas) to a noncommercially proven application (vehicles). Phase one of the demonstration study investigates, develops, documents, and disseminates information regarding the economic, operational, and environmental implications of utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) in various truck fueling applications. The four (4) truck classes investigated are light duty gasoline trucks, medium duty gasoline trucks, medium duty diesel trucks and heavy duty diesel trucks. The project researches aftermarket CNG conversions for the first three vehicle classes and original equipment manufactured (OEM) CNG vehicles for light duty gasoline and heavy duty diesel classes. In phase two of the demonstration project, critical issues are identified and assessed with respect to implementing use of CNG fueled vehicles in a large vehicle fleet. These issues include defining changes in local, state, and industry CNG fueled vehicle related codes and standards; addressing vehicle fuel storage limitations; using standardized vehicle emission testing procedures and results; and resolving CNG refueling infrastructure implementation issues and related cost factors. The report identifies which CNG vehicle fueling options were tried and failed and which were tried and succeeded, with and without modifications. The conclusions include a caution regarding overly optimistic assessments of CNG vehicle technology at the initiation of the project.

  20. DOE to Provide up to $21.5 million for Research to Improve Vehicle

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Efficiency | Department of Energy up to $21.5 million for Research to Improve Vehicle Efficiency DOE to Provide up to $21.5 million for Research to Improve Vehicle Efficiency August 7, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis BENTON HARBOR, MI - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced the Department will award a total of up to $21.5 million for eleven cost-shared research and development (R&D) projects that aim to improve the fuel efficiency of light-duty vehicle engines.

  1. Onboard Hydrogen/Helium Sensors in Support of the Global Technical Regulation: An Assessment of Performance in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Crash Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, M. B.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; O'Malley, K.; Ruiz, A.

    2012-09-01

    Automobile manufacturers in North America, Europe, and Asia project a 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell powered light-duty road vehicles. These vehicles will be for general consumer applications, albeit initially in select markets but with much broader market penetration expected by 2025. To assure international harmony, North American, European, and Asian regulatory representatives are striving to base respective national regulations on an international safety standard, the Global Technical Regulation (GTR), Hydrogen Fueled Vehicle, which is part of an international agreement pertaining to wheeled vehicles and equipment for wheeled vehicles.

  2. Ethanol Blend Effects On Direct Injection Spark-Ignition Gasoline Vehicle Particulate Matter Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Barone, Teresa L

    2010-01-01

    Direct injection spark-ignition (DISI) gasoline engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected counterparts, and are now appearing increasingly in more U.S. vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged DISI engines are likely to be used in lieu of large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, to meet fuel economy standards for 2016. In addition to changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the 10% allowed by current law due to the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). In this study, we present the results of an emissions analysis of a U.S.-legal stoichiometric, turbocharged DISI vehicle, operating on ethanol blends, with an emphasis on detailed particulate matter (PM) characterization. Gaseous species, particle mass, and particle number concentration emissions were measured for the Federal Test Procedure urban driving cycle (FTP 75) and the more aggressive US06 cycle. Particle number-size distributions and organic to elemental carbon ratios (OC/EC) were measured for 30 MPH and 80 MPH steady-state operation. In addition, particle number concentration was measured during wide open throttle accelerations (WOTs) and gradual accelerations representative of the FTP 75. For the gaseous species and particle mass measurements, dilution was carried out using a full flow constant volume sampling system (CVS). For the particle number concentration and size distribution measurements, a micro-tunnel dilution system was employed. The vehicles were fueled by a standard test gasoline and 10% (E10) and 20% (E20) ethanol blends from the same supplier. The particle mass emissions were approximately 3 and 7 mg/mile for the FTP75 and US06, respectively, with lower emissions for the ethanol blends. During steady-state operation, the geometric mean diameter of the particle-number size distribution remained approximately the same (50 nm) but the particle number concentration decreased with increasing ethanol content in the fuel. In addition, increasing ethanol content significantly reduced the number concentration of 50 and 100 nm particles during gradual and WOT accelerations.

  3. Mile High: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Mile High Equipment, LLC manufactured and distributed noncompliant Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW in the U.S.

  4. Mile High: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-4501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Mile High Equipment, LLC finding that Ice-O-Matic brand automatic commercial ice maker basic model ICE2106 FW, HW does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  5. Advancing Transportation through Vehicle Electrification - PHEV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazzi, Abdullah; Barnhart, Steven

    2014-12-31

    FCA US LLC viewed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) as an historic opportunity to learn about and develop PHEV technologies and create the FCA US LLC engineering center for Electrified Powertrains. The ARRA funding supported FCA US LLC’s light-duty electric drive vehicle and charging infrastructure-testing activities and enabled FCA US LLC to utilize the funding on advancing Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) technologies for production on future programs. FCA US LLC intended to develop the next-generations of electric drive and energy batteries through a properly paced convergence of standards, technology, components and common modules. To support the development of a strong, commercially viable supplier base, FCA US LLC also utilized this opportunity to evaluate various designated component and sub-system suppliers. The original proposal of this project was submitted in May 2009 and selected in August 2009. The project ended in December 2014.

  6. Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel-economy vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mintz, M. M.; Vyas, A. D.; Wang, M. Q.

    1997-12-18

    This paper presents estimates of the fill fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low-sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. Results were obtained for three scenarios: a Reference Scenario without PNGVs, a High Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2030, and a Low Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for half as many sales by 2030. Under the higher of these two, the fuel-efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into a nearly 50% reduction in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur oxide, (SO{sub x}), and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM{sub 10}) for most of the engine-fuel combinations examined. The key exceptions were diesel- and ethanol-fueled vehicles for which PM{sub 10} emissions increased.

  7. Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by Speed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seven vehicles were tested by Consumer Reports recently to determine the fuel economy of the vehicles at a given speed. For these vehicles, the decline in fuel economy from a speed of 55 miles per...

  8. Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels.

  9. Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles using gasoline-powered internal combustion engines (ICEs). Water Chart: How far will one gallon go and how much water will it produce?

  10. Advanced Wireless Power Transfer Vehicle and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Burton, E.; Wang, J.; Konan, A.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on advanced wireless power transfer vehicle and infrastructure analysis. The potential benefits of E-roadway include more electrified driving miles from battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, or even properly equipped hybrid electric vehicles (i.e., more electrified miles could be obtained from a given battery size, or electrified driving miles could be maintained while using smaller and less expensive batteries, thereby increasing cost competitiveness and potential market penetration). The system optimization aspect is key given the potential impact of this technology on the vehicles, the power grid and the road infrastructure.

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole...

  12. Evaluation of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for natural gas and LPG vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, B. )

    1992-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the CNG and LPG vehicles studied were converted to the alternative fuel after purchase. There are wide variations in the quality of the conversion hardware and the installation. This leads to questions about the overall quality of the converted vehicles, in terms of emissions, safety, and performance. There is a considerable body of emissions data for converted light-duty vehicles, and a smaller amount for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. However, very few of these data involve real world conditions, and there is growing concern about in-use emissions. This report also attempts to assess factors that could allow in-use emissions to vary from the best-case'' results normally reported. The study also addresses issues of fuel supply, fuel composition, performance, safety, and warranty waivers. The report is based on an extensive literature and product survey and on the author's experience with fuel delivery systems for light-duty vehicles.

  13. Evaluation of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for natural gas and LPG vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, B.

    1992-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the CNG and LPG vehicles studied were converted to the alternative fuel after purchase. There are wide variations in the quality of the conversion hardware and the installation. This leads to questions about the overall quality of the converted vehicles, in terms of emissions, safety, and performance. There is a considerable body of emissions data for converted light-duty vehicles, and a smaller amount for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. However, very few of these data involve real world conditions, and there is growing concern about in-use emissions. This report also attempts to assess factors that could allow in-use emissions to vary from the ``best-case`` results normally reported. The study also addresses issues of fuel supply, fuel composition, performance, safety, and warranty waivers. The report is based on an extensive literature and product survey and on the author`s experience with fuel delivery systems for light-duty vehicles.

  14. March 28, 1979: Three Mile Island | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8, 1979: Three Mile Island March 28, 1979: Three Mile Island March 28, 1979: Three Mile Island March 28, 1979 A partial meltdown of the core occurs at one of the two reactors at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Highways Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Celebrates 200 Miles of Electric Highways on Delicious Rank

  16. Development of a dedicated ethanol ultra-low-emissions vehicle (ULEV): Phase 3 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, L.; Callahan, T.; Leone, D.; Naegeli, D.; Shouse, K.; Smith, L.; Whitney, K.

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the 3.5 year project discussed in this report was to develop a commercially competitive vehicle powered by ethanol (or an ethanol blend) that can meet California`s Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (ULEV) standards and equivalent Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) energy efficiency for a light duty passenger car application. This particular report summarizes the third phase of the project, which lasted 12 months. Emissions tests were conducted with advanced after-treatment devices on one of the two, almost identical, test vehicles, a 1993 Ford Taurus flexible fuel vehicle. The report also covers tests on the engine removed from the second Taurus vehicle. This engine was modified for an increased compression ratio, fitted with air assist injectors, and included an advanced engine control system with model-based control.

  17. Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel economy vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mintz, M.M.; Wang, M.Q.; Vyas, A.D.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents estimates of the full cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into reductions in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns, particularly under the High Market Share Scenario.

  18. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,805,"6,634",94.1,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,805,"6,634",94.1

  19. Study Pinpoints Sources of Polluting Vehicle Emissions (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Unburned lubricant produces 60%-90% of organic carbon emissions. While diesel fuel is often viewed as the most polluting of conventional petroleum-based fuels, emissions from gasoline engines can more significantly degrade air quality. Gasoline exhaust is at least as toxic on a per-unit-mass basis as diesel exhaust, and contributes up to 10 times more particulate matter (PM) to the emission inventory. Because emissions from both fuels can gravely impact health and the environment, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched a study to understand how these pollutants relate to fuels, lubricants, and engine operating conditions. NREL's Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project tested a variety of vehicles over different drive cycles at moderate (72 F) and cold (20 F) temperatures. Testing included: (1) Normal and high-emitting light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles; (2) Gasoline, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles; (3) New and aged lubricants representative of those currently on the market; and (4) Gasoline containing no ethanol, E10, Texas-mandated low-emission diesel fuel, biodiesel, and CNG. The study confirmed that normally functioning emission control systems for gasoline light-duty vehicles are very effective at controlling organic carbon (OC) emissions. Diesel vehicles without aftertreatment emission control systems exhibited OC emissions approximately one order of magnitude higher than gasoline vehicles. High-emitter gasoline vehicles produced OC emissions similar to diesel vehicles without exhaust aftertreatment emission control. Exhaust catalysts combusted or converted more than 75% of lubricating oil components in the exhaust gases. Unburned crankcase lubricant made up 60%-90% of OC emissions. This OC represented 20%-50% of emitted PM in all but two of the vehicles. Three-way catalysts proved effective at reducing most of the OC. With high PM emitters or vehicles with deteriorated aftertreatment, high-molecular-weight fuel components and unburned lubricant were emitted at higher rates than in vehicles in good repair, with functioning emissions systems. Light-duty gasoline, medium-duty diesel, and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles produced more particles with fresh oil than with aged oil. The opposite trend was observed in light- and medium-duty high PM emitters. This effect was not readily apparent with heavy-duty diesel vehicles, perhaps because the lubricant represented a much smaller fraction of the total PM in those trucks.

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption New passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles that are dedicated AFVs are exempt from state motor vehicle sales and use taxes. Qualified vehicles include vehicles capable of operating exclusively on natural gas, propane, hydrogen, or electricity, and plug-in electric vehicles that are capable of being charged by an external power source and can travel at least 30 miles using only electricity. Qualified vehicles must meet the California

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Cell Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs | Department of Energy Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Presentation given by OneD Material, LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about innovative cell materials and design for 300 mile range EVs. PDF icon es130_zhu_2014_p.pdf More

  2. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau...

  3. Table 5.2. U.S. per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    75,000 or More ... 8.2 2.3 28.5 1,443 1,692 5.2 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 9.0 1.4 14.7 769 890 7.3 125...

  4. Table 5.13. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    More ... 12.3 Q Q 11.4 10.8 12.8 13.9 12.7 Q 10.7 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 10.7 Q Q 8.8 10.2 10.9 12.0...

  5. Table 5.15. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 12.3 11.8 11.8 12.5 13.5 13.2 Q 13.3 Q 11.9 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 10.7 10.8 10.8 11.9 Q Q Q...

  6. Table 5.3. U.S. per Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.0 75,000 or More ... 19.1 12.3 620 727 19.8 4.2 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 12.4 10.7 558 647 19.2 6.8...

  7. Fact #586: August 31, 2009 New Vehicle Fuel Economies by Vehicle Type |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6: August 31, 2009 New Vehicle Fuel Economies by Vehicle Type Fact #586: August 31, 2009 New Vehicle Fuel Economies by Vehicle Type The average fuel economy for new cars climbed to over 30 miles per gallon (mpg) in 2008 while the average for new pickup trucks stayed around 20 mpg. For new vans and sport utility vehicles (SUVs) the average fuel economy has noticeably increased in the last few years. These data are weighted by the number of vehicles sold. New Vehicle

  8. Impacts of Vehicle Weight Reduction via Material Substitution on Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Jarod C.; Sullivan, John L.; Burnham, Andrew; Elgowainy, Amgad

    2015-10-20

    This study examines the vehicle-cycle impacts associated with substituting lightweight materials for those currently found in light-duty passenger vehicles. We determine part-based energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission ratios by collecting material substitution data from both the literature and automotive experts and evaluating that alongside known mass-based energy use and GHG emission ratios associated with material pair substitutions. Several vehicle parts, along with full vehicle systems, are examined for lightweighting via material substitution to observe the associated impact on GHG emissions. Results are contextualized by additionally examining fuel-cycle GHG reductions associated with mass reductions relative to the baseline vehicle during the use phase and also determining material pair breakeven driving distances for GHG emissions. The findings show that, while material substitution is useful in reducing vehicle weight, it often increases vehicle-cycle GHGs depending upon the material substitution pair. However, for a vehicles total life cycle, fuel economy benefits are greater than the increased burdens associated with the vehicle manufacturing cycle, resulting in a net total life-cycle GHG benefit. The vehicle cycle will become increasingly important in total vehicle life-cycle GHGs, since fuel-cycle GHGs will be gradually reduced as automakers ramp up vehicle efficiency to meet fuel economy standards.

  9. Renewable Fuels and Vehicles Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Fuels & Vehicles Overview Dale Gardner Associate Director, Renewable Fuels S&T 12 August 2008 State Energy Advisory Board to 2 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy DOE Programs Supported 3 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Advanced Energy Initiative * Develop advanced battery technologies that allow plug-in hybrid electric vehicles to have a 40 mile range operating solely on battery charge. * Accelerate progress towards the

  10. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems ...

  11. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles This ...

  12. LEAFing Through New Vehicle Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The LEAF is a five-passenger hatchback, powered by advanced lithium-ion batteries with a range of more than 100 miles on a single charge. The vehicle will cost drivers about $25,000 after a federal tax credit.

  13. Fact #794: August 26, 2013 How Much Does an Average Vehicle Owner...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    economy for all light vehicles on the road today is 21.4 miles per gallon (mpg). A person owning a gasoline vehicle with that fuel efficiency pays between 137 and 296 in fuel...

  14. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles Fact 854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model...

  15. AVTA: 2013 BRP Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe testing results of the 2013 BRP neighborhood electric vehicle. Neighborhood electric vehicles reach speeds of no more than 35 miles per hour and are only allowed on roads with speed limits of up to 35 miles per hour. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  16. AVTA: 2009 Vantage Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe testing results of two 2009 Vantage neighborhood electric vehicles (a pickup truck style and a van style). Neighborhood electric vehicles reach speeds of no more than 35 miles per hour and are only allowed on roads with speed limits of up to 35 miles per hour. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  17. Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles | Department of Energy 4 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model Year 2014 Vary from 62 to 265 Miles Driving ranges for all-electric vehicles vary considerably. Based on the official Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) range values reported on window stickers, the Mitsubishi i-MiEV has the shortest range (62 miles)

  18. Word Pro - S1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2014 Mileage Fuel Consumption Fuel Economy 18 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 5 10 15 20 25 30 Thousand Miles per Vehicle Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase b Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase a Heavy-Duty Trucks c a Through 1989, data are for passenger cars and motorcycles. For 1990-2006, data are for passenger cars

  19. Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

  20. 2012 Fuel Economy of New Vehicles Sets Record High: EPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that model year 2012 vehicles achieved an all-time high fuel economy average of 23.6 miles per gallon.

  1. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

  2. Seven Mile Hill Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.wsgs.uwyo.eduTopicsEnergyResourceswind.aspx http:renewableenergydev.comredwind-power-seven-mile-hill-wind-energy-project Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K

    2012-01-01

    We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  4. Drive Cycle Powertrain Efficiencies and Trends Derived From EPA Vehicle Dynamometer Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, John F

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle manufacturers among others are putting great emphasis on improving fuel economy (FE) of light-duty vehicles in the U.S. market, with significant FE gains being realized in recent years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data indicates that the aggregate FE of vehicles produced for the U.S. market has improved by over 20% from model year (MY) 2005 to 2013. This steep climb in FE includes changes in vehicle choice, improvements in engine and transmission technology, and reducing aerodynamic drag, rolling resistance, and parasitic losses. The powertrain related improvements focus on optimizing in-use efficiency of the transmission and engine as a system, and may make use of what is termed downsizing and/or downspeeding. This study explores quantifying recent improvements in powertrain efficiency, viewed separately from other vehicle alterations and attributes (noting that most vehicle changes are not completely independent). A methodology is outlined to estimate powertrain efficiency for the U.S city and highway cycle tests using data from the EPA vehicle database. Comparisons of common conventional gasoline powertrains for similar MY 2005 and 2013 vehicles are presented, along with results for late-model hybrid electric vehicles, the Nissan Leaf, Chevy Volt and other selected vehicles.

  5. Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length According to the latest National Household Travel Survey, the average trip length grew to over 10 miles in 2009, just slightly over the 9.9 mile average in 2001. Trips to work in 2009 increased to an average of 12.6 miles. The average trip length has been growing each survey year since the lowest average in 1983. Average Vehicle Trip Length, 1969-2009 Graph showing the average vehicle

  6. Light duty utility arm startup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-03-11

    This Startup Plan encompasses activities necessary to perform startup and operation of the LDUA in Facility Group 3 tanks and complete turnover to CPO. The activities discussed in this plan will occur prior to, and following the US Department Energy, Richland Operations Office Operational Readiness Review. This startup plan does not authorize or direct any specific field activities or authorize a change of configuration. As such, this startup plan need not be Unresolved Safety Question (USQ) screened.

  7. Light-duty Diesels: Clean Enough?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  8. NGV and FCV Light Duty Transportation Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Matt Fronk, Matt Fronk and Associates, LLC, at the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop held October 18-19, 2011, in Lemont, Illinois.

  9. Advanced Technology Light Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ammonia delivery is designed to reduce cold start NOx and HC emissions PDF icon deer12henry.pdf More Documents & Publications Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx ...

  10. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Modeling Updates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Analysis; Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 23, 2013 | Washington, DC Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Modeling Updates in the Transportation Sector Overview 2 AEO2014 Transportation Model Updates Washington, D.C., July 2013 Discussion purposes only - Do not cite or circulate * Light-duty vehicle - Vehicle miles traveled by age cohort, update modeling parameters, employment and VMT - E85 demand - Battery electric vehicle cost, efficiency, and availability * Heavy-duty vehicle, rail,

  12. Fact #658: January 17, 2011 Increasing Use of Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source: Environmental Protection Agency, Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide ... Technology 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Continuously Variable ...

  13. The impact of electric vehicles on CO{sub 2} emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentley, J.M.; Teagan, P.; Walls, D.; Balles, E.; Parish, T.

    1992-05-01

    A number of recent studies have examined the greenhouse gas emissions of various light duty vehicle alternatives in some detail. These studies have highlighted the extreme range of predicted net greenhouse gas emissions depending on scenarios for fuel types, vehicle and power generation efficiencies, the relative greenhouse contributions of emitted gases and a number of uncertainties in fuel chain efficiencies. Despite the potential range of results, most studies have confirmed that electric vehicles generally have significant potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline and most alternative fuels under consideration. This report summarizes the results of a study which builds on previous efforts with a particular emphasis on: (1) A detailed analysis of ICEV, FCV, and EV vehicle technology and electric power generation technology. Most previous transportation greenhouse studies have focused on characterization of fuel chains that have relatively high efficiency (65--85%) when compared with power generation (30--40%) and vehicle driveline (13--16%) efficiencies. (2) A direct comparison of EVs, FCVs with gasoline and dedicated alternative fuel, ICEVs using equivalent vehicle technology assumptions with careful attention to likely technology improvements in both types of vehicles. (3) Consideration of fuel cell vehicles and associated hydrogen infrastructure. (4) Extension of analyses for several decades to assess the prospects for EVs with a longer term prospective.

  14. The impact of electric vehicles on CO[sub 2] emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentley, J.M.; Teagan, P.; Walls, D.; Balles, E.; Parish, T. , Inc., Cambridge, MA )

    1992-05-01

    A number of recent studies have examined the greenhouse gas emissions of various light duty vehicle alternatives in some detail. These studies have highlighted the extreme range of predicted net greenhouse gas emissions depending on scenarios for fuel types, vehicle and power generation efficiencies, the relative greenhouse contributions of emitted gases and a number of uncertainties in fuel chain efficiencies. Despite the potential range of results, most studies have confirmed that electric vehicles generally have significant potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline and most alternative fuels under consideration. This report summarizes the results of a study which builds on previous efforts with a particular emphasis on: (1) A detailed analysis of ICEV, FCV, and EV vehicle technology and electric power generation technology. Most previous transportation greenhouse studies have focused on characterization of fuel chains that have relatively high efficiency (65--85%) when compared with power generation (30--40%) and vehicle driveline (13--16%) efficiencies. (2) A direct comparison of EVs, FCVs with gasoline and dedicated alternative fuel, ICEVs using equivalent vehicle technology assumptions with careful attention to likely technology improvements in both types of vehicles. (3) Consideration of fuel cell vehicles and associated hydrogen infrastructure. (4) Extension of analyses for several decades to assess the prospects for EVs with a longer term prospective.

  15. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with...

  16. "Table 11. Fuel Economy, Selected Survey Years (Miles Per Gallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy, Selected Survey Years (Miles Per Gallon)" ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",15.1,16.1,18.3,19.3,19.8,20.2 "Household Characteristics" "Census...

  17. Seven Mile, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Seven Mile is a village in Butler County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 8th congressional district.12 References ...

  18. Fact #797: September 16, 2013 Driving Ranges for Electric Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 7: September 16, 2013 Driving Ranges for Electric Vehicles Fact #797: September 16, 2013 Driving Ranges for Electric Vehicles The figure below shows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) driving ranges for electric vehicles (EVs) offered for the 2013 model year (MY). The Tesla Model S has the longest range of any EV offered, ranging from 139 miles for the 40 kilowatt-hour (kW-hr) battery pack model to 265 miles for the 85 kW-hr battery pack model. Battery capacity is

  19. Energy Flowchart Scenarios of Future U.S. Energy Use Incorporating Hydrogen Fueled Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G; Daily III, W

    2004-06-03

    This project has adapted LLNL energy flowcharts of historical U.S. energy use drawn from the DOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) data to include scenarios involving hydrogen use. A flexible automated process for preparing and drawing these flowcharts has also been developed. These charts show the flows of energy between primary sectors of the economy so that a user can quickly understand the major implications of a proposed scenario. The software can rapidly generate a spectrum of U.S. energy use scenarios in the 2005-2050 timeframe, both with and without a transition to hydrogen-fueled transportation. These scenarios indicate that fueling 100% of the light duty fleet in 2050 (318 million 80 mpg-equivalent compressed hydrogen fuel cell vehicles) will require approximately 100 million tonnes (10.7 quads) of H2/year, reducing petroleum use by at least 7.3 million barrels of oil/day (15.5 quads/yr). Linear extrapolation of EIA's 2025 reference projection to 2050 indicates approximate U.S. primary energy use of 180 quads/yr (in 2050) relative to current use of 97 quads/yr (comprising 39 quads/yr of petroleum). Full deployment of 50% efficient electricity generation technologies for coal and nuclear power and improvements in gasoline lightduty vehicle fleet fuel economy to 50 mpg would reduce projected U.S. primary energy consumption to 143 quads/yr in 2050, comprising 58 quads/yr (27 million bbl/day) of petroleum. Full deployment of H2 automobiles by 2050 could further reduce U.S. petroleum dependence to 43 quads/yr. These projections indicate that substantial steps beyond a transition to H2 light-duty vehicles will be necessary to reduce future U.S. petroleum dependence (and related greenhouse gases) below present levels. A flowchart projecting future U.S. energy flows depicting a complete transition by 2050 to compressed hydrogen light-duty vehicles is attached on the following page (corresponding to scenario 7 in the Appendix). It indicates that producing 100 billion kilograms of hydrogen fuel annually (10.7 quads/yr) from a balanced blend of primary energy sources will likely require 16.2 quads of primary energy input, with an additional 0.96 Quads of electricity for hydrogen storage. These energy flows are comparable to or smaller than projected growth in individual primary energy sources over the 2005-2050 timeframe except perhaps the case of windpower.

  20. Focus Series: Denver Energy Advisor Program Helps Homeowners Go the Extra Mile in Mile-High City

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Focus Series DENVER-ENERGY ADVISOR PROGRAM Energy Advisor Program Helps Homeowners Go the Extra Mile in Mile-High City A Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner in Denver, Colorado, launched the Denver Energy Challenge in 2011 with a "neighborhood blitz" model focused on door-to-door outreach. In early 2012, after experiencing difficulty scheduling energy assessments and converting them to upgrades, Denver Energy Challenge revamped the program and ultimatel y upgraded more than

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    system-efficiency Go Generated_thumb20140708-12454-1nsa79k U.S. Light-Duty Fuel Consumption and Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Generated_thumb20140708-12454-1nsa79k Trend of per capita VMT and fuel use in U.S. light-duty vehicles from 1970-2012 Last update July 2014 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20141209-960-hxf1gg Clean Cities Petroleum Savings by Fuel Economy and VMT Reductions Generated_thumb20141209-960-hxf1gg Trend of displacement by fuel economy improvement and VMT reduction

  2. Effects of Electric Vehicle Fast Charging on Battery Life and Vehicle Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2015-04-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, four new 2012 Nissan Leaf battery electric vehicles were instrumented with data loggers and operated over a fixed on-road test cycle. Each vehicle was operated over the test route, and charged twice daily. Two vehicles were charged exclusively by AC level 2 EVSE, while two were exclusively DC fast charged with a 50 kW charger. The vehicles were performance tested on a closed test track when new, and after accumulation of 50,000 miles. The traction battery packs were removed and laboratory tested when the vehicles were new, and at 10,000-mile intervals. Battery tests include constant-current discharge capacity, electric vehicle pulse power characterization test, and low peak power tests. The on-road testing was carried out through 70,000 miles, at which point the final battery tests were performed. The data collected over 70,000 miles of driving, charging, and rest are analyzed, including the resulting thermal conditions and power and cycle demands placed upon the battery. Battery performance metrics including capacity, internal resistance, and power capability obtained from laboratory testing throughout the test program are analyzed. Results are compared within and between the two groups of vehicles. Specifically, the impacts on battery performance, as measured by laboratory testing, are explored as they relate to battery usage and variations in conditions encountered, with a primary focus on effects due to the differences between AC level 2 and DC fast charging. The contrast between battery performance degradation and the effect on vehicle performance is also explored.

  3. Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  4. Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  5. Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et...

  6. GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

    2003-08-24

    The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple relationship between number and mass emissions was not observed. Data were collected on-road to compare weekday with weekend air quality around the Twin Cities area. This portion of the study resulted in the development of a method to apportion the Diesel and SI contribution to on-road aerosol.

  7. Propane vehicles : status, challenges, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood Werpy, M.; Burnham, A.; Bertram, K.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-17

    Propane as an auto fuel has a high octane value and has key properties required for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. To operate a vehicle on propane as either a dedicated fuel or bi-fuel (i.e., switching between gasoline and propane) vehicle, only a few modifications must be made to the engine. Until recently propane vehicles have commonly used a vapor pressure system that was somewhat similar to a carburetion system, wherein the propane would be vaporized and mixed with combustion air in the intake plenum of the engine. This leads to lower efficiency as more air, rather than fuel, is inducted into the cylinder for combustion (Myers 2009). A newer liquid injection system has become available that injects propane directly into the cylinder, resulting in no mixing penalty because air is not diluted with the gaseous fuel in the intake manifold. Use of a direct propane injection system will improve engine efficiency (Gupta 2009). Other systems include the sequential multi-port fuel injection system and a bi-fuel 'hybrid' sequential propane injection system. Carbureted systems remain in use but mostly for non-road applications. In the United States a closed-loop system is used in after-market conversions. This system incorporates an electronic sensor that provides constant feedback to the fuel controller to allow it to measure precisely the proper air/fuel ratio. A complete conversion system includes a fuel controller, pressure regulator valves, fuel injectors, electronics, fuel tank, and software. A slight power loss is expected in conversion to a vapor pressure system, but power can still be optimized with vehicle modifications of such items as the air/fuel mixture and compression ratios. Cold start issues are eliminated for vapor pressure systems since the air/fuel mixture is gaseous. In light-duty propane vehicles, the fuel tank is typically mounted in the trunk; for medium- and heavy-duty vans and trucks, the tank is located under the body of the vehicle. Propane tanks add weight to a vehicle and can slightly increase the consumption of fuel. On a gallon-to-gallon basis, the energy content of propane is 73% that of gasoline, thus requiring more propane fuel to travel an equivalent distance, even in an optimized engine (EERE 2009b).

  8. Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duleep, G.

    2011-02-01

    Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies? other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles and from recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

  9. Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duleep, G.

    2011-02-01

    Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies, other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles, and recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

  10. Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Microsoft Word - 10_Million_Loaded_Miles.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Trucks Surpass 10 Million Loaded Miles CARLSBAD, N.M., April 19, 2010 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office said drivers, who haul defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, surpassed 10 million safe, loaded miles. The first of more than 8,400 shipments to WIPP arrived 11 years ago from Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico. "There's no doubt, some of the best drivers in the transportation industry work for

  12. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confidential, 4222013 2013 DOE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM REVIEW PRESENTATION Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle ...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle ...

  15. Highway vehicle MPG and market shares report: Model year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, L.S. ); Hu, P.S. )

    1991-04-01

    This issue of Highway Vehicle MPG and Market Shares Report: Model Year 1990 reports the estimated sales-weighted fuel economies, sales, market shares, and other vehicle characteristics of new automobiles and light trucks. The estimates are made on a make and model basis (e.g., Chevrolet is a make and Corsica is a model), from model year 1976 to model year 1990. Vehicle sales data are used as weighting factors in the sales-weighted estimation procedure. Thus, the estimates represent averages of the overall new vehicle fleet, reflecting the composition of the fleet. Highlights are provided on the trends in the vehicle characteristics from one model year to the next. Analyses are also made on fuel economy changes to determine what caused the changes. The new automobile fleet experienced a fuel economy loss of 0.4 mpg from the previous model year, dropping to 27.6 mpg. This is the second consecutive decline in the fuel economy of new automobiles since model year 1983. The main reason for the fuel economy decline in automobiles was that the compact, midsize, and large size classes, which together claimed more than 75% of the new automobile market, each experienced fuel economy declines of 0.4 mpg or more. In contrast, the new light truck fleet showed an increase of 0.3 mpg from the previous year to a current mpg of 20.5. The fuel economy increase in light trucks was primarily due to the fact that the large pickup class, which represents 35.0% of the new 1990 light truck market experienced a gain of 0.7 mpg in its fuel economy. Overall, the sales-weighted fuel economy of the new light-duty vehicle fleet (automobiles and light trucks) dropped to 24.8 mpg in model year 1990, a reduction of 0.2 mpg from model year 1989. 9 refs., 29 figs., 55 tabs.

  16. Vehicle Aerodynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicle Aerodynamics Background Tougher emissions standards, as well as industry demands for more powerful engines and new vehicle equipment, continue to increase the heat rejection requirements of heavy-duty vehicles. However, changes in the physical configuration and weight of these vehicles can affect how they handle wind resistance and energy loss due to aerodynamic drag. Role of High-Performance Computing The field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) offers researchers the ability to

  17. Table 5.12. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 30.8 25.1 28.9 42.6 27.1 Q Q Q 25.2 31.8 23.3 13.7 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 16.6 15.4 16.2 19.5 12.8 Q...

  18. Table 5.9. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1993 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  19. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

  20. Primary Side Power Flow Control of Wireless Power Transfer for Electric Vehicle Charging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John M; Onar, Omer C; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan

    2015-01-01

    Various noncontacting methods of plug-in electric vehicle charging are either under development or now deployed as aftermarket options in the light-duty automotive market. Wireless power transfer (WPT) is now the accepted term for wireless charging and is used synonymously for inductive power transfer and magnetic resonance coupling. WPT technology is in its infancy; standardization is lacking, especially on interoperability, center frequency selection, magnetic fringe field suppression, and the methods employed for power flow regulation. This paper proposes a new analysis concept for power flow in WPT in which the primary provides frequency selection and the tuned secondary, with its resemblance to a power transmission network having a reactive power voltage control, is analyzed as a transmission network. Analysis is supported with experimental data taken from Oak Ridge National Laboratory s WPT apparatus. This paper also provides an experimental evidence for frequency selection, fringe field assessment, and the need for low-latency communications in the feedback path.

  1. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Make Rapid Progress in Range, Durability - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Make Rapid Progress in Range, Durability NREL analyzed data from 500,000 individual vehicle trips covering 3.6 million miles August 10, 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently completed a seven-year project to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hydrogen fueling infrastructure in real-world settings. The National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning

  2. FY2014 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    The Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to advancing light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle systems to help maximize the number of electric miles driven and increase the energy efficiency of transportation vehicles.

  3. Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George A.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Harley, Robert A.

    2009-04-10

    Average particle number concentrations and size distributions from {approx}61,000 light-duty (LD) vehicles and {approx}2500 medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) trucks were measured during the summer of 2006 in a San Francisco Bay area traffic tunnel. One of the traffic bores contained only LD vehicles, and the other contained mixed traffic, allowing pollutants to be apportioned between LD vehicles and diesel trucks. Particle number emission factors (particle diameter D{sub p} > 3 nm) were found to be (3.9 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup 14} and (3.3 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} fuel burned for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively. Size distribution measurements showed that diesel trucks emitted at least an order of magnitude more particles for all measured sizes (10 < D{sub p} < 290 nm) per unit mass of fuel burned. The relative importance of LD vehicles as a source of particles increased as D{sub p} decreased. Comparing the results from this study to previous measurements at the same site showed that particle number emission factors have decreased for both LD vehicles and diesel trucks since 1997. Integrating size distributions with a volume weighting showed that diesel trucks emitted 28 {+-} 11 times more particles by volume than LD vehicles, consistent with the diesel/gasoline emission factor ratio for PM{sub 2.5} mass measured using gravimetric analysis of Teflon filters, reported in a companion paper.

  4. A fuel-based motor vehicle emission inventory for the San Francisco Bay area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.R.; Singer, B.C.; Harley, R.A.; Martien, P.T.; Fanai, A.K.

    1997-12-31

    Traditionally, regional motor vehicle emission inventories (MVEI) have been estimated by combining travel demand model and emission factor model predictions. The accuracy of traditional MVEIs is frequently challenged, and development of independent methods for estimating vehicle emissions has been identified as a high priority for air quality research. In this study, an alternative fuel-based MVEI was developed for the San Francisco Bay Area using data from 1990--1992. To estimate CO emissions from motor vehicles in the Bay Area, estimates of gasoline sales were combined with infrared remote sensing measurements of CO and CO{sub 2} exhaust concentrations from over 10,000 light-duty vehicles in summer 1991. Once absolute estimates of CO emissions have been computed, it is possible to use ambient NO{sub x}/CO and NMOC/CO ratios from high traffic areas to estimate emissions for NO{sub x} and NMOC (excluding some resting loss and diurnal evaporative emissions). Ambient ratios were generated from special-study measurements of NMOC and CO in 1990 and 1992, and from routine sampling of NO{sub x} and CO in 1991. All pollutant concentrations were measured on summer mornings at Bay Area monitoring sites in areas with high levels of vehicle traffic and no other significant sources nearby. Stabilized CO emissions calculated by the fuel-based method for cars and light-duty trucks were 1720{+-}420 tons/day. This value is close to California`s MVEI 7G model estimates. Total on-road vehicle emissions of CO in the Bay Area were estimated to be 2900{+-}800 tons/day. Emissions of NMOC were estimated to be 570{+-}200 tons/day, which is 1.6{+-}0.6 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G. In the present study, emissions of NO{sub x} from on-road vehicles were estimated to be 250{+-}90 tons/day, which is 0.6{+-}0.2 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G.

  5. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  6. New York Nuclear Profile - Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,630,"5,294",95.9,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Consumption Comparisons in 2010 One quad equals: - 50.2 million short tons of coal = enough coal to fill a train of railroad cars 4,123 miles long (about one and a half times across the U.S.) - 974.7 billion cubic feet natural gas - 8.2 billion gallons of gasoline = 21.2 days of U.S. gasoline use = 22.89 million passenger cars each driven 12,400 miles = 20.12 million light-duty vehicles each driven 12,200 miles = all new passenger cars sold, each driven 50,000 miles = 13.69 million stock

  8. Vehicle Crashworthiness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crashworthiness Background While automakers and truck manufacturers are called upon to increase the levels of safety protection in their vehicles and reduce the number of injuries that occur in accidents, crash testing of vehicles as a means to optimize vehicle safety design is becoming increasingly expensive. Use of more sophisticated and more expensive occupant dummies ($120,000 per dummy) can almost double the current average price of $500,000 per test. In addition, the increasing diversity

  9. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  10. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  11. Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage - Current Technology Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology Hydrogen storage is a significant challenge for the development and viability of hydrogen-powered vehicles. On-board hydrogen storage in the range of approximately 5-13 kg is required to enable a driving range of greater than 300 miles for the full platform of light-duty automotive vehicles using fuel cell power plants. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Current on-board hydrogen storage approaches involve compressed hydrogen gas

  12. DOE Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Test Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yimin

    2012-03-31

    Based on the contract NT-42790 to the Department of Energy, Plug-in Hybrid Ethanol Research Platform, Advanced Vehicle Research Center (AVRC) Virginia has successfully developed the phase I electric drive train research platform which has been named as Laboratory Rapid Application Testbed (LabRAT). In phase II, LabRAT is to be upgraded into plug-in hybrid research platform, which will be capable of testing power systems for electric vehicles, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles running on conventional as well as alternative fuels. LabRAT is configured as a rolling testbed with plentiful space for installing various component configurations. Component connections are modularized for flexibility and are easily replaced for testing various mechanisms. LabRAT is designed and built as a full functional vehicle chassis with a steering system, brake system and four wheel suspension. The rear drive axle offers maximum flexibility with a quickly changeable gear ratio final drive to accommodate different motor speed requirements. The electric drive system includes an electric motor which is mechanically connected to the rear axle through an integrated speed/torque sensor. Initially, a 100 kW UQM motor and corresponding UQM motor controller is used which can be easily replaced with another motor/controller combination. A lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) battery pack is installed, which consists of 108 cells of 100 AH capacity, giving the total energy capacity of 32.5 kWh. Correspondingly, a fully functional battery management system (BMS) is installed to perform battery cell operation monitoring, cell voltage balancing, and reporting battery real time operating parameters to vehicle controller. An advanced vehicle controller ECU is installed for controlling the drive train. The vehicle controller ECU receives traction or braking torque command from driver through accelerator and brake pedal position sensors and battery operating signals from the BMS through CAN BUS, and then generates motor torque command (traction or braking) to the motor controller based on the control algorithm software embedded in the vehicle controller ECU. The vehicle controller ECU is a re-programmable electronic control unit. Any control algorithm software developed can be easily downloaded to vehicle controller ECU to test any newly developed control strategy. The flexibility of the control system significantly enhances the practical applicability of the LabRAT. A new test methodology has been developed for the LabRAT simulating any vehicles running on road with different weights from compact passenger car to light duty truck on an AC or eddy current dynamometers without much effort for modification of the system. LabRAT is equipped with a fully functional data acquisition system supplied by CyberMetrix. The measurement points along the drive train are DC electric power between battery pack and motor controller input, AC electric power between motor controller and electric motor, mechanical power between motor and rear axle. The data acquisition system is designed with more capability than current requirements in order to meet the requirements for phase II.

  13. Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-24

    EAGLES1.1 is PC-based interactive software for analyzing performance (e.g., maximum range) of electric vehicles (EVs) or fuel economy (e.g., miles/gallon) of gasoline vehicles (GVs). The EV model provides a second by second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified vehicle velocity/time or power/time profile. It takes into account the effects of battery depth-of-discharge (DOD) and regenerative braking. The GV fuel economy model which relates fuel economy, vehicle parameters, and driving cycle characteristics, canmore »be used to investigate the effects of changes in vehicle parameters and driving patterns on fuel economy. For both types of vehicles, effects of heating/cooling loads on vehicle performance can be studied. Alternatively, the software can be used to determine the size of battery needed to satisfy given vehicle mission requirements (e.g., maximum range and driving patterns). Options are available to estimate the time necessary for a vehicle to reach a certain speed with the application of a specified constant power and to compute the fraction of time and/or distance in a drivng cycle for speeds exceeding a given value.« less

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Community...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Community and Fleet Readiness Data and Reports Making plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs, also known as electric cars) as ...

  15. 2011 Hyundai Sonata 3539 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Shirk; Tyler Gray; Jeffrey Wishart

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicle batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid (VIN KMHEC4A47BA003539). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Model Year 2016 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  17. Model Year 2007 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  18. Model Year 2010 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-14

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  19. Model Year 2009 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  20. Model Year 2005 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  1. Model Year 2008 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  2. Model Year 2006 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  3. Model Year 2015 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  4. Model Year 2014 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  5. Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Program 18th annual report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Department remains focused on the technologies that are critical to making electric and hybrid vehicles commercially viable and competitive with current production gasoline-fueled vehicles in performance, reliability, and affordability. During Fiscal Year 1994, significant progress was made toward fulfilling the intent of Congress. The Department and the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (a partnership of the three major domestic automobile manufacturers) continued to work together and to focus the efforts of battery developers on the battery technologies that are most likely to be commercialized in the near term. Progress was made in industry cost-shared contracts toward demonstrating the technical feasibility of fuel cells for passenger bus and light duty vehicle applications. Two industry teams which will develop hybrid vehicle propulsion technologies have been selected through competitive procurement and have initiated work, in Fiscal Year 1994. In addition, technical studies and program planning continue, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to achieve the goals of reducing the transportation sector dependence on imported oil, reducing the level of environmentally harmful emissions, and enhancing industrial productivity and competitiveness.

  6. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert.

  7. Early dismantlement of Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, J.; Heisey, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear station ceased commercial operation following the March 1979 accident. Following completion of an extensive cleanup effort that included removal and shipment of the damaged core, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a possession-only license (POL) amendment on September 14, 1993. Postdefueling monitored storage (PDMS) technical specifications were issued on December 28, 1993. Entry into PDMS required that the licensee demonstrate that the plant was in a safe and stable condition and posed no risk to public health and safety.

  8. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  9. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  10. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  11. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  12. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  13. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  14. Energy-consumption and carbon-emission analysis of vehicle and component manufacturing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-12

    A model is presented for calculating the environmental burdens of the part manufacturing and vehicle assembly (VMA) stage of the vehicle life cycle. The approach is bottom-up, with a special focus on energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. The model is applied to both conventional and advanced vehicles, the latter of which include aluminum-intensive, hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric and all-electric vehicles. An important component of the model, a weight-based distribution function of materials and associated transformation processes (casting, stamping, etc.), is developed from the United States Council for Automotive Research Generic Vehicle Life Cycle Inventory Study. As the approach is bottom-up, numerous transformation process data and plant operational data were extracted from the literature for use in representing the many operations included in the model. When the model was applied to conventional vehicles, reliable estimates of cumulative energy consumption (34 GJ/vehicle) and CO{sub 2} emission (2 tonnes/vehicle) were computed for the VMA life-cycle stage. The numerous data sets taken from the literature permitted the development of some statistics on model results. Because the model explicitly includes a greater coverage of relevant manufacturing processes than many earlier studies, our energy estimates are on the higher end of previously published values. Limitations of the model are also discussed. Because the material compositions of conventional vehicles within specific classes (cars, light duty trucks, etc.) are sensibly constant on a percent-by-weight basis, the model can be reduced to a simple linear form for each class dependent only on vehicle weight. For advanced vehicles, the material/transformation process distribution developed above needs to be adjusted for different materials and components. This is particularly so for aluminum-intensive and electric-drive vehicles. In fact, because of their comparatively high manufacturing energy, batteries required for an electric vehicle can significantly add to the energy burden of the VMA stage. Overall, for conventional vehicles, energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions from the VMA stage are about 4% of their total life-cycle values. They are expected to be somewhat higher for advanced vehicles.

  15. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  16. New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sets aggressive new fuel-economy standards for cars and light-duty trucks. A number of Energy Department projects and investments are unleashing innovation that will create jobs...

  17. Fact #659: January 24, 2011 Fuel Economy Ratings for Vehicles Operating on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity | Department of Energy 9: January 24, 2011 Fuel Economy Ratings for Vehicles Operating on Electricity Fact #659: January 24, 2011 Fuel Economy Ratings for Vehicles Operating on Electricity The Environmental Protection Agency has developed a new methodology for determining how fuel economy information will be displayed on the window sticker of a vehicle that operates on electricity. The fuel economy will be displayed in miles per gallon equivalent (MPGequivalent), so that

  18. Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Both Increased during 2015 | Department of Energy 4: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The nation's highway vehicle miles of travel (VMT) and the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) reflect strikingly similar patterns, indicating the strong relationship between the nation's economy and its travel. Beginning in

  19. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation. Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service: Diesel Hybrid Electric Buses (Fact Sheet).

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Web site and in print publications. TESTING ADVANCED VEHICLES INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ◆ DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES Indianapolis Public Transportation DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES NREL/PIX 13504, 13505, 13583 THE INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION CORPORATION (INDYGO) provides transit service in the Indianapolis Metropolitan area, using 226 vehicles to serve 28 fixed and demand response routes. IndyGo vehicles accumulated more than 9 million miles and transported 11 million

  20. Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines Comparing the Performance of SunDiesel and Conventional Diesel in a Light-Duty Vehicle and Engines 2005 Diesel ...

  1. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES - Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anya Breitenbach

    2013-03-15

    This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use.

  2. Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market Future Potential of Hybrid and Diesel Powertrains in the U.S. Light-Duty Vehicle Market 2004 Diesel Engine ...

  3. Autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyrowitz, A.L.; Blidberg, D.R.; Michelson, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    There are various kinds of autonomous vehicles (AV`s) which can operate with varying levels of autonomy. This paper is concerned with underwater, ground, and aerial vehicles operating in a fully autonomous (nonteleoperated) mode. Further, this paper deals with AV`s as a special kind of device, rather than full-scale manned vehicles operating unmanned. The distinction is one in which the AV is likely to be designed for autonomous operation rather than being adapted for it as would be the case for manned vehicles. The authors provide a survey of the technological progress that has been made in AV`s, the current research issues and approaches that are continuing that progress, and the applications which motivate this work. It should be noted that issues of control are pervasive regardless of the kind of AV being considered, but that there are special considerations in the design and operation of AV`s depending on whether the focus is on vehicles underwater, on the ground, or in the air. The authors have separated the discussion into sections treating each of these categories.

  4. Fuel Efficiency of New European HD Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of New European HD Vehicles Fuel Efficiency of New European HD Vehicles Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_erkkila.pdf More Documents & Publications Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S.

  5. Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energys FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  6. Fact #813: January 20, 2014 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Continues to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rise | Department of Energy 3: January 20, 2014 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Continues to Rise Fact #813: January 20, 2014 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Continues to Rise The sales-weighted fuel economy average of all light vehicles sold in model year (MY) 2013 was 1.6 miles per gallon (mpg) higher than MY 2011. This increase brings the new light vehicle fuel economy average to 24 mpg for the first time since the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began recording new vehicle fuel

  7. Battery Electric Vehicles: Range Optimization and Diversification for the U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong

    2012-01-01

    Properly selecting the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the market acceptance and the resulting social benefits of BEVs. Analysis of transportation technology transition could be biased against battery electric vehicles (BEV) and mislead policy making, if BEVs are not represented with optimal ranges. This study proposes a coherent method to optimize the BEV driving range by minimizing the range-related cost, which is formulated as a function of range, battery cost, energy prices, charging frequency, access to backup vehicles, and the cost and refueling hassle of operating the backup vehicle. This method is implemented with a sample of 36,664 drivers, representing U.S. new car drivers, based on the 2009 National Household Travel Survey data. Key findings are: 1) Assuming the near term (2015) battery cost at $405/kWh, about 98% of the sampled drivers are predicted to prefer a range below 200 miles, and about 70% below 100 miles. The most popular 20-mile band of range is 57 to77 miles, unsurprisingly encompassing the Leaf s EPA-certified 73-mile range. With range limited to 4 or 7 discrete options, the majority are predicted to choose a range below 100 miles. 2) Found as a statistically robust rule of thumb, the BEV optimal range is approximately 0.6% of one s annual driving distance. 3) Reducing battery costs could motivate demand for larger range, but improving public charging may cause the opposite. 4) Using a single range to represent BEVs in analysis could significantly underestimate their competitiveness e.g. by $3226/vehicle if BEVs are represented with 73-mile range only or by $7404/BEV if with 150-mile range only. Range optimization and diversification into 4 or 7 range options reduce such analytical bias by 78% or 90%, respectively.

  8. Using Electric Vehicles to Meet Balancing Requirements Associated with Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-07-31

    Many states are deploying renewable generation sources at a significant rate to meet renewable portfolio standards. As part of this drive to meet renewable generation levels, significant additions of wind generation are planned. Due to the highly variable nature of wind generation, significant energy imbalances on the power system can be created and need to be handled. This report examines the impact on the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP) region for a 2019 expected wind scenario. One method for mitigating these imbalances is to utilize plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) or battery electric vehicles (BEVs) as assets to the grid. PHEVs and BEVs have the potential to meet this demand through both charging and discharging strategies. This report explores the usage of two different charging schemes: V2GHalf and V2GFull. In V2GHalf, PHEV/BEV charging is varied to absorb the additional imbalance from the wind generation, but never feeds power back into the grid. This scenario is highly desirable to automotive manufacturers, who harbor great concerns about battery warranty if vehicle-to-grid discharging is allowed. The second strategy, V2GFull, varies not only the charging of the vehicle battery, but also can vary the discharging of the battery back into the power grid. This scenario is currently less desirable to automotive manufacturers, but provides an additional resource benefit to PHEV/BEVs in meeting the additional imbalance imposed by wind. Key findings in the report relate to the PHEV/BEV population required to meet the additional imbalance when comparing V2GHalf to V2GFull populations, and when comparing home-only-charging and work-and-home-charging scenarios. Utilizing V2GFull strategies over V2GHalf resulted in a nearly 33% reduction in the number of vehicles required. This reduction indicates fewer vehicles are needed to meet the unhandled energy, but they would utilize discharging of the vehicle battery into the grid. This practice currently results in the voiding of automotive manufacturer's battery warranty, and is not feasible for many customers. The second key finding is the change in the required population when PHEV/BEV charging is available at both home and work. Allowing 10% of the vehicle population access to work charging resulted in nearly 80% of the grid benefit. Home-only charging requires, at best, 94% of the current NWPP light duty vehicle fleet to be a PHEV or BEV. With the introduction of full work charging availability, only 8% of the NWPP light duty vehicle fleet is required. Work charging has primarily been associated with mitigating range anxiety in new electric vehicle owners, but these studies indicate they have significant potential for improving grid reliability. The V2GHalf and V2GFull charging strategies of the report utilize grid frequency as an indication of the imbalance requirements. The introduction of public charging stations, as well as the potential for PHEV/BEVs to be used as a resource for renewable generation integration, creates conditions for additional products into the ancillary services market. In the United Kingdom, such a capability would be bid as a frequency product in the ancillary services market. Such a market could create the need for larger, third-party aggregators or services to manage the use of electric vehicles as a grid resource. Ultimately, customer adoption, usage patterns and habits, and feedback from the power and automotive industries will drive the need.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tractor Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a ...

  10. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (115 Newhaven Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830)

    1994-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  11. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  12. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1994-03-15

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

  13. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1996-03-12

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

  14. Vehicle technologies program Government Performance and Results Act (GPA) report for fiscal year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.; Stephens, T. S.; Birky, A. K.

    2012-08-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has defined milestones for its Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP). This report provides estimates of the benefits that would accrue from achieving these milestones relative to a base case that represents a future in which there is no VTP-supported vehicle technology development. Improvements in the fuel economy and reductions in the cost of light- and heavy-duty vehicles were estimated by using Argonne National Laboratory's Autonomie powertrain simulation software and doing some additional analysis. Argonne also estimated the fraction of the fuel economy improvements that were attributable to VTP-supported development in four 'subsystem' technology areas: batteries and electric drives, advanced combustion engines, fuels and lubricants, and materials (i.e., reducing vehicle mass, called 'lightweighting'). Oak Ridge National Laboratory's MA{sup 3}T (Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies) tool was used to project the market penetration of light-duty vehicles, and TA Engineering's TRUCK tool was used to project the penetrations of medium- and heavy-duty trucks. Argonne's VISION transportation energy accounting model was used to estimate total fuel savings, reductions in primary energy consumption, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that would result from achieving VTP milestones. These projections indicate that by 2030, the on-road fuel economy of both light- and heavy-duty vehicles would improve by more than 20%, and that this positive impact would be accompanied by a reduction in oil consumption of nearly 2 million barrels per day and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of more than 300 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. These benefits would have a significant economic value in the U.S. transportation sector and reduce its dependency on oil and its vulnerability to oil price shocks.

  15. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  16. Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 8: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles The average trip length (one-way) is 9.7 miles according to the 2009 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey. Trip lengths vary by the purpose of the trip. Shopping and family/personal business are the shortest trips, on average. One-way trips to/from work average 12.2 miles. Trip Length by Purpose, 2009 Graphic showing trip length by purpose,

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency Besides their energy security and environmental benefits, many alternative fuels such as biodiesel, ...

  18. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt072vssmackie2013o.pdf More Documents & Publications Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector...

  19. FASTSim: A Model to Estimate Vehicle Efficiency, Cost and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Wang, L.; Wood, E.; Lopp, S.; Ramroth, L.

    2015-05-04

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is a high-level advanced vehicle powertrain systems analysis tool supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. FASTSim provides a quick and simple approach to compare powertrains and estimate the impact of technology improvements on light- and heavy-duty vehicle efficiency, performance, cost, and battery batches of real-world drive cycles. FASTSim’s calculation framework and balance among detail, accuracy, and speed enable it to simulate thousands of driven miles in minutes. The key components and vehicle outputs have been validated by comparing the model outputs to test data for many different vehicles to provide confidence in the results. A graphical user interface makes FASTSim easy and efficient to use. FASTSim is freely available for download from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s website (see www.nrel.gov/fastsim).

  20. 2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  1. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

  2. Model Year 2011 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  3. Model Year 2012 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  4. Model Year 2013 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  5. Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUCKFELDT, R.A.

    1999-02-24

    In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

  6. Vehicle barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirsh, Robert A. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  7. Fact #794: August 26, 2013 How Much Does an Average Vehicle Owner Pay in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Taxes Each Year? | Department of Energy 4: August 26, 2013 How Much Does an Average Vehicle Owner Pay in Fuel Taxes Each Year? Fact #794: August 26, 2013 How Much Does an Average Vehicle Owner Pay in Fuel Taxes Each Year? According to the Federal Highway Administration, the average fuel economy for all light vehicles on the road today is 21.4 miles per gallon (mpg). A person owning a gasoline vehicle with that fuel efficiency pays between $137 and $296 in fuel taxes each year, depending

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing Annual Progress Report The Vehicle...

  9. NREL: Learning - Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Photo of a parked blue compact car with large decals on the doors stating that it is a plug-in hybrid achieving more than 120 miles per gallon. This Toyota Prius hybrid electric car was converted to a plug-in hybrid for research purposes. Credit: Keith Wipke Image of the cutaway top view of a passenger vehicle showing the drive train that contains an electric motor and a small internal combustion engine side by side in front. The motors are connected by

  10. Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fleet and Baseline Performance Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts baseline performance and fleet testing of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on seven HEV models and accumulated 1.4 million fleet testing miles on 26 HEVs. The HEV models tested or in testing include: Toyota Gen I and Gen II Prius, and Highlander; Honda Insight, Civic and Accord; Chevrolet Silverado; Ford Escape; and Lexus RX 400h. The baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed track testing to document the HEVs fuel economy (SAE J1634) and performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model are driven to 160,000 miles per vehicle within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events, and fuel use is recorded and used to compile life-cycle costs. At the conclusion of the 160,000 miles of fleet testing, the SAE J1634 tests are rerun and each HEV battery pack is tested. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, Electric Transportation Applications, and Exponent Failure Analysis Associates. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  11. 51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    51-Mile Hydroelectric Power Project Demonstration of new methodologies to reduce the LCOE for small, hydropower development

  12. Bureaucracy in crisis: Three Mile Island, the shuttle Challenger, and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casamayou, M.H.

    1995-07-01

    This book is a study in organizational theory about how technological bureaucracies perceive, communicate about, and respond to potential risks to public safety, using Three mile island and the Challenger accident as examples.

  13. 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) Presentation given at DEER 2006, ...

  14. Toward 300 Miles on a Single Charge? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Toward 300 Miles on a Single Charge? News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.27.13 Toward 300 Miles on a Single Charge? Berkeley Lab scientists design a high-performance, long cycle-life

  15. Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FIRST QUARTER 20 08 REPORT Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison Prepared by: A U G U S T 2 0 0 8 FIRST QUARTER 2008 REPORT OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING WITHIN A THREE-MILE RADIUS OF PROJECT RULISON Prepared for: Noble Energy Production, Inc. Prepared by: URS Corporation 8181 East Tufts Avenue Denver, CO 80237 August 12, 2008 First Quarter 2008 Report August 2008 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Introduction

  16. Vehicles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    our nation's growing reliance on imported oil by running our vehicles on renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicles and fuels can also put the brakes on air pollution...

  17. Fact #657: January 10, 2011 Record Increase for New Light Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy, 1975-2009 Model Year Miles per Gallon 1975 13.1 1976 14.2 1977 15.1 1978 15.8 1979 15.9 1980 19.2 1981 20.5 1982 21.1 1983 21.0 1984 21.0 1985 21.3 ...

  18. Fact #813: January 20, 2014 New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Continues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy, 1975-2013 Model Year Miles per Gallon 1975 13.1 1976 14.2 1977 15.1 1978 15.8 1979 15.9 1980 19.2 1981 20.5 1982 21.1 1983 21.0 1984 21.0 1985 21.3 ...

  19. 1982 worldwide pipeline construction will top 21,900 miles, $9. 5 billion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.

    1982-07-01

    Reports that pipeline construction slowed slightly in 1982 because of lowered economic activity worldwide, with an upturn forecast for 1983. Explains that need for new pipelines to transport increasing amounts of oil and gas energy now being discovered, plus use of pipelines to transport other commodities in increasing amounts, has created a backlog of demand for facilities. Indicates that commodities suited for pipeline transport and getting consideration include crude oil; refined products; natural gas liquids; LPG; coal slurries; carbon dioxide (used for enhanced oil recovery); chemicals such as ammonia, ethane, ethylene, and similar petrochemical feedstocks; industrial gases such as oxygen, nitrogen; and solids slurries such as ores, wood chips, and other non-soluble minerals, even items such as wood chips and wood pulp for paper-making. Reveals that there are 10,396 miles of coal slurry pipeline planned for the US and 500 miles in Canada. Major US projects underway in the gas pipeline field include the 797-mile, 36-in. Trailblazer system in Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. Products/ LPG/NGL pipelines underway include 105 miles of dual 4 and 6-in. line in Kansas. Crude pipeline activity includes 100 miles of 12-in. in California and 80 miles of 4 thru 40-in. in Alaska on the North Slope. Updates plans in Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Ireland, France, the Middle East, Australia, Southeast Asia, Mexico, South America and the USSR.

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Carbon Emission Comparisons One million metric tons of carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions equals: - the combustion of 530 thousand short tons of coal - the coal input to 1 coal plant (200-MW) in about 1 year - the combustion of 18 billion cubic feet of natural gas - the combustion of 119 million gallons of gasoline = the combustion of gasoline for 7 hours in the U.S. = 323 thousand new cars, each driven 12,400 miles = 282 thousand new light-duty vehicles, each driven 12,200 miles = 274

  1. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  2. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

  3. Analysis Reveals Impact of Road Grade on Vehicle Energy Use (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    Findings of study indicate that, on average, road grade could be responsible for 1%-3% of fuel use in light-duty automobiles, with many individual trips impacted by as much as 40%.

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    more information, including a list of eligible vehicles and funds available, see the Light-Duty Motor Vehicle Purchase or Lease Incentive Program website. (Reference Texas...

  5. Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for ...

  6. Overview of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for light-duty vehicles for many years, probably decades ..." NRC Report 1 * Advanced engines in conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric...

  7. Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles Vehicles Watch this video to learn about the benefits of electric vehicles -- including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions and lower maintenance costs. Vehicles, and the fuel it takes to power them, are an essential part of our American infrastructure and economy, moving people and goods across the country. From funding research into technologies that will save Americans money at the pump to increasing the fuel economy of gasoline-powered vehicles to encouraging the development

  8. 2011 Honda CR-Z 4466 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C67BS004466). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. 2011 HONDA CR-Z 2982 - HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tyler; Shirk, Matthew; Wishart, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C64BS002982). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Electric vehicle test report, Cutler-Hammer Corvette

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The work described was part of the effort to characterize vehicles for the state-of-the-art assessment of electric vehicles. The vehicle evaluated was a Chevrolet Corvette converted to electric operation. The vehicle was based on a standard production 1967 chassis and body. The original internal combustion engine was replaced by an electric traction motor. Eighteen batteries supplied the electrical energy. A controller, an onboard battery charger, and several dashboard instruments completed the conversion. The remainder of the vehicle, and in particular the remainder of the drive-train (clutch, driveshaft, and differential), was stock, except for the transmission. The overall objective of the tests was to develop performance data at the system and subsystem level. The emphasis was on the electrical portion of the drive train, although some analysis and discussion of the mechanical elements are included. There was no evaluation of other aspects of the vehicle such as braking, ride, handling, passenger accomodations, etc. Included are a description of the vehicle, the tests performed and a discussion of the results. Tests were conducted both on the road (actually a mile long runway) and in a chassis dynamometer equipped laboratory. The majority of the tests performed were according to SAE Procedure J227a and included maximum effort accelerations, constant-speed range, and cyclic range. Some tests that are not a part of the SAE Procedure J227a are described and the analysis of the data from all tests is discussed. (LCL)

  11. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van -- Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen–85% CNG.

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van - Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-16

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen-85% CNG.

  13. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  14. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  15. Performance of electric and hybrid vehicles at the 1995 American Tour de Sol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Buitrago, C.; Duoba, M.; Larsen, R.

    1995-12-31

    Energy consumption and performance data were collected on more than 40 electric and hybrid vehicles during the 1995 American Tour de Sol. At this competition, one electric vehicle drove 229 miles on one charge using nickel metalhydride batteries. The results obtained from the data show that electric vehicle efficiencies reached 9.07 mi./kWh or 70 equivalent mpg of gasoline when compared to the total energy cycle efficiency of electricity and gasoline. A gasoline-fueled 1995 Geo Metro that drove the same route attained 36.4 mpg.

  16. Fact #566: April 13, 2009 Vehicle Travel and the Price of Gasoline |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6: April 13, 2009 Vehicle Travel and the Price of Gasoline Fact #566: April 13, 2009 Vehicle Travel and the Price of Gasoline The price of gasoline is one factor that can have an effect on the number of highway vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The graph below shows a three-month moving average of the percentage change of monthly data from one year to the next (i.e., February 2001 data were compared with February 2000 data). In 2008, when gasoline prices were 20-30% higher,

  17. Fact #584: August 17, 2009 The Price of Gasoline and Vehicle Travel: How Do

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    They Relate? | Department of Energy 4: August 17, 2009 The Price of Gasoline and Vehicle Travel: How Do They Relate? Fact #584: August 17, 2009 The Price of Gasoline and Vehicle Travel: How Do They Relate? The price of gasoline is one factor that can have an effect on the number of highway vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The graph below shows a three-month moving average of the percentage change of monthly data from one year to the next (i.e., February 2001 data were compared with February

  18. Fact #657: January 10, 2011 Record Increase for New Light Vehicle Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economy | Department of Energy 7: January 10, 2011 Record Increase for New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy Fact #657: January 10, 2011 Record Increase for New Light Vehicle Fuel Economy The sales-weighted fuel economy average of all light vehicles sold in model year (MY) 2009 was 1.4 miles per gallon (mpg) higher than MY2008. This is the largest annual increase in fuel economy since the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began recording new car fuel economy data in 1975. In addition, the 22.4

  19. Fact #847: November 17, 2014 Cars were Over 50% of Light Vehicle Production

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in 2014 - Dataset | Department of Energy 7: November 17, 2014 Cars were Over 50% of Light Vehicle Production in 2014 - Dataset Fact #847: November 17, 2014 Cars were Over 50% of Light Vehicle Production in 2014 - Dataset Excel file with dataset for Fact #847: November 17, 2014 Cars were Over 50% of Light Vehicle Production in 2014 File fotw#847_web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact #848: November 24, 2014 Nearly Three-Fourths of New Cars have Fuel Economy above 25 Miles per Gallon

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry ... The standard procedures and test specifications are used to test and collect data from ...

  1. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt072vssmackie2011

  2. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt072vssmackie2012

  3. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt066vsskarner2011...

  4. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt066vsskarner2012...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vehicle evaluation, codes and standards development, and heavy vehicle systems optimization. PDF icon 2012vsstreport.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vehicle evaluation, codes and standards development, and heavy vehicle systems optimization. PDF icon 2011vsstreport.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Leaders in Advanced Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recognizes Leaders in Advanced Vehicle Research, Development and Deployment Vehicle Technologies ... Wereszczak's work in ceramics and brittle materials supports vehicle OEMs and their ...

  8. Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

    2009-04-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

  9. Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort

    2005-03-01

    The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

  10. 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 00,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) 100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20) Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. PDF icon 2006_deer_barnitt.pdf More Documents & Publications Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel Impact of

  11. NUREG-0668 MASTER* TITLE LIST PUBLICLY AVAILABLE DOCUMENTS THREE MILE ISLAND UNIT 2

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RECSIVEP ev Tin JUN 11157^; NUREG-0668 MASTER* TITLE LIST PUBLICLY AVAILABLE DOCUMENTS THREE MILE ISLAND UNIT 2 DOCKET 50-320 Cumulated to May 21,1979 Office of Administration U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUREG-0668 TITLE LIST PUBLICLY AVAILABLE DOCUMENTS THREE MILE ISLAND UNIT 2 DOCKET 50-320 Cumulated to M a y 2 1 , 1979 Division of Technical Information and Document Control Office of Administration U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, D.C. 20555 . CONTENTS Page Preface. v

  12. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultralow-Sulfur Fuel | Department of Energy Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultralow-Sulfur Fuel Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in

  13. Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    THIRD QUARTER 20 08 REPORT Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison Prepared by: M A R C H 2 0 0 9 THIRD QUARTER 2008 REPORT OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING WITHIN A THREE-MILE RADIUS OF PROJECT RULISON Prepared for: Noble Energy Inc. EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. Williams Production RMT Inc. Prepared by: URS Corporation 8181 East Tufts Avenue Denver, CO 80237 March 16, 2009 Rulison Third Quarter 2008 Report March 2009 i TABLE OF CONTENTS

  14. Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FOURTH QUARTER 20 08 REPORT Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison F F Prepared by: M A R C H 2 0 0 9 FOURTH QUARTER 2008 REPORT OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING WITHIN A THREE-MILE RADIUS OF PROJECT RULISON Prepared for: Noble Energy Inc. EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. Williams Production RMT Inc. Prepared by: URS Corporation 8181 East Tufts Avenue Denver, CO 80237 March 26, 2009 Rulison Fourth Quarter 2008 Report March 2009 i TABLE OF

  15. To Pluto and Beyond: Powering New Horizons' 3-Billion-Mile Journey |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy To Pluto and Beyond: Powering New Horizons' 3-Billion-Mile Journey To Pluto and Beyond: Powering New Horizons' 3-Billion-Mile Journey July 15, 2015 - 11:23am Addthis This image of Pluto, taken by New Horizons after a 9 1/2-year journey, is our highest-resolution photo of the dwarf planet since its discovery by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930. | Photo courtesy of NASA. This image of Pluto, taken by New Horizons after a 9 1/2-year journey, is our highest-resolution photo of the

  16. Voltage Vehicles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    distributor specializing in the full spectrum of electric vehicles (EV) and full-performance alternative fuel vehicles (AFV). References: Voltage Vehicles1 This article is a...

  17. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

    2006-03-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

  18. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles Vehicles EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development and