National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for light sources neutron

  1. Neutron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  2. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  3. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

    1959-01-13

    A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

  4. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Light Source Data and Analysis Framework at NERSC Jack Deslippe, Shane Canon, Eli Dart, Abdelilah Essiari, Alexander Hexemer, Dula Parkinson, Simon Patton, Craig Tull + Many More The ALS Data Needs September 21, 2010 - NIST (MD) Light source data volumes are growing many times faster than Moore's law. ● Light source luminosity ● Detector resolution & rep-rates ● Sample automation BES user facilities serve 10,000 scientists and engineers every year. Mostly composed of many small

  5. Intense fusion neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-15

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 21} neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10{sup 20} neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the

  6. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-04-21

    A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

  7. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-01-20

    A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

  8. Light-Source Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Light Source Facilities America ALS - Advanced Light Source, USA APS - Advanced Photon Source, USA CAMD - Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices, USA CHESS - Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, USA CLS - Canadian Light Source, Canada CTST - UCSB Center for Terahertz Science and Technology, USA DFELL - Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory, USA Jlab - Jefferson Lab, USA LCLS - Linear Coherent Light Source, USA LNLS - Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Brazil NSLS -

  9. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J.

    1991-02-01

    This report discusses the research and development, design and safety of the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (LSP)

  10. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  12. Fusion pumped light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  14. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  15. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Scattering Facilities » Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Neutron Scattering Facilities Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Print Text Size: A A A

  16. Compact ion source neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali; Chang-Hasnain, Constance; Rangelow, Ivo; Kwan, Joe

    2015-10-13

    A neutron generator includes a conductive substrate comprising a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips and a source of an atomic species to introduce the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips. A target placed apart from the substrate is voltage biased relative to the substrate to ionize and accelerate the ionized atomic species toward the target. The target includes an element capable of a nuclear fusion reaction with the ionized atomic species to produce a one or more neutrons as a reaction by-product.

  17. CHINA SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEI,J.

    2007-01-29

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator-based high-power project currently in preparation under the direction of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The complex is based on an H- linear accelerator, a rapid cycling proton synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV, a solid tungsten target station, and five initial instruments for spallation neutron applications. The facility will operate at 25 Hz repetition rate with a phase-I beam power of about 120 kW. The major challenge is to build a robust and reliable user's facility with upgrade potential at a fractional of ''world standard'' cost.

  18. Neutron light output and detector efficiency (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron light output and detector efficiency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron light output and detector efficiency You are accessing a document from the ...

  19. Neutron light output and detector efficiency (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron light output and detector efficiency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron light output and detector efficiency Authors: Taddeucci, Terry N 1 + Show Author ...

  20. Spallation Neutron Source | Neutron Science at ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The recently commissioned 11 Tesla horizontal field magnet at GP-SANS will enable advanced neutron scattering research. Credit: Genevieve MartinORNL. 11 Tesla Magnet Commissioned ...

  1. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

    1987-11-06

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

  2. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  3. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  4. Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources delivered by Patricia Dehmer, U.S. Department of Energy

  5. (International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-11-08

    The International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources was started about a decade ago with the purpose of sharing information throughout the global neutron community. The collaboration has been extremely successful in optimizing the use of resources, and the discussions are open and detailed, with reasons for failure shared as well as reasons for success. Although the meetings have become increasingly oriented toward pulsed neutron sources, many of the neutron instrumentation techniques, such as the development of better monochromators, fast response detectors and various data analysis methods, are highly relevant to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). I presented one paper on the ANS, and another on the neutron optical polarizer design work which won a 1989 R D-100 Award. I also gained some valuable design ideas, in particular for the ANS hot source, in discussions with individual researchers from Canada, Western Europe, and Japan.

  6. Neutron Sources for Standard-Based Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, Radoslav; McLean, Thomas

    2014-11-10

    The DHS TC Standards and the consensus ANSI Standards use 252Cf as the neutron source for performance testing because its energy spectrum is similar to the 235U and 239Pu fission sources used in nuclear weapons. An emission rate of 20,000 ± 20% neutrons per second is used for testing of the radiological requirements both in the ANSI standards and the TCS. Determination of the accurate neutron emission rate of the test source is important for maintaining consistency and agreement between testing results obtained at different testing facilities. Several characteristics in the manufacture and the decay of the source need to be understood and accounted for in order to make an accurate measurement of the performance of the neutron detection instrument. Additionally, neutron response characteristics of the particular instrument need to be known and taken into account as well as neutron scattering in the testing environment.

  7. Chiral Three-Nucleon Interactions in Light Nuclei, Neutron- α...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Chiral Three-Nucleon Interactions in Light Nuclei, Neutron- Scattering, and Neutron Matter Authors: Lynn, J. E. ; Tews, I. ; Carlson, J. ; Gandolfi, S. ; Gezerlis, A. ; ...

  8. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  9. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2010-01-08

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  10. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  11. Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack'

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This month, workers at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), the half-mile electron racetrack for one of the world’s most advanced light sources, will begin filling the facility’s steel and concrete shell.

  12. X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    X-Ray Light Sources Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home User Facilities

  13. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home

  14. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  15. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  16. Next Generation Light Source Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

  17. Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Authors: Kippen, Karen E. 1 ; Clayton, ...

  18. Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Authors: Kippen, Karen E. ...

  19. Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source You are accessing a ...

  20. The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source Authors: ...

  1. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project SNS03.31.10.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0247: Draft Environmental Impact...

  2. Spallation Neutron Source Power Level Exceeds 1 MW (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spallation Neutron Source Power Level Exceeds 1 MW Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spallation Neutron Source Power Level Exceeds 1 MW No abstract prepared. Authors: ...

  3. The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for materials research Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for ...

  4. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  5. LANSCE | International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ICANS-XIX Paul Scherrer Institit (PSI) Gindelwald, Switzerland March 8012, 2010 ICANS-XVIII China Spallation Neutron Source, Beijing, China, April 26-29, 2007 ICANS-XVII Bishop's ...

  6. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  7. EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States needs a high-flux, short- pulsed neutron source to provide its scientific and industrial research communities with a much more intense source of pulsed neutrons for neutron...

  8. BNL Activities in Advanced Neutron Source Development: Past and Present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, J.B.; Ludewig, H.; Montanez, P.; Todosow, M.; Smith, G.C.; Larese, J.Z.

    1998-06-14

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in advanced neutron sources almost from its inception in 1947. These efforts have mainly focused on steady state reactors beginning with the construction of the first research reactor for neutron beams, the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. This was followed by the High Flux Beam Reactor that has served as the design standard for all the subsequent high flux reactors constructed worldwide. In parallel with the reactor developments BNL has focused on the construction and use of high energy proton accelerators. The first machine to operate over 1 GeV in the world was the Cosmotron. The machine that followed this, the AGS, is still operating and is the highest intensity proton machine in the world and has nucleated an international collaboration investigating liquid metal targets for next generation pulsed spallation sources. Early work using the Cosmotron focused on spallation product studies for both light and heavy elements into the several GeV proton energy region. These original studies are still important today. In this report we discuss the facilities and activities at BNL focused on advanced neutron sources. BNL is involved in the proton source for the Spallation Neutron source, spectrometer development at LANSCE, target studies using the AGS and state-of-the-art neutron detector development.

  9. Iterative Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Use of a coded source facilitates high-resolution neutron imaging but requires that the radiographic data be deconvolved. In this paper, we compare direct deconvolution with two different iterative algorithms, namely, one based on direct deconvolution embedded in an MLE-like framework and one based on a geometric model of the neutron beam and a least squares formulation of the inverse imaging problem.

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  11. The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron ...

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, Eva

    1999-05-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

  13. January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source January 16, 2009 The Department gives its initial approval to begin plans for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to build a second target station for the Spallation Neutron Source, expanding what is already the world's most powerful pulsed neutron scattering facility. The new station, which will cost approximately $1

  14. Next Generation Light Source Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the scientific needs into the technical performance requirements. Feedback from these workshops will provide important input for advancing the design of the facility. Workshops are planned in the following areas Fundamental Atomic, Molecular, Optical Physics & Combustion Dynamics Mon. Aug. 20 - Tues. Aug 21, 2012 Physical

  15. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, John P.; McCollister, Daryl R.

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  16. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

    1998-04-28

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

  17. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  18. Driver circuit for solid state light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, Fred; Denvir, Kerry; Allen, Steven

    2016-02-16

    A driver circuit for a light source including one or more solid state light sources, a luminaire including the same, and a method of so driving the solid state light sources are provided. The driver circuit includes a rectifier circuit that receives an alternating current (AC) input voltage and provides a rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a switching converter circuit coupled to the light source. The switching converter circuit provides a direct current (DC) output to the light source in response to the rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a mixing circuit, coupled to the light source, to switch current through at least one solid state light source of the light source in response to each of a plurality of consecutive half-waves of the rectified AC voltage.

  19. Spallation Neutron Source Radiation Shielding Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azmy, Y.Y.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.; Johnston, J.O.; Lillie, R.A.; McNeilly, G.S.; Santoro, R.T.

    1999-11-14

    This paper summarizes results of Spallation Neutron Source calculations to estimate radiation hazards and shielding requirements for activated Mercury, target components, target cooling water, and {sup 7}Be plateout. Dose rates in the accelerator tunnel from activation of magnets and concrete were investigated. The impact of gaps and other streaming paths on the radiation environment inside the test cell during operation and after shutdown were also assessed.

  20. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  1. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  2. Laser-Compton Light Source Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mega ray Laser-Compton Light Source Technology Laser-Compton light source technology enables production of mono-energetic gamma rays and x rays. In the gamma-ray regime, these sources enable new, isotope-specific nuclear materials detection systems and photon-based study of nuclear processes (nuclear photonics). Laser-Compton light sources and related nuclear missions concepts were conceived of and realized over the course of the last decade at LLNL. Created by Compton scattering short-duration

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Project Frank ...

  4. Building the World's Most Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-03

    View this time-lapse video showing construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Construction is shown from 2009-2012.

  5. Astronomy Particle Physics Light Sources Genomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - 2 Astronomy Particle Physics Light Sources Genomics Climate * Big Data Software - Broad ecosystem of capabilities and technologies - Research and evaluate - Customize and...

  6. Neutron source detection with high pressure capillary arrays...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Neutron source detection with high pressure capillary arrays. No abstract prepared. Authors: Chinn, Douglas Alan ; McClain, Jaime L. ; Ballard, William Parker ; Galambos, ...

  7. Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Kippen, Karen E...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Kippen, Karen E. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clayton, Steven Los Alamos National Laboratory Los...

  8. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  9. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Li, G. S.; McKeown, R. D.; Qian, X.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wu, F. F.; Zhang, C.

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  10. The European scene regarding spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    In Europe, a short pulse spallation neutron source, ISIS, has been operating for over 10 years, working its way up to a beam power level of 200 kW. A continuous source, SINQ, designed for a beam power of up to 1 MW, is scheduled to start operating at the end of 1996, and a detailed feasibility study has been completed for a 410 kW short pulse source, AUSTRON. Each of these sources seems to have settled for a target concept which is at or near the limits of its feasibility: The ISIS depleted uranium plate targets, heavy water cooled and Zircaloy clad, have so far not shown satisfactory service time and operation is likely to continue with a Ta-plate target, which, in the past has been used successfully for the equivalent of one full-beam-year before it was taken out of service due to degrading thermal properties. SINQ will initially use a rod target, made of Zircaloy only, but plans exist to move on to clad lead rods as quickly as possible. Apart from the not yet explored effect of hydrogen and helium production, there are also concerns about the generation of 7-Be in the cooling water from the spallation of oxygen, which might result in undesirably high radioactivity in the cooling plant room. A Liquid metal target, also under investigation for SINQ, would not only reduce this problem to a level of about 10 %, but would also minimize the risk of radiolytic corrosion in the beam interaction zone. Base on similar arguments, AUSTRON has been designed for edge cooled targets, but thermal and stress analyses show, that this concept is not feasible at higher power levels.

  11. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananyev, S. S. Spitsyn, A. V. Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-15

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion–fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium–tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m{sup 3}Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium–tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  12. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial

  13. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  16. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  17. Neutron collar calibration for assay of LWR (light-water reactor) fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, H.O.; Pieper, J.E.

    1987-03-01

    The neutron-coincidence collar is used for the verification of the uranium content in light-water reactor fuel assemblies. An AmLi neutron source is used to give an active interrogation of the fuel assembly to measure the /sup 235/U content, and the /sup 238/U content is verified from a passive neutron-coincidence measurement. This report gives the collar calibration data of pressurized-water reactor and boiling-water reactor fuel assemblies. Calibration curves and correction factors are presented for neutron absorbers (burnable poisons) and different fuel assembly sizes. The data were collected at Exxon Nuclear, Franco-Belge de Fabrication de Combustibles, ASEA-Atom, and other nuclear fuel fabrication facilities.

  18. Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Buttram, Malcolm T.; Mar, Alan; Helgeson, Wesley D.; O'Malley, Martin W.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Baca, Albert G.; Chow, Weng W.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

  19. Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

    2009-12-01

    A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

  20. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  1. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  2. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  3. Slower, colder, longer : prospects for a very cold neutron source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micklich, B. J.; Carpenter, J. M.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    2007-01-01

    The motivation for our study is to establish the prospects for a neutron source providing intense pulsed beams with spectra as cold as is realistic. The scientific motivation is to serve applications in nanoscience, biology and technology.

  4. Design and Demonstration of a Quasi-monoenergetic Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Sorensen, Peter F.; Foxe, Michael P.; Bench, G.; Bernstein, A.

    2014-03-05

    The design of a neutron source capable of producing 24 and 70 keV neutron beams with narrow energy spread is presented. The source exploits near-threshold kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction while taking advantage of the interference `notches' found in the scattering cross-sections of iron. The design was implemented and characterized at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Alternative lters such as vanadium and manganese are also explored and the possibility of studying the response of di*erent materials to low-energy nuclear recoils using the resultant neutron beams is discussed.

  5. High gradient accelerators for linear light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1988-09-26

    Ultra-high gradient radio frequency linacs powered by relativistic klystrons appear to be able to provide compact sources of radiation at XUV and soft x-ray wavelengths with a duration of 1 picosecond or less. This paper provides a tutorial review of the physics applicable to scaling the present experience of the accelerator community to the regime applicable to compact linear light sources. 22 refs., 11 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powers, Peter E.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    A tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source and a method of operating a light source are provided. The light source includes a pump laser, first and second non-linear optical crystals, a tunable filter, and light pulse directing optics. The method includes the steps of operating the pump laser to generate a pulsed pump beam characterized by a nanosecond pulse duration and arranging the light pulse directing optics so as to (i) split the pulsed pump beam into primary and secondary pump beams; (ii) direct the primary pump beam through an input face of the first non-linear optical crystal such that a primary output beam exits from an output face of the first non-linear optical crystal; (iii) direct the primary output beam through the tunable filter to generate a sculpted seed beam; and direct the sculpted seed beam and the secondary pump beam through an input face of the second non-linear optical crystal such that a secondary output beam characterized by at least one spectral bandwidth on the order of about 0.1 cm.sup.-1 and below exits from an output face of the second non-linear optical crystal.

  7. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  8. An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benedict; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz, Janos; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

    2004-09-01

    One of the first third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS, has been operating for almost a decade at Berkeley Lab, where experimenters have been exploiting its high brightness for forefront science. However, accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since the ALS was designed. As a result, the performance of the ALS is in danger of being eclipsed by that of newer, more advanced sources. The ALS upgrade that we are planning includes full-energy, top-off injection with higher storage-ring current and the replacement of five first-generation insertion devices with nine state-of-the art insertion devices and four new application-specific beamlines now being identified in a strategic planning process. The upgrade will help keep the ALS at the forefront of soft x-ray synchrotron light sources for the next two decades.

  9. LOW VOLTAGE 14 Mev NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Little, R.N. Jr.; Graves, E.R.

    1959-09-29

    An apparatus yielding high-energy neutrons at the rate of 10/sup 8/ or more per second by the D,T or D,D reactions is described. The deuterium gas filling is ionized by electrons emitted from a filament, and the resulting ions are focused into a beam and accelerated against a fixed target. The apparatus is built in accordance with the relationship V/sub s/ = A--B log pd, where V/sub s/ is the sparking voltage, p the gas pressure, and d the gap length between the high voltage electrodes. Typical parameters to obtain the high neutron yields are 55 to 80 kv, 0.5 to 7.0 ma beam current, 5 to 12 microns D/sub 2/, and a gap length of 1 centimeter.

  10. Rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.; Fugitt, Jock A.

    2000-01-01

    An rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source is provided. The light source comprises a hollow, elongated chamber and at least one center conductor disposed within the hollow, elongated chamber. A portion of each center conductor extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. At least one gas capable of forming an electronically excited molecular state is contained within each center conductor. An electrical coupler is positioned concentric to the hollow, elongated chamber and the electrical coupler surrounds the portion of each center conductor that extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. A rf-power supply is positioned in an operable relationship to the electrical coupler and an impedance matching network is positioned in an operable relationship to the rf power supply and the electrical coupler.

  11. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Sokol, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  12. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Sokol, P. E.

    2011-08-15

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  13. Linac Coherent Light Source Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-15

    This suite consists of codes to generate an initial x-ray photon distribution and to propagate the photons through various objects. The suite is designed specifically for simulating the Linac Coherent Light Source, and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) being built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The purpose is to provide sufficiently detailed characteristics of the laser to engineers who are designing the laser diagnostics.

  14. Astronomy Particle Physics Light Sources Genomics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - 2 Astronomy Particle Physics Light Sources Genomics Climate * Big Data Software - Broad ecosystem of capabilities and technologies - Research and evaluate - Customize and optimize for NERSC/HPC platforms - Deploy and maintain * Engaging NERSC Users - Broad user base support - 1-1 in-depth engagement - 3 - Systems DAS Services DAS Tools Capabilities Transfer Processing Storage/ Management Analytics/ Visualisation Burst Buffer Parallel Filesystem Interactive Nodes Compute Nodes GridFtp NEWT

  15. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulp, Thomas Jan; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Sommers, Ricky; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  16. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, James L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  17. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  18. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  19. Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters using a High-Flux Neutron Source Detailed images of deposits identified inside automotive DPFs using neutrons show how the deposits of soot, ash, and washcoat occurs within the filter. p-14_toops.pdf (380.82 KB) More Documents & Publications Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies Non-Destructive Neutron

  20. Plasma-based EUV light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri; Golingo, Raymond; Nelson, Brian A.

    2010-11-02

    Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

  1. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W. [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Instrument and Source Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter)

  2. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  3. LCLS Parameters Update | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Parameters Update The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has demonstrated FEL operations over the energy range 280 eV to 11.2 keV using the fundamental with pulse energies of at least 1-3 mJ depending on the pulse duration and photon energy (please note that operation above 10 keV requires special accelerator conditions that may not be available at all times). Third harmonic radiation is available up to 25 keV at about 1% of the fundamental pulse energy. The pulse length can be varied from

  4. Concept of DT fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anan'ev, S.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Kuteev, B.V.; Cherkez, D.I.; Shirnin, P.N.; Kazakovsky, N.T.

    2015-03-15

    A concept of DT-fusion neutron source (FNS) with the neutron yield higher than 10{sup 18} neutrons per second is under design in Russia. Such a FNS is of interest for many applications: 1) basic and applied research (neutron scattering, etc); 2) testing the structural materials for fusion reactors; 3) control of sub-critical nuclear systems and 4) nuclear waste processing (including transmutation of minor actinides). This paper describes the fuel cycle concept of a compact fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ∼0.5 and ∼0.3 m, magnetic field ∼1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The system provides the fuel mixture with equal fractions of D and T (D:T = 1:1) for all FNS technology systems. (authors)

  5. Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

  6. Measurement of Ultracold Neutrons Produced by Using Doppler-shifted Bragg Reflection at a Pulsed-neutron Source

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Brun, T. O.; Carpenter, J. M.; Krohn, V. E.; Ringo, G. R.; Cronin, J. W.; Dombeck, T. W.; Lynn, J. W.; Werner, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) have been produced at the Argonne pulsed-neutron source by the Doppler shift of 400-m/s neutrons Bragg reflected from a moving crystal. The peak density of UCN produced at the crystal exceeds 0.1 n/cm{sup 3}.

  7. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Yan; Gohar, Yousry; Zhong, Zhaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  8. Small plasma focus as neutron pulsed source for nuclides identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milanese, M.; Moroso, R.; Barbaglia, M.; Universidad del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires , Pinto 399, Tandil 7000, Buenos Aires ; Niedbalski, J.; Mayer, R.; Castillo, F.

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we present preliminary results on the feasibility of employing a low energy (2 kJ, 31 kV) plasma focus device as a portable source of pulsed neutron beams (2.45 MeV) generated by nuclear fusion reactions D-D, for the in situ analysis of substances by nuclear activation. This source has the relevant advantage of being pulsed at requirement, transportable, not permanently radioactive, without radioactive waste, cheap, among others. We prove the feasibility of using this source showing several spectra of the characteristic emission line for manganese, gold, lead, and silver.

  9. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  10. Status of the SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaneyasu, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.

    2010-06-23

    The SAGA Light Source (SAGA-LS) is a synchrotron radiation facility consisting of a 255 MeV injector linac and a 1.4 GeV storage ring that is 75.6 m in circumference. The SAGA-LS has been stably providing synchrotron radiation to users since it first started user operation in February 2006. Along with the user operation, various machine improvements have been made over the past years, including upgrading the injector linac control system, replacing a septum magnet and constructing a beam diagnostic system. In addition to these improvements, insertion devices have been developed and installed. An APPLE-II type variable polarization undulator was installed in 2008. To address the demand from users for high-flux hard x-rays, a superconducting 4 T class wiggler is being developed. An experimental setup for generating MeV photons by laser Compton scattering is being constructed for beam monitoring and future user experiments.

  11. LED intense headband light source for fingerprint analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    2005-03-08

    A portable, lightweight and high-intensity light source for detecting and analyzing fingerprints during field investigation. On-site field analysis requires long hours of mobile analysis. In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a plurality of light emitting diodes; a power source; and a personal attachment means; wherein the light emitting diodes are powered by the power source, and wherein the power source and the light emitting diodes are attached to the personal attachment means to produce a personal light source for on-site analysis of latent fingerprints. The present invention is available for other applications as well.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work

  13. Dynamics of a self-gravitating neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paret, D. Manreza; Martínez, A. Pérez; Rey, A. Ulacia; Sussman, Roberto A. E-mail: aurora@icmf.inf.cu E-mail: sussman@nucleares.unam.mx

    2010-03-01

    We examine the dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized neutron gas as a source of a Bianchi I spacetime described by the Kasner metric. The set of Einstein-Maxwell field equations can be expressed as a dynamical system in a 4-dimensional phase space. Numerical solutions of this system reveal the emergence of a point-like singularity as the final evolution state for a large class of physically motivated initial conditions. Besides the theoretical interest of studying this source in a fully general relativistic context, the resulting idealized model could be helpful in understanding the collapse of local volume elements of a neutron gas in the critical conditions that would prevail in the center of a compact object.

  14. Actinide/beryllium neutron sources with reduced dispersion characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schulte, Louis D.

    2012-08-14

    Neutron source comprising a composite, said composite comprising crystals comprising BeO and AmBe.sub.13, and an excess of beryllium, wherein the crystals have an average size of less than 2 microns; the size distribution of the crystals is less than 2 microns; and the beryllium is present in a 7-fold to a 75-fold excess by weight of the amount of AmBe.sub.13; and methods of making thereof.

  15. The advanced neutron source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 {center_dot} 10{sup 19} {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} s{sup -1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R&D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R&D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R&D program will focus on the four objectives described.

  16. The Advanced Neutron Source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, D.L.

    1992-11-30

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of {approximately} 330 MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of > 7 {times} 10{sup 19} M{sup {minus}2} {center_dot} S{sup {minus}1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science-as well as applied research-leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The R&D program will focus on the four objectives: Address feasibility issues; provide analysis support; evaluate options for improvement in performance beyond minimum requirements; and provide prototype demonstrations for unique facilities. The remainder of this report presents (1) the process by which the R&D activities are controlled and (2) a discussion of the individual tasks that have been identified for the R&D program, including their justification, schedule and costs. The activities discussed in this report will be performed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and through subcontracts with industry, universities, and other national laboratories. It should be noted that in general a success path has been assumed for all tasks.

  17. The Advanced Neutron Source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, D.L.

    1992-11-30

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of [approximately] 330 MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of > 7 [times] 10[sup 19] M[sup [minus]2] [center dot] S[sup [minus]1]. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science-as well as applied research-leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The R D program will focus on the four objectives: Address feasibility issues; provide analysis support; evaluate options for improvement in performance beyond minimum requirements; and provide prototype demonstrations for unique facilities. The remainder of this report presents (1) the process by which the R D activities are controlled and (2) a discussion of the individual tasks that have been identified for the R D program, including their justification, schedule and costs. The activities discussed in this report will be performed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and through subcontracts with industry, universities, and other national laboratories. It should be noted that in general a success path has been assumed for all tasks.

  18. Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) target station design integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamy, T.; Booth, R.; Cleaves, J.; Gabriel, T.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for a 1- to 3-MW short pulse spallation source with a liquid mercury target has been started recently. The design tools and methods being developed to define requirements, integrate the work, and provide early cost guidance will be presented with a summary of the current target station design status. The initial design point was selected with performance and cost estimate projections by a systems code. This code was developed recently using cost estimates from the Brookhaven Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source study and experience from the Advanced Neutron Source Project`s conceptual design. It will be updated and improved as the design develops. Performance was characterized by a simplified figure of merit based on a ratio of neutron production to costs. A work breakdown structure was developed, with simplified systems diagrams used to define interfaces and system responsibilities. A risk assessment method was used to identify potential problems, to identify required research and development (R&D), and to aid contingency development. Preliminary 3-D models of the target station are being used to develop remote maintenance concepts and to estimate costs.

  19. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crane, T.W.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and /sup 252/Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (/sup 3/He, /sup 10/BF/sub 3/) and recoil (/sup 4/He, CH/sub 4/) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (< 10 nCi/g) is the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a /sup 252/Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables.

  20. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  2. Short-term Human Vision Protection from Intense Light Sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Short-term Human Vision Protection from Intense Light Sources The primary objective of this invention is to minimize the sensitivity of the human eye to intense visible light by ...

  3. A SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Antici'c, T.; Arganda, E.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90 Degree-Sign to +15 Degree-Sign in declination using four different energy ranges above 1 EeV (10{sup 18} eV). The method used in this search is more sensitive to neutrons than to photons. The upper limit on a neutron flux is derived for a dense grid of directions for each of the four energy ranges. These results constrain scenarios for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

  4. Tomsk Polytechnic University cyclotron as a source for neutron based cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisin, V. A.; Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina av., Tomsk 634050 ; Bogdanov, A. V.; Golovkov, V. M.; Sukhikh, L. G.; Verigin, D. A.; Musabaeva, L. I.

    2014-02-15

    In this paper we present our cyclotron based neutron source with average energy 6.3 MeV generated during the 13.6 MeV deuterons interactions with beryllium target, neutron field dosimetry, and dosimetry of attendant gamma fields. We also present application of our neutron source for cancer treatment.

  5. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    , probably at a small fraction of the cost of He-3 detectors. In addition to neutron scattering science, the fully developed base technology can be used as a rugged, low-cost neutron detector in area monitoring and surveying. Radiation monitors are used in a number of other settings for occupational and environmental radiation safety. Such a detector can also be used in environmental monitoring and remote nuclear power plant monitoring. For example, the Department of Energy could use it to characterize nuclear waste dumps, coordinate clean-up efforts, and assess the radioactive contaminants in the air and water. Radiation monitors can be used to monitor the age and component breakdown of nuclear warheads and to distinguish between weapons and reactor grade plutonium. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses radiation monitors for treaty verification, remote monitoring, and enforcing the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. As part of treaty verification, monitors can be used to certify the contents of containers during inspections. They could be used for portal monitoring to secure border checkpoints, sea ports, air cargo centers, public parks, sporting venues, and key government buildings. Currently, only 2% of all sea cargo shipped is inspected for radiation sources. In addition, merely the presence of radiation is detected and nothing is known about the radioactive source until further testing. The utilization of radiation monitors with neutron sensitivity and capability of operation in hostile port environments would increase the capacity and effectiveness of the radioactive scanning processes.

  6. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

    1994-04-26

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

  7. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

  8. Overview of Light Sources (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Overview of Light Sources Authors: Wootton, Kent ; SLAC Publication Date: 2016-02-08 OSTI Identifier: 1237935 Report Number(s): ...

  9. Homegrown solution for synchrotron light source | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and powerful facility. Concerned that this would leave him without the low-energy light source he needed to study the electronic properties of new materials, he improvised,...

  10. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  11. Materials Selection for the HFIR Cold Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, K.

    2001-08-24

    In year 2002 the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) will be fitted with a source of cold neutrons to upgrade and expand its existing neutron scattering facilities. The in-reactor components of the new source consist of a moderator vessel containing supercritical hydrogen gas moderator at a temperature of 20K and pressure of 15 bar, and a surrounding vacuum vessel. They will be installed in an enlarged beam tube located at the site of the present horizontal beam tube, HB-4; which terminates within the reactor's beryllium reflector. These components must withstand exceptional service conditions. This report describes the reasons and factors underlying the choice of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy for construction of the in-reactor components. The overwhelming considerations are the need to minimize generation of nuclear heat and to remove that heat through the flowing moderator, and to achieve a minimum service life of about 8 years coincident with the replacement schedule for the beryllium reflector. 6061-T6 aluminum alloy offers the best combination of low nuclear heating, high thermal conductivity, good fabricability, compatibility with hydrogen, superior cryogenic properties, and a well-established history of satisfactory performance in nuclear environments. These features are documented herein. An assessment is given of the expected performance of each component of the cold source.

  12. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Progress report FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the progress made in 1993 in the following sections: (1) project management; (2) research and development; (3) design and (4) safety. The section on research and development covers the following: (1) reactor core development; (2) fuel development; (3) corrosion loop tests and analysis; (4) thermal-hydraulic loop tests; (5) reactor control and shutdown concepts; (6) critical and subcritical experiments; (7) material data, structure tests, and analysis; (8) cold source development; (9) beam tube, guide, and instrument development; (10) neutron transport and shielding; (11) I and C research and development; and (12) facility concepts.

  13. A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

    2011-10-31

    Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-#12;bers promise the high #12;eld-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of #12;field emitters with a density up to 10{sup 6} tips/cm{sup 2} and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

  14. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Source Reclamation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, R.G.; Jones, S.W.

    1994-05-01

    Over the past fifty years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed an extensive capability to handle significant quantities of nuclear materials as part of its role in support of DOE Defense Program activities. The goals and objectives of these activities are met through a base program in nuclear materials technology research, development, and demonstration as well as through additional programs (such as the Neutron Source Reclamation Program) aimed at specific, often near-term goals. This base program encompasses (1) plutonium process technology research, development and demonstration activities, (2) technology transfer and offsite technical support, (3) nuclear materials recycle and recovery, and (4) nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  15. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING-DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEI,J.

    2005-05-16

    After six years, the delivery of components for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring (AR) and the transport lines was completed in Spring 2005. Designed to deliver 1.5 MW beam power (1.5 x 10{sup 14} protons of 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz), stringent measures were implemented in the fabrication, test, and assembly to ensure the quality of the accelerator systems. This paper summarizes the design, R&D, and construction of the ring and transport systems.

  16. Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff E. Nause; Ian Ferguson; Alan Doolittle

    2007-02-28

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.

  17. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99Mo is the parent isotope of 99mTc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  18. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  19. In the OSTI Collections: Neutron Sources for Studying Matter | OSTI, US

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Neutron Sources for Studying Matter Dr. Watson computer sleuthing scientist. Article Acknowledgement: Dr. William N. Watson, Physicist DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information Two sources and things explored with their use Neutron source technology Studying the neutron itself References Research Organizations and Facilities Reports available through OSTI's SciTech Connect Additional References Understanding what makes

  20. Thermal neutron steady-state spectra in light water reactor fuel assemblies poisoned with various non-1/v absorbers of different concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, K.; Chandra, S.; Jha, R.C.; Tewari, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on the thermal neutron scattering kernel that explicitly incorporates the presence of chemical binding energy and the collective oscillations in the dynamics of water, the steady-state thermal neutron spectra in light water reactor fuel assemblies poisoned with non-1/v absorbers, such as cadmium, samarium, erbium, and gadolinium, in various concentrations have been computed at 298 K. The calculated spectra are in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental spectra for realistic source terms.

  1. Studies of light neutron-excess systems from bounds to continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Makoto; Otsu, Hideaki

    2012-10-20

    The generalized two-center cluster model (GTCM), which can handle various single particle configurations in general two center systems, is applied to the light neutron-rich system, {sup 12}Be = {alpha}+{alpha}+4N. We discuss the change of the neutrons' configuration around two {alpha}-cores as a variation of an excitation energy. We show that the excess neutrons form various chemical-bondinglike configurations around two {alpha} cores in the unbound region above the {alpha} decay threshold. The possibility of the {alpha} cluster formation in the heavier neutron-excess system, {sup 28}Ne, is also discussed.

  2. Neutron generators with size scalability, ease of fabrication and multiple ion source functionalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-11-18

    A neutron generator is provided with a flat, rectilinear geometry and surface mounted metallizations. This construction provides scalability and ease of fabrication, and permits multiple ion source functionalities.

  3. A new storage-ring light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Alex

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  4. Room-temperature LINAC structures for the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billen, J. H.; Young, L. M.; Kurennoy, S.; Crandall, K. R.

    2001-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is building room-temperature rf accelerating structures for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). These structures, for H{sup -} ions, consist of six 402.5-MHz, 2-MW drift-tube linac (DTL) tanks from 2.5 to 87 MeV followed by four 805-MHz, 4-MW coupled-cavity linac (CCL) modules to 186 MeV. The DTL uses permanent magnet quadrupoles inside the drift tubes arranged in a 6{beta}{lambda} FFODDO lattice with every third drift tube available for diagnostics and steering. The CCL uses a 13{beta}{lambda} FODO electromagnetic quadrupole lattice. Diagnostics and magnets occupy the 2.5{beta}{lambda} spaces between 8-cavity segments. This paper discusses design of the rf cavities and low-power modeling work.

  5. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  6. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  7. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, Jonathan G.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  8. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  9. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C.; Quigley, Gerard P.

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  10. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users ...

  11. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  12. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z. -X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Sthr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  13. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2010-01-08

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  14. Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falkenstein, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

  15. Initial tests of the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} ion source with an external antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Kang, Y.; Peters, J.

    2006-03-15

    The ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a radio-frequency (rf) multicusp source designed to deliver H{sup -} beam pulses of 40 mA to the SNS accelerator with a normalized root-mean-square emittance of less than 0.2{pi} mm mrad, with a pulse length of 1 ms and a repetition rate of 60 Hz. In order to achieve this performance the source must operate with both high-pulse rf power, {approx}50 kW, and high average rf power, {approx}3.5 kW, over a continuous operational period of 3 weeks. During operation at these power levels the plasma-immersed, porcelain-coated rf antenna is susceptible to damage, limiting source lifetime. We are therefore developing an ion source where the plasma is separated from the Cu antenna by an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} discharge chamber. This article describes the ion source, presents initial beam extraction measurements, and details our ongoing effort to develop this concept into a suitable ion source for the SNS.

  16. Advances in the performance and understanding of the Spallation Neutron Source ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.

    2006-03-15

    The ion source developed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a radio-frequency, multicusp source designed to produce {approx}40 mA of H{sup -} with a normalized rms emittance of less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. To date, the source has been utilized in the commissioning of the SNS accelerator and has already demonstrated stable, satisfactory operation at beam currents of 10-40 mA with duty factors of {approx}0.1% for operational periods of several weeks. Ultimately the SNS facility will require beam duty factors of 6% (1 ms pulse length, 60 Hz repetition rate). To ascertain the capability of the source to deliver beams at this duty factor over sustained periods, ongoing experiments are being performed in which the ion source is continuously operated on a dedicated test stand. The results of these tests are reported as well as a theory of the Cs release and transport processes that was derived from these data. The theory was then employed to develop a more effective source-conditioning procedure and a direct-transfer Cs collar, which led to a considerable improvement in source performance.

  17. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  19. Single-Volume Neutron Scatter Camera for High-Efficiency Neutron Imaging and Source Characterization. Year 2 of 3 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Erik

    2015-10-01

    The neutron scatter camera (NSC), an imaging spectrometer for fission energy neutrons, is an established and proven detector for nuclear security applications such as weak source detection of special nuclear material (SNM), arms control treaty verification, and emergency response. Relative to competing technologies such as coded aperture imaging, time-encoded imaging, neutron time projection chamber, and various thermal neutron imagers, the NSC provides excellent event-by-event directional information for signal/background discrimination, reasonable imaging resolution, and good energy resolution. Its primary drawback is very low detection efficiency due to the requirement for neutron elastic scatters in two detector cells. We will develop a singlevolume double-scatter neutron imager, in which both neutron scatters can occur in the same large active volume. If successful, the efficiency will be dramatically increased over the current NSC cell-based geometry. If the detection efficiency approaches that of e.g. coded aperture imaging, the other inherent advantages of double-scatter imaging would make it the most attractive fast neutron detector for a wide range of security applications.

  20. Neutron economic reactivity control system for light water reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.; Gregurech, Steve

    1989-01-01

    A neutron reactivity control system for a LWBR incorporating a stationary seed-blanket core arrangement. The core arrangement includes a plurality of contiguous hexagonal shaped regions. Each region has a central and a peripheral blanket area juxapositioned an annular seed area. The blanket areas contain thoria fuel rods while the annular seed area includes seed fuel rods and movable thoria shim control rods.

  1. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will bemore » based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.« less

  2. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  3. In the OSTI Collections: Neutron Sources for Studying Matter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... by removing preexisting neutrons from nuclei using any of several nuclear reactions. ... The High Flux Isotope Reactor works like any nuclear reactor that involves a chain of ...

  4. DOE Science Showcase - Neutron Sources for Studying Matter |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System, INL Energy Frontier Research Center for ... carbon (blue), crystalline carbon (green), and hydrogen (white.) (hi-res image) ...

  5. Measurement of the neutron spectrum and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, R.

    2015-07-07

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement of the neutron spectral distribution and fluence from the 252Cf source (model NS-120, LLNL serial # 7001677, referred as the SMALL Cf source) and determination of the ambient neutron dose rate equivalent and kerma at 100 cm for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). The dosimetric quantities should be based on the neutron spectrum and the current neutron-to-dose conversion coefficients.

  6. Tunable light source for use in photoacoustic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bisson, Scott E.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides a photoacoustic spectrometer that is field portable and capable of speciating complex organic molecules in the gas phase. The spectrometer has a tunable light source that has the ability to resolve the fine structure of these molecules over a large wavelength range. The inventive light source includes an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) having combined fine and coarse tuning. By pumping the OPO with the output from a doped-fiber optical amplifier pumped by a diode seed laser, the inventive spectrometer is able to speciate mixtures having parts per billion of organic compounds, with a light source that has a high efficiency and small size, allowing for portability. In an alternative embodiment, the spectrometer is scanned by controlling the laser wavelength, thus resulting in an even more compact and efficient design.

  7. Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-drivenNeutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt,B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-02-15

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable ofproducing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm2 and with atomicfraction>90 percent was designed and tested with an electrostaticlow energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source wasincorporatedinto the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source(ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQaccelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gastarget. In this design a 40 mA D+ beam is produced from a 6 mm diameteraperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into theRFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used tocreate ~; 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HVbreakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize thefield in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguideto the plasma is done by an autotuner. We observed significantimprovement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride linerinside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared withPBGUNS simulations.

  8. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, F; Thomas, A G; Mangles, S P; Banerjee, S; Corde, S; Flacco, A; Litos, M; Neely, D; Viera, J; Najmudin, Z; Bingham, R; Joshi, C; Katsouleas, T

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future eff orts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefi eld accelerators for these specifi c applications.

  9. High efficiency light source using solid-state emitter and down-conversion material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narendran, Nadarajah; Gu, Yimin; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2010-10-26

    A light emitting apparatus includes a source of light for emitting light; a down conversion material receiving the emitted light, and converting the emitted light into transmitted light and backward transmitted light; and an optic device configured to receive the backward transmitted light and transfer the backward transmitted light outside of the optic device. The source of light is a semiconductor light emitting diode, a laser diode (LD), or a resonant cavity light emitting diode (RCLED). The down conversion material includes one of phosphor or other material for absorbing light in one spectral region and emitting light in another spectral region. The optic device, or lens, includes light transmissive material.

  10. Vibrational spectra of light and heavy water with application to neutron cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damian, J. I. Marquez; Granada, J. R.; Malaspina, D. C.

    2013-07-14

    The design of nuclear reactors and neutron moderators require a good representation of the interaction of low energy (E < 1 eV) neutrons with hydrogen and deuterium containing materials. These models are based on the dynamics of the material, represented by its vibrational spectrum. In this paper, we show calculations of the frequency spectrum for light and heavy water at room temperature using two flexible point charge potentials: SPC-MPG and TIP4P/2005f. The results are compared with experimental measurements, with emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering data. Finally, the resulting spectra are applied to calculation of neutron scattering cross sections for these materials, which were found to be a significant improvement over library data.

  11. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schriesheim, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne's ZING-P and ZING-P' prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and in press'' articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

  12. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne`s ZING-P and ZING-P` prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and ``in press`` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

  13. Neutron Source Facility Training Simulator Based on EPICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Young Soo; Wei, Thomas Y.; Vilim, Richard B.; Grelle, Austin L.; Dworzanski, Pawel L.; Gohar, Yousry

    2015-01-01

    A plant operator training simulator is developed for training the plant operators as well as for design verification of plant control system (PCS) and plant protection system (PPS) for the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology Neutron Source Facility. The simulator provides the operator interface for the whole plant including the sub-critical assembly coolant loop, target coolant loop, secondary coolant loop, and other facility systems. The operator interface is implemented based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which is a comprehensive software development platform for distributed control systems. Since its development at Argonne National Laboratory, it has been widely adopted in the experimental physics community, e.g. for control of accelerator facilities. This work is the first implementation for a nuclear facility. The main parts of the operator interface are the plant control panel and plant protection panel. The development involved implementation of process variable database, sequence logic, and graphical user interface (GUI) for the PCS and PPS utilizing EPICS and related software tools, e.g. sequencer for sequence logic, and control system studio (CSS-BOY) for graphical use interface. For functional verification of the PCS and PPS, a plant model is interfaced, which is a physics-based model of the facility coolant loops implemented as a numerical computer code. The training simulator is tested and demonstrated its effectiveness in various plant operation sequences, e.g. start-up, shut-down, maintenance, and refueling. It was also tested for verification of the plant protection system under various trip conditions.

  14. H{sup -} radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welton, R. F.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  15. Model-Based Least Squares Reconstruction of Coded Source Neutron Radiographs: Integrating the ORNL HFIR CG1D Source Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Gregor, Jens; Bingham, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    At the present, neutron sources cannot be fabricated small and powerful enough in order to achieve high resolution radiography while maintaining an adequate flux. One solution is to employ computational imaging techniques such as a Magnified Coded Source Imaging (CSI) system. A coded-mask is placed between the neutron source and the object. The system resolution is increased by reducing the size of the mask holes and the flux is increased by increasing the size of the coded-mask and/or the number of holes. One limitation of such system is that the resolution of current state-of-the-art scintillator-based detectors caps around 50um. To overcome this challenge, the coded-mask and object are magnified by making the distance from the coded-mask to the object much smaller than the distance from object to detector. In previous work, we have shown via synthetic experiments that our least squares method outperforms other methods in image quality and reconstruction precision because of the modeling of the CSI system components. However, the validation experiments were limited to simplistic neutron sources. In this work, we aim to model the flux distribution of a real neutron source and incorporate such a model in our least squares computational system. We provide a full description of the methodology used to characterize the neutron source and validate the method with synthetic experiments.

  16. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; et al

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  17. Proceedings of the 10th meeting of the international collaboration on advanced neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyer, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    This report contains papers from the 10th meeting of the International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources. Two general types of workshops are discussed, instrument and target-station. Individual papers are indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP)

  18. Picture of the Week: Laser-driven neutron source for research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser-driven neutron source for research and global security At Los Alamos's Trident facility, scientists are using an ultra-high intensity laser beam to produce high intensity ...

  19. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Tennant

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity???????¢????????????????s Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  20. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Annette

    1999-03-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

  1. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  2. Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    linac (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Authors: Jeon, Dong-O Publication Date: 2013-04-23 OSTI Identifier: 1091911 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue:

  3. Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Authors: Kippen, Karen E. [1] ; Clayton, Steven [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-04-10 OSTI Identifier: 1127473 Report Number(s): LA-UR-14-22440 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org:

  4. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J.; Leung, K.N.

    1997-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  5. Development of a Time-tagged Neutron Source for SNM Detection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Wallig, Joe; Waldron, Will; Tinsley, Jim

    2015-06-18

    Associated particle imaging (API) is a powerful technique for special nuclear material (SNM) detection and characterization of fissile material configurations. A sealed-tube neutron generator has been under development by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to reduce the beam spot size on the neutron production target to 1 mm in diameter for a several-fold increase in directional resolution and simultaneously increases the maximum attainable neutron flux. A permanent magnet 2.45 GHz microwave-driven ion source has been adopted in this time-tagged neutron source. This type of ion source provides a high plasma density that allows the use of a sub-millimeter aperture for themore » extraction of a sufficient ion beam current and lets us achieve a much reduced beam spot size on target without employing active focusing. The design of this API generator uses a custom-made radial high voltage insulator to minimize source to neutron production target distance and to provide for a simple ion source cooling arrangement. Preliminary experimental results showed that more than 100 µA of deuterium ions have been extracted, and the beam diameter on the neutron production target is around 1 mm.« less

  6. Development of a Time-tagged Neutron Source for SNM Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Wallig, Joe; Waldron, Will; Tinsley, Jim

    2015-06-18

    Associated particle imaging (API) is a powerful technique for special nuclear material (SNM) detection and characterization of fissile material configurations. A sealed-tube neutron generator has been under development by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to reduce the beam spot size on the neutron production target to 1 mm in diameter for a several-fold increase in directional resolution and simultaneously increases the maximum attainable neutron flux. A permanent magnet 2.45 GHz microwave-driven ion source has been adopted in this time-tagged neutron source. This type of ion source provides a high plasma density that allows the use of a sub-millimeter aperture for the extraction of a sufficient ion beam current and lets us achieve a much reduced beam spot size on target without employing active focusing. The design of this API generator uses a custom-made radial high voltage insulator to minimize source to neutron production target distance and to provide for a simple ion source cooling arrangement. Preliminary experimental results showed that more than 100 µA of deuterium ions have been extracted, and the beam diameter on the neutron production target is around 1 mm.

  7. Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma July 18, 2011 - 12:07pm Addthis The new anti-cancer drug, vemurafenib, is the green honeycomb structure at middle left. Four dotted red lines show where it attaches to a target area in the mutated enzyme, disabling it from promoting the growth of tumors. | Image courtesy of Plexxikon Inc. The new anti-cancer drug, vemurafenib, is the green honeycomb structure at middle left. Four

  8. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented.

  9. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Harkay, K.; Hernandez-Garcia; Legg, R.; Padmore, H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.

    2010-05-26

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  10. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; et al

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a newmore » generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.« less

  11. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  12. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE INTERNATIONAL USER GROUP FOREIGN PRINCIPAL PARTY IN INTEREST (FPPI) / U.S. AGENT I, _______________________________on behalf of ___________________________________, (Name, Authorized Representative for Int'l User Group) (Name of Int'l User Group Organization) the Foreign Principal Party in Interest, that is subject to the jurisdiction of __________________________________ and having an office and place of business at (Name of

  13. LCLS Users' Organization Executive Committee | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users' Organization Executive Committee SAVE THE DATE: SSRL/LCLS Users' Conference and Workshops, October 5-7, 2016 Read summary of 2015 users' conference. During the annual meeting, users also have the opportunity to vote for their Users Executive Committee Representatives. The LCLS Users' Organization (LCLS UO) provides an organized framework and independent vehicle for interaction between the scientists who are interested in using the Linac Coherent Light Source (the users) and LCLS/SLAC

  14. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  15. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ − z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} and 2.20 ×10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively.

  16. A TARGETED SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Arqueros, F.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration101; and others

    2014-07-10

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as nine ''target sets'', in addition to the search for a neutron flux from the Galactic center or from the Galactic plane. Within a target set, each candidate source is weighted in proportion to its electromagnetic flux, its exposure to the Auger Observatory, and its flux attenuation factor due to neutron decay. These searches do not find evidence for a neutron flux from any class of candidate sources. Tabulated results give the combined p-value for each class, with and without the weights, and also the flux upper limit for the most significant candidate source within each class. These limits on fluxes of neutrons significantly constrain models of EeV proton emission from non-transient discrete sources in the Galaxy.

  17. A strongly heated neutron star in the transient z source MAXI J0556-332

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A.; Fridriksson, Joel K.; Wijnands, Rudy; Cackett, Edward M.; Degenaar, Nathalie; Linares, Manuel

    2014-11-10

    We present Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations of the quiescent neutron star in the transient low-mass X-ray binary MAXI J0556-332. Observations of the source made during outburst (with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) reveal tracks in its X-ray color-color and hardness-intensity diagrams that closely resemble those of the neutron-star Z sources, suggesting that MAXI J0556-332 had near- or super-Eddington luminosities for a large part of its ∼16 month outburst. A comparison of these diagrams with those of other Z sources suggests a source distance of 46 ± 15 kpc. Fits to the quiescent spectra of MAXI J0556-332 with a neutron-star atmosphere model (with or without a power-law component) result in distance estimates of 45 ± 3 kpc, for a neutron-star radius of 10 km and a mass of 1.4 M {sub ☉}. The spectra show the effective surface temperature of the neutron star decreasing monotonically over the first ∼500 days of quiescence, except for two observations that were likely affected by enhanced low-level accretion. The temperatures we obtain for the fits that include a power law (kT{sub eff}{sup ∞} = 184-308 eV) are much higher than those seen for any other neutron star heated by accretion, while the inferred cooling (e-folding) timescale (∼200 days) is similar to other sources. Fits without a power law yield higher temperatures (kT{sub eff}{sup ∞} = 190-336 eV) and a shorter e-folding time (∼160 days). Our results suggest that the heating of the neutron-star crust in MAXI J0556-332 was considerably more efficient than for other systems, possibly indicating additional or more efficient shallow heat sources in its crust.

  18. Reactor physics analyses of the advanced neutron source three-element core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehin, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    A reactor physics analysis was performed for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor with a three-element core configuration. The analysis was performed with a two-dimensional r-z 20-energy-group finite-difference diffusion theory model of the 17-d fuel cycle. The model included equivalent r-z geometry representations of the central control rods, the irradiation and production targets, and reflector components. Calculated quantities include fuel cycle parameters, fuel element power distributions, unperturbed neutron fluxes in the reflector and target regions, reactivity perturbations, and neutron kinetics parameters.

  19. Structure of Light Neutron-rich Nuclei Studied with Transfer Reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer reactions have been used for many years to understand the shell structure of nuclei. Recent studies with rare-isotope beams extend this work and make it possible to probe the evolution of shell structure far beyond the valley of stability, requiring measurements in inverse kinematics. We present a novel technical approach to measurements in inverse kinematics, and apply this method to different transfer reactions, each of which probes different properties of light, neutron-rich nuclei.

  20. OSTIblog Articles in the Spallation Neutron Source Topic | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Spallation Neutron Source Topic The NXS Class of 2014 by Kathy Chambers 19 Nov, 2014 in Every summer for the past 16 years, the Department of Energy has invited the best and brightest graduates from across the country to attend the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering (NXS). This year, 65 graduate students attending North American universities, and studying physics, chemistry, materials science, or related fields, participated

  1. DOE Science Showcase - Neutron Sources for Studying Matter | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Neutron Sources for Studying Matter Understanding the properties of matter on the atomic scale and then using this knowledge to optimize those properties or develop new materials and functionality is a key priority of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This activity supports the operation of three neutron scattering facilities, one of the most powerful tools for characterizing matter. These facilities are

  2. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore » laser sources.« less

  3. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30

    This document lays out a proposal by the Instrument Development Team (IDT) composed of scientists from leading Universities and National Laboratories to design and build a conceptually new high-flux inelastic neutron spectrometer at the pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge. This instrument is intended to supply users of the SNS and scientific community, of which the IDT is an integral part, with a platform for ground-breaking investigations of the low-energy atomic-scale dynamical properties of crystalline solids. It is also planned that the proposed instrument will be equipped with a polarization analysis capability, therefore becoming the first polarized beam inelastic spectrometer in the SNS instrument suite, and the first successful polarized beam inelastic instrument at a pulsed spallation source worldwide. The proposed instrument is designed primarily for inelastic and elastic neutron spectroscopy of single crystals. In fact, the most informative neutron scattering studies of the dynamical properties of solids nearly always require single crystal samples, and they are almost invariably flux-limited. In addition, in measurements with polarization analysis the available flux is reduced through selection of the particular neutron polarization, which puts even more stringent limits on the feasibility of a particular experiment. To date, these investigations have mostly been carried out on crystal spectrometers at high-flux reactors, which usually employ focusing Bragg optics to concentrate the neutron beam on a typically small sample. Construction at Oak Ridge of the high-luminosity spallation neutron source, which will provide intense pulsed neutron beams with time-averaged fluxes equal to those at medium-flux reactors, opens entirely new opportunities for single crystal neutron spectroscopy. Drawing upon experience acquired during decades of studies with both crystal and time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers, the IDT has developed a conceptual

  4. Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choong, Vi-En

    2010-02-23

    At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

  5. Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

  6. X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The APS is one of only four third-generation, hard x-ray synchrotron radiation light ... Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory ...

  7. Boron-Containing Red Light-Emitting Phosphors And Light Sources Incorporating The Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-03-28

    A boron-containing phosphor comprises a material having a formula of AD1-xEuxB9O16, wherein A is an element selected from the group consisting of Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, and combinations thereof; D is at least an element selected from the group consisting of rare-earth metals other than europium; and x is in the range from about 0.005 to about 0.5. The phosphor is used in a blend with other phosphors in a light source for generating visible light with a high color rendering index.

  8. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soffer, L.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  9. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimbal, Andreas; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Degering, Detlev; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-08

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a {sup 228}Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed {sup 228}Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10{sup −6}. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of {sup 3}He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  10. Ultrabright Laser-based MeV-class Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, F; Anderson, G; Anderson, S; Bayramian, A; Berry, B; Betts, S; Dawson, J; Ebbers, C; Gibson, D; Hagmann, C; Hall, J; Hartemann, F; Hartouni, E; Heebner, J; Hernandez, J; Johnson, M; Messerly, M; McNabb, D; Phan, H; Pruet, J; Semenov, V; Shverdin, M; Sridharan, A; Tremaine, A; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-04-02

    We report first light from a novel, new source of 10-ps 0.776-MeV gamma-ray pulses known as T-REX (Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays). The MeV-class radiation produced by TREX is unique in the world with respect to its brightness, spectral purity, tunability, pulse duration and laser-like beam character. With T-REX, one can use photons to efficiently probe and excite the isotope-dependent resonant structure of atomic nucleus. This ability will be enabling to an entirely new class of isotope-specific, high resolution imaging and detection capabilities.

  11. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  12. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  13. Pulsed neutrons: one year of experience with the new source at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lander, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source based on a 500-MeV proton accelerator operating at 30 Hz and with an average proton current of approx. 10 ..mu..A. Neutron-scattering instruments for elastic scattering include two powder diffractometers, a single-crystal diffractometer based on the Laue method and employing a large (30 x 30 cm) position-sensitive scintillation detector, a small-angle diffractometer using a position-sensitive detector, and a polarized-neutron diffractometer which will utilize the spin-refrigerator device to obtain a beam of white polarized neutrons. For inelastic scattering, we presently have the crystal-analyzer spectrometer and two chopper spectrometers capable of providing monoenergetic incident neutron beams of between 100 and 600 MeV. From its inception IPNS has been operating in a user mode and the selection of experiments is made by a Program Committee twice a year on the basis of the scientific merit of submitted proposals.

  14. The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Science Program at the Los Alamos Ultracold Neutron Source Authors: Saunders, Alexander [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-06-13 OSTI Identifier: 1083838 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-24322 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  15. SOURCES 4C : a code for calculating ([alpha],n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, W. B.; Perry, R. T.; Shores, E. F.; Charlton, W. S.; Parish, Theodore A.; Estes, G. P.; Brown, T. H.; Arthur, Edward D. ,; Bozoian, Michael; England, T. R.; Madland, D. G.; Stewart, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    SOURCES 4C is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to radionuclide decay. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., an intimate mixture of a-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 44 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 107 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code provides the magnitude and spectra, if desired, of the resultant neutron source in addition to an analysis of the'contributions by each nuclide in the problem. LASTCALL, a graphical user interface, is included in the code package.

  16. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, Lawrence B. [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (United States); Czirr, J. Bart [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubes is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.

  17. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubesmore » is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.« less

  18. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  19. Advanced Light Source (ALS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) exterior dome at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. (Source: ALS) Location Berkeley, California Start of Operations 1993 Number of Users ...

  20. Refrigeration options for the Advanced Light Source Superbend Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Hoyer, E.H.; Schlueter, R.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-07-09

    The 1.9 GeV Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produces photons with a critical energy of about 3.1 kev at each of its thirty-six 1.3 T gradient bending magnets. It is proposed that at three locations around the ring the conventional gradient bending magnets be replaced with superconducting bending magnets with a maximum field of 5.6 T. At the point where the photons are extracted, their critical energy will be about 12 keV. In the beam lines where the SuperBend superconducting magnets are installed, the X ray brightness at 20 keV will be increased over two orders of magnitude. This report describes three different refrigeration options for cooling the three SuperBend dipoles. The cooling options include: (1) liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryogen cooling using stored liquids, (2) a central helium refrigerator (capacity 70 to 100 W) cooling all of the SuperBend magnets, (3) a Gifford McMahon (GM) cryocooler on each of the dipoles. This paper describes the technical and economic reasons for selecting a small GM cryocooler as the method for cooling the SuperBend dipoles on the LBNL Advanced Light Source.

  1. Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates the World’s Brightest Synchrotron Light Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Ernest Moniz today dedicated the world’s most advanced light source, the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

  2. Light-ion production in the interaction of 96 MeV neutrons with oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippawan, U.; Pomp, S.; Atac, A.; Blomgren, J.; Dangtip, S.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Oesterlund, M.; Bergenwall, B.; Nilsson, L.; Olsson, N.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Corcalciuc, V.; Koning, A.J.

    2006-03-15

    Double-differential cross sections are reported for light-ion (p, d, t, {sup 3}He, and {alpha}) production in oxygen induced by 96 MeV neutrons. Energy spectra are measured at eight laboratory angles from 20 degree sign to 160 degree sign in steps of 20 degree sign . Procedures for data taking and data reduction are presented. Deduced energy-differential and production cross sections are reported. Experimental cross sections are compared to theoretical reaction model calculations and experimental data at lower neutron energies in the literature. The measured proton data agree reasonably well with the results of the model calculations, whereas the agreement for the other particles is less convincing. The measured production cross sections for protons, deuterons, tritons, and {alpha} particles support the trends suggested by data at lower energies.

  3. New opportunities for quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering at steady-state sources using mechanical selection of the incident and final neutron energy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mamantov, Eugene

    2015-06-12

    We propose a modification of the neutron wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) device that enables inelastic (in particular, quasielastic) scattering measurements not relying on the neutron time-of-flight. The proposed device is highly suitable for a steady-state neutron source, somewhat similar to a triple-axis spectrometer, but with simultaneous selection of the incident and final neutron energy over a broad range of scattering momentum transfer. Both the incident and final neutron velocities are defined by the WAVES geometry and rotation frequency. The variable energy transfer is achieved through the natural variation of the velocity of the transmitted neutrons as a function of themore » scattering angle component out of the equatorial plane.« less

  4. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimov, D. Moscow Engineering Physics Institute , Russia; Bernstein, A. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; BarbeauP.,; Barton, P. J. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Bolozdynya, A. Moscow Engineering Physics Institute , Russia; Cabrera-Palmer, B. Sandia National Laboratories; Cavanna, F. Yale University; Cianciolo, Vince ORNL; Collar, J. University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute; Cooper, R. J. Indiana University; Dean, D. J. Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Efremenko, Yuri University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Etenko, A. Moscow Engineering Physics Institute , Russia; Fields, N. University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute; Foxe, M. Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Figueroa-Feliciano, E. Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Fomin, N. University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Gallmeier, F. Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Garishvili, I. University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Gerling, M. Sandia National Laboratories; Green, M. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Greene, Geoffrey University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Hatzikoutelis, A. University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Henning, Reyco University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Hix, R. University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Hogan, D. University of California-Berkeley; Hornback, D. University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Jovanovic, I. Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Hossbach, T. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Iverson, Erik B ORNL; Klein, S. R. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Khromov, A. Moscow Engineering Physics Institute , Russia; Link, J. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Louis, W. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lu, W. Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Mauger, C. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marleau, P. Sandia National Laboratories; Markoff, D. North Carolina Central University, Durham; Martin, R. D. University of South Dakota; Mueller, Paul Edward ORNL; Newby, J. Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Orrell, John L. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; O'Shaughnessy, C. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Penttila, Seppo Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Patton, K. North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Poon, A. W. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Radford, David C ORNL; Reyna, D. Sandia National Laboratories; Ray, H. University of Florida, Gainesville; Scholberg, K. Duke University, North Carolina; Sosnovtsev, V. Moscow Engineering Physics Institute , Russia; Tayloe, R. Indiana University; Vetter, K. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Virtue, C. Laurentian University, Canada; Wilkerson, J. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yoo, J. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory; Yu, Chang-Hong ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  5. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  6. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Dennis; Padmore, Howard; Lessner, Eliane

    2013-03-27

    potentially revolutionary science involves soft excitations such as magnons and phonons; in general, these are well below the resolution that can be probed by today’s optical systems. The study of these low-energy excitations will only move forward if advances are made in high-resolution gratings for the soft X-ray energy region, and higher-resolution crystal analyzers for the hard X-ray region. In almost all the forefront areas of X-ray science today, the main limitation is our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate X-rays at the level required for these advanced measurements. To address these issues, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) sponsored a workshop, X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities, which was held March 27–29, 2013, near Washington, D.C. The workshop addressed a wide range of technical and organizational issues. Eleven working groups were formed in advance of the meeting and sought over several months to define the most pressing problems and emerging opportunities and to propose the best routes forward for a focused R&D program to solve these problems. The workshop participants identified eight principal research directions (PRDs), as follows: Development of advanced grating lithography and manufacturing for high-energy resolution techniques such as soft X-ray inelastic scattering. Development of higher-precision mirrors for brightness preservation through the use of advanced metrology in manufacturing, improvements in manufacturing techniques, and in mechanical mounting and cooling. Development of higher-accuracy optical metrology that can be used in manufacturing, verification, and testing of optomechanical systems, as well as at wavelength metrology that can be used for quantification of individual optics and alignment and testing of beamlines. Development of an integrated optical modeling and design framework that is designed and maintained specifically for X-ray optics. Development of

  7. Impact of switching to the ICRP-74 neutron flux-to-dose equivalent rate conversion factors at the Sandia National Laboratory Building 818 Neutron Source Range.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Dann C.

    2009-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a neutron calibration facility which supports the calibration, maintenance, and repair of Radiation Protection Instruments. The SNL neutron reference fields are calibrated using the following methodology: Fluence rate is initially established by calculation using the NIST traceable source emission rate (decay corrected). Correction factors for the effects of room return or scatter, and source anisotropy are then developed by using a suitable radiation transport code to model the geometry of the facility. The conventionally true neutron dose rates are then determined using the appropriate fluence-todose equivalent conversion coefficients at several reference positions. This report describes the impact on calculated neutron dose rates of switching from NCRP-38 to CRP-74 neutron flux-todose equivalent rate conversion factors. This switch is driven by recent changes to dosimetry requirements addressed in 10 CFR 835 (Occupational Radiation Protection).

  8. Development of the radio frequency driven H{sup {minus}} ion source for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, M.A.; Gough, R.A.; Leung, K.N.; Rickard, M.L.; Scott, P.K.; Wengrow, A.B.; Williams, M.D.; Wutte, D.C.

    1998-02-01

    The ion source for the 1 MW National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is required to provide 35mA of H{sup {minus}} beam current (1 ms pulses at 60 Hz) at 65 keV with a normalized root-mean-square emittance of {lt}0.2 pimmmrad. The same ion source should be able to produce 70 mA of H{sup {minus}}at 6{percent} duty factor when the NSNS is upgraded to 2 MW of power. For this application, a radio-frequency driven, magnetically filtered multicusp source is being developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The design of this R and D ion source, which is equipped with a cesium dispenser-collar, a fast ion beam prechopper (rise times {lt}100 ns) and a strong permanent-magnet insert for electron deflection, will be presented.{copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Computational Assessment of Naturally Occurring Neutron and Photon Background Radiation Produced by Extraterrestrial Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; de Wet, Wouter C.; Patton, Bruce W.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, a computational assessment of the variation in terrestrial neutron and photon background from extraterrestrial sources is presented. The motivation of this assessment is to evaluate the practicality of developing a tool or database to estimate background in real time (or near–real time) during an experimental measurement or to even predict the background for future measurements. The extraterrestrial source focused on during this assessment is naturally occurring galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The MCNP6 transport code was used to perform the computational assessment. However, the GCR source available in MCNP6 was not used. Rather, models developed and maintained by NASA were used to generate the GCR sources. The largest variation in both neutron and photon background spectra was found to be caused by changes in elevation on Earth's surface, which can be as large as an order of magnitude. All other perturbations produced background variations on the order of a factor of 3 or less. The most interesting finding was that ~80% and 50% of terrestrial background neutrons and photons, respectively, are generated by interactions in Earth's surface and other naturally occurring and man-made objects near a detector of particles from extraterrestrial sources and their progeny created in Earth's atmosphere. In conclusion, this assessment shows that it will be difficult to estimate the terrestrial background from extraterrestrial sources without a good understanding of a detector's surroundings. Therefore, estimating or predicting background during a measurement environment like a mobile random search will be difficult.

  10. Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belenky, Gregory; Bruno, John D.; Kisin, Mikhail V.; Luryi, Serge; Shterengas, Leon; Suchalkin, Sergey; Tober, Richard L.

    2011-01-25

    A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

  11. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE MEDICAL PERSONNEL PROTECTION INTERLOCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUDA,S.; GMUR,N.F.; LARSON,R.; THOMLINSON,W.

    1998-11-03

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated.

  12. IPNS neutron scattering instrumentation: A -- Existing and planned; B -- Possibilities for IPNS upgrade, a 1-MW spallation source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.; Crawford, K.

    1994-12-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) is a pulsed spallation neutron source located at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, Illinois in the US. This facility is the outgrowth of a long line of pioneering work on pulsed spallation neutron sources begun at Argonne in the early 1970s. IPNS uses protons accelerated in the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron to produce neutrons via the spallation process (effectively a nuclear evaporation in which 10--50 neutrons are released per incident proton) in a heavy-element target. These neutrons are then moderated to produce spectra peaked at thermal or subthermal energies, and directed into beams which serve a variety of instruments. This paper discusses the diffractometers, various spectrometers, and reflectometers in existence and those planned for the upgrade of the IPNS.

  13. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C. -K.; Senesi, R.

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10²more » MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.« less

  14. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C. -K.; Senesi, R.

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10² MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.

  15. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  16. Use of PuBe source to simulate neutron-induced single event upsets in static RAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normand, E.; Wert, J.L.; Doherty, W.R.; Oberg, D.L.; Measel, P.R.; Criswell, T.L.

    1988-12-01

    Neutron induced single event upsets were measured in static memory devices using a 10 curie PuBe source. The PuBe source conservatively overestimates the spectrum of fast neutrons emitted by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). For the 93L422, the neutron-induced upset rate compared favorably with calculated values derived using the burst generation concept. By accounting for the production of the ionizing particles by the PuBe and RTG neutron spectra, convenient upper bound SEU upset rates for memory devices near an RTG can be derived.

  17. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  18. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics for the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, M.W.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power accelerator-based pulsed spallation source being designed by a multilaboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the SNS design. The liquid-mercury target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Based on the current design, a three-dimensional CFD model has been developed that includes the stainless steel target structure, the liquid-mercury target flow, and the liquid-mercury cooling jacket that wraps around the nose of the target.

  19. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, David H.; Jongewaard, Erik; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2008-09-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL) requiring extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new type of light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. Therefore a new RF gun or at least the modification of an existing gun was necessary. The parameters listed in Table 1 illustrate the unique characteristics of LCLS which drive the requirements for the electron gun as given in Table 2. The gun beam quality needs to accommodate emittance growth as the beam is travels through approximately one kilometer of linac and two bunch compressors before reaching the undulator. These beam requirements were demonstrated during the recent commissioning runs of the LCLS injector and linac [2] due to the successful design, fabrication, testing and operation of the LCLS gun. The goal of this paper is to relate the technical background of how the gun was able to achieve and in some cases exceed these requirements by understanding and correcting the deficiencies of the prototype s-band RF photocathode gun, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA Gun III. This paper begins with a brief history and technical description of Gun III and the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC, and studies of the gun's RF and emittance compensation solenoid. The work at the GTF identified the gun and solenoid deficiencies, and helped to define the specifications for the LCLS gun. Section 1.1.5 describes the modeling used to compute and correct the gun RF fields and Section 1.1.6 describes the use of these fields in the electron beam simulations. The magnetic design and measurements of

  20. Evaluation of two-stage system for neutron measurement aiming at increase in count rate at Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Fusion Neutronics Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, K. Ochiai, K.; Sukegawa, A.; Ishii, K.; Kitajima, S.; Baba, M.; Sasao, M.

    2014-11-15

    In order to increase the count rate capability of a neutron detection system as a whole, we propose a multi-stage neutron detection system. Experiments to test the effectiveness of this concept were carried out on Fusion Neutronics Source. Comparing four configurations of alignment, it was found that the influence of an anterior stage on a posterior stage was negligible for the pulse height distribution. The two-stage system using 25 mm thickness scintillator was about 1.65 times the count rate capability of a single detector system for d-D neutrons and was about 1.8 times the count rate capability for d-T neutrons. The results suggested that the concept of a multi-stage detection system will work in practice.

  1. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  2. Final Report, Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-antimonide cathodes b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns and copper RF photoguns

  3. Summary of dynamic analyses of the advanced neutron source reactor inner control rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrich, W.R.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the structural dynamic analyses that were instrumental in providing design guidance to the Advanced Neutron source (ANS) inner control element system is presented in this report. The structural analyses and the functional constraints that required certain performance parameters were combined to shape and guide the design effort toward a prediction of successful and reliable control and scram operation to be provided by these inner control rods.

  4. ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

    2000-11-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

  5. A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2010-10-11

    We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

  6. Nanodiamond Foils for H- Stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Related Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L; Harris, Gary; Piazza, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a single nanodiamond foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the entire operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control over film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development

  7. Novel neutralized-beam intense neutron source for fusion technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osher, J.E.; Perkins, L.J.

    1983-07-08

    We describe a neutralized-beam intense neutron source (NBINS) as a relevant application of fusion technology for the type of high-current ion sources and neutral beamlines now being developed for heating and fueling of magnetic-fusion-energy confinement systems. This near-term application would support parallel development of highly reliable steady-state higher-voltage neutral D/sup 0/ and T/sup 0/ beams and provide a relatively inexpensive source of fusion neutrons for materials testing at up to reactor-like wall conditions. Beam-target examples described incude a 50-A mixed D-T total (ions plus neutrals) space-charge-neutralized beam at 120 keV incident on a liquid Li drive-in target, or a 50-A T/sup 0/ + T/sup +/ space-charge-neutralized beam incident on either a LiD or gas D/sub 2/ target with calculated 14-MeV neutron yields of 2 x 10/sup 15//s, 7 x 10/sup 15//s, or 1.6 x 10/sup 16//s, respectively. The severe local heat loading on the target surface is expected to limit the allowed beam focus and minimum target size to greater than or equal to 25 cm/sup 2/.

  8. Neutron light output response and resolution functions in EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Enqvist, Andreas; Lawrence, Christopher C.; Wieger, Brian M.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Massey, Thomas N.

    2013-03-26

    Here, the neutron light output response functions and detector resolution functions were measured at Ohio University's tandem Van de Graaff generator for three cylindrical EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells, having dimensions 12.7(circle divide)-by-12.7, 7.6-by-7.6, and 7.6-by-5.1 cm. A 7.44 MeV deuteron beam was used on an Al-27 target generating a continuous spectrum over the energy range from a few hundred keV to over 10 MeV. The light output response functions are determined using an exponential fit. Detector resolution functions are obtained for the 12.7-by-12.7 and 7.6-by-7.6 cm detectors. It is demonstrated that the dependence on detector size is important for themore » light output response functions, but not to the same extent for the resolution function, even when photomultiplier tubes, detector material, and other detector characteristics are carefully matched.« less

  9. Computational Assessment of Naturally Occurring Neutron and Photon Background Radiation Produced by Extraterrestrial Sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; de Wet, Wouter C.; Patton, Bruce W.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, a computational assessment of the variation in terrestrial neutron and photon background from extraterrestrial sources is presented. The motivation of this assessment is to evaluate the practicality of developing a tool or database to estimate background in real time (or near–real time) during an experimental measurement or to even predict the background for future measurements. The extraterrestrial source focused on during this assessment is naturally occurring galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The MCNP6 transport code was used to perform the computational assessment. However, the GCR source available in MCNP6 was not used. Rather, models developed and maintained bymore » NASA were used to generate the GCR sources. The largest variation in both neutron and photon background spectra was found to be caused by changes in elevation on Earth's surface, which can be as large as an order of magnitude. All other perturbations produced background variations on the order of a factor of 3 or less. The most interesting finding was that ~80% and 50% of terrestrial background neutrons and photons, respectively, are generated by interactions in Earth's surface and other naturally occurring and man-made objects near a detector of particles from extraterrestrial sources and their progeny created in Earth's atmosphere. In conclusion, this assessment shows that it will be difficult to estimate the terrestrial background from extraterrestrial sources without a good understanding of a detector's surroundings. Therefore, estimating or predicting background during a measurement environment like a mobile random search will be difficult.« less

  10. Light-ion production in the interaction of 96 MeV neutrons with carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippawan, U.; Dangtip, S.; Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Gustavsson, C.; Klug, J.; Oesterlund, M.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nilsson, L.; Olsson, N.; Jonsson, O.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Renberg, P.-U.; Corcalciuc, V.; Watanabe, Y.; Koning, A. J.

    2009-06-15

    Double-differential cross sections for light-ion (p, d, t, {sup 3}He, and {alpha}) production in carbon induced by 96 MeV neutrons have been measured at eight laboratory angles from 20 deg. to 160 deg. in steps of 20 deg. Experimental techniques are presented as well as procedures for data taking and data reduction. Deduced energy-differential, angle-differential, and production cross sections are reported. Experimental cross sections are compared with theoretical reaction model calculations and experimental data in the literature. The measured particle data show marked discrepancies from the results of the model calculations in spectral shape and magnitude. The measured production cross sections for protons, deuterons, tritons, {sup 3}He, and {alpha} particles support the trends suggested by data at lower energies.