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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Light in the dark; the new German neutron source FRM-II for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Light in the dark; the new German neutron source FRM-II for science, medicine and industry. Winfried Petry, ZWE FRM-II ...

2

Neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

3

NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Characteristics of neutron radiography at various neutron-energy ranges...Good discrimination between materials, and ready

6

Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Neutron Reaction Rate Measurements, JA Grundl, V. Spiegel, CM Eisenhauer, HT Heaton II, DM Gilliam (NBS), and J. Bigelow (ORNL), Nucl. ...

2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source Spallation Neutron Source Providing the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world... Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has passed another milestone on the way to completion this year--the commissioning of the proton accumulator ring. Brookhaven led the design and construction of the accumulator ring, which will allow an order of magnitude more beam power than any other facility in the world. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by the U.S. Department of Energy. The figure on the right shows a schematic of the accumulator ring and transport beam lines that are being designed and built by Brookhaven

8

Neutron sources and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Spallation Neutron Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D/gim D/gim Spallation Neutron Source SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source. This one-of-a-kind facility pro- vides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. When ramped up to its full beam power of 1.4 MW, SNS will be eight times more powerful than today's best facility. It will give researchers more detailed snapshots of the smallest samples of physical and biological materials than ever before

10

Next Generation Light Source  

Next Generation Light Source Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination High Entry Barrier 71 ...

11

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Spallation Neutron Source | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source SNS site, Spring 2012 The 80-acre SNS site is located on the east end of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron...

14

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: IV: Neutronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has initiated a pre-conceptual design study for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) and given preliminary approval for the...

15

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the lasing medium. 3 figs.

Pappas, D.S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

SNS | Spallation Neutron Source | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS SNS Instruments Working with SNS Contact Us User Program Manager Laura Morris Edwards 865.574.2966 Spallation Neutron Source Home | User Facilities | SNS SNS | Spallation Neutron Source SHARE SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. This one-of-a-kind facility provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. The 80-acre SNS site is located on Chestnut Ridge and is part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Although most people don't know it, neutron scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. For example, things like medicine, food, electronics, and cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a

19

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment addresses the proposed action by the U.S. Department of Energy to upgrade the facilities of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the Accelerator Test Facility and the Source Development Laboratory. The environmental effects of a No-Action Alternative as well as a Proposed Action are evaluated in the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet” link below leads to a one-page summary of the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment” link below leads to the whole 41-page

20

Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F/gim F/gim Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) gives researchers more detailed informa- tion on the structure and dynamics of physical and biological materials than ever before possible. This accelerator- based facility provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. Scien- tists are able to count scattered neutrons, measure their energies and the angles at which they scatter, and map their final positions. SNS enables measurements of greater sensitivity, higher speed, higher resolution, and in more complex sample environments than have been possible at existing neutron facilities. Future Growth SNS was designed from the outset to accommodate a second target station, effectively doubling the capacity of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Research on fusion neutron sources  

SciTech Connect

The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. 'Fusion for Neutrons' (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

Gryaznevich, M. P. [Tokamak Solutions UK, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON, OX133DB (United Kingdom)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report 2001 Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source For the period October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001 Introduction Science Highlights Year in Review Operations Publications Abstracts Nancye Wright & Lydia Rogers The National Synchrotron Light Source Department is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven Science Associates, Inc. Upton, New York 11973 Under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 Mary Anne Corwin Steven N. Ehrlich & Lisa M. Miller Managing Editor Science Editors Production Assistants Cover images (clockwise from top left) 1. from Science Highlight by K.R. Rajashankar, M.R. Chance, S.K. Burley, J. Jiang, S.C. Almo, A. Bresnick, T. Dodatko, R. Huang, G. He,

23

Calibrated Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST designed a compliant source. ... needed for new purposes and as old sources decay ... The figure shows a reprentative energy spectrum from such ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lighting industry is driven to provide light sources and lighting systems that, when properly applied, will produce a suitable luminous environment in which to perform a specified task. Tasks may include everything from office work, manufacturing and inspection to viewing priceless art objects, selecting the right chair for your living room, and deciding which produce item to select for tonight's dinner. While energy efficiency is a major consideration in any new lighting system design, the sacrifice of lighting quality may cost more in terms of lost productivity and user dissatisfaction than can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in filament, fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Manufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved color rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take the form of either increasing lamp efficiency (lumens of light delivered per watt of power consumed) or decreasing lamp size, thus making a more easily controlled light source that places light where it is needed. The manufacturer's second goal is to produce lamps that render colors accurately while maintaining high efficiency. This paper will discuss new introductions in light sources and lighting systems and how they may impact the design of luminous environments of the future.

Krailo, D. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and will be updated as needed. Photon Sciences ESH Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) SOP No. Standard Operating Procedure for: LS-ES-0002 Procedure for Acid Etching of Silicon and Germanium Crystals LS-ESH-0004 NSLS Operations Group Chemical Spill and Gas Release Response LS-ESH-0010 VUV Injection Shutter LOTO LS-ESH-0012 LINAC LOTO LS-ESH-0013 Controlled Access to the VUV Ring LS-ESH-0014 Radiation Safety Interlocks at the National Synchrotron Light Source LS-ESH-0019 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements LS-ESH-0020 Biosafety Requirements at the NSLS LS-ESH-0021 Biosafety Level 2 work at the NSLS/ A Technical Basis LS-ESH-0022 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements

26

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Angle Limit," Phys. Rev. Lett., 99: 134801 (2007). 33 Researchers Produce Firsts with Bursts of Light BNL researchers have generated extremely short pulses of light that are the...

27

Cold Neutron and Ultracold Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Moderators Solid Methane CH 4 CD 4 ... In a cold neutron flux with a continuous spectrum, more neutrons could ... Magneto-vibrational Scatt. + ...

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

28

Advanced Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

29

Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Sources Directorate Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 ii | Vision and Mission Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan The VISION of the Light Sources Directorate is: to be a provider of choice for world-class photon science and facilities that deliver outstanding scientific productivity and impact, and to be recognized as a leader in developing innovative techniques and ap- plications of photon science Our MISSION is defined by the set of activities that are required to realize this vision: to advance scientific knowledge and to solve critical problems through the design, construction, operation, and use of premier photon science facilities | Table of Contents Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan

30

PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 PROGRESS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE PROJECT, IG-0532 When completed, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be...

31

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: I: Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: Session I: Radiation Effects, A. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials Committee Program...

32

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: II: Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: Session II: Radiation Effects, B. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials Committee Program...

33

Advanced Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the generation of artificial light using electric lamps, photometric and color performance have been paramount in lamp design, manufacturing, measurement, lighting design, and visual perception. Many designers and researchers have strived to understand how light and color are generated, related, and to improve them. This has stemmed from the development of incandescent lamps, halogen lamps, linear fluorescent lamps, high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps, and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) among other...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study  

SciTech Connect

A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology.

Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Efficient Light Sources Today  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews new lamp and lighting technology in terms of application and economic impact. Included are the latest advances in High Intensity Discharge systems, energy saving fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and the new state of the art high performance fluorescent systems. Cost analyses will show that typical owning and operating cost reductions of 15 to 65% can be achieved without sacrificing illumination levels when the right system is chosen and properly applied.

Hart, A. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an optimized third generation source not only translatesfirst third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS,of a third-generation synchrotron light source translates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

38

Fourth Generation Light Source Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light Sources October 27 to 29, 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This workshop is being co-hosted by APS, NSLS, SSRL and TJNAF. FGLSlogo This workshop will explore the phenomenology of interactions with ultra-high-power, -brilliance, and -coherence light sources in the DUV, soft x-ray, and x-ray regimes, as well as the scientific opportunities they provide. The workshop will begin with tutorials on the generation and properties of these sources and identify issues in their use in experimentation. Also included will be an overview of current efforts to develop these sources and a review of the scientific opportunities defined by previous research and workshops. These background talks will be followed

39

MATERIALS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES: III: Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both liquid mercury and liquid lead-bismuth eutectic have been proposed as possible target materials for spallation neutron sources. During the 1950's and...

40

Switchable radioactive neutron source device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgrade on the Advanced Light Source," Nucl. Instrum. Meth.n photoemission at the Advanced Light Source," Radit. Phys.high-pressure studies at the Advanced Light Source w i t h a

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

International workshop on cold neutron sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)) [comps.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

-- Why Use Neutrons? -- Neutron Sources -- Continuous vs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Pulsed Sources: -- WNR/PSR LANSCE (Los Alamos). http://lansce.lanl.gov -- SNS (Oak Ridge National Lab). http://www.sns.gov. Page 6. ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Neutron dosimetry at SLAC: Neutron sources and instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes in detail the dosimetric characteristics of the five radioisotopic type neutron sources ({sup 238}PuBe, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 238}PuB, {sup 238}PuF{sub 4}, and {sup 238}PuLi) and the neutron instrumentation (moderated BF{sub 3} detector, Anderson-Braun (AB) detector, AB remmeter, Victoreen 488 Neutron Survey Meter, Beam Shut-Off Ionization Chamber, {sup 12}C plastic scintillator detector, moderated indium foil detector, and moderated and bare TLDs) that are commonly used for neutron dosimetry at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). 36 refs,. 19 figs.

Liu, J.C.; Jenkins, T.M.; McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Cold Neutron Source core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... walls are necessary for the containment of the ... a recombination of radiolysis products is induced in ... Neutrons are produced by fission with energies ...

2009-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. (eds.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

Rothman, Eva

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fission fragment driven neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

Miller, Lowell G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Young, Robert C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Brugger, Robert M. (Columbia, MO)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modulating the Neutron Flux from a Mirror Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 14-MeV neutron source based on a Gas-Dynamic Trap will provide a high flux of 14 MeV neutrons for fusion materials and sub-component testing. In addition to its main goal, the source has potential applications in condensed matter physics and biophysics. In this report, the author considers adding one more capability to the GDT-based neutron source, the modulation of the neutron flux with a desired frequency. The modulation may be an enabling tool for the assessment of the role of non-steady-state effects in fusion devices as well as for high-precision, low-signal basic science experiments favoring the use of the synchronous detection technique. A conclusion is drawn that modulation frequency of up to 1 kHz and modulation amplitude of a few percent is achievable. Limitations on the amplitude of modulations at higher frequencies are discussed.

Ryutov, D D

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Portable Low Energy Neutron Source - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Typically, sources of low energy neutrons are large and immobile, often filling entire rooms. A portable source of low energy neutrons would allow for accurate and ...

51

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the scientific needs into the technical performance requirements. Feedback from these workshops will provide important input for advancing the design of the facility. Workshops are planned in the following areas Fundamental Atomic, Molecular, Optical Physics & Combustion Dynamics Mon. Aug. 20 - Tues. Aug 21, 2012 Physical Chemistry, Catalysis, & Photosynthesis Thurs. Aug. 23 - Fri. Aug 24, 2012 Quantum Materials, Magnetism & Spin Dynamics Mon. Aug. 27 - Tues. Aug 28, 2012 Materials & Bio-imaging at the Nanoscale Thurs. Aug. 30 - Fri. Aug 31, 2012 Further information is available on the workshop website:

52

Aspects of a high intensity neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique methodology for creating a neutron source model was developed for deuterons and protons incident on solid phase beryllium and lithium targets. This model was then validated against experimental results already ...

Chapman, Peter H. (Peter Henry)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

1957-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

incorporating LEDs into tomorrows task lights, to reducing light entrapment within the LED, to fundamental research into how Organic Lighting Emitting Diodes operate. LED and...

55

Science Opportunities at ORNL's Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Neutron Sciences Directorate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates two of the world's most advanced neutron scattering research facilities: the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Our vision is to provide unprecedented capabilities for understanding structure and properties across the spectrum of biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering, and to stay at the leading edge of neutron science by developing new instruments, tools, and services. This talk will provide an update on the operations of the two research facilities and highlight the significant research that is emerging. For example, scientists from ORNL are at the forefront of research on a new class of iron-based superconductors based on experiments performed at the Triple-Axis Spectrometer at HFIR and ARCS at SNS. The complementary nature of neutron and x-ray techniques will be discussed to spark discussion among attendees.

Anderson, Ian [ORNL, SNS

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

NGLS: Next Generation Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo NGLS logo NGLS Science NGLS Technology Seminars Workshop/Reports Related Links Further Info NGLS Facility Combustion Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Today is a golden age for light sources. Storage ring-based synchrotrons routinely provide X-ray beams exploited by thousands of scientists annually to answer fundamental questions in diverse fields including human health, energy, and electronics and information processing. MORE > NGLS Science Science section chart NGLS CD-0 Proposal NGLS Technology Technology section chart Seminars Science section chart Workshops Science section chart Last updated 06/21/2013 Top A U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory Operated by the University

57

The Advanced Light Source Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The ALS, a third-generation synchrotron light source at Berkeley Lab, has been operating for almost a decade and is generating forefront science by exploiting the high brightness of a third-generation source in three areas: (1) high resolving power for spectroscopy; (2) high spatial resolution for microscopy and spectromicroscopy; and (3) high coherence for experiments such as speckle. However, the ALS was one of the first third-generation machines to be designed, and accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since its conception. As a result, its performance will inevitably be outstripped by newer, more advanced sources. To remain competitive and then set a new standard, the performance of the ALS, in particular its brightness, must be enhanced. Substantial improvements in brightness and current have always been feasible in principle, but they incur the penalty of a much reduced lifetime, which is totally unacceptable to our users. Significant brightness improvements can be realized in the core soft x-ray region by going to top-off operation, where injection would be quasi-continuous and the lifetime objections disappear. In top-off mode with higher average current, a reduced vertical emittance and beta function, and small-gap permanent-magnet or superconducting insertion devices, one to two orders of magnitude improvement in brightness can be had in the soft x-ray range. These improvements also extend the high energy range of the undulator radiation beyond the current limit of 2000 eV. Descriptions of the upgrade and the important new science achievable are presented.

Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benjamin; Hussain, Zahid; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

Multi-source solar simulator using single light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, techniques and apparatus are described for adjusting the spectral irradiance characteristics of a light source. The invention is applicable to any light source and has many areas of utility. One example is for simulating solar light for use in testing efficiency of photovoltaic cells. Solar light at any point in the world can be simulated. Also, light having any desired wavelength (or combination of desired wavelengths) can be obtained from a single light source using the techniques and apparatus of the invention. 4 figs.

Emery, K.A.; Osterwald, C.R.

1989-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Secondary electron ion source neutron generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Daryl R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

Carpenter, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Neutron Cross Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the prospect of construction of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL, and the fantastic high neutron flux, new, up to now impossible, experiments seem to be feasible in the fields of applied nuclear physics and astrophysics. These experiments will supply crucial neutron-induced cross section data for radionuclides, which are badly needed by many applied physics programs. The SNS will be uniquely suited for measuring the cross sections of interest to nuclear criticality safety, accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW), and heavy element nucleosynthesis for astrophysics. Because the sample sizes required at current facilities are usually too large for practical measurements, scarce information of these cross sections is available. Using the high neutron flux at the SNS will allow these measurements to be made with samples about 40 times smaller than at the next best facility. The large reduction in sample size at the SNS will result in orders of magnitude reduction in background from the radioactive samples and make them much easier to produce; hence, a much wider range of samples will be accessible for measurement at the SNS than at any other facility.

Guber, K.H.

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

63

Industry Group Learns About Light Source Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry over the past 50 years. General Electric's "Durathon" sodium metal halide battery breakthrough required the use of light sources allowing them to understand the...

64

Characterizations and Diagnostics of Compton Light Source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is a world class Compton light source facility. At the HIGS, a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) (more)

Sun, Changchun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E < 5 meV. The accelerator driven subcritical facility is designed with a provision to add a cryogenically cooled moderator system. This cold neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

66

Physics design of a cold neutron source for KIPT neutron source facility.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. It is based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility with low enriched uranium fuel, using the existing electron accelerators at KIPT of Ukraine [1]. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100-KW electron beam, which has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, with a natural uranium target [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron beam experiments and material studies are also included. Over the past two-three decades, structures with characteristic lengths of 100 {angstrom} and correspondingly smaller vibrational energies have become increasingly important for both science and technology [3]. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructures can be well matched by neutrons with longer vibrational wavelength and lower energy. In the accelerator-driven subcritical facility, most of the neutrons are generated from fission reactions with energy in the MeV range. They are slowed down to the meV energy range through scattering reactions in the moderator and reflector materials. However, the fraction of neutrons with energies less than 5 meV in a normal moderator spectrum is very low because of up-scattering caused by the thermal motion of moderator or reflector molecules. In order to obtain neutrons with energy less than 5 meV, cryogenically cooled moderators 'cold neutron sources' should be used to slow down the neutrons. These cold moderators shift the neutron energy spectrum down because the thermal motion of moderator molecules as well as the up-scattering is very small, which provides large gains in intensity of low energy neutrons, E neutron source could provide the neutrons beams with lower energy, which could be utilized in scattering experiment and material structures analysis. This study describes the performed physics analyses to define and characterize the cold neutron source of the KIPT neutron source facility. The cold neutron source is designed to optimize the cold neutron brightness to the experimental instruments outside the radial heavy concrete shield of the facility. Liquid hydrogen or solid methane with 20 K temperature is used as a cold moderator. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX [4], with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data libraries, is utilized to calculate the cold neutron source performance and estimate the nuclear heat load to the cold moderator. The surface source generation capability of MCNPX code has been used to provide the possibility of analyzing different design configurations and perform design optimization analyses with reasonable computer resources. Several design configurations were analyzed and their performance were characterized and optimized.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Kellogg, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Light production metrics of radiation sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light production by a radiation source is evaluated and reviewed as an important concept of physics from the Black-Body point of view. The mechanical equivalent of the lumen, the unit of perceived light, is explained and evaluated using radiation physics arguments. The existence of an upper limit of luminous efficacy is illustrated for various sources and implications are highlighted.

C. Tannous

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

Manos, Dennis M. (Williamsburg, VA); Diggs, Jessie (Norfolk, VA); Ametepe, Joseph D. (Roanoke, VA)

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

The status of the spallation neutron source ion source  

SciTech Connect

The ion source for the spallation neutron source (SNS) is a radio-frequency, multicusp source designed to deliver 45 mA of H2 to the SNS accelerator with a pulse length of 1 ms and repetition rate of 60 Hz. A total of three ion sources have been fabricated and commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and subsequently delivered to the SNS at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ion sources are currently being rotated between operation on the SNS accelerator, where they are involved in ongoing efforts to commission the SNS LINAC, and the hot spare stand (HSS), where high-current tests are in progress. Commissioning work involves operating the source in a low duty-factor mode (pulse width {approx}200 ms and repetition rate {approx}5 Hz) for extended periods of time while the high-current tests involve source operation at full duty-factor of 6 percent (1 ms/60 Hz). This report discusses routine performance of the source employed in the commissioning role as well as the initial results o f high-current tests performed on the HSS.

Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Keller, R.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

71

Status of the intense pulsed neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IPNS is not unique in having concerns about the level of funding, and the future looks good despite these concerns. This report details the progress made at IPNS during the last two years. Other papers in these proceedings discuss in detail the status of the enriched uranium Booster target, the two instruments that are under construction, GLAD and POSY II, and a proposal for research on an Advanced Pulsed Neutron Source (ASPUN) that has been submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE). Further details on IPNS are available in the IPNS Progress Report 1987--1988, available by writing the IPNS Division Office. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V.; Schulke, A.W.; Worlton, T.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESY) Herman Winick (SLAC) Mike Zisman (LBNL) WHITEPAPERof Future Light Sources A White Paper Report prepared byheart of the all- 24 WHITEPAPER Science and Technology of

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Advanced Light Source: Technical Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wiggler --"" after upgrade / SSRL NSLS bend GeV) 1 eV 10 eVSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which operates two storageBunch Length (ps) Aladdin NSLS (VUV) NSLS (X-ray) SSRL (

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Microwave generated plasma light source apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A microwave generated plasma light source including a microwave generator, a microwave cavity having a light reflecting member forming at least a portion of the cavity, and a member transparent to light and opaque to microwaves disposed across an opening of the cavity opposite the feeding opening through which the microwave generator is coupled. An electrodeless discharge bulb is disposed at a position in the cavity such that the cavity operates as a resonant cavity at least when the bulb is emitting light. In the bulb is encapsulated at least one discharge light emissive substance. The bulb has a shape and is sufficiently small that the bulb acts substantially as a point light source.

Yoshizawa, K.; Ito, H.; Kodama, H.; Komura, H.; Minowa, Y.

1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron 247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source EIS-0247: Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source SUMMARY The United States needs a high-flux, short- pulsed neutron source to provide its scientific and industrial research communities with a much more intense source of pulsed neutrons for neutron scattering research than is currently available. This source would assure the availability of a state-of-the-art neutron research facility in the United States in the decades ahead. This facility would be used to conduct research in areas such as materials science, condensed matter physics, the molecular structure of biological materials, properties of polymers and complex fluids, and magnetism. In addition to creating new scientific and

79

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the gas/oil industry radioactive sources are routinelyreplacement of radioactive sources for oil-well logging withto build a neutron source suit- able for oil-well logging

Persaud, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Application of light emitting diodes as solid state light sources in analytical chemistry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several analytical systems were developed with light emitting diodes (LEDs) as solid state light sources. With an LED as a light source, liquid core waveguide (more)

Eom, In Yong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering 38 mA H beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride AlN plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Fuja, Raymond E [ORNL; Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Lee, Sung-Woo [ORNL; McCarthy, Mike [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Shin, Ki [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Radioactive Neutron Sources Emission Rates (44010C and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Safe handling of neutron sources and the industrial safety aspects are taught through an apprentice-type relationship with each new handler. ...

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O' Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEXT GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE FACILITY AT LBNL * J.N.FEL PERFORMANCE The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is aStudies for a Next Generation Light Source Facility at

Corlett, J.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Roseberry, Ron T [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Linac Coherent Light Source is  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coherent Light Source is Coherent Light Source is a revolution in x-ray science. Just as the invention of x-ray machines a century ago astonishingly revealed the inside of our bodies and began new sciences, the world's first x-ray laser will open up unprecedented opportunities. Pioneering experiments will advance our understand ing of everything from the hidden physics inside planets, to how proteins function as the engines of life, to building nanotechnology devices for the backbone of future industry and technology. The applications are legion: medicine, electronics, biology, solid-state physics, nanotechnology, energy production, industry and fields that do not yet exist. Linac Coherent Light Source New Tools Create New Science The LCLS is dramatically different from any x-ray

88

Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays at several nuclear reactors were created BNCTand intensity. Nuclear reactors as neutron source forsource based on a nuclear reactor [4]. The comparison shows

Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source and a method of operating a light source are provided. The light source includes a pump laser, first and second non-linear optical crystals, a tunable filter, and light pulse directing optics. The method includes the steps of operating the pump laser to generate a pulsed pump beam characterized by a nanosecond pulse duration and arranging the light pulse directing optics so as to (i) split the pulsed pump beam into primary and secondary pump beams; (ii) direct the primary pump beam through an input face of the first non-linear optical crystal such that a primary output beam exits from an output face of the first non-linear optical crystal; (iii) direct the primary output beam through the tunable filter to generate a sculpted seed beam; and direct the sculpted seed beam and the secondary pump beam through an input face of the second non-linear optical crystal such that a secondary output beam characterized by at least one spectral bandwidth on the order of about 0.1 cm.sup.-1 and below exits from an output face of the second non-linear optical crystal.

Powers, Peter E. (Dayton, OH); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

X-Ray Light Sources X-Ray Light Sources Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This activity supports the operation of five DOE light sources. The unique properties of synchrotron radiation include its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and in the case of the Linac Coherent Light Source, high coherence, which makes it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions

91

AFRD - Advanced Light Source Accelerator Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Accelerator Physics ALS Accelerator Physics Home Organization Outreach and Diversity News Highlights Safety Links Intramural FPO Accelerator Physics Group This page and the Group's own site emphasize the continuing effort to improve the performance and versatility of the accelerator-related systems of the ALS. If you want to start with a nontechnical explanation of what synchrotron light is, how scientists use it, and how the Advanced Light Source works, try About the ALS. The research performed using beams from the ALS is a vast topic that spans many scientific disciplines; a good overview with in-depth links is available at the ALS Science Briefs page. The ALS is a “” synchrotron light source based on a low-emittance electron storage ring with a nominal energy of 1.9 GeV. Since the machine

92

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

One of the first third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS, has been operating for almost a decade at Berkeley Lab, where experimenters have been exploiting its high brightness for forefront science. However, accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since the ALS was designed. As a result, the performance of the ALS is in danger of being eclipsed by that of newer, more advanced sources. The ALS upgrade that we are planning includes full-energy, top-off injection with higher storage-ring current and the replacement of five first-generation insertion devices with nine state-of-the art insertion devices and four new application-specific beamlines now being identified in a strategic planning process. The upgrade will help keep the ALS at the forefront of soft x-ray synchrotron light sources for the next two decades.

Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benedict; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz,Janos; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson,Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

XAFS at the Canadian Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canadian Light Source Hard X-ray Micro-Analysis Beamline (HXMA, 06ID-1) is a hard X-ray spectroscopy beamline currently under commissioning. The source of the beamline is a superconducting wiggler covering 5 to 40 keV. The primary optics include a cryogenically cooled double crystal monochromator (Si 111 and 220), white beam vertical collimating and toroidal focusing mirrors. End station experimental capabilities include XAFS (Ge solid state detectors), microprobe (Kirkpatrick-Baez murors, Ge solid state detector and image plate area detector), and diffraction (Huber psi-8 and powder diffraction setups, with diamond anvil cell high pressure sample environment). Commissioning status for the XAFS capabilities is described.

Jiang, D. T. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Chen, N. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Zhang, L.; Malgorzata, K. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wright, G.; Igarashi, R.; Beauregard, D.; Kirkham, M.; McKibben, M. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

95

Linac Coherent Light SourCe  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linac Linac Coherent Light SourCe after the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (now the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) developed its two- mile-long linear accelerator (linac), it received approval from the Department of Energy to construct the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first free electron laser (FEL) facility that would be able to produce x-rays short and bright enough that individual molecules could be imaged in their natural states. 40 years Genesis of the idea In 1992, Dr. Claudio Pellegrini, a professor at UCLA, first developed a proposal for a facility that would eventually become LCLS. The idea generated interest within the scientific community, and a design study report conducted by SLAC in the late 1990s led to the first

96

Summary of alpha-neutron sources in GADRAS.  

SciTech Connect

A common source of neutrons for calibration and testing is alpha-neutron material, named for the alpha-neutron nuclear reaction that occurs within. This material contains a long-lived alpha-emitter and a lighter target element. When the alpha particle from the emitter is absorbed by the target, neutrons and gamma rays are released. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) includes built-in alpha-neutron source definitions for AcC, AmB, AmBe, AmF, AmLi, CmC, and PuC. In addition, GADRAS users may create their own alpha-neutron sources by placing valid alpha-emitters and target elements in materials within their one-dimensional models (1DModel). GADRAS has the ability to use pre-built alpha-neutron sources for plotting or as trace-sources in 1D models. In addition, if any material (existing or user-defined) specified in a 1D model contains both an alpha emitter in conjunction with a target nuclide, or there is an interface between such materials, then the appropriate neutron-emission rate from the alpha-neutron reaction will be computed. The gamma-emissions from these sources are also computed, but are limited to a subset of nine target nuclides. If a user has experimental data to contribute to the alpha-neutron gamma emission database, it may be added directly or submitted to the GADRAS developers for inclusion. The gadras.exe.config file will be replaced when GADRAS updates are installed, so sending the information to the GADRAS developers is the preferred method for updating the database. This is also preferable because it enables other users to benefit from your efforts.

Mitchell, Dean James; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

New LED light sources and lamps for general illumination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light source compared to traditional light sources like incandescent bulbs and fluorescent tubes bulb. LEDs emit colored light with a narrow spectral band of 20-30 nm, colors covering the spectralNew LED light sources and lamps for general illumination Carsten Dam-Hansen, Birgitte Thestrup

98

Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications  

SciTech Connect

A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: LED Task Light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light The goal of this project is to accelerate the use of energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp...

100

January 16, 2009: Expansion of Spallation Neutron Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

January 16, 2009The Department gives its initial approval to begin plans for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to build a second target station for the Spallation Neutron Source, expanding...

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101

The JLab high power ERL light source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source.

G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

102

Neutronic Design Calculations on Moderators for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide an intense source of neutrons for a large variety of experiments. It consists of a high-energy (1-GeV) and high-power ({approximately}1-MW) proton accelerator, an accumulator ring, together with a target station and an experimental area. In the target itself, the proton beam will produce neutrons via the spallation process and these will be converted to low-energy (<2-eV) neutrons in moderators located close to the target. Current plans are to have two liquid-hydrogen (20-K) moderators and two room-temperature H{sub 2}O moderators. Extensive engineering design work has been conducted on the moderator vessels. For our studies we have produced realistic neutronic representations of these moderators. We report on neutronic studies conducted on these representations of the moderators using Monte Carlo simulation techniques.

Murphy, D.B.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Plasma-based EUV light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

104

Plasma-based EUV light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

105

Instrument and Source Design Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ron Crone, RRD Director Ron Crone, RRD Director ISDD Director Ron Crone. Instrument and Source Design Division The Instrument and Source Design Division (ISDD) supports the engineering and development of scientific instruments at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. ISDD continuously develops facilities and capabilities associated with neutron science through research and development. Organization Chart A PDF version of the ISDD Organization Chart is available. Key Division Contacts Director Ron Crone Administrative Assistant Wendy Brooks HFIR Instrument Engineering Doug Selby SNS Instrument Engineering David Vandergriff Instrumentation Projects and Development Ken Herwig Project Management/Operations and Analysis Barbara Thibadeau Source Development and Engineering Analysis Phil Ferguson

106

SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to the LCLS User Resources Site Welcome to the LCLS User Resources Site User Portal | Agreements | Data Collection & Analysis | Logistics | Policies | Proposals | Safety | Schedules | Shipping The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) encourages scientists from diverse fields to submit proposals for experiments that utilize the LCLS's unique capabilities. Interested scientists are encouraged to learn more about the latest developments by contacting LCLS staff scientists and by reviewing the instrument descriptions. Step-By-Step Instructions to Working at LCLS Review LCLS Policies Review Machine FAQ & Parameters Register and Submit Proposals Confirm User Agreement Reserve Accommodations Complete Safety Training Request Computer Account Establish User Account Ship Samples/Equipment Review Check-in Procedures

107

Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

108

Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Argonne Committees and Contacts diamond Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources May 5 and 6, 2011 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory Room 401A1100...

109

Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

Vujic, J L; Greenspan, E; Guess, S; Karni, Y; Kastenber, W E; Kim, L; Leung, K N; Regev, D; Verbeke, J M; Waldron, W L; Zhu, Y

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

Graves, Van B [ORNL; Dayton, Michael J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

LOW VOLTAGE 14 Mev NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus yielding high-energy neutrons at the rate of 10/sup 8/ or more per second by the D,T or D,D reactions is described. The deuterium gas filling is ionized by electrons emitted from a filament, and the resulting ions are focused into a beam and accelerated against a fixed target. The apparatus is built in accordance with the relationship V/sub s/ = A--B log pd, where V/sub s/ is the sparking voltage, p the gas pressure, and d the gap length between the high voltage electrodes. Typical parameters to obtain the high neutron yields are 55 to 80 kv, 0.5 to 7.0 ma beam current, 5 to 12 microns D/sub 2/, and a gap length of 1 centimeter.

Little, R.N. Jr.; Graves, E.R.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of an LED reference light source for calibration of radiographic imaging detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stable reference light source based on an LED (Light Emission Diode) is presented for stabilizing the conversion gain of the opto-electronic system of a gamma- and fast-neutron radiographic and tomographic imaging device. A constant fraction of the LED light is transported to the image plane of the camera and provides a stable reference exposure. This is used to normalize the images during off-line image processing. We have investigated parameters influencing the stability of LEDs and developed procedures and criteria to prepare and select LEDs suitable for delivering stable light outputs for several 100 h of operation.

Weierganz, M; Bromberger, B; Dangendorf, V; Feldman, G; Goldberg, M B; Lindemann, M; Mor, I; Tittelmeier, K; Vartsky, D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Development of an LED reference light source for calibration of radiographic imaging detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stable reference light source based on an LED (Light Emission Diode) is presented for stabilizing the conversion gain of the opto-electronic system of a gamma- and fast-neutron radiographic and tomographic imaging device. A constant fraction of the LED light is transported to the image plane of the camera and provides a stable reference exposure. This is used to normalize the images during off-line image processing. We have investigated parameters influencing the stability of LEDs and developed procedures and criteria to prepare and select LEDs suitable for delivering stable light outputs for several 100 h of operation.

M. Weierganz; D. Bar; B. Bromberger; V. Dangendorf; G. Feldman; M. B. Goldberg; M. Lindemann; I. Mor; K. Tittelmeier; D. Vartsky

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Can Handheld Plastic Detectors Do Both Gamma and Neutron Isotopic Identification with Directional Source Location?  

SciTech Connect

This paper demonstrates, through MCNPX simulations, that a compact hexagonal array of detectors can be utilized to do both gamma isotopic identification (ID) along with neutron identification while simultaneously finding the direction of the source relative to the detector array. The detector array itself is composed of seven borated polyvinyl toluene (PVT) hexagonal light pipes approximately 4 inches long and with a 1.25 inch face-to-face thickness assembled in a tight configuration. The gamma ID capability is realized through judicious windowing algorithms as is the neutron spectral unfolding. By having multiple detectors in different relative positions, directional determination of the source can be realized. By further adding multiplicity counters to the neutron counts, fission events can be measured.

Robert Hayes

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER  

SciTech Connect

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Walker, C. [ITER Joint Central Team, Garching (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Subcritical Neutron Multiplication Measurements of HEU Using Delayed Neutrons as the Driving Source  

SciTech Connect

A new method for the determination of the multiplication of highly enriched uranium systems is presented. The method uses delayed neutrons to drive the HEU system. These delayed neutrons are from fission events induced by a pulsed 14-MeV neutron source. Between pulses, neutrons are detected within a medium efficiency neutron detector using {sup 3}He ionization tubes within polyethylene enclosures. The neutron detection times are recorded relative to the initiation of the 14-MeV neutron pulse, and subsequently analyzed with the Feynman reduced variance method to extract singles, doubles and triples neutron counting rates. Measurements have been made on a set of nested hollow spheres of 93% enriched uranium, with mass values from 3.86 kg to 21.48 kg. The singles, doubles and triples counting rates for each uranium system are compared to calculations from point kinetics models of neutron multiplicity to assign multiplication values. These multiplication values are compared to those from MC NP K-Code calculations.

Hollas, C.L.; Goulding, C.A.; Myers, W.L.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report  

SciTech Connect

Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work explaining how one class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses.

Nasta,K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Proton Driver Linac for the Frankfurt Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Frankfurt Neutron Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum (FRANZ) will deliver high neutron fluxes in the energy range of 1 to 500 keV. The Activation Mode provides a high averaged neutron flux created by a cw proton beam of up to 5 mA, while in the Compressor Mode intense neutron pulses of 1 ns length are formed with a repetition rate of up to 250 kHz. The Compressor Mode is well-suited for energy-dependent neutron capture measurements using the Time-of-Flight method in combination with a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector array. The design of the proton driver linac for both operation modes is presented. This includes the volume type ion source, the ExB chopper located in the low energy section, the RFQ-IH combination for beam acceleration and the bunch compressor. Finally, the neutron production at the lithium-7 target and the resulting energy spectrum is described.

Wiesner, C.; Chau, L. P.; Dinter, H.; Droba, M.; Heilmann, M.; Joshi, N.; Maeder, D.; Metz, A.; Meusel, O.; Noll, D.; Podlech, H.; Ratzinger, U.; Reichau, H.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schweizer, W.; Volk, K.; Wagner, C. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Reifarth, R. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Mueller, I.

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The LDLR crystals,Director for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and Steven

Duque editor, Theresa; Greiner editor, Annette; Moxon editor, Elizabeth; Robinson editor, Arthur; Tamura editor, Lori

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

New Electronic Light Sources for Sustainability in a Greener Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the product areaselectronic linear fluorescent, electronic compact fluorescent, electronic high-intensity discharge (HID), and light-emitting diode (LED). This year, a new type of light sourcesolid-state plasma lighting (a miniature HID technology)was assessed. This project demonstrates how light sources are making their way into new designs providing new types of light fixtures. A total of seven products w...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, James L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: HID Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Systems Evaluation of Electronic Ballasts and Related Controls for HID Lighting Systems Objective HID ballast The goal of this project is to evaluate the potential of electronic ballasts and related controls for HID lighting systems to improve the efficiency of current technology. The specific objectives of this project are to: Test, analyze and determine the potential of electronic ballasts for HID lighting systems in cooperation with manufacturers as an emerging energy efficient technology to reduce lighting loads in commercial, industrial and municipal applications. Identify control strategies to further improve the energy efficiency of these systems with a municipal partner. Provide appropriate recommendations for incorporating these technologies into current state codes and regulations.

125

Residual stress measurement using the pulsed neutron source at LANSCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can make spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in the crystalline interplanar spacing, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all the lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement which allows anisotropic effects to be studied. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr Neutron Scattering Centre (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Holden, T.M. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Timing system of the Swiss Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The timing system of the Swiss Light Source is based on the event system concept of APS, Argonne [1]. However, for SLS the hardware was completely redesigned while preserving the software compatibility with the APS system. This gave us a head start in the implementation: we could use the latest available hardware and take advantage of the features integrated in the EPICS software. The event system is used as the sole timing distribution method, for hardware trigger delivery (assisted with a high-precision delay at a few places) and for controlling all the timing-related tasks of operation: injector sequencing, filling patterns, software synchronization, timestamps and so on. The event network is also extended to the beamlines to allow synchronization of the beamline experiments. The implementation consists of the hardware (Gigabit Ethernet link, FPGAs) and a firmware core written in VHDL. The functionality of the cards can be modified in situ by rewriting the firmware in flash memory. On the other hand, the f...

Korhonen, T T; Korhonen, Timo; Heiniger, Martin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NIST Light Source Illuminates Fusion Power Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Their measurement tool also is used in incandescent light bulbsit's the element tungsten. Published with permission of ITER. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3) high-temperature superconducting materials that carry electricity with no loss for efficient power transmission lines; and (4) materials for solid-state lighting with half of the present power consumption. Excitement about NSLS-II is evident in many ways, most notably the extraordinary response we had to the 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the anticipated 60 or more beamlines that NSLS-II will ultimately host. A total of 54 proposals were submitted and, after extensive review, 34 were approved. Funding from both the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health has already been secured to support the design and construction of a number of these beamlines. FY11 is a challenging and exciting year for the NSLS-II Project as we reach the peak of our construction activity. We remain on track to complete the project by March 2014, a full 15 months ahead of schedule and with even more capabilities than originally planned. The Photon Sciences Directorate is well on its way to fulfilling our vision of being a provider of choice for world-class photon sciences and facilities.

Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss opportunities for a neutrino program at the Spallation Neutrons Source (SNS) being commissioning at ORNL. Possible investigations can include study of neutrino-nuclear cross sections in the energy rage important for supernova dynamics and neutrino nucleosynthesis, search for neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, and various tests of the standard model of electro-weak interactions.

Yu Efremenko; W R Hix

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

130

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Light Source Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALITE) research program is aimed at breakthrough basic research to achieve approximately 150 to 200 lumens per watt for fluorescent light sources, and to increase high intensity discharge light source efficiency by up to 50%. This report describes work on high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. These commercially available lamps currently have efficacies up to 120 lumens per watt (LPW), and radiate approximately 36% of their energy in the visible spectrum and 53% in the infrared ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Laser Probing of Neutron-Rich Nuclei in Light Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron-rich 6He and 8He isotopes exhibit an exotic nuclear structure that consists of a tightly bound 4He-like core with additional neutrons orbiting at a relatively large distance, forming a halo. Recent experimental efforts have succeeded in laser trapping and cooling these short-lived, rare helium atoms, and have measured the atomic isotope shifts along the 4He-6He-8He chain by performing laser spectroscopy on individual trapped atoms. Meanwhile, the few-electron atomic structure theory, including relativistic and QED corrections, has reached a comparable degree of accuracy in the calculation of the isotope shifts. In parallel efforts, also by measuring atomic isotope shifts, the nuclear charge radii of lithium and beryllium isotopes have been studied. The techniques employed were resonance ionization spectroscopy on neutral, thermal lithium atoms and collinear laser spectroscopy on beryllium ions. Combining advances in both atomic theory and laser spectroscopy, the charge radii of these light halo nuclei have now been determined for the first time independent of nuclear structure models. The results are compared with the values predicted by a number of nuclear structure calculations, and are used to guide our understanding of the nuclear forces in the extremely neutron-rich environment.

Z. -T. Lu; P. Mueller; G. W. F. Drake; W. Noertershaeuser; Steven C. Pieper; Z. -C. Yan

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

The European Spallation Source Getting the "Green" Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Spallation Source Getting the "Green" Light. ... Location: 10:30 am, Green Auditorium, Gaithersburg, VTC to Boulder in Room 4511. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source | 2010...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 Beamline Development Proposals - Results NSLS-II Rendering The 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the National Synchrotron Light Source II yielded 54...

134

lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light Source Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and light source users and facilities. News is a broadthe Department of Energys user facilities have establisheda National User Facility Organization consisting of user

Robinson, Art

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Science and Instrumentation for the Linac Coherent Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Instrumentation for the Linac Coherent Light Source WB00852.GIF (317 bytes) Where: SLAC Panofsky Auditorium When: Friday, October 15, 1999 (1:30 pm) Saturday,...

136

Design of a High Intensity Neutron Source for Neutron-Induced Fission Yield Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upgraded IGISOL facility with JYFLTRAP, at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyv\\"askyl\\"a, has been supplied with a new cyclotron which will provide protons of the order of 100 {\\mu}A with up to 30 MeV energy, or deuterons with half the energy and intensity. This makes it an ideal place for measurements of neutron-induced fission products from various actinides, in view of proposed future nuclear fuel cycles. The groups at Uppsala University and University of Jyv\\"askyl\\"a are working on the design of a neutron converter that will be used as neutron source in fission yield studies. The design is based on simulations with Monte Carlo codes and a benchmark measurement that was recently performed at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. In order to obtain a competitive count rate the fission targets will be placed very close to the neutron converter. The goal is to have a flexible design that will enable the use of neutron fields with different energy distributions. In the present paper, some considerations for the design of the neutron converter will be discussed, together with different scenarios for which fission targets and neutron energies to focus on.

M. Lantz; D. Gorelov; A. Jokinen; V. S. Kolhinen; A. Mattera; H. Penttil; S. Pomp; V. Rakopoulos; S. Rinta-Antila; A. Solders

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

James R. Boyce

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

140

Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

Reed, Scott (Albuquerue, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerue, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerue, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerue, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Beamlines NSLS-II Ring Schematic The National Synchrotron Light Source II will accommodate at least 58 beamlines using 27 straight sections for insertion-device sources and...

142

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: OLED's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information For more information on this project, please contact: Steve Johnson Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4274 SGJohnson@lbl.gov Sponsor Information This project is...

143

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: Charge Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information For more information on this project, please contact: Steve Johnson Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4274 SGJohnson@lbl.gov Sponsor Information This project is...

144

Performance of the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility has now been operating in a routine way for outside users since November 1, 1981. From that date through December of 1982, the accelerator system was scheduled for neutron science for 4500 hours. During this time the accelerator achieved its short-term goals by delivering about 380,000,000 pulses of beam totaling over 6 x 10/sup 20/ protons. The changes in equipment and operating practices that evolved during this period of intense running are described. The intensity related instability threshold was increased by a factor of two and the accelerator beam current has been ion source limited. Plans to increase the accelerator intensity are also described. Initial operating results with a new H/sup -/ ion source are discussed.

Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' March 22, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Kendra Snyder This month, workers at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), the half-mile electron racetrack for one of the world's most advanced light sources, will begin filling the facility's steel and concrete shell. In 2015, NSLS-II will open its doors - and its ultra-bright beams of x-ray, infrared and ultraviolet light - to thousands of researchers around the world, enabling the detailed exploration of everything from

146

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' March 22, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Kendra Snyder This month, workers at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), the half-mile electron racetrack for one of the world's most advanced light sources, will begin filling the facility's steel and concrete shell. In 2015, NSLS-II will open its doors - and its ultra-bright beams of x-ray, infrared and ultraviolet light - to thousands of researchers around the world, enabling the detailed exploration of everything from

147

National Synchrotron Light Source: vacuum system for National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a 24 million dollar project under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is a research facility dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron radiation is that radiation produced by the acceleration of charged particles at near the speed of light. This facility will provide a continuous spectrum of radiation from the vacuum ultraviolet to the hard x-ray range. The radiation will be highly intense, 100% polarized, extremely well collimated and will have a pulsed time structure. The radiation will be produced in two electron storage rings at energies of 700 MeV and 2.5 GeV, respectively. A maximum of one ampere at 2 GeV, or one-half ampere at 2.5 GeV, of electron beam will be stored.

Schuchman, J.C.; Godel, J.B.; Jordan, W.; Oversluizen, T.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Web Site about the International Light Source Community  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Web Site about the International Light Source Community A Web Site about the International Light Source Community On February 17, 2005, the international light source community, including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, launched the first website dedicated to providing the media, general public, and scientific community with the latest news and information about and from the world's accelerator-driven light sources (synchrotrons and free-electron lasers) and about the science carried out by users of these facilities. The web site - www.lightsources.org - was developed and is jointly maintained by the lightsource.org Collaboration, whose members represent the world's light source facilities in Europe, North America, and Asia. Support for the project is provided by science funding agencies of many

149

A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 monolayers of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10^9 to 10^10 n/cm^2 of tip array area.

Reichenbach, Birk; Schwoebel, P R; 10.1063/1.2913331

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for materials research  

SciTech Connect

When completed in 2006, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will use an accelerator to produce the most intense beams of pulsed neutrons in the world. This unique facility is being built by a collaboration of six US Department of Energy laboratories and will serve a diverse community of users drawn from academia, industry, and government labs. The project continues on schedule and within budget, with commissioning and installation of all systems going well. Installation of 14 state-of-the-art instruments is under way, and design work is being completed for several others. These new instruments will enable inelastic and elastic-scattering measurements across a broad range of science such as condensed-matter physics, chemistry, engineering materials, biology, and beyond. Neutron Science at SNS will be complemented by research opportunities at several other facilities under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mason, Thom [ORNL; Anderson, Ian S [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Hodges, Jason P [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Horton, Linda L [ORNL; Klose, Frank Richard [ORNL; Mesecar, Andrew D. [University of Illinois, Chicago; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Ohl, M. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A status report on the Advanced Neutron Source Project  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be a new laboratory for neutron research, centered around a 330 MW(f) research reactor cooled and reflected by heavy water and including extensive experiment systems and support facilities. The major components of the baseline design, occupying about 16 heetares, are a guide hall/research support area, containing most of the neutron beam experiment systems, shops and supporting laboratories; a 60 m diameter containment building housing the reactor and its primary coolant system, and selected scientific research facilities; an operations support building with the majority of the remaining plant systems; an office/interface complex providing a carefully designed, user friendly entry point for access control; and several other major facilities including user housing, an electrical substation, a diesel generator building, a cryorefrigerator building, and heavy water cleanup and upgrade systems.

West, C.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dense Plasma Focus Fusion Neutron Sources Progress at NSTec, September 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of dense plasma focus (DPF) sources are introduced, including their operating characteristics and current activities. Neutron resonance spectroscopy is discussed and the feasibility of using DPF for neutron sources is considered.

Hagen, E. C.

2011-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Canadian Light Source (with groups at the APS and NSLS, the ALS has pioneered some

Tamura, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Phase I MX Beamlines at Diamond Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, I02, I03 and I04 at Diamond Light Source are presented. These beamlines formed the life science component of Phase 1 of Diamond Light Source. The article provides details of the design and the current status of the beamlines.

Duke, E. M. H.; Evans, G.; Flaig, R.; Hall, D. R.; Latchem, M.; McAuley, K. E.; Sandy, D. J.; Sorensen, T. L-M.; Waterman, D.; Johnson, L. N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michigan University and ALS), J.D. Bozek and G.D. Ackerman (Shining light on met als in the environment," EleinentsStray field reduc tion of als eddy current septum magnets,"

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.

Nause, Jeff E; Ferguson, Ian; Doolittle, Alan

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Linac Coherent Light Source Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linac Coherent Light Source Overview Linac Coherent Light Source Overview Linac Coherent Light Source Overview Addthis Description Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall. Duration 5:50 Topic Physics Credit Energy Department Video MR. : The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is located in the heart of California's beautiful San Francisco Bay Area. Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy, SLAC has been home to the world's longest particle accelerator for nearly 50 years. In 2009 SLAC ushered in a new era in its long history of physics research with a new kind of laser called the Linac Coherent Light Source, or LCLS. The LCLS is the first laser in the world to produce hard X-rays, which can

158

Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, powerful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia.

Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Control System Availability for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is continuing its ramp up of beam power, while simultaneously increasing production hours and striving for reduced unplanned downtime. For the large, highly-distributed EPICS-based control system of the SNS, this demand for increased availability is combined with the need for ongoing system maintenance, upgrades and improvements. Causes of recent control system related downtime will be reviewed along with experiences in addressing the competing needs of availability and system improvements.

Hartman, Steven M [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

Galambos, John D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: OLED Cathodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OLED Cathodes OLED Cathodes Development of New Cathodes for OLED's Objective The objective of this project is to develop improved cathodes for use in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Approach A major challenge for organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology is to improve electron injection into the organic electroluminescent layer, which limits the efficiency of the device and the luminous flux per unit area. This project aims at overcoming such barriers by developing “structured cathodes” based on functional materials (nanotubes and nanoclusters) with characteristic size smaller than the optical wavelength. The incorporation of such nanostructured cathodes in OLEDs can significantly improve device efficiency by lowering operating voltage, and increase device stability and light extraction.

162

The advanced neutron source research and development plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 {center_dot} 10{sup 19} {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} s{sup -1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R&D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R&D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R&D program will focus on the four objectives described.

Selby, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ulyanov Street, Nizhny Novgorod 603950, Russia I. Y. Dodin and N. J particles could not travel faster than light. Hence, the final energy is estimated from Eq. 52 as a -1 Research through Grant No. 08-02-01209-a and the NNSA under the SSAA Program through DOE Research un- der

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

164

Photon Sciences | About the National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Source NSLS One of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is host each year to 2,400 researchers from more than 400 universities, laboratories, and companies. Research conducted at the NSLS has yielded advances in biology, physics, chemistry, geophysics, medicine, and materials science. Synchrotron light is produced by electrons when they are forced to move in a curved path at nearly the speed of light. At the NSLS, beams of light in the x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared wavelengths are produced by two synchrotrons for use in experiments. Powerful Light, Diverse Research Since the intensity of synchrotron light can be 10,000 times greater than conventional beams generated in a laboratory, scientists can use these

165

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation storage ring NSLS, the third-generation storageto be commissioned in 2009, and NSLS-II, an advanced third-storage ring sources. NSLS-II will extend this range down to

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the construction of LCLS, the first hard x-ray laser, towith storage-ring sources and LCLS will extend this down todown to sub-microseconds and LCLS will cover the range from

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NSLS remains a viable and productive facility, as can be seen by the rich and diverse science produced in 2004. In one of these exciting research projects published in Nature, researchers detected a rare 'hole crystal' in a cuprate superconductor, which may provide insight into high-temperature superconductivity. In another Nature publication, the crystal structure of a segment of RNA was determined, opening a new window of knowledge into that crucial molecule. These are just a couple of the science highlights of 2004, and many others are displayed in the pages of this report. All told, more than 700 publications resulted from NSLS research this year, the facility hosted 2,299 users, and the number of experiments performed rose from 1,145 in 2003 to 1,374 nuclear indications that the NSLS continues to thrive. As the NSLS accelerator complex enters its third decade of operations, it continues to perform very well. For 2004, the overall reliability of the VUV-IR ring was excellent at 99 percent. The reliability of the x-ray ring was just shy of 92 percent, primarily due to the need to replace the injection septum vacuum chamber, which developed a leak during the middle of the year. The Operations Division did a tremendous job of installing our spare chamber in minimal time, despite the complexity of the job and the inaccessibility of its location in the ring, as well as keeping downtime to a minimum throughout the rest of the year. In order to continue to meet the needs of users, several key beamline upgrades took place this year that will enrich our scientific programs, including upgrades to beamlines U12IR, X1A, X13A, and X21. We are very excited about two brand-new beamlines that were commissioned in 2004: X29 and X27A. X29 is the new mini-gap undulator beamline designed for macromolecular crystallography, and it will meet the growing demand of NSLS users who perform research in that area. The establishment of an x-ray microprobe at beamline X27A, optimized for the environmental science community, is also very important, as it will help to satisfy the large over subscription rate for this technique at the NSLS. Two other important upgrades that were initiated this past year are the replacement of the X25 wiggler with an undulator and the construction of the X9 undulator beamline for small-angle scattering, with an emphasis on nanoscience research. Another key activity that will benefit all users was the restoration of the x-ray ring lattice symmetry, which reduced the horizontal emittance and made the operational lattice more robust. Similarly, all users will benefit from the introduction of the PASS (Proposal Allocation Safety Scheduling) system this past year, which has greatly improved the process of proposal submission, review, allocation, and scheduling. This coming year we will work to add Rapid Access to the capabilities of PASS. Overall, the success of these and the many other projects that space does not permit listing is a testament to the dedication, hard work, and skill of the NSLS staff. Safety has always been an important issue at a large, complex scientific facility like the NSLS and in 2004 it received renewed attention. Safety is our highest priority and we spent a great deal of time reviewing and refining our safety practices and procedures. A new 'Safety Highlights' web page was created for safety news, and a large number of safety meetings and discussions were held. These reviews and meetings generated many ideas on how the NSLS might improve its safety practices, and we are committed to putting these in place and improving our already very good safety program. We had no lost-time accidents in 2004, which is a notable accomplishment. Our goal is to be best in class and I'm confident that by working together we can achieve that status. Several activities took place this past year to advance our proposal to replace the NSLS with a new National Synchrotron Light Source-II facility. These included a major workshop in support of the proposed facility in March, a mail review of our proposal outlinin

MILLER,L.; (EDITOR)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was provided thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

ROTHMAN,E.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The continued development of the Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to ensure that the SNS will meet its operational commitments as well as provide for future facility upgrades with high reliability, we are developing a rf-driven, H{sup -} ion source based on a water-cooled, ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber. To date, early versions of this source have delivered up to 42 mA to the SNS front end and unanalyzed beam currents up to {approx}100 mA (60 Hz, 1 ms) to the ion source test stand. This source was operated on the SNS accelerator from February to April 2009 and produced {approx}35 mA (beam current required by the ramp up plan) with availability of {approx}97%. During this run several ion source failures identified reliability issues, which must be addressed before the source re-enters production: plasma ignition, antenna lifetime, magnet cooling, and cooling jacket integrity. This report discusses these issues, details proposed engineering solutions, and notes progress to date.

Welton, R. F.; Carmichael, J.; Fuga, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Han, B.; Kang, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T.; Potter, K. G.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6471 (United States); Desai, N. J. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

SNS/BNL Diagnostics System Group, Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS/BNL Diagnostics System Group SNS/BNL Diagnostics System Group Homepage The Spallation Neutron Source project is a collaboration between six national laboratories of the United states to build a Mega Watt neutrons source driven by a proton accelerator. The complex is going to be build in Oak Ridge (Tennessee) and consists of a full energy (1 Gev) linac, an accumulator ring and a mercury target with several instruments for neutron scattering. Information on the project can be found at http://www.sns.gov. At Brookhaven National Laboratory we work mainly on the accumulator ring and transfer lines diagnostics (HEBT, Ring, RTBT). Some of the systems are SNS-wide ie: the Beam Loss Monitor system and Beam Current Monitor system. In addition our group provides parts of other systems to our partner laboratories. Our group is part or the Collider Accelerator Division that is also in charge of RHIC and the AGS complex. If you are looking for information on a particular topic you can contact the persons working on it.

171

Neutron source in the MCNPX shielding calculating for electron accelerator driven facility  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of an experimental neutron source facility. It is an accelerator driven system (ADS) utilizing a subcritical assembly driven by electron accelerator. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as a design tool due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the facility shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. A method, based on generating and utilizing neutron source file, was proposed and tested. This method reduces significantly the required computer resources and improves the statistics of the calculated neutron dose outside the shield boundary. However the statistical errors introduced by generating the neutron source were not directly represented in the results, questioning the validity of this methodology, because an insufficiently sampled neutron source can cause error on the calculated neutron dose. This paper presents a procedure for the validation of the generated neutron source file. The impact of neutron source statistic on the neutron dose is examined by calculating the neutron dose as a function of the number of electron particles used for generating the neutron source files. When the value of the calculated neutron dose converges, it means the neutron source has scored sufficient records and statistic does not have apparent impact on the calculated neutron dose. In this way, the validity of neutron source and the shield analyses could be verified. (authors)

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y. [Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (ALS, LBL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed toas a third-generation synchrotron radiation source, that is,latest generation of synchrotron light sources, l extremely

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A SEARCH FOR POINT SOURCES OF EeV NEUTRONS  

SciTech Connect

A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90 Degree-Sign to +15 Degree-Sign in declination using four different energy ranges above 1 EeV (10{sup 18} eV). The method used in this search is more sensitive to neutrons than to photons. The upper limit on a neutron flux is derived for a dense grid of directions for each of the four energy ranges. These results constrain scenarios for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez Castillo, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [IFGW, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress...

176

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Linac Coherent Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCLS - Linac Coherent Light Source Banner image of LCLS undulator hall. LCLS, the world's first hard X-ray free-electron laser, pushes science to new extremes with ultrabright,...

177

Status report on the Advanced Light Source control system  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a status report on the ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) control system. The current status, performance data, and future plans will be discussed. Manpower, scheduling, and costs issues are addressed.

Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.; Young, J.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

HIGH INTENSITY LIGHT SOURCES (Part II of Thesis)  

SciTech Connect

A stable carbon arc operated in controlled atmosphere is described. The arc was designed to serve as a light source during lifetime studies of the B/sup 2/ SIGMA state of the CN molecule. The CN radiation from the plasma of the arc was investigated and found to have a brightness temperature of 5500 icient laborato K at lambda 3883 A. This is considerably higher than an estimate of the value required for lifetime measurements. The stability of the carbon arc under various conditions is discussed. For successful lifetime measurements, the light source employed must have a high brightness temperature (intensity). A method for the determination of the brightness temperature of a light source at a specific wave length is described. The method was used for determining the brightness temperatures of some available light sources. Sodium, thallium, and mercury discharge lamps, a medium-pressure mercury arc lamp, and the carbon arc were studied. (auth)

Worden, E.F. Jr.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Sthr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL Author: Corlett, J.N. Publication Date: 04-12-2011 Publication Info: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/81t3h97w Keywords: NGLS, FEL, 2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, high-brightness, highrepetition- rate, high- repetition-rate (1 MHz) Local Identifier: LBNL Paper LBNL-4391E Preferred Citation:

182

Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources  

SciTech Connect

Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

Falkenstein, Zoran (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Materials Selection for the HFIR Cold Neutron Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In year 2002 the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) will be fitted with a source of cold neutrons to upgrade and expand its existing neutron scattering facilities. The in-reactor components of the new source consist of a moderator vessel containing supercritical hydrogen gas moderator at a temperature of 20K and pressure of 15 bar, and a surrounding vacuum vessel. They will be installed in an enlarged beam tube located at the site of the present horizontal beam tube, HB-4; which terminates within the reactor's beryllium reflector. These components must withstand exceptional service conditions. This report describes the reasons and factors underlying the choice of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy for construction of the in-reactor components. The overwhelming considerations are the need to minimize generation of nuclear heat and to remove that heat through the flowing moderator, and to achieve a minimum service life of about 8 years coincident with the replacement schedule for the beryllium reflector. 6061-T6 aluminum alloy offers the best combination of low nuclear heating, high thermal conductivity, good fabricability, compatibility with hydrogen, superior cryogenic properties, and a well-established history of satisfactory performance in nuclear environments. These features are documented herein. An assessment is given of the expected performance of each component of the cold source.

Farrell, K.

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically, probably at a small fraction of the cost of He-3 detectors. In addition to neutron scattering science, the fully developed base technology can be used as a rugged, low-cost neutron detector in area monitoring and surveying. Radiation monitors are used in a number of other settings for occupational and environmental radiation safety. Such a detector can also be used in environmental monitoring and remote nuclear power plant monitoring. For example, the Department of Energy could use it to characterize nuclear waste dumps, coordinate clean-up efforts, and assess the radioactive contaminants in the air and water. Radiation monitors can be used to monitor the age and component breakdown of nuclear warheads and to distinguish between weapons and reactor grade plutonium. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses radiation monitors for treaty verification, remote monitoring, and enforcing the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. As part of treaty verification, monitors can be used to certify the contents of containers during inspections. They could be used for portal monitoring to secure border checkpoints, sea ports, air cargo centers, public parks, sporting venues, and key government buildings. Currently, only 2% of all sea cargo shipped is inspected for radiation sources. In addition, merely the presence of radiation is detected and nothing is known about the radioactive source until further testing. The utilization of radiation monitors with neutron sensitivity and capability of operation in hostile port environments would increase the capacity and effectiveness of the radioactive scanning processes.

Lacy, Jeffrey L

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source

Walker, R P; Christou, C; Han, J H; Kay, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Progress report FY 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in 1993 in the following sections: (1) project management; (2) research and development; (3) design and (4) safety. The section on research and development covers the following: (1) reactor core development; (2) fuel development; (3) corrosion loop tests and analysis; (4) thermal-hydraulic loop tests; (5) reactor control and shutdown concepts; (6) critical and subcritical experiments; (7) material data, structure tests, and analysis; (8) cold source development; (9) beam tube, guide, and instrument development; (10) neutron transport and shielding; (11) I and C research and development; and (12) facility concepts.

Campbell, J.H. [ed.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering Div.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-#12;bers promise the high #12;eld-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of #12;field emitters with a density up to 10{sup 6} tips/cm{sup 2} and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

Plum, Michael A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Shielding Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements, calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.

Johnson, J.O.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) conceptual design shielding analysis  

SciTech Connect

The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.

Johnson, J.O.; Odano, N.; Lillie, R.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

Pellegrini, Claudio [UCLA

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research JUNE 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share The interiors of the Canadian Light Source (top) and Advanced Photon Source experiment halls. (CLS photo courtesy of Canadian Light Source) Seeking to solve some of today's greatest global problems, scientists using x-ray light source facilities at national research laboratories in

197

Demonstration of a solid deuterium source of ultra-cold neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN), neutrons with energies low enough to be confined by the Fermi potential in material bottles, are playing an increasing role in measurements of fundamental properties of the neutron. The ability to manipulate UCN with material guides and bottles, magnetic fields, and gravity can lead to experiments with lower systematic errors than have been obtained in experiments with cold neutron beams. The UCN densities provided by existing reactor sources limit these experiments. The promise of much higher densities from solid deuterium sources has led to proposed facilities coupled to both reactor and spallation neutron sources. In this paper we report on the performance of a prototype spallation neutron-driven solid deuterium source. This source produced bottled UCN densities of 145 +/-7 UCN/cm3, about three times greater than the largest bottled UCN densities previously reported. These results indicate that a production UCN source with substantially higher densities should be possible.

A. Saunders; J. M. Anaya; T. J. Bowles; B. W. Filippone; P. Geltenbort; R. E. Hill; M. Hino; S. Hoedl; G. E. Hogan; T. M. Ito; K. W. Jones; T. Kawai; K. Kirch; S. K. Lamoreaux; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; L. J. Marek; J. W. Martin; C. L. Morris; R. N. Mortensen; A. Pichlmaier; S. J. Seestrom; A. Serebrov; D. Smith; W. Teasdale; B. Tipton; R. B. Vogelaar; A. R. Young; J. Yuan

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Optimization of the target of an accelerator-driven neutron source through Monte Carlo numerical simulation of neutron and gamma transport by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intense neutron beams for research on the structure and dynamics of materials in fields such as physics07-G00050D/gim SpallationNeutronSource SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source. This one-of-a-kind facility pro- vides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. When ramped up to its full beam

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

199

"Development and Neutronic Validation of pelletized Cold and Very Cold Moderators for Pulsed Neutron Sources" Phase II Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense beams of cold neutrons are produced at several DOE facilities and are used by researchers to study the microscopic structure of materials. Energetic neutrons are produced by a high energy proton beam impacting a target. The fast neutrons are converted to the desired cold neutrons passing through a cryogenic moderator vessel, presently filled with dense cold hydrogen gas. Moderators made from solid methane have demonstrated superior performance to the hydrogen moderators but cannot be implemented on high power sources such as the SNS due to the difficulty of removing heat from the solid blocks of methane. Cryogenic Applications F, Inc has developed the methane pellet formation and transport technologies needed to produce a hydrogen cooled solid methane pellet moderator, potentially capable of being used in a high power spallation neutron facility. Such a methane pellet moderator could double the brightness of the neutron beam. Prior to this work a methane pellet moderator had not been produced or studied. The Indiana University LENS facility is a small pulsed neutron source used in part to study and develop cold neutron moderators. In this project cold neutrons were produced in a solid methane pellet moderator and analyzed with the LENS facility diagnostics. The results indicated that the neutron beam formed by the pellet moderator was similar to that of a solid methane block moderator.

Foster, Christopher; Baxter, David V

2012-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, Ji

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008-2009 data) Outline * Receptor modeling overview * Results from 2007 data set * New goals arising from analysis of 2007 data * New data for 2008 * New data for 2009 * Tentative conclusions * Future analysis i Factor profiles from 2007 analysis Source attribution of Black Carbon from 2007 analysis Goals/Issues suggested by the analysis of the 2007 data set * Are there seasonal differences in the source strengths? * Are there other LAA chemical components besides black carbon. What are their sources? * Can the various data sets available (e.g., 2007, 2008, 2009) be combined in a single large PMF analysis 2008 Data Set For Receptor Analysis * 42 samples from Eastern Siberia including 4 depth profiles

203

Electrodeless lighting RF power source development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An efficient, solid state RF power source has been developed on this NICE project for exciting low power electrodeless lamp bulbs. This project takes full advantage of concurrent advances in electrodeless lamp technology. Electrodeless lamp lighting systems utilizing the sulfur based bulb type developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc., is an emerging technology which is based on generating light in a confined plasma created and sustained by RF excitation. The bulb for such a lamp is filled with a particular element and inert gas at low pressure when cold. RF power from the RF source creates a plasma within the bulb which reaches temperatures approaching those of high pressure discharge lamp plasmas. At these temperatures the plasma radiates substantial visible light with a spectrum similar to sunlight.

NONE

1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma July 18, 2011 - 12:07pm Addthis The new anti-cancer drug, vemurafenib, is the green honeycomb structure at middle left. Four dotted red lines show where it attaches to a target area in the mutated enzyme, disabling it from promoting the growth of tumors. | Image courtesy of Plexxikon Inc. The new anti-cancer drug, vemurafenib, is the green honeycomb structure at middle left. Four dotted red lines show where it attaches to a target area in the mutated enzyme, disabling it from promoting the growth of tumors. | Image courtesy of Plexxikon Inc. Mike Ross Science Writer at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory What does this mean for me? A new drug designed to fight melanoma was discovered thanks to the

205

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery  

Office of Science (SC) Website

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 06.13.11 GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Company is constructing a new battery factory in Upstate New York that is expected to create 300+ jobs. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo GE's new Image courtesy of GE GE's new "Durathon(tm)" sodium metal halide battery. The story of American manufacturing over the past two decades has too often been a tale of outsourcing, off-shoring, and downsizing-not least in

206

Multi-Photon Phosphor Feasibility Research: Advanced Light Source Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiencies of commercial light sources have reached a plateau at about 33 percent of the maximum possible, but these efficiencies will have to be doubled to achieve the energy savings in lighting needed in the future. One possibility is to develop phosphor materials for application to fluorescent lamps that emit two visible photons for each absorbed ultraviolet photon. Scientists discussed the possibility of developing such phosphor materials at a workshop held May 8 through May 10, 2001 in Peabody, Ma...

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

The President`s budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met.

Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H. [eds.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Engineering Services

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Generating polarization controllable FELs at Dalian coherent light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The property of the FEL polarization is of great importance to the user community. FEL pulses with ultra-high intensity and flexible polarization control ability will absolutely open up new scientific realms. In this paper, several polarization control approaches are presented to investigate the great potential on Dalian coherent light source, which is a government-approved novel FEL user facility with the capability of wavelength continuously tunable in the EUV regime of 50-150 nm. The numerical simulations show that both circularly polarized FELs with highly modulating frequency and 100 microjoule level pulse energy could be generated at Dalian coherent light source.

Zhang, T; Wang, D; Zhao, Z T; Zhang, W Q; Wu, G R; Dai, D X; Yang, X M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solid-state radioluminscent compsitions and light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new types of radioluminescent (RL) compositions light sources are provided. The first type is an all-organic system, consisting of covalently bound tritium within a solid, optically clear polymeric matrix. The matrix contains organic scintillation dyes that capture excitation energy from beta decay and red-shift the energy in a stepwise fashion, after which a chosen wavelength is emitted as fluorescence. The second type of RL light source consists of a zeolite crystalline material, in which material's intralattice spaces a tritiated compound and a luminophore are sorbed, and which material is optionally further dispersed in a refractive index-matched polymer matrix. 10 refs.

Clough, R.L.; Gill, J.T.; Hawkins, D.B. Renschler, C.L.; Shepodd, T.J.; Smith, H.M.

1989-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world`s best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world`s best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using {sup 64}Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet.

Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

High efficiency light source using solid-state emitter and down-conversion material  

SciTech Connect

A light emitting apparatus includes a source of light for emitting light; a down conversion material receiving the emitted light, and converting the emitted light into transmitted light and backward transmitted light; and an optic device configured to receive the backward transmitted light and transfer the backward transmitted light outside of the optic device. The source of light is a semiconductor light emitting diode, a laser diode (LD), or a resonant cavity light emitting diode (RCLED). The down conversion material includes one of phosphor or other material for absorbing light in one spectral region and emitting light in another spectral region. The optic device, or lens, includes light transmissive material.

Narendran, Nadarajah (Clifton Park, NY); Gu, Yimin (Troy, NY); Freyssinier, Jean Paul (Troy, NY)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Study of Transverse Coupled Bunch Instabilities by Using Non-Linear Taylor Maps for the Advanced Light Source (ALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Advanced Light Source (ALS) M. Meddahi and J. Bengtssonthe Advanced Light Source (ALS)* M. Meddahi and J. Bengtssongeneration light source, ALS, it is insufficient to rely on

Meddahi, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning of the new high-intensity ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) has started in 2009. The design goal of this new generation high intensity UCN source is to surpass by a factor of ~100 the current ultracold neutron densities available for fundamental physics research, with the greatest thrust coming from the search for a neutron electric dipole moment. The PSI UCN source is based on neutron production via proton induced lead spallation, followed by neutron thermalization in heavy water and neutron cooling in a solid deuterium crystal to cold and ultracold energies. A successful beam test with up to 2 mA proton beam on the spallation target was conducted recently. Most source components are installed, others being finally mounted. The installation is on the track for the first cool-down and UCN production in 2010.

Bernhard Lauss

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

Greiner, Annette (ed.)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Photonic crystal fibre-based light source for STED lithography  

SciTech Connect

A light source having a relative noise level in the order of 10{sup -6} and sufficient stability for application in STED lithography has been obtained using the generation of Cherenkov peaks in a supercontinuum spectrum. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Glubokov, D A; Sychev, V V; Vitukhnovsky, Alexey G; Korol'kov, A E

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Collaborators Industrial Collaborators The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and its future successor, NSLS-II, can help companies large and small solve research and manufacturing problems, generate new technologies and products, and stay competitive. The Photon Sciences Directorate would like to encourage greater use of its facilities by industrial researchers and facilitate collaborations between industry and NSLS staff, as well as government and academic institutions. Synchrotron Use by Industry What is a synchrotron? A synchrotron light source is a large machine that produces intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for the study of substances at very small scales, from looking at the molecular structure of proteins to probing the electronic properties of the next generation of computer-chip

218

Spallation-Driven Cold Neutron Sources Dr. Bradley J. Micklich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, et al. "Direct observation of fermion spin superposition by neutron interferometry," Physical ReviewNeutron Interferometry with Polarized Spin States Frank Rioux Department of Chemistry CSB|SJU The following paragraph appears in an encyclopedia entry on neutron optics.(1) A description of the original

McDonald, Kirk

219

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: LED Reflector Lamp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED Reflector Lamp LED Reflector Lamp LED Reflector Lamp Objective LED reflector lamp The goal of this project is to develop a revolutionary new reflector lamp which offers many advantages over current incandescent reflector lamps, including: three times greater efficiency ten times the rated life greater optical and performance properties use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) to generate the light. Although LEDs have been commercially available since the late 1960’s, recent dramatic improvements in LED technology have led to white light devices with efficiencies that meet or exceed those of a standard incandescent lamp. This project will build upon these improvements to develop a new type of source for focusing light. Contact Information For more information on this project, please contact:

220

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals 2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II February 16, 2011 NSLS-II Rendering Critical Dates Call for proposal issued Thursday, February 17, 2011 Letter of Intent due Monday, March 28, 2011 (submitted LOIs) Beamline development workshops April-June 2011 Beamline proposal due Monday, July 25, 2011 Related Materials Proposal template NSLS-II Beamline Development Policy NSLS-II Source Properties NSLS-II User Access Policy Project Beamlines Background Beamline Information Approved Proposals From 2010 The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), currently under construction at the U.S. Department of Energys Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY, is pleased to announce the 2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals for experimental facilities to be implemented at NSLS-II.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Mechanical design considerations of a spherical torus volumetric neutron source  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical design of a spherical torus based volumetric neutron source (ST VNS) is being studied under the support of a DOE-SBIR funding. A device capable of staged operation from a neutron wall loading of 0.5-5.0 MW/m(2) has been scoped out, as the physics and engineering design assumptions are raised from modest to aggressive levels. Margins in the design are ensured since operation of the VNS will be adequate st a wall loading of 2 MW/m(2). The device has a naturally diverted plasma with major radius of 1.07 m, a minor radius of 0.77 m for an aspect ratio of 1.4, an elongation of 3 and triangularity of 0,6. In the neutral beam driven version, the plasma current is 11.1 MA and the toroidal field at the plasma major radius is 2.13 T, The baseline fusion power is 151 MW giving an average neutron wall loading of 2 MV/m(2) on the outboard side over an accessible area of over 15 m(2) for blanket testing. The device utilizes a normal Cu conducting bell jar as the return leg of the toroidal field current, a concept developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The current is carried by an unshielded single-turn center post (CP) made of dispersion strengthened Cu which is cooled by water in a single pass from top to bottom. A special sliding electrical interface between the CP and the bell jar is provided on the upper end to allow for differential expansion and to isolate the CP from tensile and torsional forces from the bell jar. The ohmic heating in the CP is 153 MW at the start of operation and increases to 178 MW after 3 full power years of operation. Over this period the maximum Cu temperature does not exceed 160 C. This report primarily deals with the design of the CP, one of the most challenging Issues of a low aspect ratio spherical torus. Maintenance approaches for the Or and the divertor assemblies have been determined and are addressed in the paper.

Sviatoslavky, I. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources

Ivanyan, M I; Tsakanov, V M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Short-pulse limits in optical instrumentation design for the SLAC Linac Cohereent Light Source (LCLS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-pulse limits in optical instrumentation design for the SLAC Linac Cohereent Light Source (LCLS)

Tatchyn, R

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

Use of the WNR spallation neutron source at LAMPF to determine the absolute efficiency of a neutron scintillation detector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prompt fission neutron spectrum measurements at the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator laboratory require that the neutron detector efficiency be well known over a neutron energy range of 100 keV to 20 MeV. The efficiency of the detector, has been determined for energies greater than 5.0 MeV using the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) white neutron source at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in a pulsed beam, time-of-flight (TOF) experiment. Carbon matched polyethylene and graphite scatterers were used to obtain a hydrogen spectrum. The detector efficiency was determined using the well known H(n,n) scattering cross section. Results are compared to the detector efficiency calculation program SCINFUL available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Staples, P.A.; Egan, J.J.; Kegel, G.H.R.; Woodring, M.L.; DeSimone, D.J. [University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics; Lisowski, P.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Novel Light Source Based on a RF-Driven High Intensity Discharge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90-3122 Almost all the lighting news recently has been about advances in LED (Light Emitting Diode) lighting. But several companies are quietly developing new light sources that...

228

rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} ion source  

SciTech Connect

The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering {approx}38 mA H{sup -} beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Goulding, R. H. [Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} source test facility Allison scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H{sup -} ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

Long, C. D.; Stockli, M. P.; Gorlov, T. V.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A L S many other 3rd generation sources have been and arcthe soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, andconstructed third generation light sources. In this paper we

Sannibale, Fernando

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

H{sup -} radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

Welton, R. F.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6471 (United States); Dudnikov, V. G. [Muons, Inc., 552 N. Batavia Avenue, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Turvey, M. W. [Villanova University, 800E. Lancaster Ave, Villanova, Pennsylvania 19085 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Californium-252: neutron source for industry and medicine  

SciTech Connect

From eleventh conference on radioisotopes; Tokyo, Japan (13 Nov 1973). The history, production, and availability of /sup 252/Cf and its many potential uses are discussed. Applications in life sciences, education chemical analysis, exploration for natural resources, industrial process control, neutron radiography, nondestructive inspection, and neutron flux enhancement are described. (TFD)

Reinig, W.C.; Permar, P.H.; Cornman, W.R.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source V. Aleynik a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medical physics to Homeland security. Summary: Neutrons are a powerful tool for the identificationImaging Technique for a Neutron Based Elemental Analysis Interrogation System D. S. Koltick* and I. S. Novikov Purdue University, Physics Department and Center for Sensing Science and Technology 525

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

234

Feasibility studies of an accelerator for the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS)  

SciTech Connect

A proton linac plus synchrotron system was studied for the proposed Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne. An Alvarez H$sup -$ linac of 70 MeV and a high intensity fast cycling proton synchrotron to accelerate protons to 800 MeV will be the best choice to give a flux of 10$sup 16$ thermal neutron/sec cm$sup 2$ at the surface of moderator with a spallation neutron target of W or $sup 238$U. (auth)

Khoe, T.K.; Kimura, M.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Powder diffraction in materials science using the KENS cold-neutron source  

SciTech Connect

Since superconductivity fever spread around the world, neutron powder diffraction has become very popular and been widely used by crystallographers, physicists, chemists, mineralogists, and materials scientists. The purpose of present paper is to show, firstly, important characteristics of time-of-flight TOF powder diffraction using cold-neutron source in the study of materials science, and, secondly, recent studies on the structure and function of batteries at the Neutron Science Laboratory (KENS) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK).

Kamiyama, T.; Oikawa, K. [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Akiba, E. [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ideas for a Future PEP-X Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SLAC is developing a long-range plan to transfer the evolving scientific programs at SSRL from the SPEAR3 light source to a much higher performing synchrotron source -- PEP-X -- a new storage ring that would occupy the existing PEP-II tunnel and support two experimental halls, each containing 16 x-ray beam lines. Operating at 4.5 GeV and 1.5 A with a horizontal emittance of 0.14 nm-rad, reached using 90 m of damping wigglers, PEP-X would have an order of magnitude higher average brightness and flux in the 1-{angstrom} x-ray range than any existing or planned future storage ring sources. Higher brightness in the soft x-ray regime might be reached with partial lasing in long undulators, and high peak brightness could be reached with seeded FEL emission. The status of preliminary studies of PEP-X is presented.

Hettel, R.O.; Bane, K.L.F.; Bentson, L.D.; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Brennan, S.M.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; DeBarger, S.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Huang, X.; Huang, Z.; Kharakh, D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Rabedeau, T.; Safranek, J.A.; Seeman, J.; Stohr, J.; Stupakov, G.V.; Tantawi, S.G.; Wang, L.; Wang, M.H.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UCLA

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki [Quantum Optics Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device  

SciTech Connect

At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

Choong, Vi-En (Carlsbad, CA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Supercool Neutrons (Ultracold Neutrons)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the USA. Why neutrons? Neutrons possess physical properties that make them valuable investigative tools Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) The world's most intense pulsed accelerator-based neutron source. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) The highest flux reactor-based neutron source for condensed matter research

Martin, Jeff

240

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne's ZING-P and ZING-P' prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and in press'' articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne`s ZING-P and ZING-P` prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and ``in press`` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fabrication and characterization of the source grating for visibility improvement of neutron phase imaging with gratings  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of gratings including metal deposition processes for highly neutron absorbing lines is a critical issue to achieve a good visibility of the grating-based phase imaging system. The source grating for a neutron Talbot-Lau interferometer is an array of Gadolinium (Gd) structures that are generally made by sputtering, photo-lithography, and chemical wet etching. However, it is very challenging to fabricate a Gd structure with sufficient neutron attenuation of approximately more than 20 {mu}m using a conventional metal deposition method because of the slow Gd deposition rate, film stress, high material cost, and so on. In this article, we fabricated the source gratings for neutron Talbot-Lau interferometers by filling the silicon structure with Gadox particles. The new fabrication method allowed us a very stable and efficient way to achieve a much higher Gadox filled structure than a Gd film structure, and is even more suitable for thermal polychromatic neutrons, which are more difficult to stop than cold neutrons. The newly fabricated source gratings were tested at the polychromatic thermal neutron grating interferometer system of HANARO at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and the visibilities and images from the neutron phase imaging system with the new source gratings were compared with those fabricated by a Gd deposition method.

Kim, Jongyul [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kye Hong; Lim, Chang Hwy; Kim, Taejoo [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chi Won [Nano Fusion Technology Division, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Wook [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Pre-saddle neutron multiplicity for fission reactions induced by heavy ions and light particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-saddle neutron multiplicity has been calculated for several fission reactions induced by heavy ions and light particles. Experimentally, it is impossible to determine the contribution of neutrons being emitted before the saddle point and those emitted between the saddle and the scission points. Determination of the pre-saddle neutron multiplicity in our research is based on the comparison between the experimental anisotropies and those predicted by the standard saddle-point statistical model. Analysis of the results shows that the pre-saddle neutron multiplicity depends on the fission barrier height and stability of the compound nucleus. In heavy ion induced fission, the number of pre-saddle neutrons decreases with increasing the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. A main cause of this behavior is due to a reduction in the ground state-to-saddle point transition time with increasing the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. Whereas in induced fission by light particles, the number of pre-saddle neutrons increases with increasing the excitation energy of the compound nucleus.

S. Soheyli; M. K. Khalili

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

RESULTS OF FIRST EXPERIMENTS ON NEUTRON GENERATION IN THE VITA NEUTRON SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­2821/2000/62#9#/092005#6#/$15.00 ©2000 The American Physical Society 62 092005­1 #12; II. EXPERIMENT The measurement of the neutron and the single­neutron event is shown in the top panel of Fig. F. BOEHM et al. PHYSICAL REVIEW D 62 092005 092005 and # 2 are displayed. NEUTRON PRODUCTION BY COSMIC­RAY MUONS AT . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW D 62 092005 092005

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

246

Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Proceedings of the 10th meeting of the international collaboration on advanced neutron sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers from the 10th meeting of the International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources. Two general types of workshops are discussed, instrument and target-station. Individual papers are indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP)

Hyer, D.K. (comp. and ed.)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Heterogeneous teleportation with laser and quantum light sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum information technology is set to transform critical network security using quantum cryptography, and complex scientific and engineering simulations with quantum computing. Quantum computer nodes may be based on a variety of systems, such as linear optics, ions, or solid state architectures such as NV-centers in diamond, semiconductor quantum dots or spins in silicon. Interfacing any of these platforms with photonic qubits in secure quantum networks will require quantum teleportation protocols to transfer the information, and matter-light teleportation has for some of these systems been demonstrated. However, although it is conceivable that the input photon originates from a dissimilar source to that supplying the entangled resources, every demonstration so far of teleportation using linear optics use the same or identical sources for the input and entangled photons, often accompanied by a fourth heralding photon. Here we show that photons from fundamentally different sources can be used in the optical quantum teleportation protocol. Input photons are generated by a laser, and teleported using polarisation-entangled photon pairs electrically generated by an entangled-light-emitting diode (ELED). The sources have bandwidth differing by a factor 1000, different photon statistics and need not be precisely degenerate- but we still observe a teleportation fidelity of 0.77, beating the quantum limit by 10 standard deviations. This is a significant leap towards practical applications, such as extending the range of existing QKD systems using quantum relays and repeaters, which usually use weak coherent laser pulses for quantum information transport. The use of an ELED offers practical advantages of electrical control, and as we show erases the multi-photon character of the laser input field, thus eliminating errors if used in a quantum optics circuit.

R. M. Stevenson; J. Nilsson; A. J. Bennett; J. Skiba-Szymanska; I. Farrer; D. A. Ritchie; A. J. Shields

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

Computational and Experimental Validation of a WGPu Neutron Leakage Source Using a Shielded PuBe (,n) Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Measurements / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Protection

Gabriel Ghita; Glenn Sjoden; James Baciak

250

Linac Coherent Light Source Video and Multimedia Collection  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a DOE Scientific User Facility, began operation in 2009. SLAC's two-mile-long linear accelerator (linac) has long produced high-energy electrons for physics experiments. Now the linac is driving a new kind of laser, creating X-ray pulses more than a billion times brighter than the most powerful existing sources. Intense x-ray beams are not new. However, atoms are constantly moving or vibrating, and synchrotron X-ray sources produce long pulses which yield only blurred images of these motions. LCLS is the first source to produce X-rays that are both very intense and clumped into ultrafast pulses. By sequencing together images of the ultrasmall, taken with the ultrafast pulses of the LCLS, scientists are for the first time creating molecular movies, revealing the frenetic action of the atomic world for us to see. [Extracted, with edits, from http://lcls.slac.stanford.edu/WhatIsLCLS_1.aspx] The LCLS Multimedia gallery currently includes four short videos about the science and several clips that provide animated tours or flyovers of the facility and its instruments. Podcasts are an opportunity to hear key staff members address details of LCLS operations, and blog entries from five team members provide behind-the-scenes glimpses of this physics adventure.

251

Phase 2 safety analysis report: National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II program was established in order to provide additional space for experiments, and also staging and equipment storage areas. It also provides additional office space and new types of advanced instrumentation for users. This document will deal with the new safety issues resulting from this extensive expansion program, and should be used as a supplement to BNL Report No. 51584 ''National Synchrotron Light Source Safety Analysis Report,'' July 1982 (hereafter referred to as the Phase I SAR). The initial NSLS facility is described in the Phase I SAR. It comprises two electron storage rings, an injection system common to both, experimental beam lines and equipment, and office and support areas, all of which are housed in a 74,000 sq. ft. building. The X-ray Ring provides for 28 primary beam ports and the VUV Ring, 16. Each port is capable of division into 2 or 3 separate beam lines. All ports receive their synchrotron light from conventional bending magnet sources, the magnets being part of the storage ring lattice. 4 refs.

Stefan, P. (ed.)

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we have made significant progress with the design of PEP-X, a USR that would inhabit the decommissioned PEP-II tunnel at SLAC. The enlargement of the dynamic aperture is largely a result of the cancellations of the 4th-order resonances in the 3rd-order achromats and the effective use of lattice optimization programs. In this paper, we will show those cancellations of the 4th-order resonances using an analytical approach based on the exponential Lie operators and the Poisson brackets. Wherever possible, our analytical results will be compared with their numerical counterparts. Using the derived formulae, we will construct 4th-order geometric achromats and use them as modules for the lattice of the PEP-X USR, noting that only geometric terms are canceled to the 4th order.

Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

253

Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented.

Diamond, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The development of solid methane neutron moderators at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source facility of Argonne National Laboratory.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) started using solid methane moderators in 1985 because of their efficient conversion (about 3.5 times greater than was achieved with a liquid hydrogen moderator) of fast neutrons to long wavelength neutrons. However, the solid methane moderators experienced numerous failures due to pressure surges caused by a combination of (1) the release of stored energy, which occurred when methane radiolytic products recombined, and (2) the expansion of hydrogen, which built up in the solid methane during irradiation. During the ensuing years studies were made to determine how to operate the solid methane moderators without causing failure. The rate at which stored energy built up during irradiation and the temperature at which hydrogen was released during annealing were determined. Since 1993 IPNS has successfully operated the solid methane moderators (at about 30 K) by periodically annealing to the liquid state around 90 K after every roughly three days of irradiation.

Carpenter, J. M.; Miller, M. E.; Scott, T. L.

1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes: a promising molecular design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes Light Emitting Diode (OLED), intermolecular p­p interactions should be usually suppressed to avoid any Emitting Diodes (SMOLEDs) is almost absent from the literature. In this work, three aryl-substituted Di

256

National Synchrotron Light Source A View of Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

managed for the U.S. Department of Energy managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle National Synchrotron Light Source A View of Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multipurpose re- search laboratory funded by the U.S. Department of En- ergy. Located on a 5,300-acre site on Long Island, New York, the Laboratory operates large-scale facilities for studies in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, applied science, and advanced technology. Brookhaven's 2,600 scientists, engineers, and support staff are joined each year by more than 5,000 visiting research- ers from around the world.

257

Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

Hinkson, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

259

Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Design of the Advanced Light Source timing system  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation synchrotron radiation facility, and as such, has several unique timing requirements. Arbitrary Storage Ring filling patterns and high single bunch purity requirements demand a highly stable, low jitter timing system with the flexibility to reconfigure on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This modular system utilizes a highly linear Gauss Clock with ``on the fly`` programmable setpoints to track a free-running Booster ramping magnet and provides digitally programmable sequencing and delay for Electron Gun, Linac, Booster Ring, and Storage Ring RF, Pulsed Magnet, and Instrumentation systems. It has proven itself over the last year of accelerator operation to be reliable and rock solid.

Fahmie, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires  

SciTech Connect

Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

Hammer, E.E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions JANUARY 23, 2008 Bookmark and Share In this e-coli cell, the proteins (shown in blue) crowd around ribosomes (purple). These regions have a high concentration of protein, typically greater than 30 percent, which limits the ensemble of states into which the proteins can bend themselves. Download hi-res image.) Proteins, the biological molecules that are involved in virtually every action of every organism, may themselves move in surprising ways, according to a recent study carried out at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team x-ray beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source, a national user

263

Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)  

SciTech Connect

The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Spin-out in cutting-edge light source technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Biochemsitry Organic light emitting diode (OLED) synthesis Information and Safety Research Facilities Education: Vojislav Sradnov Faculty Supervisor: Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING DIODE

Mottram, Nigel

265

Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

Sommer, W.F.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on blue ultra bright LEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on single quantum well (SQW) InGaN/GaN ultra bright blue LEDs. It is shown that the light yield of such light sources and their timing characteristics don't deteriorate even after 10^10 total pulses. The longterm stability of the sources light yield is better than 1%.

B. K. Lubsandorzhiev; Y. E. Vyatchin

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on blue ultra bright LEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on single quantum well (SQW) InGaN/GaN ultra bright blue LEDs. It is shown that the light yield of such light sources and their timing characteristics don't deteriorate even after 10^10 total pulses. The longterm stability of the sources light yield is better than 1%.

Lubsandorzhiev, B K

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Status of PEP-X Light Source Design Study  

SciTech Connect

The SLAC Beam Physics group and other SLAC collaborators continue to study options for implementing a near diffraction-limited ring-based light source in the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel that will serve the SSRL scientific program in the future. The study team has completed the baseline design for a 4.5-GeV storage ring having 160 pm-rad emittance with stored beam current of 1.5 A, providing >10{sup 22} brightness for multi-keV photon beams from 3.5-m undulator sources. The team has also investigated possible 5-GeV ERL configurations which, similar to the Cornell and KEK ERL plans, would have {approx}30 pm-rad emittance with 100 mA current, and {approx}10 pm-rad emittance with 25 mA or less. Now a 4.5-GeV 'ultimate' storage ring having emittance similar to the ERL and operating with {approx}200 mA is under study. An overview of the progress of the PEP-X design study and SSRL's plans for defining performance parameters that will guide the choice of ring options is presented.

Bane, K.L.F.; Bertsche, K.J.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; Huang, X.; Jiao, Y.; Ng, C.-K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Rivetta, C.H.; Safranek, J.A.; Stupakov, G.V.; Wang, L.; Wang, M.-H.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC; Rabedeau, T.; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

269

Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,Introduction The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a

Thompson, Neil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Challenges of Third-Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the list of third-generation sources developed by Professorthe design of third-generation sources arise directly fromparameters of the third-generation sources planned, or under

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.  

SciTech Connect

One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE \\\\ LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE ? M. Venturini ,of designing a 4th generation light source in the 0.27 ? 1.2

Ventturini, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness in halogen light bulbs can have a significant impact on the illumination patterns generatedTo appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition 2) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering

Heidrich, Wolfgang

274

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness in halogen light bulbs can have a significant impact on the illumination patterns generatedTo appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering (from left to right

Recanati, Catherine

275

Tungsten Lamps as an Affordable Light Source for Testing of Photovoltaic Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved Tungsten light source system for photovoltaic cell testing made from low-cost, commercially available materials is presented as an alternative to standard expensive testing equipment. In this work, spectral correction of the Tungsten light ... Keywords: I-V measurement, Light source, Photovoltaic, Testing

Jeydmer Aristizabal; Badr Omrane; Clint Landrock; Sasan Vosoogh-Grayli; Yindar Chuo; Jasbir N. Patel; Bozena Kaminska; Carlo Menon

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 {mu}eV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W. [Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Note: A portable pulsed neutron source based on the smallest sealed-type plasma focus device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development and operation of a portable and compact pulsed neutron source based on sealed-type plasma focus (PF) device are reported. The unit is the smallest sealed-type neutron producing PF device. The effective volume of the PF unit is 33 cm{sup 3} only. A compact size single capacitor (4 {mu}F) is used as the energy driver. A battery based power supply unit is used for charging the capacitor and triggering the spark gap. The PF unit is operated at 10 kV (200 J) and at a deuterium gas filling pressure of 8 mb. The device is operated over a time span of 200 days and the neutron emissions have been observed for 200 shots without changing the gas in between the shots. The maximum yield of this device is 7.8 x 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse. Beyond 200 shots the yield is below the threshold (1050 neutrons/pulse) of our {sup 3}He detector. The neutron energy is evaluated using time of flight technique and the value is (2.49 {+-} 0.27) MeV. The measured neutron pulse width is (24 {+-} 5) ns. Multishot and long duration operations envisage the potentiality of such portable device for repetitive mode of operation.

Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, Rohit; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, Prabhat [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Alternate Tunings for the Linac Coherent Light Source Photoinjector  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The LCLS Photoinjector beamline has been designed to deliver 10-ps long electron bunches of 1 nC with a normalized projected transverse emittance smaller than 1.2 mm-mrad at 135 MeV. Tolerances and regulation requirements are tight for this tuning. Half of the total emittance at the end of the injector comes from the ''cathode emittance'' which is 0.7 mm-mrad for our nominal 1nC tuning. As the ''cathode emittance'' scales linearly with laser spot radius, the emittance will be dramatically reduced for smaller radius, but this is only possible at lower charge. In particular, for a 0.2 nC charge, we believe we can achieve an emittance closer to 0.4 mm-mrad. This working point will be easier to tune and the beam quality should be much easier to maintain than for the 1 nC case. In the second half of this paper, we discuss optimum laser pulse shapes. We demonstrate that the benefits of the ellipsoidal shapes seem to be important enough so that serious investigations should be carried out in the production of such pulses.

Limborg-Deprey, C.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

280

Neutron imaging with coded sources: new challenges and the implementation of a simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limitations in neutron flux and resolution (L/D) of current neutron imaging systems can be addressed with a Coded Source Imaging system with magnification (xCSI). More precisely, the multiple sources in an xCSI system can exceed the flux of a single pinhole system for several orders of magnitude, while maintaining a higher L/D with the small sources. Moreover, designing for an xCSI system reduces noise from neutron scattering, because the object is placed away from the detector to achieve magnification. However, xCSI systems are adversely affected by correlated noise such as non-uniform illumination of the neutron source, incorrect sampling of the coded radiograph, misalignment of the coded masks, mask transparency, and the imperfection of the system Point Spread Function (PSF). We argue that a model-based reconstruction algorithm can overcome these problems and describe the implementation of a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique algorithm for coded sources. Design pitfalls that preclude a satisfactory reconstruction are documented.

Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy spectra of the pneumatically positioned neutron sources at LLNL's Hazards control standards and calibration facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hazards Control Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains a Standards and Calibration Laboratory that includes three neutron sources (two /sup 252/Cf and one /sup 238/PuBe that can be positioned pneumatically for irradiations. Ten moderators exist to modify the neutron energy spectra produced by these sources. The thicknesses and materials of these moderators are: 25-cm water; 5-, 10-, 15-, and 25-cm heavy water; 20-cm aluminum; and 2-, 5-, 10-, and 15-cm polyethylene. We used a multisphere spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at 2 m from both the PuBe source and the smaller Cf source, with the sources bare, and in all of the moderators. These data were reduced in 25 energy groups ranging from 0.25 eV to 16 MeV. Except for the 15-m polyethylene moderator, we also made measurements using a liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer. These data were reduced in 0.1-MeV increments from 0.5 to 12.5 MeV. Spectra from the measurements and from independent calculations are presented in tabular and graphic form. Dosimetric values, calculated from both the measured and calculated spectra, are also presented.

Thorngate, J.H.

1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.  

SciTech Connect

Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); McDaniel, Floyd Del (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Raber, Thomas N.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

An Ultracold Neutron Source for TRIUMF 4th Draft #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location is the availability of hot cells with which to handle safely parts of the UCN source. Additionally handling hot cells for servicing. . existing 50 T crane is available in the area for shielding blocks, target cooling, and remote handling are based predominantly on our experience from the LANL SD 2 UCN

Martin, Jeff

284

Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives...

285

Neutrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Oak Ridge 10-24 August 2013 John M. Carpenter ANL, ORNLSNS 18 August 2013 2 Neutron Detection How does one detect a neutron? - It is...

286

GDT-based neutron source with multiple-mirror end plugs  

SciTech Connect

We present a new linear trap to be built at the Budker Institute. It combines gasdynamictype central cell with sloshing ions for beam fusion and the multiple-mirror end plugs for improved axial confinement. Thus it is designed as an efficient neutron source and a testbed for future development of mirror-based fusion reactors.

Beklemishev, A.; Anikeev, A.; Burdakov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, I.; Postupaev, V.; Sinitsky, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.  

SciTech Connect

X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97  

SciTech Connect

Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

D. Akimov; A. Bernstein; P. Barbeau; P. Barton; A. Bolozdynya; B. Cabrera-Palmer; F. Cavanna; V. Cianciolo; J. Collar; R. J. Cooper; D. Dean; Y. Efremenko; A. Etenko; N. Fields; M. Foxe; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; N. Fomin; F. Gallmeier; I. Garishvili; M. Gerling; M. Green; G. Greene; A. Hatzikoutelis; R. Henning; R. Hix; D. Hogan; D. Hornback; I. Jovanovic; T. Hossbach; E. Iverson; S. R. Klein; A. Khromov; J. Link; W. Louis; W. Lu; C. Mauger; P. Marleau; D. Markoff; R. D. Martin; P. Mueller; J. Newby; J. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; S. Pentilla; K. Patton; A. W. Poon; D. Radford; D. Reyna; H. Ray; K. Scholberg; V. Sosnovtsev; R. Tayloe; K. Vetter; C. Virtue; J. Wilkerson; J. Yoo; C. H. Yu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target  

SciTech Connect

A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer NOMAD at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is neutron time-of-flight diffractometer designed to determine pair dist ribution functions of a wide range of materials ranging from short range ordered liquids to long range ordered crystals. Due to a large neutron flux provided by the Spallation Neutron Source SNS and a large detector coverage neutron count-rates exceed comparable instruments by one to two orders of magnitude. This is achieved while maintaining a relatively high momentum transfer resolution of a $\\delta Q/Q \\sim 0.8\\%$ FWHM (typical), and an achievable $\\delta Q/Q$ of 0.24\\% FWHM (best). The real space resolution is related to the maximum momentum transfer; A maximum momentum transfer of 50\\AA$^{-1}$ can be achieved routinely and the maximum momentum transfer given by the detector configuration and the incident neutron spectrum is 125 \\AA$^{-1}$. High stability of the source and the detector allow small contrast isotope experiments to be performed. A detailed description of the instrument is given and the results of experiments with standard samples are discussed.

Feygenson, Mikhail [ORNL; Carruth, John William [ORNL; Hoffmann, Ron [ORNL; Chipley, Kenneth King [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Advanced Lighting Technologies:Energy Efficiency and Power Quality of Lighting Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his EPRI technical update is the third in a series of technical assessments of advanced lighting technologies. A total of seven lighting products were assessed in 2013: low cost screw based light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, retrofit LED ceiling fixtures, suspended LED fixtures, LED-based 2x4 troffers, LED high bay fixtures, innovative LED screw based lamps, and LED hospitality lighting. Prior to beginning an in-depth assessment, the EPRI Lighting Group evaluated each of the tested technologies to ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Source with a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a relatively low-energy (keV. The beam size in the ALS is small, due to the smallCompared to the prototype ALS superconducting bend magnet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Light-ion production in the interaction of 96 MeV neutrons with silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double-differential cross sections for light-ion (p, d, t, He-3 and alpha) production in silicon, induced by 96 MeV neutrons are reported. Energy spectra are measured at eight laboratory angles, ranging from 20 degrees to 160 degrees in steps of 20 degrees. Procedures for data taking and data reduction are presented. Deduced energy-differential, angle-differential and production cross sections are reported. Experimental cross sections are compared to theoretical reaction model calculations and experimental data in the literature.

U. Tippawan; S. Pomp; A. Atac; B. Bergenwall; J. Blomgren; S. Dangtip; A. Hildebrand; C. Johansson; J. Klug; P. Mermod; L. Nilsson; M. Osterlund; N. Olsson; K. Elmgren; O. Jonsson; A. V. Prokofiev; P. -U. Renberg; P. Nadel-Turonski; V. Corcalciuc; Y. Watanabe; A. Koning

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

295

Microsoft Word - Science and Technology of Future Light Sources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ultrafast radiation sources covering the entire spectral area from THz to x-rays to gamma ray beams that are intrinsically synchronized to a laser pulse. A.6 Other Sources...

296

Subcritical measurements using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes recent measurements of the subcritical neutron multiplication factor using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method. This work was supported by a program of collaboration between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan related to the development of fast breeder technology. The experiment reported consists of a configuration of two interacting tanks of uranyl nitrate aqueous solution with different uranium concentrations in each tank. The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method obtains the subcriticality from the signals of three detectors: the first, a parallel plate ionization chamber with /sup 252/Cf electroplated on one of its plates that is located in or near the system containing the fissile material, and produces an electrical pulse for every spontaneous fission that occurs and thereby serves as a timed source of fission neutrons; and the second and third detectors that are placed in or near the system containing fissile material and serve to detect particles from the fission chain multiplication process. 9 refs.

Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Kryter, R.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light SourceCommunication  

SciTech Connect

Research at the world's accelerator- (storage-ring and linac) based light sources is one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of science. It frequently results in direct benefits to society, thereby demonstrating the value of the research with very concrete examples, but this is not widely understood or appreciated outside of the immediate user community. Our growing group of light source communicators from facilities in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, inspired by the Interactions.org Web site created by high-energy (elementary-particle)physics communicators, concluded that a light source community Web site (lightsources.org) would be the best tool for establishing effective collaboration between the communications offices of the world's light sources and to maximize the impact of our efforts. We envision lightsources.org to serve as a one-stop-shopping site for information about all aspects of light sources and the research they make possible. Audiences to be served include science communicators, the press, policymakers, the light source community, the wider scientific community, the science-interested public, and students and educators. Our proposal has been sent to the world's light source facility directors by J. Murray Gibson (APS) and William G. Stirling (ESRF). As a result,light sources.org is now being supported by a growing list of facilities from Europe, North America, and Asia. We hope to launch lightsources.org before the end of 2004.

Robinson, Art

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer SAFWAN only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed emitting diodes; LEDs; Animal forage; Excitation-emission matrices; EEM. INTRODUCTION Movement of chemical

299

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Phase estimation with weak measurement using a white light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a high precision phase estimation based on a weak measurements scheme using commercial light-emitting diode. The method is based on a measurement of the imaginary part of the weak value of a polarization operator. The imaginary part of the weak value appeared due to the measurement interaction itself. The sensitivity of our method is equivalent to resolving light pulses of order of attosecond and it is robust against chromatic dispersion.

Xiao-Ye Xu; Yaron Kedem; Kai Sun; Lev Vaidman; Chuan-Feng Li; Guang-Can Guo

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

305

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

306

STUDY OF FODO STRUCTURES FOR A SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source of Very High Brilliance, SSRL-ACD-Note 1128. K. Kim,proposed by Wiedemann for the SSRL [7] has been studied as a

Wrulich, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

ICFA Workshop on Future Light Sources Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources Overview C. Pellegrini Overview of SASE Theory and Planned Experiments D. Nguyen Overview of Gun and Linac FEL Experimental Results H. Kitamura Advanced Insertion...

308

Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ICANS-XIV. The fourteenth meeting of the international collaboration on advanced neutron sources.  

SciTech Connect

The meeting began with a reception on Sunday evening. Monday's plenary sessions included status reports on the four operating spallation neutron sources, IPNS, ISIS, KENS, and the Lujan Center; on the INR source under construction at Troitsk; on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor at Dubna; and on proposals for five new installations. We also heard reports on spin-off activities: the ASTE tests (liquid mercury target tests at the AGS accelerator at Brookhaven), the ACoM activities (developments aimed to provide cold moderators suitable for high-power pulsed sources), and the International Workshop on Cold Moderators for Pulsed Neutron Sources, held in September 1997 at Argonne. Jose Alonso and Bob Macek delivered enlightening invited talks overviewing linear accelerators and rings for spallation neutron sources. The rest of the meeting was devoted to targets and moderators and to instrumentation in a normal rotation of ICANS topics. There were altogether 84 oral reports and 23 poster presentations. On Tuesday and on Wednesday morning, we divided into separate series of sessions on Instrumentation and on Targets and Moderators. In the first, we had reports and discussions on instrumentation and techniques, on computer software, on instrument suites, and on new instruments and equipment. In the second series were sessions on liquid target systems, on solid target systems, on neutron production and target physics, on moderator physics and performance, and on target and moderator neutronics. The Tuesday evening meetings went on until 10:00, making for a 14-hour working day. That everyone willingly endured the long hours is a credit to the dedication of the attendees. On Wednesday afternoon, we boarded buses for the 1-hour trip to Argonne, where attendees toured IPNS and the Advanced Photon Source. Returning to Starved Rock, we enjoyed boat rides on the Illinois River and then a barbecue banquet dinner at the Lodge. All day Thursday and Friday morning, the attendees, in small working groups, discussed next-generation powder diffractometers, critical heat flux limitations on solid targets, monte carlo instrument simulation, prospects for high- and low-energy spectroscopy, small angle scattering and reflectometry, and the roles of solid and liquid targets in high-power pulsed spallation sources. Representatives of the laboratories participating in ICANS met Thursday evening to discuss the outcome of ICANS XIV and to decide whether, where, and when the next meeting would take place. They agreed to meet again in about 2 years in Japan. After the lunch break on Friday, the working group chairs presented the findings of their groups to the participants in a final plenary session, and the meeting adjourned with good feelings of accomplishment.

Carpenter, J. M., ed.; Tobin, C. A., ed.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz with a maximum peak energy of 10 MJ is described. The solid deuterium converter with a volume of V=160 cm3 (8 mol), which is exposed to a thermal neutron fluence of 4.5x10^13 n/cm2, delivers up to 550 000 UCN per pulse outside of the biological shield at the experimental area. UCN densities of ~ 10/cm3 are obtained in stainless steel bottles of V ~ 10 L resulting in a storage efficiency of ~20%. The measured UCN yields compare well with the predictions from a Monte Carlo simulation developed to model the source and to optimize its performance for the upcoming upgrade of the TRIGA Mainz into a user facility for UCN physics.

J. Karch; Yu. Sobolev; M. Beck; K. Eberhardt; G. Hampel; W. Heil; R. Kieser; T. Reich; N. Trautmann; M. Ziegner

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator  

SciTech Connect

We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

312

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Black hole neutron star coalescence as a source of gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations showing the coalescence of a black hole with a neutron star to be a promising theoretical source of short duration gamma-ray bursts. The favorable features of the process include rapid onset, millisecond variability, a duration much longer than the dynamical timescale, and a range of outcomes sufficient to allow variety in the properties of individual gamma-ray bursts. Interestingly, the process of coalescence differs rather markedly from past predictions.

W. H. Lee; W. Kluzniak

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

Pogge, James R [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Neutron Energy Spectrum of a Po-Be (alpha,n) Source  

SciTech Connect

The newtron energy spectrum of a Po-Be (alpha, n) source was measured as part of an intercomparison of newtron energy spectral measurements sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Intensity maxima for neutron energies > 1 MeV were seen at or near 1.4, 2.1, 3.1, 5.0, 6.7, 7.7 and 9.7 MeV.

Anderson, M. E.

1972-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

High-Efficiency Nitride-Base Photonic Crystal Light Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research activities performed in the framework of this project represent a major breakthrough in the demonstration of Photonic Crystals (PhC) as a competitive technology for LEDs with high light extraction efficiency. The goals of the project were to explore the viable approaches to manufacturability of PhC LEDS through proven standard industrial processes, establish the limits of light extraction by various concepts of PhC LEDs, and determine the possible advantages of PhC LEDs over current and forthcoming LED extraction concepts. We have developed three very different geometries for PhC light extraction in LEDs. In addition, we have demonstrated reliable methods for their in-depth analysis allowing the extraction of important parameters such as light extraction efficiency, modal extraction length, directionality, internal and external quantum efficiency. The information gained allows better understanding of the physical processes and the effect of the design parameters on the light directionality and extraction efficiency. As a result, we produced LEDs with controllable emission directionality and a state of the art extraction efficiency that goes up to 94%. Those devices are based on embedded air-gap PhC - a novel technology concept developed in the framework of this project. They rely on a simple and planar fabrication process that is very interesting for industrial implementation due to its robustness and scalability. In fact, besides the additional patterning and regrowth steps, the process is identical as that for standard industrially used p-side-up LEDs. The final devices exhibit the same good electrical characteristics and high process yield as a series of test standard LEDs obtained in comparable conditions. Finally, the technology of embedded air-gap patterns (PhC) has significant potential in other related fields such as: increasing the optical mode interaction with the active region in semiconductor lasers; increasing the coupling of the incident light into the active region of solar cells; increasing the efficiency of the phosphorous light conversion in white light LEDs etc. In addition to the technology of embedded PhC LEDs, we demonstrate a technique for improvement of the light extraction and emission directionality for existing flip-chip microcavity (thin) LEDs by introducing PhC grating into the top n-contact. Although, the performances of these devices in terms of increase of the extraction efficiency are not significantly superior compared to those obtained by other techniques like surface roughening, the use of PhC offers some significant advantages such as improved and controllable emission directionality and a process that is directly applicable to any material system. The PhC microcavity LEDs have also potential for industrial implementation as the fabrication process has only minor differences to that already used for flip-chip thin LEDs. Finally, we have demonstrated that achieving good electrical properties and high fabrication yield for these devices is straightforward.

James Speck; Evelyn Hu; Claude Weisbuch; Yong-Seok Choi; Kelly McGroddy; Gregor Koblmuller; Elison Matioli; Elizabeth Rangel; Fabian Rol; Dobri Simeonov

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Opportunities for Neutrino Physics at the Spallation Neutron Source: A White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this document, the product of a workshop at the SNS in May 2012, we describe this free, high-quality stopped-pion neutrino source and outline various physics that could be done using it. We describe without prioritization some specific experimental configurations that could address these physics topics.

A. Bolozdynya; F. Cavanna; Y. Efremenko; G. T. Garvey; V. Gudkov; A. Hatzikoutelis; W. R. Hix; W. C. Louis; J. M. Link; D. M. Markoff; G. B. Mills; K. Patton; H. Ray; K. Scholberg; R. G. Van de Water; C. Virtue; D. H. White; S. Yen; J. Yoo

2012-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.

Garren, A.A. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Accelerators]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.J. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Accelerators; Green, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.; Johnson, D.E. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States); Leung, E.M.; Madura, D.D. [Martin Marietta Technologies, Inc., Rancho Bernardo, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neutron Repulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding how: a.) The Sun generates and releases neutrinos, energy and solar-wind hydrogen and helium; b.) An inhabitable planet formed and life evolved around an ordinary-looking star; c.) Continuous climate change - induced by cyclic changes in gravitational interactions of the Sun's energetic core with planets - has favored survival by adaptation.

Oliver K. Manuel

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Containment performance analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for steaming-pool-type accidents and an accident involving molten core-concrete interaction. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during postulated severe accidents. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms for each scenario, which are to be used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for these postulated severe accidents. Also highlighted will be a comparison of source terms estimated by two different versions of the MELCOR code.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Discreteness and the transmission of light from distant sources  

SciTech Connect

We model the classical transmission of a massless scalar field from a source to a detector on a background causal set. The predictions do not differ significantly from those of the continuum. Thus, introducing an intrinsic inexactitude to lengths and durations--or more specifically, replacing the Lorentzian manifold with an underlying discrete structure--need not disrupt the usual dynamics of propagation.

Dowker, Fay [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Henson, Joe; Sorkin, Rafael D. [Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline Street N., Waterloo, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

(International Panel on 14 MeV Intense Neutron Source Based on Accelerators for Fusion Materials Study)  

SciTech Connect

Both travelers were members of a nine-person US delegation that participated in an international workshop on accelerator-based 14 MeV neutron sources for fusion materials research hosted by the University of Tokyo. Presentations made at the workshop reviewed the technology developed by the FMIT Project, advances in accelerator technology, and proposed concepts for neutron sources. One traveler then participated in the initial meeting of the IEA Working Group on High Energy, High Flux Neutron Sources in which efforts were begun to evaluate and compare proposed neutron sources; the Fourth FFTF/MOTA Experimenters' Workshop which covered planning and coordination of the US-Japan collaboration using the FFTF reactor to irradiate fusion reactor materials; and held discussions with several JAERI personnel on the US-Japan collaboration on fusion reactor materials.

Thoms, K.R.; Wiffen, F.W.

1991-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Light-ion production in the interaction of 96 MeV neutrons with carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double-differential cross sections for light-ion (p, d, t, 3He and alpha) production in carbon induced by 96 MeV neutrons have been measured at eight laboratory angles from 20 degrees to 160 degrees in steps of 20 degrees. Experimental techniques are presented as well as procedures for data taking and data reduction. Deduced energy-differential, angle-differential and production cross sections are reported. Experimental cross sections are compared with theoretical reaction model calculations and experimental data in the literature. The measured particle data show marked discrepancies from the results of the model calculations in spectral shape and magnitude. The measured production cross sections for protons, deuterons, tritons, 3He, and alpha particles support the trends suggested by data at lower energies.

U. Tippawan; S. Pomp; J. Blomgren; S. Dangtip; C. Gustavsson; J. Klug; P. Nadel-Turonski; L. Nilsson; M. sterlund; N. Olsson; O. Jonsson; A. V. Prokofiev; P. -U. Renberg; V. Corcalciuc; Y. Watanabe; A. J. Koning

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

325

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources forDeveloping-Country Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources haverecently attained levels of efficiency and cost that allow them tocompete with fluorescent lighting for off-grid applications in thedeveloping world. Additional attributes (optics, size, ruggedness, andservice life) make them potentially superior products. Enormousreductions in energy use and greenhouse-gas emissions are thus possible,and system costs can be much lower given the ability to downsize thecharging and energy storage components compared to a fluorescentstrategy. However, there is a high risk of "market-spoiling" if inferiorproducts are introduced and result in user dissatisfaction. Completesystems involve the integration of light sources and optics, energysupply, and energy storage. A natural starting point for evaluatingproduct quality is to focus on the individual light sources. This reportdescribes testing results for batches of 10 5mm white LEDs from 26manufacturers. Efficacies and color properties are presented.

Mills, Evan

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

Novel broadband light sources and pulse generation techniques at 1.5 [mu]m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wide diversity of applications, in both fundamental science and practical technology, has come to rely on broadband optical light sources as key enabling tools. In this thesis, we investigate three devices that contribute ...

Shen, Hanfei M, 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-Country Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stewart Craine collected the LED samples in Shenzen, China4. Variation in efficacy of LEDs tested. Figure 5. Figure 6.Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-

Mills, Evan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/papers/syncpanel.pdf. M.F.Coherent Light Source 5 (LCLS) in the United States andwww-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/ Accelerator 6 (TESLA) in

Chong, Henry Herng Wei

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

LS-35 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnet Field Calculations Robert J. Lari September 23, 1985 Quadrupole Magnet Figure 1 shows the cross section of...

331

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the authors have made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

Marzec, B. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the author shave made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A graphite-moderated pulsed spallation ultra-cold neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposals exist and efforts are under way to construct pulsed spallation ultra-cold neutron (UCN) sources at accelerator laboratories around the world. At the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), U.S.A., it is planned to use solid deuterium (SD_2) for the UCN production from cold neutrons. The philosophies about how the cold neutrons are obtained are quite different, though. The present proposal describes a third approach which applies a temperature optimized graphite moderator in combination with the SD_2 and qualitatively combines advantages of the different schemes. The scheme described here allows to build a powerful UCN source. Assuming a pulsed 2 mA, 590 MeV proton beam with an average current of 10 microA, one obtains UCN densities in excess of 2000 cm^{-3}, UCN fluxes of about 10^6 cm^{-2} s^{-1}, and total numbers of UCN in excess of 2*10^9 every 800 s.

Klaus Kirch

2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Shielding analysis and design of the KIPT experimental neutron source facility of Ukraine.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility [1]. The facility uses the existing electron accelerators of KIPT in Ukraine. The neutron source of the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Reactor physics experiments and material performance characterization will also be carried out. The subcritical assembly is driven by neutrons generated by the electron beam interactions with the target material. A fraction of these neutrons has an energy above 50 MeV generated through the photo nuclear interactions. This neutron fraction is very small and it has an insignificant contribution to the subcritical assembly performance. However, these high energy neutrons are difficult to shield and they can be slowed down only through the inelastic scattering with heavy isotopes. Therefore the shielding design of this facility is more challenging relative to fission reactors. To attenuate these high energy neutrons, heavy metals (tungsten, iron, etc.) should be used. To reduce the construction cost, heavy concrete with 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} density is selected as a shielding material. The iron weight fraction in this concrete is about 0.6. The shape and thickness of the heavy concrete shield are defined to reduce the biological dose equivalent outside the shield to an acceptable level during operation. At the same time, special attention was give to reduce the total shield mass to reduce the construction cost. The shield design is configured to maintain the biological dose equivalent during operation {le} 0.5 mrem/h inside the subcritical hall, which is five times less than the allowable dose for working forty hours per week for 50 weeks per year. This study analyzed and designed the thickness and the shape of the radial and top shields of the neutron source based on the biological dose equivalent requirements inside the subcritical hall during operation. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX is selected because of its capabilities for transporting electrons, photons, and neutrons. Mesh based weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized to estimate the biological dose outside the shield with good statistics. A significant effort dedicated to the accurate prediction of the biological dose equivalent outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The building wall was designed with ordinary concrete to reduce the biological dose equivalent to the public with a safety factor in the range of 5 to 20.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Naberezhnev, D.; Duo, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

338

Environmental Assessment for the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II) BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK U. S. Department Of Energy Brookhaven Site Office September 2006 DOE/EA-1558 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PREFACE....................................................................................................................1 2.0 SUMMARY .................................................................................................................2 3.0 PURPOSE AND NEED ............................................................................................10 4.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES, INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION.....................................................................................................................11

339

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Science Highlights high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy image Nanocrystal Catalyst Transforms Impure Hydrogen into Electricity September 18, 2013 Brookhaven Lab scientists use simple, 'green' process to create novel core-shell catalyst that tolerates carbon monoxide in fuel cells and opens new, inexpensive pathways for zero-emission vehicles. Organic Solar Cells Shedding New Light on the 'Electron Highways' of Organic Solar Cells August 30, 2013 Researchers at Brookhaven Lab and Stony Brook University have developed a way to map out the degree of "traffic congestion" on the electron highways within the photoactive layer of organic solar cells. Li-ion Batteries For Better Li-ion Batteries, Scientists Watch One at Work August 29, 2013

340

New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics First Molecular-Level Enzyme Images Could Improve Breast-Cancer Therapy Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies MARCH 3, 2009 Bookmark and Share The DOE, as part of its Clean Coal & Natural Gas Power Systems initiative, has a "Turbines of Tomorrow" program with the Program Performance Goal to: "By 2010, develop turbine technology that is capable of efficiently

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Oak Ridge Reservation site evaluation report for the Advanced Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build for initial service late in this century. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide a useable neutron flux for scattering experiments 5 to 10 times as a high as that generated by any existing research reactor, secondary purposes include production of a variety of transuranic and other isotopes and irradiation of materials. The ANS is proposed to be located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report documents the evaluation of alternative sites on the ORR and the selection of a site for the ANS.

Sigmon, B.; Heitzman, A.C. Jr.; Morrissey, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Characteristics of a RF-Driven Ion Source for a Neutron Generator Used for Associated Particle Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present recent work on a prototype compact neutron generator for associated particle imaging (API). API uses alpha particles that are produced simultaneously with neutrons in the deuterium-tritium ({sup 2}D({sup 3}T,n){sup 4}{alpha}) fusion reaction to determine the direction of the neutrons upon exiting the reaction. This method determines the spatial position of each neutron interaction and requires the neutrons to be generated from a small spot in order to achieve high spatial resolution. The ion source for API is designed to produce a focused ion beam with a beam spot diameter of 1-mm or less on the target. We use an axial type neutron generator with a predicted neutron yield of 10{sup 8} n/s for a 50 {mu}A D/T ion beam current accelerated to 80 kV. The generator utilizes an RF planar spiral antenna at 13.56 MHz to create a highly efficient inductively coupled plasma at the ion source. Experimental results show that beams with an atomic ion fraction of over 80% can be obtained while utilizing only 100 watts of RF power in the ion source. A single acceleration gap with a secondary electron suppression electrode is used in the tube. Experimental results from ion source testing, such as the current density, atomic ion fraction, electron temperature, and electron density will be discussed.

Wu Ying; Leung, K.-N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hurley, John P. [Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 (United States); Ji Qing; Kwan, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals

Simos, N; Fallier, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An Overview of near-field vs. far-field radiation characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Overview of near-field vs. far-field radiation characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLS)

Tatchyn, R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and light-emit...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis of core-concrete interaction event with flooding for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses salient aspects of the methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from an accident involving a molten core-concrete interaction event (with and without flooding) in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for this postulated severe accident. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during this severe accident. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms, which are then used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for the support of the Conceptual Safety Analysis Report for ANS. The results are also to be used to examine the effectiveness of subpile room flooding during this type of severe accident.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Recent Performance of the SNS H-Source for 1-MW Neutron Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance of the SNS ion source and LEBT as they continue to deliver ~50 mA H- beams at a 5.3% duty factor required for neutron production with a ~1MW proton beam since the fall of 2009. The source continues to deliver persistent H- beams for up to 6 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of ~4 mg, except when there are excessive plasma impurities. In one case the H- beam decayed due to an air leak, which is shown to be consistent with sputtering of the Cs layer, and which allows to bracket the plasma potential. In another case, the performance of two sources degraded progressively, which appears to be consistent with a progressive deterioration of the Cs covered Mo converter. These two and other recently discovered issues are discussed in detail.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Nguyen, C T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Cong Tam Nguyen

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Videos on the YouTube Channel of the Advanced Light Source (ALS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a DOE Scientific User Facility and a division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is one of the world's brightest sources of ultraviolet and soft-x-ray beams, generating intense light for scientific and technical research. The ALS produces light in the x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum that is one billion times brighter than the sun. This extraordinary tool offers unprecedented opportunities for state-of-the art research in materials science, biology, chemistry, physics, and the environmental sciences. The channel includes twelve presentations from the ALS 2012 Users Meeting.

352

Modern lighting sources and controls for energy efficient lighting and a smart control algorithm application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important measure of prosperity of a nation. Energy has been the life-blood for continual progress of human civilization. Since the beginning of industrial revolution around two centuries ago, the global energy consumption has increased ... Keywords: energy efficiency, energy saving, fuzzy logic, modern lighting, sensors, smart controls

?afak Sa?lam; Blent Oral

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Coordinator Program Coordinator Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide

354

High-Brightness Beams from a Light Source Injector The Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of existing linacs, and in particular light source injectors, for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments is becoming more common due to the desire to test FELs at ever shorter wavelengths. The high-brightness, high-current beams required by high-gain FELs impose technical specifications that most existing linacs were not designed to meet. Moreover, the need for specialized diagnostics, especially shot-to-shot data acquisition, demands substantial modification and upgrade of conventional linacs. Improvements have been made to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac in order to produce and characterize high-brightness beams. Specifically, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL in support of fourth-generation light source research. The enhancements to the linac technical and diagnostic capabilities that allowed for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm are described. Recent results, includi...

Travish, G; Borland, M; Hahne, M; Harkay, K C; Lewellen, J W; Lumpkin, Alex H; Milton, S V; Sereno, N S

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Observations of Space Charge effects in the Spallation Neutron Source Accumulator Ring  

SciTech Connect

The Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring was designed to allow independent control of the transverse beam distribution in each plane. However, at high beam intensities, nonlinear space charge forces can strongly influence the final beam distribution and compromise our ability to independently control the transverse distributions. In this study we investigate the evolution of the beam at intensities of up to ~8x10^13 ppp through both simulation and experiment. Specifically, we analyze the evolution of the beam distribution for beams with different transverse aspect ratios and tune splits. We present preliminary results of simulations of our experiments.

Potts III, Robert E [ORNL; Cousineau, Sarah M [ORNL; Holmes, Jeffrey A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Air-Source Heat Pumps for Residential and Light Commercial Space Conditioning Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology brief provides the latest information on current and emerging air-source heat pump technologies for space heating and space cooling of residential and light commercial buildings. Air-source heat pumps provide important options that can reduce ownership costs while reducing noise and enhancing reliability and customer comfort. The tech brief also describes new air-source heat pumps with an important load shaping and demand response option.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Modernization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to Provide a Cold Neutron Source and Experimentation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the installation of a cold neutron source at HFIR with respect to the project as a modernization of the facility. The paper focuses on why the project was required, the scope of the cold source project with specific emphasis on the design, and project management information.

Rothrock, Benjamin G [ORNL; Farrar, Mike B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Transmutation facility for weapons grade plutonium based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft, pending eventual use as nuclear reactor fuel. A transmutation facility consisting of a fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons grade plutonium in the form of PuO2 pebbles in a lithium slurry was investigated and found to be technically feasible. A design concept/operation scenario was developed for a facility which would be able to transmute the world's estimated inventory of weapons grade plutonium to 11% Pu-240 concentration in about 25 years. The fusion neutron source would be based on tokamak plasma operating conditions and magnet technology being qualified in ongoing R D programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material needed to handle the high heat fluxes. Extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify other technologies required for the facility.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Transmutation facility for weapons-grade plutonium disposition based on a tokamak fusion neutron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that weapons-grade plutonium could be processed through a transmutation facility to build up sufficient actinide and fission product inventories to serve as a deterrent to diversion or theft during subsequent storage, pending eventual use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. A transmutation facility consisting of a tokamak fusion neutron source surrounded by fuel assemblies containing the weapons-grade plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2} pebbles in a lithium slurry is investigated. A design concept/operation scenario is developed for a facility that would be able to transmute the world`s estimated surplus inventory of weapons-grade plutonium to 11% {sup 240}Pu concentration in nearly 25 yr. The fusion neutron source would be based on plasma physics and plasma support technology being qualified in ongoing research and development (R&D) programs, and the plutonium fuel would be based on existing technology. A new R&D program would be required to qualify a refractory metal alloy structural material that would be needed to handle the high heat fluxes; otherwise, extensions of existing technologies and acceleration of existing R&D programs would seem to be adequate to qualify all required technologies. Such a facility might feasibly be deployed in 20 to 30 yr, or sooner with a crash program. 49 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

Stacey, W.M.; Pilger, B.L.; Mowrey, J.A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Performance of a 14-MeV neutron generator as an in situ calibration source for TFTR  

SciTech Connect

TFTR will soon enter its D-T phase with the introduction of tritium. This will result in the production of neutrons having 14-MeV energy which is significantly greater than the 2.5-MeV neutrons encountered during D-D operation. In preparation for the D-T phase, a calibration of the four neutron detection systems was performed using a 14-MeV neutron generator producing 10{sup 8} n/sec. To account for the spatial extent of the toroidally shaped plasma and for neutrons scattered from surrounding structures, detector responses were determined with the source positioned at many locations inside the vacuum vessel. Before the generator could be used as a calibration source, a characterization of its total yield and angular emission properties was obtained. The total yield was determined by aluminum activation methods to within {plus_minus}6%, while the angular emission was found to be anisotropic in the forward and reverse cones along the generator axis. After the characterization was performed, the generator was mounted on a moveable track inside the vacuum vessel, where it could be remotely moved across the view of each detector. This paper presents details of the methods and results of the source characterization, together with initial results of the in-vessel D-T neutron calibration.

Roquemore, A.L.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Strachan, J.D. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

6 GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34 October 23, 1985 YC/AVR To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV Light Source, the following procedure will be used by all the task groups. The procedure uses a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) to break down the project into manageable, easy to estimate, components. The project is first broken down into major tasks or categories. Then each major division is continuously subdivided until the desired level of detail is achieved. This can be shown best by using the example of the WBS of the Aladdin Upgrade Project, excerpts of which are included in Appendix A. As shown in the example, the project is first divided into: 1.1 Project Management and Administration

364

Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Recovered Light Source Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Energy-recovered linac/TJNAF Free Electron Laser Developed at: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Brookhaven National

365

Recent Beam Measurements and New Instrumentation at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

Sannibale, F.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Chin, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Filippetto, D.; /Frascati; Jaegerhofer, L.; /Vienna, Tech. U.; Julian, J.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Low, R.; Plate, D.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.; Scarvie, T.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC; Weber, J.; Zolotorev, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

366

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

Sannibale, Fernando; Baptiste, Kenneth; Barry, Walter; Chin, Michael; Filippetto, Daniele; Jaegerhofer, Lukas; Julian, James; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Low, Raymond; Plate, David; Portmann, Gregory; Robin, David; Scarvie, Tomas; Stupakov, Gennady; Weber, Jonah; Zolotorev, Max

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Plans for an Integrated Front-End Test Stand at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

A spare Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) is presently being fabricated by industry with delivery to Oak Ridge National Laboratory planned in late 2012. The establishment of a test stand at the Spallation Neutron Source site is underway so that complete acceptance testing can be performed during the winter of 2012-2013. This activity is the first step in the establishment of an integrated front-end test stand that will include an ion source, low-energy beam transport (LEBT), RFQ, medium-energy beam transport, diagnostics, and a beam dump. The test stand will be capable of delivering an H- ion beam of up to 50 mA with a pulse length of 1 ms and a repetition rate of 60 Hz or a proton beam of up to 50 mA, 100us, 1Hz. The test stand will enable the following activities: complete ion source characterization; development of a magnetic LEBT chopper; development of a two-source layout; development of beam diagnostics; and study of beam dynamics of high intensity beam.

Champion, Mark S [ORNL; Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL; Heidenreich, Dale A [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Moss, John [ORNL; Roseberry, Jr., R Tom [ORNL; Schubert, James Phillip [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Final Report US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The history of IEC development will be briefly described, and some speculation about future directions will be offered. The origin of IEC is due to the brilliance of Phil Farnsworth, inventor of electronic TV in the US. Early experiments were pioneered in the late 1960s by Robert Hirsch who later became head of the DOE fusion program. At that time studies of IEC physics quickly followed at the University of Illinois and at Penn State University. However, despite many successes in this early work, IEC research died as DOE funding stopped in the mid 1980s. In the early 90s, R. W. Bussard of EMC revived work with a new major project based on a magnetic assisted IEC. While doing supportive studies for that project, G. Miley proposed a grided STAR mode IEC as a neutron source for NAA. This concept was later used commercially by Daimler- Benz in Germany to analysis impurities in incoming ores. This represented a first practical application of the IEC. During this period other research groups at LANL, U of Wisconsin and Kyoto University entered IEC research with innovative new concepts and approaches to IEC physics and applications. Much of this work is documented in the present and in past US-Japan Workshops. At present we stand on the threshold of a new area of IEC applications as neutron source, for isotope production, and as a plasma source. These applications provide a way to continue IEC understanding and technology development with the ultimate goal being a fusion power plant. Indeed, a distinguishing feature of the IEC vs. other fusion confinement approaches is the unique opportunity for spin off applications along the way to a power producing plant.

Miley, George, H.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Construction of Thermal Neutron Calibration Fields Using a Graphite Pile and Americium-Beryllium Neutron Sources at KAERI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Measurements / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Protection

B. H. Kim; S. M. Jun; J. S. Kim; K. S. Lim; J. L. Kim

370

A New Low-Energy Neutron Spectrometer Based on Position-Sensitive Proportional Counter for Accelerator-Based Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Measurements / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

I. Murata; H. Miyamaru; I. Kato; S. Yoshida; Y. Mori

371

Watching an uniformly moving source of light using a telescope and a frequency-meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scenario that involves a stationary observer who detects a point like source of light moving with constant velocity at a constant altitude, using a telescope and a frequency-meter. We derive a formula for the angular velocity at which we should rotate the axis of the telescope and a formula that relates the proper period at which the source emits successive wave crests and the proper period at which the stationary observer receives them

Bernhard Rothenstein; Ioan Damian

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study -- Volume 1: Main report. Final report, Revision 12/94  

SciTech Connect

A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology. Volume 2 of this report contains 26 appendices containing results, meeting minutes, and fuel panel presentations.

Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Advanced neutron source project information management. A model for the future  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a proposed new research facility that will provide steady-state beams of neutrons for experiments by more than 1000 researchers per year in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will also include irradiation capabilities to produce radioisotopes for medical applications, research, industry, and materials testing. This paper discusses the architecture and data flow used by the project, some quantitative examinations of potential cost savings and return on investment and software applications used to generate and manage data across IBM-compatible personal computers, Macintosh, and Unix-based workstations. Personnel management aspects addressed include providing paper copy to users only when needed for adequate technical review, using graded approaches to providing support for numerous user-needed software applications, and implementing a phased approach to compliance with computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) standards that allows sufficient user flexibility for performing technical tasks while providing needed data sharing and integration.

King-Jones, K.; Cleaves, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Neutron Source project information management: A model for the future  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a proposed new research facility that will provide steady-state beams of neutrons for experiments by more than 1,000 researchers per year in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will also include irradiation capabilities to produce radioisotopes for medical applications, research, industry, and materials testing. This paper discusses the architecture and data flow used by the project, some quantitative examinations of potential cost savings and return on investment, and software applications used to generate and manage data across IBM-compatible personal computers, Macintosh, and Unix-based workstations. Personnel management aspects addressed include providing paper copy to users only when needed for adequate technical review, using graded approaches to providing support for numerous user-needed software applications, and implementing a phased approach to compliance with computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) standards that allows sufficient user flexibility for performing technical tasks while providing needed data sharing and integration.

King-Jones, K.; Cleaves, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Engineering design issues of a low aspect ratio tokamak volumetric neutron source  

SciTech Connect

Engineering design issues of a volumetric neutron source (VNS) based on a steady state low aspect ratio DT tokamak are presented. At the present the major radius is 0.8 m, the minor radius 0.6 m for an aspect ratio of 1.33, the plasma current is 10.1 MA, the toroidal field at the major radius is 1.8 T, the fusion power is 39 MW giving an average neutron wall loading of 1.0 MW/m(2) on the outboard side with an available testing area of 10 m(2). Two neutral beams delivering more than 20 MW are used to drive the steady state fusion plasma. A single turn unshielded water cooled dispersion strengthened (DS) Cu centerpost is used in conjunction with a conducting Cu bell jar which acts as a vacuum boundary and the return legs for the toroidal field (TF) coils. The centerpost is 9 m long, carries 7.2 MA and is specially shaped to minimize ohmic heating, which is calculated using temperature dependent DS Cu properties and increases in resistivity due to nuclear transmutations are accounted for. A naturally diverted plasma scrapeoff layer dominated by pressure-driven instabilities is assumed giving a peak heat flux of 5.2 MW/m(2) on the diverter plates. Fabrication approaches for the centerpost and its replacement time lines have been estimated to be feasible and reasonable.

Sviatoslavky, I. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

DOE/EIS0247; Final Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SNS FEIS SNS FEIS Cover Sheet COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (DOE/EIS-0247) LOCATIONS OF ALTERNATIVE SITES: Illinois, New Mexico, New York, and Tennessee. CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. David Wilfert, EIS Document Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road, 146/FEDC Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Telephone: (800) 927-9964 Facsimile: (423) 576-4542 E-mail: NSNSEIS@ornl.gov Mr. Jeff Hoy, SNS Program Manager Office of Basic Energy Research U.S. Department of Energy (ER-10) Germantown, MD 20874 Telephone: (301) 903-4924 Facsimile: (301) 903-9513 E-mail: Jeff.Hoy@mailgw.er.doe.gov

377

Record of Decision for the Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

140 140 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 1999 / Notices or minimize environmental harm that may result from implementing the Redevelopment Plan. Accordingly, Navy will dispose of the surplus Federal property at Naval Air Station Barbers Point in a manner that is consistent with the State of Hawaii's Redevelopment Plan for the property. Dated: June 17, 1999. William J. Cassidy, Jr., Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Conversion And Redevelopment). Dated: June 25, 1999. Ralph W. Corey, CDR, JAGC, USN, Alternate Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 99-16691 Filed 6-29-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3810-FF-M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision.

378

The Status of Research Regarding Magnetic Mirrors as a Fusion Neutron Source or Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results, theory and innovative ideas now point with increased confidence to the possibility of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) neutron source which would be on the path to an attractively simple Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror (ATM) power plant. Although magnetic mirror research was terminated in the US 20 years ago, experiments continued in Japan (Gamma 10) and Russia (GDT), with a very small US effort. This research has now yielded data, increased understanding, and generated ideas resulting in the new concepts described here. Early mirror research was carried out with circular axisymmetric magnets. These plasmas were MHD unstable due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature near the mid-plane. Then the minimum-B concept emerged in which the field line curvature was everywhere favorable and the plasma was situated in a MHD stable magnetic well (70% average beta in 2XII-B). The Ioffe-bar or baseball-coil became the standard for over 40 years. In the 1980's, driven by success with minimum-B stabilization and the control of ion cyclotron instabilities in PR6 and 2XII-B, mirrors were viewed as a potentially attractive concept with near-term advantages as a lower Q neutron source for applications such as a hybrid fission fuel factory or toxic waste burner. However there are down sides to the minimum-B geometry: coil construction is complex; restraining magnetic forces limit field strength and mirror ratios. Furthermore, the magnetic field lines have geodesic curvature which introduces resonant and neoclassical radial transport as observed in early tandem mirror experiments. So what now leads us to think that simple axisymmetric mirror plasmas can be stable? The Russian GDT experiment achieves on-axis 60% beta by peaking of the kinetic plasma pressure near the mirror throat (where the curvature is favorable) to counter-balance the average unfavorable mid-plane curvature. Then a modest augmentation of plasma pressure in the expander results in stability. The GDT experiments have confirmed the physics of effluent plasma stabilization predicted by theory. The plasma had a mean ion energy of 10 keV and a density of 5e19m-3. If successful, the axisymmetric tandem mirror extension of the GDT idea could lead to a Q {approx} 10 power plant of modest size and would yield important applications at lower Q. In addition to the GDT method, there are four other ways to augment stability that have been demonstrated; including: plasma rotation (MCX), diverter coils (Tara), pondermotive (Phaedrus & Tara), and end wall funnel shape (Nizhni Novgorod). There are also 5 stabilization techniques predicted, but not yet demonstrated: expander kinetic pressure (KSTM-Post), Pulsed ECH Dynamic Stabilization (Post), wall stabilization (Berk), non-paraxial end mirrors (Ryutov), and cusp ends (Kesner). While these options should be examined further together with conceptual engineering designs. Physics issues that need further analysis include: electron confinement, MHD and trapped particle modes, analysis of micro stability, radial transport, evaluation and optimization of Q, and the plasma density needed to bridge to the expansion-region. While promising all should be examined through increased theory effort, university-scale experiments, and through increased international collaboration with the substantial facilities in Russia and Japan The conventional wisdom of magnetic mirrors was that they would never work as a fusion concept for a number of reasons. This conventional wisdom is most probably all wrong or not applicable, especially for applications such as low Q (DT Neutron Source) aimed at materials testing or for a Q {approx} 3-5 fusion neutron source applied to destroying actinides in fission waste and breeding of fissile fuel.

Simonen, T

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling and analysis of hydrogen detonation events in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor containment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling, analyses, and evaluations for hydrogen detonation in selected regions of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) containment during hypothetical severe accident conditions. Shock wave generation and transport modeling and analyses were conducted for two stratified configurations in the dome region of the high bay. Principal tools utilized for these purposes were the CTH and CET89 computer codes. Dynamic pressure loading functions were generated for key locations and used for evaluating structural response behavior for which a finite-element model was developed using the ANSYS code. For the range of conditions analyzed in the two critical dome regions, it was revealed that the ANS containment would be able to withstand detonation loads without failure.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Kim, S.H.; Valenti, S.N.; Simpson, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sawruk, W. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Spallation Neutron Source Availability Top-Down Apportionment Using Characteristic Factors and Expert Opinion  

SciTech Connect

Apportionment is the assignment of top-level requirements to lower tier elements of the overall facility. A method for apportioning overall facility availability requirements among systems and subsystems is presented. Characteristics that influence equipment reliability and maintainability are discussed. Experts, using engineering judgment, scored each characteristic for each system whose availability design goal is to be established. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method is used to produce a set of weighted rankings for each characteristic for each alternative system. A mathematical model is derived which incorporates these weighting factors. The method imposes higher availability requirements on those systems in which an incremental increase in availability is easier to achieve, and lower availability requirements where greater availability is more difficult and costly. An example is given of applying this top-down apportionment methodology to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility.

Haire, M.J.; Schryver, J.C.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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381

Basics of Fusion-Fissison Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

FFRF, standing for the Fusion-Fission Research Facility represents an option for the next step project of ASIPP (Hefei, China) aiming to a first fusion-fission multifunctional device [1]. FFRF strongly relies on new, Lithium Wall Fusion plasma regimes, the development of which has already started in the US and China. With R/a=4/1m/m, Ipl=5 MA, Btor=4-6 T, PDT=50- 100 MW, Pfission=80-4000MW, 1 m thick blanket, FFRF has a unique fusion mission of a stationary fusion neutron source. Its pioneering mission of merging fusion and fission consists in accumulation of design, experimental, and operational data for future hybrid applications.

Leonid E. Zakharov

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

EXPERIENCE WITH COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE FROM A PARTNER LAB PERSPECTIVE.  

SciTech Connect

Collaborative development and operation of large physics experiments is fairly common. Less common is the collaborative development or operation of accelerators. A current example of the latter is the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS project was conceived as a collaborative effort between six DOE facilities. In the SNS case, the control system was also developed collaboratively. The SNS project has now moved beyond the collaborative development phase and into the phase where Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is integrating contributions from collaborating ''partner labs'' and is beginning accelerator operations. In this paper, the author reflects on the benefits and drawbacks of the collaborative development of an accelerator control system as implemented for the SNS project from the perspective of a partner lab.

HOFF, L.T.

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted.

Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination  

SciTech Connect

This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

Ian Ferguson

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

Rothman, E.Z. [ed.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Solid-state radioluminescent zeolite-containing composition and light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new type of RL light source consisting of a zeolite crystalline material, the intralattice spaces of which a tritiated compound and a luminophore are sorbed, and which material is optionally further dispersed in a refractive index-matched polymer matrix.

Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, John T. (Miamisburg, OH); Hawkins, Daniel B. (Fairbanks, AK); Renschler, Clifford L. (Tijeras, NM); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A 4p BaF2 detector for (n,g) cross section measurements at a spallation neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quest for improved neutron capture cross sections for advanced reactor concepts, transmutation of radioactive wastes as well as for astrophysical scenarios of neutron capture nucleosynthesis has motivated new experimental efforts based on modern techniques. Recent measurements in the keV region have shown that a 4p BaF2 detector represents an accurate and versatile instrument for such studies. The present work deals with the potential of such a 4p BaF2 detector in combination with spallation neutron sources, which offer large neutron fluxes over a wide energy range. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT package have been performed to investigate the critical backgrounds at a spallation facility, to optimize the detector design, and to discuss alternative solutions.

M. Heil; R. Reifarth; M. M. Fowler; R. C. Haight; F. Kppeler; R. S. Rundberg; E. H. Seabury; J. L. Ullmann; J. B. Wilhelmy; K. Wisshak

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

388

Design of an Aluminum Proton Beam Window for the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aluminum proton beam window design is being considered at the Spallation Neutron Source primarily to increase the lifetime of the window, with secondary advantages of higher beam transport efficiency and lower activation. The window separates the core vessel, the location of the mercury target, from the vacuum of the accelerator, while withstanding the pass through of a proton beam of up to 2 MW with 1.0 GeV proton energy. The current aluminum alloy being investigated for the window material is 6061-T651 due to its combination of high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good resistance to aqueous corrosion, as well as demonstrated dependability in previous high-radiation environments. The window design will feature a thin plate with closely spaced cross drilled cooling holes. An analytical approach was used to optimize the dimensions of the window before finite element analysis was used to simulate temperature profiles and stress fields resulting from thermal and static pressure loading. The resulting maximum temperature of 60 C and Von Mises stress of 71 MPa are very low compared to allowables for Al 6061-T651. A significant challenge in designing an aluminum proton beam window for SNS is integrating the window with the current 316L SS shield blocks. Explosion bonding was chosen as a joining technique because of the large bonding area required. A test program has commenced to prove explosion bonding can produce a robust vacuum joint. Pending successful explosion bond testing, the aluminum proton beam window design will be proven acceptable for service in the Spallation Neutron Source.

Janney, Jim G [ORNL; McClintock, David A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source is discussed with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nightime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

390

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision is disclosed. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode. 1 fig.

Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

Frank, Alan M. (Livermore, CA); Edwards, William R. (Modesto, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Facilities and Capabilities | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. The continuous neutron source at HFIR and the pulsed neutron source at SNS complement each other well and, along with their...

393

1982--1992: A decade of research on the vacuum ultraviolet ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses highlights of research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and X-ray lithography.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The New Munich Neutron Source FRM II: Overview and Uses for Biological Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron Physics at NIST M. Arif 8th UCN Workshop St. Petersburg ­ Moscow, Russia June 11-21, 2011 #12;NCNR Guide Hall 20 MW Reactor #12;Neutron Physics at the NCNR Beam Flux n cm-2 s-1 Peak Wavelength Facility Low Scatter Neutron Dosimeter Calibration Facility #12;December 31, 2012 Physics Physics Physics

Doster, Wolfgang

395

Design and operation of the wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample position with a large solid angle of detector coverage. The instrument incorporates modern neutron instrumentation, such as an elliptically focused neutron guide, high speed magnetic bearing choppers, and a massive array of {sup 3}He linear position sensitive detectors. Novel features of the spectrometer include the use of a large gate valve between the sample and detector vacuum chambers and the placement of the detectors within the vacuum, both of which provide a window-free final flight path to minimize background scattering while allowing rapid changing of the sample and sample environment equipment. ARCS views the SNS decoupled ambient temperature water moderator, using neutrons with incident energy typically in the range from 15 to 1500 meV. This range, coupled with the large detector coverage, allows a wide variety of studies of excitations in condensed matter, such as lattice dynamics and magnetism, in both powder and single-crystal samples. Comparisons of early results to both analytical and Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument performance demonstrate that the instrument is operating as expected and its neutronic performance is understood. ARCS is currently in the SNS user program and continues to improve its scientific productivity by incorporating new instrumentation to increase the range of science covered and improve its effectiveness in data collection.

Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Loguillo, M. J.; Lucas, M. S.; Delaire, O. [Neutron Scattering Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Tang, X.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory 138-78, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Design and operation of the wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample position with a large solid angle of detector coverage. The instrument incorporates modern neutron instrumentation, such as an elliptically-focused neutron guide, high speed magnetic bearing choppers and a massive array of 3He linear position sensitive detectors. Novel features of the spectrometer include the use of a large gate valve between the sample and detector vacuum chambers and the placement of the detectors within the vacuum, both of which provide a window-free final flight path to minimize background scattering while allowing rapid changing of the sample and sample environment equipment. ARCS views the SNS decoupled ambient temperature water moderator, using neutrons with incident energy typically in the range from 15 to 1500 meV. This range, coupled with the large detector coverage, allows a wide variety of studies of excitations in condensed matter, such as lattice dynamics and magnetism, in both powder and single-crystal samples. Comparisons of early results to both analytical and Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument performance demonstrate that the instrument is operating as expected and its neutronic performance is understood. ARCS is currently in the SNS user program, and continues to improve its scientific productivity by incorporating new instrumentation to increase the range of science covered and improve its effectiveness in data collection.

Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Loguillo, Mark [ORNL; Lucas, Matthew [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Tang, Xiaoli [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Lin, J. Y. Y. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Fultz, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Neutronic Aspects and Recent Experimental Results with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Neutronic Aspects and Recent Experimental Results with Methane Moderators at IUCF Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS). ...

398

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Protein Structures Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

400

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel By Jared Sagoff * October 10, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Thanks in part to research performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded today to Americans Brian Kobilka and Robert Lefkowitz for their work on G-protein-coupled receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors, or GPCRs, are a large family of proteins embedded in a cell's membrane that sense molecules outside the cell and activate a cascade of different cellular processes in response. They constitute key components of how cells interact with their environments and are the target of nearly half of today's pharmaceuticals. These medicines work by connecting with many of the 800 or so human GPCRs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE H. J. Moe V. R. Veluri LS-55-Revised Harch 1987 2 1.0 Introduction Shielding estimates for the linac, positron converter, booster synchrotron and the positron storage ring have been computed using preliminary design information. Calculations have been made of the resulting radiation for several types of operations involving normal beam loss, as well as, certain accidental beam losses. When available, experimental data from existing accelerator and light source facilities have been used in lieu of theoretical estimates. 2.0 Shielding Design Objective The Department of Energy's basic occupational exposure limit is 5 rem per year (DOE 81). However, in its guidance for maintaining exposures "as

402

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE-Il  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE-Il PROJECT SLAC NATIONAL ACCELERATOR LABORATORY AGENCY: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1904) on a project to expand the existing Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). One of SLAC's major scientific facilities is the LCLS, the world's first hard X-ray free electron laser. The LCLS X-ray laser beams enable the simultaneous investigation of a material's electronic and structural properties on the size (sub-nanometer) and time (femto-second) scales that determine their function. Research programs at SLAC include materials science, catalytic sciences, structural molecular biology, and molecular environmental

403

Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

Ma,H.; Rose, J.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC. Radiological Considerations and Shielding calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC will be the world's first X-ray free electron laser when it becomes operational in 2009. Pulses of X-ray laser light from LCLS will be many orders of magnitude brighter and several orders of magnitude shorter than what can be produced by other X-ray sources available in the world. These characteristics will enable frontier new science in many areas. This paper describes the LCLS beam parameters and its lay-out. Results of the Monte Carlo calculations for the shielding design of the electron dump line, radiation damage to undulator, the residual radiation and the soil activation around the electron dump are presented.

Mao, X.S.; Fasso, A.; Nakao, N.; Rokni, S.H.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility (12/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Stanford Linear A ccelerator Center DOE/EA-1426 Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility LCLS December 2002 LCLS Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1426 December 2002 Page - i - Environmental Assessment for LCLS Experimental Facility Table of Contents Preface ............................................................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Summary ................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Need for LCLS ..................................................................................................... 6 3.0 Description of Proposed Action and Alternatives

406

Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

Jensen, George A. (Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA); Molton, Peter M. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

New implementation of an SX700 undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly engineered implementation of a collimated SX700-style beam line for soft x-rays is described. This facility is operational at the Advanced Light Source and delivers high brightness undulator beams to a scanning zone plate microscope and to an array of end stations for x-ray spectroscopic studies of wet surfaces. Switching between branches is motorized, servo-steering systems maintain throughput and the monochromator works together with the elliptical undulator for a fully automated facility.

Warwick, T.; Andresen, N.; Comins, J.; Kaznacheyev, K.; Kortright, J.B.; McKean, P.J.; Padmore, H.A.; Shuh, D.K.; Stevens, T.; Tyliszczak, T.

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Neutron Scattering Facilities 1982  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEUTRON SOURCES NEUTRON SOURCES Types of Sources U.S. Sources Available for Users Plans for the Future The Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA) SNS/ANL School on Neutron and x-Ray Scattering, June 2011 Jim Rhyne Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Los Alamos National Lab. What do we need to do neutron scattering? * Neutron Source - produces neutrons * Diffractometer or Spectrometer - Allows neutrons to interact with sample - Sorts out discrete wavelengths by monochromator (reactor) or by time of flight (pulse source) - Detectors pick up neutrons scattered from sample * Analysis methods to determine material properties * Brain power to interpret results Sources of neutrons for scattering * Nuclear Reactor - Neutrons produced from fission of 235 U - Fission spectrum neutrons

410

Report of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) safety workshop, Knoxville, Tennessee, October 25--26, 1988  

SciTech Connect

On October 25--26, 1988, about 60 people took part in an Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Safety Workshop, organized in cooperation with the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) and held in Knoxville, Tennessee. After a plenary session at which ANS Project staff presented status reports on the ANS design, research and development (R and D), and safety analysis efforts, the workshop broke into three working groups, each covering a different topic: Environmental and Waste Management, Applicable Regulatory Safety Criteria and Goals, and Reactor Concepts. Each group was asked to review the Project's approach to safety-related issues and to provide guidance on future reactor safety needs or directions for the Project. With the help of able chairmen, assisted by reporters and secretarial support, the working groups were extremely successful. Draft reports from each group were prepared before the workshop closed, and the major findings of each group were presented for review and discussion by the entire workshop attendance. This report contains the final version of the group reports, incorporating the results of the overall review by all the workshop participants.

Buchanan, J.R.; Dumont, J.N.; Kendrick, C.M.; Row, T.H.; Thompson, P.B.; West, C.D.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Muhlheim, M.D.; McBee, M.R. (comp.)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Silicon Photo-Multiplier radiation hardness tests with a beam controlled neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report radiation hardness tests performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator on silicon Photo-Multipliers, semiconductor photon detectors built from a square matrix of avalanche photo-diodes on a silicon substrate. Several samples from different manufacturers have been irradiated integrating up to 7x10^10 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2. Detector performances have been recorded during the neutron irradiation and a gradual deterioration of their properties was found to happen already after an integrated fluence of the order of 10^8 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2.

Angelone, M; Faccini, R; Pinci, D; Baldini, W; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Ramusino, A Cotta; Malaguti, R; Pozzati, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Silicon Photo-Multiplier radiation hardness tests with a beam controlled neutron source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report radiation hardness tests performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator on silicon Photo-Multipliers, semiconductor photon detectors built from a square matrix of avalanche photo-diodes on a silicon substrate. Several samples from different manufacturers have been irradiated integrating up to 7x10^10 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2. Detector performances have been recorded during the neutron irradiation and a gradual deterioration of their properties was found to happen already after an integrated fluence of the order of 10^8 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm^2.

M. Angelone; M. Pillon; R. Faccini; D. Pinci; W. Baldini; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; A. Cotta Ramusino; R. Malaguti; M. Pozzati

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Replacing a 252Cf source with a neutron generator in a shuffler - a conceptual design performed with MCNPX  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 252}Cf shuffler has been widely used in nuclear safeguards and radioactive waste management to assay fissile isotopes, such as {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu, present in a variety of samples, ranging from small cans of uranium waste to metal samples weighing several kilograms. Like other non-destructive assay instruments, the shuffler uses an interrogating neutron source to induce fissions in the sample. Although shufflers with {sup 252}Cf sources have been reliably used for several decades, replacing this isotopic source with a neutron generator presents some distinct advantages. Neutron generators can be run in a continuous or pulsed mode, and may be turned off, eliminating the need for shielding and a shuffling mechanism in the shuffler. There is also essentially no dose to personnel during installation, and no reliance on the availability of {sup 252}Cf. Despite these advantages, the more energetic neutrons emitted from the neutron generator (141 MeV for D-T generators) present some challenges for certain material types. For example when the enrichment of a uranium sample is unknown, the fission of {sup 238}U is generally undesirable. Since measuring uranium is one of the main uses of a shuffler, reducing the delayed neutron contribution from {sup 238}U is desirable. Hence, the shuffler hardware must be modified to accommodate a moderator configuration near the source to tailor the interrogating spectrum in a manner which promotes sub-threshold fissions (below 1 MeV) but avoids the over-moderation of the interrogating neutrons so as to avoid self-shielding. In this study, where there are many material and geometry combinations, the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to model, design, and optimize the moderator configuration within the shuffler geometry. The code is then used to evaluate and compare the assay performances of both the modified shuffler and the current {sup 252}Cf shuffler designs for different test samples. The matrix effect and the non-uniformity of the interrogating flux are investigated and quantified in each case. The modified geometry proposed by this study can serve s a guide in retrofitting shufflers that are already in use.

Schear, Melissa A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Implementation and qualification of neutronic calculation methodology in subcritical reactors driven by external neutron sources and applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This works had as goal to investigate calculational methodologies on subcritical source driven reactor, such as Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR) and Fusion Driven Subcritical (more)

Thiago Carluccio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Robust CsBr/Cu Photocathodes for the Linac Coherent Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linac coherent light source (LCLS), an x-ray free-electron laser project presently under construction at SLAC, uses a 2.856 GHz rf photocathode gun with a copper cathode for its electron source. While the copper cathode is performing well for the LCLS project, a cathode material with higher quantum efficiency would reduce the drive laser requirements and allow a greater range of operating conditions. Therefore a robust CsBr/Cu photocathode with greater than 50 times the quantum yield at 257 nm relative to the present LCLS copper cathode has been investigated. Preliminary experiments using a dedicated electron source development test stand at SLAC/SSRL are encouraging and are presented in this paper.

Maldonado, Juan R.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Liu, Zhi; Dowell, D.H.; Kirby, Robert E.; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC; Pease, Fabian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tagged Neutron Source for API Inspection Systems with Greatly Enhanced Spatial Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We recently developed induced fission and transmission imaging methods with time- and directionally-tagged neutrons offer new capabilities for characterization of fissile material configurations and enhanced detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). An Advanced Associated Particle Imaging (API) generator with higher angular resolution and neutron yield than existing systems is needed to fully exploit these methods.

None

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

418

Directorate Organization | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Neutron Sciences Directorate The Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD) manages and operates the Spallation Neutron Source and the High Flux Isotope Reactor, two of the world's...

419

DOE/EIS-0247; Draft Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source, December 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 1998 December 1998 Construction and Operation of the S PALLATION N EUTRON S OURCE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science DOE/EIS-0247 Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source Facility Draft Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science December 1998 DOE/EIS-0247 Draft, December 1998 Cover Sheet COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS), Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (DOE/EIS-0247) LOCATIONS OF ALTERNATIVE SITES: Illinois, New Mexico, New York, and Tennessee. CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. David Wilfert, EIS Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office

420

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses.Types of lighting include:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light sources neutron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; /SLAC; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Design, status and first operations of the spallation neutron source polyphase resonant converter modulator system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a new 1.4 MW average power beam, 1 GeV accelerator being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator requires 15 converter-modulator stations each providing between 9 and 11 MW pulses with up to a 1 .I MW average power. The converter-modulator can be described as a resonant 20 kHz polyphase boost inverter. Each converter modulator derives its buss voltage from a standard substation cast-core transformer. Each substation is followed by an SCR pre-regulator to accommodate voltage changes from no load to full load, in addition to providing a soft-start function. Energy storage is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. These capacitors do not fail short, but clear any internal anomaly. Three 'H-Bridge' IGBT transistor networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are time-gated to generate the desired klystron pulse width. Pulse width modulation of the individual 20 lcHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with DSP based adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes nanocrystalline alloy that provides low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Capacitors are used on the transformer secondary networks to resonate the leakage inductance. The transformers are wound for a specific leakage inductance, not turns ratio. This design technique generates multiple secondary volts per turn as compared to the primary. With the appropriate tuning conditions, switching losses are minimized. The resonant topology has the added benefit of being deQed in a klystron fault condition, with little energy deposited in the arc. This obviates the need of crowbars or other related networks. A review of these design parameters, operational performance, production status, and OWL installation and performance to date will be presented.

Reass, W. A. (William A.); Apgar, S. E. (Sean E.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gonzales, J. (Jacqueline); Gribble, R. F. (Robert F.); Hardek, T. W. (Thomas W.); Lynch, M. T. (Michael T.); Rees, D. E. (Daniel E.); Tallerico, P. J. (Paul J.); Trujillo, P. B. (Pete B.); Anderson, D. E. (David E.); Heidenreich, D. A. (Dale A.); Hicks, J. D. (Jim D.); Leontiev, V. N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Successful Completion of the Top-off Upgrade of the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An upgrade of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to enable top-off operation has been completed during the last four years. The final work centered around radiation safety aspects, culminating in a systematic proof that top-off operation is equally safe as decaying beam operation. Commissioning and transition to full user operations happened in late 2008 and early 2009. Top-off operation at the ALS provides a very large increase in time-averaged brightness (by about a factor of 10) as well as improvements in beam stability. The following sections provide an overview of the radiation safety rationale, commissioning results, as well as experience in user operations.

Steier, C.; Bailey, B.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Biocca, A.; Byrne, W.; Casey, P.; Chin, M.; Donahue, R.; Duarte, R.; Fahmie, M.; Gath, B.; Jacobson, S.; Julian, J.; Jung, J. Y.; Kritscher, M.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Marks, S.; McKean, P.; Mueller, R. [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; /SLAC; Sanami, T.; /SLAC /KEK, Tsukuba; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J. [eds.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities.

Warwick, T.; Padmore, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Hitchcock, A.P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rightor, E.G. [Dow Texas Polymer Center, Freeport, TX (United States); Tonner, B.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fuel Cycle Optimization of a Helium-Cooled, Sub-Critical, Fast Transmutation of Waste Reactor with a Fusion Neutron Source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Possible fuel cycle scenarios for a helium-cooled, sub-critical, fast reactor with a fusion neutron source for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel have been analyzed. (more)

Maddox, James Warren

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

National synchrotron light source annual report 1987: For the period of October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the reports and operational information of the National Synchrotron Light source facility for 1987. The reports are grouped mainly under VUV research and x-ray research. (LSP)

White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century, light-source user facilities have transformedagreement that a new user facility that provides an array ofon which large-scale user facilities in this domain might be

Arenholz, Elke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

LED Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are semiconductor devices that produce light when an electrical current is applied....

433

Development of large volume double ring penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the development of large volume double ring Penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions is reported. The developed Penning discharge source consists of two cylindrical end cathodes of stainless steel having radius 6 cm and a gap 5.5 cm between them, which are fitted in the top and bottom flanges of the vacuum chamber. Two stainless steel anode rings with thickness 0.4 cm and inner diameters 6.45 cm having separation 2 cm are kept at the discharge centre. Neodymium (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) permanent magnets are physically inserted behind the cathodes for producing nearly uniform magnetic field of {approx}0.1 T at the center. Experiments and simulations have been performed for single and double anode ring configurations using helium gas discharge, which infer that double ring configuration gives better light emissions in the large volume Penning plasma discharge arrangement. The optical emission spectroscopy measurements are used to complement the observations. The spectral line-ratio technique is utilized to determine the electron plasma density. The estimated electron plasma density in double ring plasma configuration is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, which is around one order of magnitude larger than that of single ring arrangement.

Prakash, Ram; Vyas, Gheesa Lal; Jain, Jalaj; Prajapati, Jitendra; Pal, Udit Narayan [Microwave Tubes Division, CSIR-Central Electronics and Engineering Research Institute, Pilani-333031 (India); Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Manchanda, Ranjana [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions prototypical to the SNS. Post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the target vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

McClintock, David A [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL; Carroll, Adam J [ORNL; Dayton, Michael J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

Parkin, Don M. (Los Alamos, NM); Dudey, Norman D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

Bakeman, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Theory and Analysis of the Feynman-Alpha Method for Deterministically and Randomly Pulsed Neutron Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contract FIKW-CT-2000-00063. REFERENCES 1. R. UHRIG, Random Noise Techniques in Nuclear Reactor Systems. Conf. New Frontiers of Nuclear Technology: Reactor Phys- ics (PHYSOR 2002), Seoul, Korea, October 7 Determination in Accelerator Driven Nuclear Reactors by Statistics from Neutron Detectors ~Feynman-Alpha Method

Pázsit, Imre

439

An ALS handbook: A summary of the capabilities and characteristics of the advanced light source  

SciTech Connect

This booklet aims to provide the prospective user of the Advanced Light Source with a concise description of the radiation a researcher might expect at his or her experimental station. The focus is therefore on the characteristics of the light that emerges from insertion devices and bending magnets and on how components of the beam lines further alter the properties of the radiation. The few specifications and operating parameters of the ALS storage ring that are of interest are those that directly determine the radiation characteristics. Sections 4 through 5 are primarily devoted to summary presentations, by means of performance plots and tabular compilations, of radiation characteristics at the ALS--spectral brightness, flux, coherent power, resolution, etc.--assuming a representative set of three undulators and one wiggler and a corresponding set of four beam lines. As a complement to these performance summaries, Section 1 is a general introductory discussion of synchrotron radiation and the ALS, and Section 2 discusses the properties of the stored electron beam that affect the radiation. Section 3 then provides an introduction to the characteristics of synchrotron radiation from bending magnets, wigglers, and undulators. In addition, Section 5 briefly introduces the theory of diffraction-grating and crystal monochromators. As compared with previous editions of this booklet, the performance plots and tabular compilations of the ALS radiation characteristics are now based on conservative engineering designs rather than preliminary physics designs.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Methods for absorbing neutrons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

Guillen, Donna P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Longhurst, Glen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Porter, Douglas L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parry, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z