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1

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Beamlines NSLS-II Ring Schematic The National Synchrotron Light Source II will accommodate at least 58 beamlines using 27 straight sections for insertion-device sources and...

2

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source | 2010...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 Beamline Development Proposals - Results NSLS-II Rendering The 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the National Synchrotron Light Source II yielded 54...

3

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals 2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II February 16, 2011 NSLS-II Rendering Critical Dates Call for proposal issued Thursday, February 17, 2011 Letter of Intent due Monday, March 28, 2011 (submitted LOIs) Beamline development workshops April-June 2011 Beamline proposal due Monday, July 25, 2011 Related Materials Proposal template NSLS-II Beamline Development Policy NSLS-II Source Properties NSLS-II User Access Policy Project Beamlines Background Beamline Information Approved Proposals From 2010 The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), currently under construction at the U.S. Department of Energys Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY, is pleased to announce the 2011 Call for Beamline Development Proposals for experimental facilities to be implemented at NSLS-II.

4

Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals

Simos, N; Fallier, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Reports Monthly status reports on the NSLS-II project highlight progress in key areas: accelerator systems; experimental facilities; conventional facilities; procurement;...

6

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report PDR cover image Brookhaven National Laboratory has prepared a preliminary design for a world class user facility for scientific research using...

7

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning for Life Sciences at NSLS-II: A Chronology Planning for Life Sciences at NSLS-II: A Chronology Since 2007, through workshops, trips to Washington, white papers, and other activities, NSLS-II planners have been steadily mapping out what promises to be a rich life sciences research program at the new facility. July 17-18, 2007 - Brookhaven Lab hosts the first NSLS-II user workshop, which was attended by over 450 participants, including many members of the life sciences user community and representatives from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER). January 15-16, 2008 - A scientific strategic planning workshop at Brookhaven Lab marked the beginning of plans for life sciences research and beamlines at NSLS-II. The goal of this workshop was to generate a detailed white paper that presented a vision of Life Sciences research, beamlines, and facilities at NSLS-II and describes the path forward and timeline toward achieving this goal.

8

NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.

Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Advanced Light Source: Technical Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wiggler --"" after upgrade / SSRL NSLS bend GeV) 1 eV 10 eVSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which operates two storageBunch Length (ps) Aladdin NSLS (VUV) NSLS (X-ray) SSRL (

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Canadian Light Source (with groups at the APS and NSLS, the ALS has pioneered some

Tamura, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget and the years to follow, we need to continue to educate our elected representatives about the benefits that are provided to our society and our economy by scientific investigation including research done at DOE user facilities like the NSLS. We face another interesting challenge as the NSLS-II project progresses: the formation of scientific research teams associated with particular beamlines at the new facility. In early 2007, the final draft of the conceptual design report will be available, which will describe the projected capabilities of NSLS-II, and we can expect a workshop in mid-2007 to launch the process leading to letters of intent for beamlines. This process will include lots of discussion about access modes, as we seek ways to allow scientific and technical innovators from the user community to play significant roles at NSLS-II.

MILLER, L. (EDITOR)

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

2007 NSLS Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

07 NSLS Publications 07 NSLS Publications Brookhaven National Laboratory * National Synchrotron Light Source * P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973 * http://www.nsls.bnl.gov/ VUV-IR Beamlines ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 2 X-Ray Beamlines .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 8 NSLS Users NSLS Staff ............................................................................................................................................................................................................

13

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

14

NSLS ESH&Q | Additional Safety Help  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Committees Working Committees Staff Directory Employment Statistics 2010 Annual Report 2009 Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan (PDF) Contacts Facilities NSLS NSLS-II...

15

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment addresses the proposed action by the U.S. Department of Energy to upgrade the facilities of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the Accelerator Test Facility and the Source Development Laboratory. The environmental effects of a No-Action Alternative as well as a Proposed Action are evaluated in the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet” link below leads to a one-page summary of the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment” link below leads to the whole 41-page

16

SUMMAR OF DISCUSSIONS OF USES OF THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) FOR EARTH SCIENCES RESEARCH: WORKSHOP REPORT OF THE ALS USERS' ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING, LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, BERKELEY,CA, JUNE 2-3, 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) an intensity of 3 x lo9be comparable to The those at NSLS. Using different sets of

Dillard, J.; Wallenberg, H.; Perry, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and will be updated as needed. Photon Sciences ESH Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) SOP No. Standard Operating Procedure for: LS-ES-0002 Procedure for Acid Etching of Silicon and Germanium Crystals LS-ESH-0004 NSLS Operations Group Chemical Spill and Gas Release Response LS-ESH-0010 VUV Injection Shutter LOTO LS-ESH-0012 LINAC LOTO LS-ESH-0013 Controlled Access to the VUV Ring LS-ESH-0014 Radiation Safety Interlocks at the National Synchrotron Light Source LS-ESH-0019 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements LS-ESH-0020 Biosafety Requirements at the NSLS LS-ESH-0021 Biosafety Level 2 work at the NSLS/ A Technical Basis LS-ESH-0022 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements

18

NSLS-II | NEXT Integrated Project Team | Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEXT Project NEXT stands for NSLS-II Experimental Tools, a set of five or six beamlines being developed for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), with funding from...

19

Rf system for the NSLS coherent infrared radiation source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing NSLS X-ray Lithography Source (XLS Phase I) is being considered for a coherent synchrotron radiation source. The existing 211 MHz warm cavity will be replaced with a 5-cell 2856 MHz superconducting RF cavity, driven by a series of 2 kW klystrons. The RF system will provide a total V{sub RF} of 1.5 MV to produce {sigma}{sub L} = 0.3 mm electron bunches at an energy of 150 MeV. Superconducting technology significantly reduces the required space and power needed to achieve the higher voltage. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the superconducting RF system and cavity, power requirements, and cavity design parameters such as input coupling, Quality Factor, and Higher Order Modes.

Broome, W.; Biscardi, R.; Keane, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Thomas, M.; Wang, J.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

NSLS-II | ABBIX Integrated Project Team | Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a set of three beamlines being developed for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), with funding from the National Institutes of Health. Documents & Design Reports...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation storage ring NSLS, the third-generation storageto be commissioned in 2009, and NSLS-II, an advanced third-storage ring sources. NSLS-II will extend this range down to

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Microsoft Word - NSLS-II User Access Policy Apr 2013.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II National Synchrotron Light Source II PRP Proposal Review Panel PS Photon Sciences PU Partner User SAC Science Advisory Committee iv NSLS-II USER ACCESS POLICY APPROVALS...

23

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' March 22, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Kendra Snyder This month, workers at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), the half-mile electron racetrack for one of the world's most advanced light sources, will begin filling the facility's steel and concrete shell. In 2015, NSLS-II will open its doors - and its ultra-bright beams of x-ray, infrared and ultraviolet light - to thousands of researchers around the world, enabling the detailed exploration of everything from

24

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' Installing a Light Source 'Racetrack' March 22, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Brookhaven National Lab's NSLS II Construction Site | Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab Kendra Snyder This month, workers at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), the half-mile electron racetrack for one of the world's most advanced light sources, will begin filling the facility's steel and concrete shell. In 2015, NSLS-II will open its doors - and its ultra-bright beams of x-ray, infrared and ultraviolet light - to thousands of researchers around the world, enabling the detailed exploration of everything from

25

Photon Sciences | About the National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Source NSLS One of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is host each year to 2,400 researchers from more than 400 universities, laboratories, and companies. Research conducted at the NSLS has yielded advances in biology, physics, chemistry, geophysics, medicine, and materials science. Synchrotron light is produced by electrons when they are forced to move in a curved path at nearly the speed of light. At the NSLS, beams of light in the x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared wavelengths are produced by two synchrotrons for use in experiments. Powerful Light, Diverse Research Since the intensity of synchrotron light can be 10,000 times greater than conventional beams generated in a laboratory, scientists can use these

26

NSLS-II Design and Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Design & Performance NSLS-II CD-0 Proposal Preliminary Design Report (PDR) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) Source Properties (.pdf) Cell section Last Modified: April 2,...

27

NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

NSLS-II Beam Diagnostics Overview  

SciTech Connect

A new 3rd generation light source (NSLS-II) is in the early stages of construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux with exceptional beam stability. It presents several challenges for diagnostics and instrumentation, related to the extremely small emittance. In this paper, we present an overview of all planned instrumentation systems, results from research and development activities; and then focus on other challenging aspects.

Singh,O.; Alforque, R.; Bacha, B.; Blednykh, A.; Cameron, P.; Cheng, W.; Dalesio, L. B.; Della Penna, A. J.; doom, L.; Fliller, R. P.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H-C.; Johnson, E. D.; Kosciuk, b. N.; Kramer, S. L.; Krinsky, S.; Mead, J.; Ozaki, S.; Padrazo, D.; Pinayev, I.; Ravindranath, R. V.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Sharma, S.; Skaritka, J.; Tanabe, T.; Tian, Y.; Willeke, F. J.; Yu, L-H.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

Photon Sciences | NSLS-II Beamlines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Beamlines NSLS-II Beamlines beamlines Current NSLS-II Beamline Diagram The National Synchrotron Light Source II will accommodate more than 60 beamlines using 27 straight sections for insertion-device sources and 31 bending-magnet or three-pole-wiggler sources, with additional beamlines possible through canted insertion devices and multiple branches. Six beamlines were selected in 2008 and are now funded within the NSLS-II project. These project beamlines encompass research programs in inelastic x-ray scattering, hard x-ray nanoprobe, coherent hard x-ray scattering, coherent soft x-ray scattering and polarization, submicron resolution x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray powder diffraction. For each beamline, a beamline advisory team, or BAT, has been established to represent the broader scientific community in a specific area of

30

Fourth Generation Light Source Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light Sources October 27 to 29, 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This workshop is being co-hosted by APS, NSLS, SSRL and TJNAF. FGLSlogo This workshop will explore the phenomenology of interactions with ultra-high-power, -brilliance, and -coherence light sources in the DUV, soft x-ray, and x-ray regimes, as well as the scientific opportunities they provide. The workshop will begin with tutorials on the generation and properties of these sources and identify issues in their use in experimentation. Also included will be an overview of current efforts to develop these sources and a review of the scientific opportunities defined by previous research and workshops. These background talks will be followed

31

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorization Documents Authorization Documents Environmental Assessment for NSLS, ATF & SDL NSLS Safety Assessment Document Accelerator Safety Envelope Fire Hazard Analysis Conduct of Operations NSLS-II Environmental Assessment (2006) Finding of No Significant Impact (2006) Comparison of NSLS-II Environmental Assessment with NSLS-II Title II Design Specifications (2008) "NEXT" Beamlines Environmental Evaluation Notification Form and Approval Memo (2011) Linac Commissioning Safety Assessment Document (2011) NSLS-II USI Determination #1 NSLS-II USI Determination #2 NSLS-II USI Determination #3 NSLS-II USI Determination #4 NSLS-II USI Determination #5 Linac Commissioning Accelerator Safety Envelope (2011) Linac Commissioning Plan (2011) Booster Commissioning Safety Assessment Document (2011)

32

National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3) high-temperature superconducting materials that carry electricity with no loss for efficient power transmission lines; and (4) materials for solid-state lighting with half of the present power consumption. Excitement about NSLS-II is evident in many ways, most notably the extraordinary response we had to the 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the anticipated 60 or more beamlines that NSLS-II will ultimately host. A total of 54 proposals were submitted and, after extensive review, 34 were approved. Funding from both the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health has already been secured to support the design and construction of a number of these beamlines. FY11 is a challenging and exciting year for the NSLS-II Project as we reach the peak of our construction activity. We remain on track to complete the project by March 2014, a full 15 months ahead of schedule and with even more capabilities than originally planned. The Photon Sciences Directorate is well on its way to fulfilling our vision of being a provider of choice for world-class photon sciences and facilities.

Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Collaborators Industrial Collaborators The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and its future successor, NSLS-II, can help companies large and small solve research and manufacturing problems, generate new technologies and products, and stay competitive. The Photon Sciences Directorate would like to encourage greater use of its facilities by industrial researchers and facilitate collaborations between industry and NSLS staff, as well as government and academic institutions. Synchrotron Use by Industry What is a synchrotron? A synchrotron light source is a large machine that produces intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for the study of substances at very small scales, from looking at the molecular structure of proteins to probing the electronic properties of the next generation of computer-chip

34

National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J. [eds.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

NSLS-II Transport Line Progress  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

NSLS 2009 Activity Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

Nasta K.; Mona R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report  

SciTech Connect

Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work explaining how one class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses.

Nasta,K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement Plans NSLS FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 NSLS-II FY09 PS Directorate FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13...

39

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Interlock Testing Active NSLS Controlled Documents Assessment Tracking System (ATS) Conduct of Operations Document Index Forms & Templates Interlocks (Personnel...

40

NSLS Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services NSLS Services Computing Services Lab Space Libraries Postal Services Procurement Repair & Equipment Services Shipping Procedures Storage User Accounts Workshop Procedures...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov National Synchrotron Light Source II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of power, or as much as needed to power about 300,000 light bulbs or 4,000 homes. · Cooling the facility · 631 344-2345 · www.bnl.gov FACTS (04-11) National Synchrotron Light Source II NSLS-II by the Numbers World's premier synchrotron will light the way to new discoveries · Like all synchrotrons, NSLS

Homes, Christopher C.

42

NSLS-II Proposal for Approval of Conceptual Design (CD-0)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal for Approval of Conceptual Design (CD-0) CD0 cover This proposal is to construct and then operate a new National Synchrotron Light Source, NSLS-II, at Brookhaven National...

43

BNL/SBU NSLS-II Workshop, May 18, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Hosts Internal Workshop on Future of NSLS-II BNL Hosts Internal Workshop on Future of NSLS-II About 125 Brookhaven Laboratory and Stony Brook University scientists and staff participated in an internal workshop to learn about the status and plans for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) on Wednesday, May 18, 2011, at BNL. The workshop's purpose was to help us identify strategies for developing and enhancing research programs in the different areas of science at BNL and SBU that will benefit from NSLS-II's capabilities. Attendees heard overview talks on the Laboratory's general vision and strategy, including the role of NSLS-II, a summary of NSLS-II status and plans, and a summary of the current state of the Lab's and SBU's science and technology (S&T) research interests (and collaborations) in using NSLS-II. During subsequent breakout sessions, workshop leaders solicited input for inclusion in the emerging strategies for developing, evolving, and positioning research programs to take maximum advantage of NSLS-II. Development of these strategies is being facilitated by a working group drawn from across BNL and SBU, including Allen Orville (ELS), Lisa Miller (PSD), Ron Pindak (PSD), Qun Shen (PSD), John Hill (BES), Jason Graetz (ST), Jose Rodriguez (BES), Lynne Ecker (GARS), Jeff Fitts (ELS), Ben Hsiao (SBU), Bob Haltiwanger (SBU), John Parise (SBU) and Doon Gibbs. The working group subsequently gathered the input from the breakout sessions and developed strategies for the further refinement of the developing NSLS-II based research programs as a part of the Laboratory's strategy for achieving its S&T missions. The results are presented here.

44

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spill A review of a recent incident at NSLS, as well as historical events, shows that communication and self checking are crucial to avoiding Human Performance Error Traps....

45

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Policies & Requirements Manual Waste Management Links Tier 1 Information Muffin Fan Wiring Guidance Solenoid Wiring Guidance Heater Tape Wiring Guidance NSLS ES&H...

46

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the QCC Forms Description Number File Format Assessment Tracking System (ATS): NSLS Family ATS Entry Request Form QF-053 Word Controlled DocumentsProcedure: Distribution...

47

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

48

Next Generation Light Source  

Next Generation Light Source Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination High Entry Barrier 71 ...

49

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source | 2010 Beamline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 Beamline Development Proposals - Approved Proposals 2010 Beamline Development Proposals - Approved Proposals Proposal Results Announcement Acronym Title Spokesperson Type Information 4DE 4-Dimensional Studies in Extreme Environments Donald J. Weidner, Stony Brook University 1 Slide ABS A Highly Automated Instrument for Static X-ray Scattering Measurements of Biological Molecules in Solution Lin Yang, BNL 1 Slide AIM Advanced Infrared Microspectroscopy Lisa Miller, BNL 1 Slide AMX Flexible Access Macromolecular Crystallography at an Undulator Beamline Dieter Schneider, BNL 1 Slide | Proposal BMM Hard X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Diffraction - Beamline for Materials Measurements Daniel Fischer, NIST 2 Slide | Proposal CDI Coherent X-ray Diffraction Ian Robinson, University College London 1 Slide | Proposal

50

NSLS II: The Future National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offer useful information about standard beamline components. http:www.bnl.govnsls2projectCDRCh11ExperimentalFacilities.pdf http:www.bnl.govnsls2projectPDR...

51

National Synchrotron Light Source Facility Manual Maintenance Management Program. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program s to meet the policy and objectives for the management and performance of cost-effective maintenance and repair of the National Synchrotron Light Source, as required by the US Department of Energy order DOE 433O.4A. It is the DOE`s policy that: The maintenance management program for the NSLS be consistent with this Order and that NSLS property is maintained in a manner which promotes operational safety, worker health, environmental protection and compliance, property preservation, and cost-effectiveness while meeting the NSLS`s programmatic mission. Structures, components and systems (active and passive) that are imporant to safe operation of the NSLS shall be subject to a maintenance program to ensure that they meet or exceed their design requirements throughout the life of the NSLS. Periodic examination of structures, systems components and equipment be performed to determine deterioration or technical obsolescence which may threaten performance and/or safety. Primary responsibility, authority, and accountability for the direction and management of the maintenance program at the NSLS reside with the line management assigned direct programmatic responsibility. Budgeting and accounting for maintenance programs are consistent with DOE Orders guidance.

Fewell, N.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Requirements at NSLS All sample preparation or wet chemistry performed in a laboratory must be coordinated with a Lab Steward. Consult this map or your Local Contact for...

53

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Document Index Document Index A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Assessment Tracking System (ATS) Institutional ATS NSLS Family ATS NSLS Family ATS Instructions B Beamline Safety Review Beamline Safety Checklist C Calibration Calibration procedure NSLS Controlled Measuring Test Equipment Calibration List Caution Tags Coaxial cables & connectors Conduct of Operations Manual Cryogenic safety Cryogenic Liquids: Storage, Usage and Handling D Design (see engineering design) Document Control drawings (also refer to Engineer Design) procedures, & policies Approving, Distributing; List of NSLS Active Controlled Documents Periodic Review; Preparing; Reviewing; specification (distribution) specification (preparation) Document list - Active Controlled Documents

54

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acceptable NSLS Safety Documentation Print NSLS users who have completed NSLS Safety Module must present a copy of one of the following documents to receive ALS 1001: Safety at the...

55

NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NSLS remains a viable and productive facility, as can be seen by the rich and diverse science produced in 2004. In one of these exciting research projects published in Nature, researchers detected a rare 'hole crystal' in a cuprate superconductor, which may provide insight into high-temperature superconductivity. In another Nature publication, the crystal structure of a segment of RNA was determined, opening a new window of knowledge into that crucial molecule. These are just a couple of the science highlights of 2004, and many others are displayed in the pages of this report. All told, more than 700 publications resulted from NSLS research this year, the facility hosted 2,299 users, and the number of experiments performed rose from 1,145 in 2003 to 1,374 nuclear indications that the NSLS continues to thrive. As the NSLS accelerator complex enters its third decade of operations, it continues to perform very well. For 2004, the overall reliability of the VUV-IR ring was excellent at 99 percent. The reliability of the x-ray ring was just shy of 92 percent, primarily due to the need to replace the injection septum vacuum chamber, which developed a leak during the middle of the year. The Operations Division did a tremendous job of installing our spare chamber in minimal time, despite the complexity of the job and the inaccessibility of its location in the ring, as well as keeping downtime to a minimum throughout the rest of the year. In order to continue to meet the needs of users, several key beamline upgrades took place this year that will enrich our scientific programs, including upgrades to beamlines U12IR, X1A, X13A, and X21. We are very excited about two brand-new beamlines that were commissioned in 2004: X29 and X27A. X29 is the new mini-gap undulator beamline designed for macromolecular crystallography, and it will meet the growing demand of NSLS users who perform research in that area. The establishment of an x-ray microprobe at beamline X27A, optimized for the environmental science community, is also very important, as it will help to satisfy the large over subscription rate for this technique at the NSLS. Two other important upgrades that were initiated this past year are the replacement of the X25 wiggler with an undulator and the construction of the X9 undulator beamline for small-angle scattering, with an emphasis on nanoscience research. Another key activity that will benefit all users was the restoration of the x-ray ring lattice symmetry, which reduced the horizontal emittance and made the operational lattice more robust. Similarly, all users will benefit from the introduction of the PASS (Proposal Allocation Safety Scheduling) system this past year, which has greatly improved the process of proposal submission, review, allocation, and scheduling. This coming year we will work to add Rapid Access to the capabilities of PASS. Overall, the success of these and the many other projects that space does not permit listing is a testament to the dedication, hard work, and skill of the NSLS staff. Safety has always been an important issue at a large, complex scientific facility like the NSLS and in 2004 it received renewed attention. Safety is our highest priority and we spent a great deal of time reviewing and refining our safety practices and procedures. A new 'Safety Highlights' web page was created for safety news, and a large number of safety meetings and discussions were held. These reviews and meetings generated many ideas on how the NSLS might improve its safety practices, and we are committed to putting these in place and improving our already very good safety program. We had no lost-time accidents in 2004, which is a notable accomplishment. Our goal is to be best in class and I'm confident that by working together we can achieve that status. Several activities took place this past year to advance our proposal to replace the NSLS with a new National Synchrotron Light Source-II facility. These included a major workshop in support of the proposed facility in March, a mail review of our proposal outlinin

MILLER,L.; (EDITOR)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NSLS Committees | Stockroom Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stockroom Committee Charge Review "Request for Additional NSLS Stockroom Inventory" forms submitted by NSLS Staff and Users to decide what items, and the quantity of each, will be...

57

NSLS-II | NEXT Integrated Project Team | Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEXT Integrated Project Team NEXT Integrated Project Team NEXT stands for NSLS-II Experimental Tools, a set of six beamlines being developed for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). DOE uses an integrated project teaming approach for managing the NEXT Project. This Integrated Project Team (IPT) is organized and led by the NSLS-II Federal Project Director. It is an essential element in DOE's acquisition process and is being used during all phases of the project's life cycle. This team consists of professionals representing diverse disciplines with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities to support the Federal Project Director in successfully executing the project. The IPT for the NEXT Project will consist of members from both DOE and the

58

NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was provided thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

ROTHMAN,E.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

Environmental Assessment for the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II) BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK U. S. Department Of Energy Brookhaven Site Office September 2006 DOE/EA-1558 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PREFACE....................................................................................................................1 2.0 SUMMARY .................................................................................................................2 3.0 PURPOSE AND NEED ............................................................................................10 4.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES, INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION.....................................................................................................................11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50V or Greater than 50V - How Do We Know? (NSLS ESH Highlight 36) 9.10.2004 Electric Shock Incident at X1 7.15.2004 Improper Modification of Power Supply 5.5.2004 How Can We...

62

National Synchrotron Light Source: vacuum system for National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a 24 million dollar project under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is a research facility dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron radiation is that radiation produced by the acceleration of charged particles at near the speed of light. This facility will provide a continuous spectrum of radiation from the vacuum ultraviolet to the hard x-ray range. The radiation will be highly intense, 100% polarized, extremely well collimated and will have a pulsed time structure. The radiation will be produced in two electron storage rings at energies of 700 MeV and 2.5 GeV, respectively. A maximum of one ampere at 2 GeV, or one-half ampere at 2.5 GeV, of electron beam will be stored.

Schuchman, J.C.; Godel, J.B.; Jordan, W.; Oversluizen, T.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NSLS-II INJECTION STRAIGHT DIAGNOSTICS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultra-bright light source being developed by the NSLS-II project will utilize top-up injection and fine tuning of the injection process is mandatory. In this paper we present the diagnostics installed in the injection straight. Its use for commissioning and tuning of the injection cycle is also described. The NSLS-II storage ring will utilize a 9.3 meter long injection straight section shown in Fig. 1. Injection will be preformed with two septa (one pulsed, one DC) and four kickers. The stored beam will be shifted towards the pulsed septum up to IS mm and the nominal distance between centers of the injected and the bumped beam is 9.5mm. The NSLS-II beam position monitors will have turn-by-turn and first-turn capabilities and will be used for the commissioning and tuning the injection process. However, there are three additional BPMs and two beam intercepting OTR screens (flags) installed in the injection straight.

Pinayev, I.; Blednykh, A.; Ferreira, M.; Fliller, R.; Kosciuk, B.; Shaftan, T.V.; Wang, G.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

NSLS Vacuum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacuum Vacuum Safe Guards X-Ray Feedthroughs VUV Feedthroughs R&D "Much ado about nothing", a popular title from English literature, has been quoted often to vacuum technologists relative to our work. In the real world there is much to do to obtain the nothingness of a good vacuum! There is even more to achieving the good ultra-high vacuum (UHV) needed for the NSLS storage rings. Today's vacuum technologist must be familiar with a large variety of pumps, gauges, chambers, materials, processes, valves, controls, diagnostics, etc., related to vacuum. A practical example would be to measure, find, and fix a system vacuum leak - a task easily compared to finding a needle in a haystack. A good knowledge of vacuum systems and skill with mass spectrometers is required for success. The vacuum

66

NSLS Services | Shipping Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS Shipping Procedures For shipments arriving at the NSLS from other locations, please ship via Federal Express. If this is not possible, or if you have any questions, please...

67

The Advanced Light Source: Technical Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wiggler --"" after upgrade / SSRL NSLS bend GeV) 1 eV 10 eVRadiation Laboratory (SSRL) uses the SPEAR storage ring atNSLS (VUV) NSLS (X-ray) SSRL (SPEAR) (1.9 max) (nominal)

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Users' Executive Committee SAXS SEM NSLS SGM U N L V . . . .of the same cell (obtained at NSLS with 540-eV x rays and an

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Directions to Training Office Directions to Training Office The Photon Sciences Training Manager is located in the NSLS facility, Building 725D, Room 2-160. Directions (from the Main Entrance) From the Main (front) entrance, take the stairs or elevator to the second floor. Turn right into the hallway and proceed past the lobby balcony. Continue past the seminar room on the right and through the hallway to make a 90 degree left turn. Continue through this next hallway past the Design Room on the left. Turn left at the overhead sign for "Training" and continue straight through to Room 2-160 on your left. Directions (from the North Entrance) From the North (back) entrance, take the stairs or elevator to the second floor. Turn left into the hallway. Turn right at the doorway marked Room

70

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49 49 Hand Safety Date: January 7, 2011 Editor: Lori Stiegler It's not unusual for experiment needs to change, and beam time to be limited while conducting research at the NSLS. Unfortunately, these factors, and several other contributing factors, converged recently and adversely affected an experimenter. The result was a hand injury that required a trip to the hospital, and sutures. In the case of this injury, the user was trying to fashion a new sample holder because of difficulty with the equipment he had brought from his home institution. The idea for the substitute sample holder had been previously discussed with his work group, but never tried. Using the alternate tools and holders he had brought, he tried to cut a slot out of a hard plastic tube with a razor

71

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide range x-ray techniques such as thin film x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, powder diffraction, small angle x-ray scattering, protein solution scattering and protein crystallography, as well as x-ray imaging. Currently she is the project leader of a multi-million dollar project on transmission x-ray microscopy recently funded by the U.S. DOE and the spokesperson for this new imaging beamline at the NSLS. She has also been collaborating with universities and industries for several projects on energy research at the NSLS.

72

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report 2001 Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source For the period October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001 Introduction Science Highlights Year in Review Operations Publications Abstracts Nancye Wright & Lydia Rogers The National Synchrotron Light Source Department is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven Science Associates, Inc. Upton, New York 11973 Under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 Mary Anne Corwin Steven N. Ehrlich & Lisa M. Miller Managing Editor Science Editors Production Assistants Cover images (clockwise from top left) 1. from Science Highlight by K.R. Rajashankar, M.R. Chance, S.K. Burley, J. Jiang, S.C. Almo, A. Bresnick, T. Dodatko, R. Huang, G. He,

73

PERFORMANCE OF THE DIAGNOSTICS FOR NSLS-II LINAC COMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The transfer lines not only provide a means to deliver the beam from one machine to another, they also provide a suite of diagnostics and utilities to measure the properties of the beam to be delivered. In this paper we discuss the suite of diagnostics that will be used to commission the NSLS-II linac and measure the beam properties. The linac to booster transfer line can measure the linac emittance with a three screens measurement or a quadrupole scan. Energy and energy spread are measured in a dispersive section. Total charge and charge uniformity are measured with wall current monitors in the linac and transformers in the transfer line. We show that the performance of the diagnostics in the transfer line will be sufficient to ensure the linac meets its specifications and provides a means of trouble shooting and studying the linac in future operation.

Fliller III, R.; Padrazo, D.; Wang, G.M.; Heese, R.; Hseuh H.-C.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Pinayev, I.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NSLS Committees | Interlock Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interlock Working Group Charge The NSLS Interlock Working Group shall review all new construction and modification of NSLS and SDL personnel protection interlock systems. It is the...

76

NSLS-II Project Pages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Project Pages Project Management Team Project Schedule Integrated Project Team (IPT) Monthly Status Meetings Advisory Committees Project Reviews Documents NSLS-II...

77

New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lighting industry is driven to provide light sources and lighting systems that, when properly applied, will produce a suitable luminous environment in which to perform a specified task. Tasks may include everything from office work, manufacturing and inspection to viewing priceless art objects, selecting the right chair for your living room, and deciding which produce item to select for tonight's dinner. While energy efficiency is a major consideration in any new lighting system design, the sacrifice of lighting quality may cost more in terms of lost productivity and user dissatisfaction than can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in filament, fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Manufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved color rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take the form of either increasing lamp efficiency (lumens of light delivered per watt of power consumed) or decreasing lamp size, thus making a more easily controlled light source that places light where it is needed. The manufacturer's second goal is to produce lamps that render colors accurately while maintaining high efficiency. This paper will discuss new introductions in light sources and lighting systems and how they may impact the design of luminous environments of the future.

Krailo, D. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Courtesy of The New York Times, Noah Berger The overall goal of the plan to enhance the NSLS facility's Industrial Users'...

79

NSLS Committees | ALARA Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toward making radiation exposure As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Reports to NSLS Chairman. Membership A. Ackerman R. Casey - Chairman N. Gmur E. Haas R. Heese X. Yang...

80

NSLS Insertion Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insertion Devices MGU-25 VUV Ring Insertion Devices X-Ray Ring Insertion Devices VISA NISUS Flux & Brightness of NSLS IDs Magnetic Measurement Lab...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NSLS Work Planning & Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Planning & Controls NSLS Work Planning and Control Procedure Lead Working Guidelines Information on Working in Areas Subject to Radiation from VUV Injection Procedure for...

82

NSLS Activity Report 1996  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submission System PDF Publishing: P. Sutherland (BNL Information Services Division) NSLS Home Page...BNL Home Page...Return to Activity Reports Page...

83

NSLS User Access  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After checking in with the Guest, User, Visitor (GUV) Center, and upon arrival at the NSLS, Beamline Operation and Safety Awareness (BLOSA) training is required for all users....

84

INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Angle Limit," Phys. Rev. Lett., 99: 134801 (2007). 33 Researchers Produce Firsts with Bursts of Light BNL researchers have generated extremely short pulses of light that are the...

86

NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

Dierker, S.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

NSLS Endstations | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UV and X-ray Probes UV and X-ray Probes The CFN operates three end-stations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) for nanomaterials characterization. The station located at the X9 beamline performs simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments for nano-scale structural characterization of a variety of materials. The Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS) station located at beamline X1A1 is capable of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for quantitative surface chemical analysis of a range of materials at gas pressures up to about 1 Torr. The undulator beamline U5UA hosts a station operating in ultra-high vacuum with a low-energy electron microscope (LEEM) and X-ray photo-emission electron microscope (XPEEM). The LEEM-XPEEM system can be used to study static and

88

Design and Measurement of the NSLS II Correctors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory will be a new state-of-the-art 3 Gev electron storage ring designed to deliver world-leading intensity and brightness, and will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS at Brookhaven. The 792-meter circumference storage ring is comprised of approximately 1000 magnetic elements, 300 of which are discrete corrector magnets. The three variants are: 120 of the 100 mm aperture correctors, 60 of the 156 mm aperture correctors, and 90 of the air core correctors.[1] The 100 mm and 156 mm horizontal and vertical dipole correctors come in two varieties: with and without a DC skew quad corrector. The air core is strictly an AC horizontal and vertical dipole corrector. The specifications are listed. Discrete corrector magnets are used for the 230 horizontal and vertical steering magnets in the NSLS-II storage ring. A unique design incorporates both dipole and skew quad correctors for (DC) steering in the same magnet. Separate AC (orbit feedback) correctors have also been designed. Comparison with alternate designs are presented as well as prototype measurements.

Spataro, C.; Danby, G.; Jackson, J.W.; Jain, A.K.; Rehak, M.; Singh, O. Skaritka, J.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced Light Source  

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Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

90

Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Sources Directorate Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 ii | Vision and Mission Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan The VISION of the Light Sources Directorate is: to be a provider of choice for world-class photon science and facilities that deliver outstanding scientific productivity and impact, and to be recognized as a leader in developing innovative techniques and ap- plications of photon science Our MISSION is defined by the set of activities that are required to realize this vision: to advance scientific knowledge and to solve critical problems through the design, construction, operation, and use of premier photon science facilities | Table of Contents Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan

91

Advanced Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the generation of artificial light using electric lamps, photometric and color performance have been paramount in lamp design, manufacturing, measurement, lighting design, and visual perception. Many designers and researchers have strived to understand how light and color are generated, related, and to improve them. This has stemmed from the development of incandescent lamps, halogen lamps, linear fluorescent lamps, high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps, and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) among other...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

NSLS Services | Procurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

signed. Forward signed copy to Joan Marshall at mail stop 725D. Users with questions about ILRs should contact the Building Manager. NSLS Staff should contact Joan Marshall (x3887)...

93

NSLS Services | Libraries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Libraries Green-Chasman Library (located in the NSLS) Located on the experimental floor near the Stockroom, this room is open at all times and contains a modest collection of...

94

NSLS Conduct of Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Securing the X-Ray Tunnel (LS-OPS-0003) Qualified Search Personnel for NSLS Accelerators (LS-ESH-0009) General Procedures Caution Tags (LS-OPS-0004) Conduct of...

95

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

96

NSLS Weekly Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weekly Activities There are a variety of weekly meetings for NSLS staff and users. These are posted regularly on the TV monitors (User Information Channel 22), along with any time...

97

NSLS User Access  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requesting Beamtime The first step is to submit a proposal for an experiment at the NSLS. You may do so by using the web-based proposal system called PASS with a temporary ID...

98

DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING  

SciTech Connect

A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fusion pumped light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the lasing medium. 3 figs.

Pappas, D.S.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Efficient Light Sources Today  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews new lamp and lighting technology in terms of application and economic impact. Included are the latest advances in High Intensity Discharge systems, energy saving fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and the new state of the art high performance fluorescent systems. Cost analyses will show that typical owning and operating cost reductions of 15 to 65% can be achieved without sacrificing illumination levels when the right system is chosen and properly applied.

Hart, A. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an optimized third generation source not only translatesfirst third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS,of a third-generation synchrotron light source translates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

104

Phase 2 safety analysis report: National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II program was established in order to provide additional space for experiments, and also staging and equipment storage areas. It also provides additional office space and new types of advanced instrumentation for users. This document will deal with the new safety issues resulting from this extensive expansion program, and should be used as a supplement to BNL Report No. 51584 ''National Synchrotron Light Source Safety Analysis Report,'' July 1982 (hereafter referred to as the Phase I SAR). The initial NSLS facility is described in the Phase I SAR. It comprises two electron storage rings, an injection system common to both, experimental beam lines and equipment, and office and support areas, all of which are housed in a 74,000 sq. ft. building. The X-ray Ring provides for 28 primary beam ports and the VUV Ring, 16. Each port is capable of division into 2 or 3 separate beam lines. All ports receive their synchrotron light from conventional bending magnet sources, the magnets being part of the storage ring lattice. 4 refs.

Stefan, P. (ed.)

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upgrade on the Advanced Light Source," Nucl. Instrum. Meth.n photoemission at the Advanced Light Source," Radit. Phys.high-pressure studies at the Advanced Light Source w i t h a

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Program The goals of the NSLS Industrial Research Program are to encourage greater use of synchrotron tools by industry researchers; improve access to NSLS beamlines by...

107

NSLS Industrial User Program | Synchrotron Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS Industrial Users' Program Industry Home | Synchrotron Techniques | Battery Lab | Science Highlights | Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Battery Lab NSLS users are...

108

Photon Sciences | Data Management at NSLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management at NSLS Users of the NSLS are responsible for meeting their Data Management obligations to their home institutions and granting agencies. Other than the beamline...

109

NSLS Committees | Beamline Review Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scrutinize all proposed beamline constructions and modifications to ensure they meet NSLS standards for safety (including radiation shielding), vacuum, and mechanical design....

110

National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

Rothman, Eva

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NSLS Electrical Equipment Inspection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Equipment Inspection Information Electrical Equipment Inspection Information A note to vendors visiting NSLS A note to users visiting NSLS Proteus Electrical Conformity Remediation Currently Certified Electrical Equipment Inspectors: First Line Contacts Email Extension Poshka, Dennis poshka@bnl.gov 2825 Alternate Contacts Boerner Jr, Albert aboerner@bnl.gov 5990 Buda, Scott buda@bnl.gov 3914 Caruso, Michael caruso@bnl.gov 4100 Chmiel, Robert chmiel@bnl.gov 8141 Church, Randolph church@bnl.gov 2736 Clay, Barret clay@bnl.gov 7284 D'Alsace, Roy dalsace@bnl.gov 3973 Danneil, Christopher cdanneil@bnl.gov 8609 Davila, Peter davila@bnl.gov 7625 De Toll, Peter detoll@bnl.gov 4100 Durfee, Douglas ddurfee@bnl.gov 7625 Fulkerson, Michael fulkerso@bnl.gov 5194 Gallagher, John jgallagher@bnl.gov 5770 Harder, David dharder@bnl.gov 4978

112

NSLS Services | Postal Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Postal Services Postal Services U.S. Postal Service BNL has a full-service U.S. Postal Service Office (Upton branch) located in Staff Services, Building 179, x2539. BNL Mail Service Mail is delivered and picked up twice a day from each building on site. Users should leave internal lab mail (brown envelopes, no stamps needed) and U.S. Mail (regular envelopes, stamps required) in the outgoing mail boxes at NSLS mail stop 725A, located in the lobby by the elevator. Receiving Mail During regular working hours, packages and other special deliveries are brought to the Stockroom while regular mail is taken to the mailstops around the building. Each beam port is assigned a mail slot at NSLS mail stop 725A near the elevator in the lobby. The beamline number should be on all mail addressed to users. Mail to users should be addressed as follows

113

NSLS Mechanical Tech  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Tech Mechanical Tech The Mechanical Technician group is supervised by Robert Scheuerer and consists of Mechanical Technicians with fabrication/machining, assembly, installation, and alignment/surveying skills. This group also serves as an interface to Central Fabrication Services when more complex or larger fabrication efforts are needed. The Mechanical Tech group is responsible for fabricating, installing, aligning, and troubleshooting the mechanical hardware used on NSLS and SDL accelerators, front ends, and User beamlines, often starting solely from Mechanical Design group drawings or CAD files. The Mechanical Tech Group is responsible for the fabrication, assembly and installation of components at the NSLS. These components include all mechanical assemblies and RF cavities. Another part of their job is to

114

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

115

Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

Ma,H.; Rose, J.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the scientific needs into the technical performance requirements. Feedback from these workshops will provide important input for advancing the design of the facility. Workshops are planned in the following areas Fundamental Atomic, Molecular, Optical Physics & Combustion Dynamics Mon. Aug. 20 - Tues. Aug 21, 2012 Physical Chemistry, Catalysis, & Photosynthesis Thurs. Aug. 23 - Fri. Aug 24, 2012 Quantum Materials, Magnetism & Spin Dynamics Mon. Aug. 27 - Tues. Aug 28, 2012 Materials & Bio-imaging at the Nanoscale Thurs. Aug. 30 - Fri. Aug 31, 2012 Further information is available on the workshop website:

117

SHIELDING REQUIREMENTS FOR NSLS-II.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory is in the process of designing a new Electron Synchrotron for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. This facility, called the 'National Synchrotron Light Source II' (NSLS-II), will provide x-ray radiation of ultra-high brightness and exceptional spatial and energy resolution. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. The project scope includes the design, construction, installation, and commissioning of the following accelerators: a 200 MeV linac, a booster accelerator operating from 200 MeV to 3.0 GeV, and the storage ring which stores a maximum of 500 mA current of electrons at an energy of 3.0 GeV. It is planned to operate the facility primarily in a top-off mode, thereby maintaining the maximum variation in stored beam current to < 1%. Because of the very demanding requirements for beam emittance and synchrotron radiation brilliance, the beam life-time is expected to be low, on the order of 2-3 hours. Analysis of the bulk shielding for operating this facility and the input parameters used for this analysis are discussed in this paper. The characteristics of each of the accelerators and their operating modes are summarized with the input assumptions for the bulk shielding analysis.

JOB,P.K.; CASEY, W.R.

2008-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

incorporating LEDs into tomorrows task lights, to reducing light entrapment within the LED, to fundamental research into how Organic Lighting Emitting Diodes operate. LED and...

119

NSLS-II | ABBIX Integrated Project Team | Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABBIX Integrated Project Team ABBIX Integrated Project Team ABBIX stands for Advanced Beamlines for Biological Investigations with X-rays, a set of three beamlines being developed for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), with funding from the National Institutes of Health. ABBIX uses DOE project management practices and systems, including an integrated project teaming management approach. This Integrated Project Team (IPT), organized and led by the ABBIX Project Manager, is being used during all phases of the project's life cycle. This team consists of professionals representing diverse disciplines with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities to support the ABBIX Project Manager in successfully executing the project. The IPT for the ABBIX Project will consist of

120

CURRENT STATUS OF INSERTION DEVICE DEVELOPMENT AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is currently under construction. Procurement of various insertion devices (IDs) has begun. This ring assumes a very high beam stability requirement which imposes tighter field specifications on insertion devices (IDs) compared to the rings of previous generation. The state of the art ID Magnetic Measurement Facility is being set up in order to be able to certify the stringent requirements on the magnetic field of NSLS-II IDs. The IDs in the project baseline scope include six 3.5m long damping wigglers (DWs) with 100mm period length and 15mm pole gap, two 2.0m Elliptically Polarizing Undulator (EPU) with 49mm period and 11.5mm minimum magnetic gap, two 3.0m long 20mm period and one 1.5m long 21mm period IVU, which the minimum gap of these is 5mm and 5.5mm, respectively. Recently a special device for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) beamline has been added to the collection of baseline devices. Three pole wigglers with a 28mm magnetic gap and a peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of the type of radiation which is currently produced with bending magnets at the NSLS.

Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D.A.; He, P.; Kitegi, C.; Rank, J.; Rhein, C.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cavity Design and Beam Simulations for the APS RF Gun Advanced Photon Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented an outline of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL), emphasizing their more. SSRL $21.OM B. NSLS $33.8M ($3M increase) C. APS $84.7M D. 4th Generation X-ray Source R&D $3.OM The SSRL and APS figures are the FY98 DOE requests. The NSLS figure is increased by $3.OM above the FY98

Kemner, Ken

122

NGLS: Next Generation Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo NGLS logo NGLS Science NGLS Technology Seminars Workshop/Reports Related Links Further Info NGLS Facility Combustion Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Today is a golden age for light sources. Storage ring-based synchrotrons routinely provide X-ray beams exploited by thousands of scientists annually to answer fundamental questions in diverse fields including human health, energy, and electronics and information processing. MORE > NGLS Science Science section chart NGLS CD-0 Proposal NGLS Technology Technology section chart Seminars Science section chart Workshops Science section chart Last updated 06/21/2013 Top A U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory Operated by the University

123

The Advanced Light Source Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The ALS, a third-generation synchrotron light source at Berkeley Lab, has been operating for almost a decade and is generating forefront science by exploiting the high brightness of a third-generation source in three areas: (1) high resolving power for spectroscopy; (2) high spatial resolution for microscopy and spectromicroscopy; and (3) high coherence for experiments such as speckle. However, the ALS was one of the first third-generation machines to be designed, and accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since its conception. As a result, its performance will inevitably be outstripped by newer, more advanced sources. To remain competitive and then set a new standard, the performance of the ALS, in particular its brightness, must be enhanced. Substantial improvements in brightness and current have always been feasible in principle, but they incur the penalty of a much reduced lifetime, which is totally unacceptable to our users. Significant brightness improvements can be realized in the core soft x-ray region by going to top-off operation, where injection would be quasi-continuous and the lifetime objections disappear. In top-off mode with higher average current, a reduced vertical emittance and beta function, and small-gap permanent-magnet or superconducting insertion devices, one to two orders of magnitude improvement in brightness can be had in the soft x-ray range. These improvements also extend the high energy range of the undulator radiation beyond the current limit of 2000 eV. Descriptions of the upgrade and the important new science achievable are presented.

Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benjamin; Hussain, Zahid; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

NSLS Services | User Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Accounts User Accounts Operating Accounts (81000 accounts) General Users who are allocated beam time and Participating Research Teams (PRTs) or Contributing Users (CUs) who operate beamlines should establish a BNL operating account to cover the costs of materials while running an experiment, shipping, and/or miscellaneous BNL services (telephone & fax codes), if these needs are anticipated. The term of the purchase order must be specified and names of persons having signature authorization for charges against this account must be listed. Brookhaven's Fiscal Division will bill the user for any charges the user makes to the account. Users are obligated to pay outstanding debts promptly. All users should set up a $1,000 operating account to cover operating expenses while at the NSLS, such as charges for use of trades, shops, and

125

NSLS User Access | Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Training Training for New Users and Users with Expired Training and/or Badges: All new users and users with expired badges must complete or update the training modules shown below prior to access to the experimental floor. The training can be completed online prior to arrival at the NSLS and is strongly recommended to save considerable time during check-in at the Guest, User, Visitor (GUV) Center in Building 400. Please note each training module is followed by an exam which asks for your name and guest number. If you do not already have a guest number, leave this entry blank. All new users and users with expired badges MUST arrive on a weekday (no weekends or holidays) and check in at the GUV Center so that your training can be verified and to receive a photo ID badge (new or updated). The GUV

126

Multi-source solar simulator using single light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, techniques and apparatus are described for adjusting the spectral irradiance characteristics of a light source. The invention is applicable to any light source and has many areas of utility. One example is for simulating solar light for use in testing efficiency of photovoltaic cells. Solar light at any point in the world can be simulated. Also, light having any desired wavelength (or combination of desired wavelengths) can be obtained from a single light source using the techniques and apparatus of the invention. 4 figs.

Emery, K.A.; Osterwald, C.R.

1989-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

127

NSLS VUV Storage Ring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VUV Storage Ring VUV Storage Ring VUV Normal Operations Operating Parameters (pdf) Insertion Devices Flux & Brightness Orbit Stability Lattice Information (pdf) Lattice : MAD Dataset Mechanical Drawing (pdf) VUV Operating Schedule Introduction & History The VUV Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was one of the first of the 2nd generation light sources to operate in the world. Initially designed in 1976 the final lattice design was completed in 1978 shortly after funding was approved. Construction started at the beginning of FY 1979 and installation of the magnets was well underway by the end of FY 1980. The first stored beam was achieved in December of 1981 at 600 MeV and the first photons were delivered to beamlines in May 1982, with routine beam line operations underway by the start of FY 1983. The number of beam

128

2004 NSLS Activity Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NatioNal NatioNal SyNchrotroN light Source activity report 2004 BNL 73577 National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2004 BNL-73577-2005 UC400 (General Energy Research) DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commerical product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

129

Workshop on atomic physics at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The workshop emphasis was to acquaint the atomic physics community with the range of experimental capabilities of the NSLS. (GHT)

Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Gregory, D.C. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Industry Group Learns About Light Source Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry over the past 50 years. General Electric's "Durathon" sodium metal halide battery breakthrough required the use of light sources allowing them to understand the...

131

Characterizations and Diagnostics of Compton Light Source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at Duke University is a world class Compton light source facility. At the HIGS, a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) (more)

Sun, Changchun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Light production metrics of radiation sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light production by a radiation source is evaluated and reviewed as an important concept of physics from the Black-Body point of view. The mechanical equivalent of the lumen, the unit of perceived light, is explained and evaluated using radiation physics arguments. The existence of an upper limit of luminous efficacy is illustrated for various sources and implications are highlighted.

C. Tannous

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

Manos, Dennis M. (Williamsburg, VA); Diggs, Jessie (Norfolk, VA); Ametepe, Joseph D. (Roanoke, VA)

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

BNL | Photon Sciences, Light as a Discovery Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Sciences Photon Sciences image Light as a Discovery Tool Brookhaven conducts scientific research using photons-particles of light-to probe the structure and makeup of materials. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) uses electrons accelerated along a high-tech ring at nearly the speed of light to create beams of light in the x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared wavelengths, resulting in a kind of giant microscope. Revealing the Structure of Matter Scientists use beam lines at NSLS to probe the electronic and atomic structures of materials, analyze very small samples, or map surfaces with atomic-scale sensitivity. Researchers at NSLS use an array of sophisticated imaging techniques to get highly detailed "pictures" of a wide range of materials, from biological molecules to advanced electronics.

135

Upgrade of NSLS timing system  

SciTech Connect

We report on the progress of the new NSLS timing system. There are three types of requirements for NSLS timing system: clocks, synchronization and trigger circuits. All ring revolution frequency clocks are generated using ECL and high speed TTL logic. The synchronization circuits allows to fill both storage rings with any bunch pattern. The triggers are generated by using commercially available digital delay generators. The delay unit`s outputs are ultrastable, with a resolution of 5 ps, and are programmed by computer via IEEE 488 interface. The block diagrams, description of all major timing components and the present status are provided in this paper.

Singh, O.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Sheehan, J.; Smith, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NSLS control system upgrade status  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS control system initially installed in 1978 has undergone several modifications but the basic system architecture remained relatively unchanged. The need for faster response, increased reliability and better diagnostics made the control system upgrade a priority. Since the NSLS runs continuously, major changes to the control system are difficult. The upgrade plan had to allow continuous incremental changes to the control system without having any detrimental effect on operations. The plan had to provide for immediate improvement in a few key areas, such as data access rates, and be complete in a short time. At present, most accelerator operations utilize the upgraded control system.

Smith, J.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Y.; Flannigan, J.; Sathe, S.; Keane, J.; Krinsky, S.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27.2013 27.2013 Researchers from NSLS-II visit SXSPM team at Argonne Synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy will soon also be developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In order to establish collaboration between the two National Laboratories, Drs. Evgeny Nazaretski and Hui Yan fom BNL visited Argonne to learn more about recent progress made in the SXSPM project. During the 2-day visit the teams discussed mutual scientific goals and strategies to achieve them. NSLS-II will be a new state-of-the-art, medium-energy electron storage ring at BNL designed to deliver high intensity and brightness. Construction of the NSLS-II's ring building began in March 2009. The new facility will begin operating in 2014

138

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

NSLS Computer Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Systems Computer Systems Micro Systems WorkStation Applications Network Configuration Documents The National Synchrotron Light Source facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, consists of two storage rings, one for VUV operating at 800 Mev and one for XRAY at 2.8 Gev and a common injection system comprised of a linear accelerator and a Booster ring. Hardware Architecture The hardware architecture of the present control system follows the current trend seen in many accelerator facilities. It is a two-level distributed system consisting of HP/900 series workstations connected by the standard ethernet to VME-based microprocessor subsystems. All the workstations have local disk and sufficient memory for fast response. Workstations are used as file server, back-up file server and for program development and other

140

NSLS PRM Table of Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LS-ESH-PRM-1.5.2 Standards For Use of Coaxial Cables and Connectors in Signal and High Voltage Systems by NSLS Users & Staff PS-ESH-PRM-1.5.3 Interlock Safety LS-ESH-PRM-1.5.4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESY) Herman Winick (SLAC) Mike Zisman (LBNL) WHITEPAPERof Future Light Sources A White Paper Report prepared byheart of the all- 24 WHITEPAPER Science and Technology of

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microwave generated plasma light source apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A microwave generated plasma light source including a microwave generator, a microwave cavity having a light reflecting member forming at least a portion of the cavity, and a member transparent to light and opaque to microwaves disposed across an opening of the cavity opposite the feeding opening through which the microwave generator is coupled. An electrodeless discharge bulb is disposed at a position in the cavity such that the cavity operates as a resonant cavity at least when the bulb is emitting light. In the bulb is encapsulated at least one discharge light emissive substance. The bulb has a shape and is sufficiently small that the bulb acts substantially as a point light source.

Yoshizawa, K.; Ito, H.; Kodama, H.; Komura, H.; Minowa, Y.

1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Application of light emitting diodes as solid state light sources in analytical chemistry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several analytical systems were developed with light emitting diodes (LEDs) as solid state light sources. With an LED as a light source, liquid core waveguide (more)

Eom, In Yong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NSLS Committees | Work Planning/Permit Review Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

require enhanced work planning. Committees review and approve submitted work permits. NSLS reports to Operations Section Head, Emil Zitvogel. NSLS-II reports to ESH Manager,...

148

NSLS-II: Accelerator Systems Advisory Committee (ASAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construction, and operations of major accelerator systems. This group will advise the NSLS-II Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) and the NSLS-II Associate Director for...

149

SUNY beam line X3, National Synchrotron Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses: beamline change and upgrades at NSLS; crystallography; surface structure; small angle scattering; EXAFS, glazing angle and fluorescence studies; and high temperature superconductors. (LSP).

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SEMATECH Visit to the National Synchrotron Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SEMATECH visitors were first given a detailed tour of the NIST NSLS beamlines, highlighting the opportunities for nanoscale measurements of ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proprietary Research Information At NSLS, proprietary research is work conducted under a Class Waiver for Proprietary Users of Energy Research Designated Facilities. Such research...

152

Photon Sciences | About the National Synchrotron Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

assemble nanomaterials into useful devices more simply and economically. High-Temperature Superconductors NSLS-II will allow scientists to study how materials become...

153

NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report (CDR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conceptual Design Report NSLS-II CDR cover Brookhaven National Laboratory has prepared a conceptual design for a world class user facility for scientific research using synchrotron...

154

NSLS Committees | Environmental, Safety & Health Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental, Safety & Health Committee Charge The NSLS ES&H Committee shall meet as needed to review: Proposed modifications to the accelerator facility, its operation, or...

155

NSLS-II Project Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Project Schedule NSLS-II Project Schedule Major Milestone Event Major Milestone Event Preliminary Schedule CD-0 (approve Mission Need) 4th quarter, FY2005 CD-1 (approve Alternative Selection and Cost Range) 4th quarter, FY2007 CD-2 (approve Performance Baseline) 1st quarter, FY2008 CD-3 (approve Start of Construction) 2nd quarter, FY2009 CD-4 (approve Start of Operations) FY2015 Critical Decisions The five Critical Decisions are major milestones approved by the Secretarial Acquisition Executive or Acquisition Executive that establish the mission need, recommended alternative, Acquisition Strategy, the Performance Baseline, and other essential elements required to ensure that the project meets applicable mission, design, security, and safety requirements. Each Critical Decision marks an increase in commitment of

156

Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O' Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEXT GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE FACILITY AT LBNL * J.N.FEL PERFORMANCE The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is aStudies for a Next Generation Light Source Facility at

Corlett, J.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Linac Coherent Light Source is  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coherent Light Source is Coherent Light Source is a revolution in x-ray science. Just as the invention of x-ray machines a century ago astonishingly revealed the inside of our bodies and began new sciences, the world's first x-ray laser will open up unprecedented opportunities. Pioneering experiments will advance our understand ing of everything from the hidden physics inside planets, to how proteins function as the engines of life, to building nanotechnology devices for the backbone of future industry and technology. The applications are legion: medicine, electronics, biology, solid-state physics, nanotechnology, energy production, industry and fields that do not yet exist. Linac Coherent Light Source New Tools Create New Science The LCLS is dramatically different from any x-ray

160

2007 NSLS Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-Plane Magnetic Anistropies of Sputtered Co0.7Fe0.3 Films on AlGaAs(001) Spin Light Emitting Diode Heterostructures, J. Appl. Phys., 101: 09D106 (2007). M Klem, D Resnick, K...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline, X6A, at NSLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy instrument has been built at the X6A beam port of the x-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This instrument allows the collection of extended x-ray-absorption fine structure and/or x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra for many elements on the millisecond time scale. The beamline employs a four-point crystal bender and a rectangular Si 220 crystal to access incident energies between 6.5 and 21 keV. Because the polychromator focuses the synchrotron beam to a narrow 100-[mu]m line, this experimental apparatus is ideal for x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments in special environments such as at high pressures, for [ital in] [ital situ] experiments, and/or for very small samples. In this manuscript we will describe the instrument design and present data with which to evaluate the instrument. This beamline is available through the NSLS user proposal system.

Lee, P.L.; Beno, M.A.; Jennings, G.; Ramanathan, M.; Knapp, G.S.; Huang, K. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); Bai, J. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of CUNY, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)); Montano, P.A. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60680 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY TEST OF THE 1500 MHZ NSLS-II PASSIVE SUPERCONDUCTING RF CAVITY  

SciTech Connect

NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. Earlier work described the design alternatives and the geometry selected for a copper prototype. We subsequently have iterated the design to lower the R/Q of the cavity and to increase the diameter of the beam pipe ferrite HOM dampers to reduce the wakefield heating. A niobium cavity and full cryomodule including LN2 shield, magnetic shield and insulating vacuum vessel have been fabricated and installed. A passive SRF 3rd harmonic cavity consisting of two tightly coupled cells has been designed and fabricated for NSLS-II. Initial cold tests of this cavity are very promising. These tests have verified that the cavity frequency and mode separation between the 0 and {pi}-modes can be set at manufacture. Further, the frequency separation can be maintained over wide tuning ranges necessary for operation. Future work includes HOM damper and motorized tuner development.

Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Kosciuk, B.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, B.; Sharma, S.; Towne, N.; Grimm, T.L.; Boulware, C.H.; Krizmanich, C.; Kuhlman, B.; Miller, N.; Siegel, B.; Winowski, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

NSLS SAD Appendices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issues USI 1: See Appendix 13 below USI 2: Laser Gamma Electron Source (LEGS) Decommissioning and Equipment Removal USI 3: X-Ray Ring Access Control Interlock Temporary...

164

Tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source and a method of operating a light source are provided. The light source includes a pump laser, first and second non-linear optical crystals, a tunable filter, and light pulse directing optics. The method includes the steps of operating the pump laser to generate a pulsed pump beam characterized by a nanosecond pulse duration and arranging the light pulse directing optics so as to (i) split the pulsed pump beam into primary and secondary pump beams; (ii) direct the primary pump beam through an input face of the first non-linear optical crystal such that a primary output beam exits from an output face of the first non-linear optical crystal; (iii) direct the primary output beam through the tunable filter to generate a sculpted seed beam; and direct the sculpted seed beam and the secondary pump beam through an input face of the second non-linear optical crystal such that a secondary output beam characterized by at least one spectral bandwidth on the order of about 0.1 cm.sup.-1 and below exits from an output face of the second non-linear optical crystal.

Powers, Peter E. (Dayton, OH); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

AFRD - Advanced Light Source Accelerator Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Accelerator Physics ALS Accelerator Physics Home Organization Outreach and Diversity News Highlights Safety Links Intramural FPO Accelerator Physics Group This page and the Group's own site emphasize the continuing effort to improve the performance and versatility of the accelerator-related systems of the ALS. If you want to start with a nontechnical explanation of what synchrotron light is, how scientists use it, and how the Advanced Light Source works, try About the ALS. The research performed using beams from the ALS is a vast topic that spans many scientific disciplines; a good overview with in-depth links is available at the ALS Science Briefs page. The ALS is a “” synchrotron light source based on a low-emittance electron storage ring with a nominal energy of 1.9 GeV. Since the machine

166

NSLS-II Integrated Project Team (IPT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Integrated Project Team NSLS-II Integrated Project Team DOE uses an integrated project teaming approach for managing the NSLS-II Project. This Integrated Project Team (IPT), organized and led by the NSLS-II Federal Project Director, is an essential element in DOE's acquisition process and is being used during all phases of the project's life cycle. This team consists of professionals representing diverse disciplines with the specific knowledge, skills, and abilities to support the Federal Project Director in successfully executing the project. The IPT for the NSLS-II Project will consist of members from both DOE and the contractor, Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The team membership will change as the project progresses from initiation to closeout to ensure the necessary skills are always represented to meet the project's needs.

167

Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, Brookhaven NationalSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven Nationalof Georgia). Use of the NSLS was supported by DOE under

Tokunaga, T.K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Long-term stability of organic carbon-stimulated chromate reduction in contaminated soils, and its relation to manganese redox status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Georgia). Use of the NSLS was supported by DOE underNational Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, Brookhaven NationalSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Sutton, Steve R.; Newville, Matthew; Rao, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | DISCOVERY at Light Speed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL People BNL People 2010 ANNUAL REPORT Photon Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory Reflections on the Year Steve Dierker Steve Dierker, Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme "Discovery at Light Speed" for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of

170

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

One of the first third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS, has been operating for almost a decade at Berkeley Lab, where experimenters have been exploiting its high brightness for forefront science. However, accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since the ALS was designed. As a result, the performance of the ALS is in danger of being eclipsed by that of newer, more advanced sources. The ALS upgrade that we are planning includes full-energy, top-off injection with higher storage-ring current and the replacement of five first-generation insertion devices with nine state-of-the art insertion devices and four new application-specific beamlines now being identified in a strategic planning process. The upgrade will help keep the ALS at the forefront of soft x-ray synchrotron light sources for the next two decades.

Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benedict; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz,Janos; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson,Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

XAFS at the Canadian Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canadian Light Source Hard X-ray Micro-Analysis Beamline (HXMA, 06ID-1) is a hard X-ray spectroscopy beamline currently under commissioning. The source of the beamline is a superconducting wiggler covering 5 to 40 keV. The primary optics include a cryogenically cooled double crystal monochromator (Si 111 and 220), white beam vertical collimating and toroidal focusing mirrors. End station experimental capabilities include XAFS (Ge solid state detectors), microprobe (Kirkpatrick-Baez murors, Ge solid state detector and image plate area detector), and diffraction (Huber psi-8 and powder diffraction setups, with diamond anvil cell high pressure sample environment). Commissioning status for the XAFS capabilities is described.

Jiang, D. T. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Chen, N. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada); Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Zhang, L.; Malgorzata, K. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wright, G.; Igarashi, R.; Beauregard, D.; Kirkham, M.; McKibben, M. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0X4 (Canada)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Linac Coherent Light SourCe  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linac Linac Coherent Light SourCe after the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (now the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) developed its two- mile-long linear accelerator (linac), it received approval from the Department of Energy to construct the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first free electron laser (FEL) facility that would be able to produce x-rays short and bright enough that individual molecules could be imaged in their natural states. 40 years Genesis of the idea In 1992, Dr. Claudio Pellegrini, a professor at UCLA, first developed a proposal for a facility that would eventually become LCLS. The idea generated interest within the scientific community, and a design study report conducted by SLAC in the late 1990s led to the first

173

Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

New LED light sources and lamps for general illumination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light source compared to traditional light sources like incandescent bulbs and fluorescent tubes bulb. LEDs emit colored light with a narrow spectral band of 20-30 nm, colors covering the spectralNew LED light sources and lamps for general illumination Carsten Dam-Hansen, Birgitte Thestrup

175

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: LED Task Light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light The goal of this project is to accelerate the use of energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp...

176

The JLab high power ERL light source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source.

G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accessing NSLS Accessing NSLS NSLS strongly advises industrial users to first consult with the Industrial Program Coordinator, Jun Wang (junwang@bnl.gov or 631-344-2661), before beginning the beam time application process. She will discuss your proposed research with you, guiding you to the most appropriate beamline and synchrotron research technique. From there, you will be contacted by the beamline staff at your target beamline. They will work with you to develop the best possible beam time proposal, which you will need to formally apply for beam time. For new users, it is often beneficial to start your NSLS experience by collaborating with seasoned users. Dr. Wang can help establish these collaborations. Whether you decide to consult with the Industrial Program Coordinator or

178

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Construction Webcams Live Camera View 1 Live Camera View 2 Time-lapse Camera View 3 Time-lapse Camera View 4 Cam 5 Available Webcams You may click either the links below or...

179

NSLS II: Soft Matter and Biomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capabilities, the need for which is being felt even now. The ultra-high brightness of NSLS-II is required to address many of these challenges. The proposed small-angle x-ray...

180

Plasma-based EUV light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Plasma-based EUV light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to the LCLS User Resources Site Welcome to the LCLS User Resources Site User Portal | Agreements | Data Collection & Analysis | Logistics | Policies | Proposals | Safety | Schedules | Shipping The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) encourages scientists from diverse fields to submit proposals for experiments that utilize the LCLS's unique capabilities. Interested scientists are encouraged to learn more about the latest developments by contacting LCLS staff scientists and by reviewing the instrument descriptions. Step-By-Step Instructions to Working at LCLS Review LCLS Policies Review Machine FAQ & Parameters Register and Submit Proposals Confirm User Agreement Reserve Accommodations Complete Safety Training Request Computer Account Establish User Account Ship Samples/Equipment Review Check-in Procedures

183

Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

184

NSLS Booster & Linac Ring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Booster & Linac Ring Booster & Linac Ring Booster Operating Parameters (pdf) Lattice Information (pdf) Mechanical Drawing (pdf) Standard Operating Mode Electrons are injected into the NSLS storage rings from a 750 MeV booster synchrotron fed by a 120 MeV linac. The electrons are first produced in a 100 KeV triode electron gun. The gun is pulsed at the booster revolution period, 94.6 nsec, seven times per booster cycle. Each pulse is 5 nsec long and supplies about 17 microbunches in the linac. After acceleration in the linac, the beam is injected into the booster on seven successive turns. Multi-turn injection in the booster is accomplished in the following way: The beam is deflected into the booster by a septum magnet. The first linac pulse goes around the booster and returns to the injection point just as

185

Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Argonne Committees and Contacts diamond Workshop on Diamonds for Modern Light Sources May 5 and 6, 2011 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory Room 401A1100...

186

Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

High-brightness beamline for X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard-x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order-of-magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new ''Cowan type'' double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (US). Dept. of Chemistry

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Microsoft Word - ASE_NSLS_Rev_03.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VUV and X-Ray Rings, and beamlines. The controls are derived from analysis within the NSLS Safety Assessment Document (SAD)(LS- NSLS-0012; rev 3; June 2011). Failure to meet the...

189

Chapter 1: Executive Summary 1-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

devices 27 Number of bend magnet sources 30 1.4 Cost and Schedule The Total Estimated Cost (TEC) of NSLS the capability to characterize and understand physical properties at the nanoscale, the processes by which, and appropriate support equipment, all housed in a new building. Specifically, the main scope elements include

Ohta, Shigemi

190

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The LDLR crystals,Director for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and Steven

Duque editor, Theresa; Greiner editor, Annette; Moxon editor, Elizabeth; Robinson editor, Arthur; Tamura editor, Lori

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition Topics Transition Topics The Photon Sciences Directorate intends to run a full schedule (~5000 hours per year) of NSLS operations to the end of fiscal year 2014 (September 30, 2014). NSLS-II will be ramped up as rapidly as possible to serve our large and productive user community. The tabs below provide information related to various transition topics. If you have comments, suggestions or questions, please contact the Photon Sciences User Administrator, at gcisco@bnl.gov. News & Updates FAQs Techniques Across DOE DOE Partner Facilities Contact Us User Transition Forum, May 2012 The User Transition Planning Forum was held on May 21, 2012, as part of the annual NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting. Below are copies of slide presentations and notes taken during the Forum. Johnson Presentation

192

New Electronic Light Sources for Sustainability in a Greener Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update continues the technical assessment of advanced lighting technologies in the product areaselectronic linear fluorescent, electronic compact fluorescent, electronic high-intensity discharge (HID), and light-emitting diode (LED). This year, a new type of light sourcesolid-state plasma lighting (a miniature HID technology)was assessed. This project demonstrates how light sources are making their way into new designs providing new types of light fixtures. A total of seven products w...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHESS), Peter Siddons (NSLS, BNL), John Arthur (SSRL), RalfSynchrotron Light Source, NSLS), John Arthur (StanfordChairman - Peter Siddons (NSLS) 9:00 Spectroscopy and atomic

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source, NSLS, (Brookhaven, USA) during thehave been at the ALS or NSLS. Several new instruments aremicroscopes at the ALS and NSLS are provided elsewhere. 18-

Moffet, Ryan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: HID Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Ballasts and Controls for HID Lighting Systems Evaluation of Electronic Ballasts and Related Controls for HID Lighting Systems Objective HID ballast The goal of this project is to evaluate the potential of electronic ballasts and related controls for HID lighting systems to improve the efficiency of current technology. The specific objectives of this project are to: Test, analyze and determine the potential of electronic ballasts for HID lighting systems in cooperation with manufacturers as an emerging energy efficient technology to reduce lighting loads in commercial, industrial and municipal applications. Identify control strategies to further improve the energy efficiency of these systems with a municipal partner. Provide appropriate recommendations for incorporating these technologies into current state codes and regulations.

196

Timing system of the Swiss Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The timing system of the Swiss Light Source is based on the event system concept of APS, Argonne [1]. However, for SLS the hardware was completely redesigned while preserving the software compatibility with the APS system. This gave us a head start in the implementation: we could use the latest available hardware and take advantage of the features integrated in the EPICS software. The event system is used as the sole timing distribution method, for hardware trigger delivery (assisted with a high-precision delay at a few places) and for controlling all the timing-related tasks of operation: injector sequencing, filling patterns, software synchronization, timestamps and so on. The event network is also extended to the beamlines to allow synchronization of the beamline experiments. The implementation consists of the hardware (Gigabit Ethernet link, FPGAs) and a firmware core written in VHDL. The functionality of the cards can be modified in situ by rewriting the firmware in flash memory. On the other hand, the f...

Korhonen, T T; Korhonen, Timo; Heiniger, Martin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NIST Light Source Illuminates Fusion Power Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Their measurement tool also is used in incandescent light bulbsit's the element tungsten. Published with permission of ITER. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

198

NSLS ESH&Q | NSLS Laboratory Rooms and Experimental Safety Reviews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS Laboratory Rooms and Experimental Safety Reviews Some beamlines have dedicated lab space. Fill out the form below and e-mail it to the Lab Steward for that beamline first. If...

199

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Light Source Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALITE) research program is aimed at breakthrough basic research to achieve approximately 150 to 200 lumens per watt for fluorescent light sources, and to increase high intensity discharge light source efficiency by up to 50%. This report describes work on high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. These commercially available lamps currently have efficacies up to 120 lumens per watt (LPW), and radiate approximately 36% of their energy in the visible spectrum and 53% in the infrared ...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

The European Spallation Source Getting the "Green" Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Spallation Source Getting the "Green" Light. ... Location: 10:30 am, Green Auditorium, Gaithersburg, VTC to Boulder in Room 4511. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light Source Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and light source users and facilities. News is a broadthe Department of Energys user facilities have establisheda National User Facility Organization consisting of user

Robinson, Art

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Science and Instrumentation for the Linac Coherent Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Instrumentation for the Linac Coherent Light Source WB00852.GIF (317 bytes) Where: SLAC Panofsky Auditorium When: Friday, October 15, 1999 (1:30 pm) Saturday,...

203

The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

James R. Boyce

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Annual Report. October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1996.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS; Brookhaven NationalX-ray microprobe (X26A, NSLS), with monochromatic X-- rays

Zawislanski, P.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ALS Activity Report 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Foundation NSLS . . . . . . National SynchrotronPohang Light Source, and the NSLSs vacuum ultravi- olet and

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

2nd Annual DOE-ERSP PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS_environmental/, NSLS: http://www.bnl.gov/envirosuite/,Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the EnviroSuite program

Hazen, Terry C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

High-Resolution Soft X-Ray Photoionization Studies of Selected Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) [9]. Another Sphericalas well as a newer SGM at NSLS, has actively investigated a

Hudson, E.A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

210

Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

Reed, Scott (Albuquerue, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerue, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerue, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerue, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: OLED's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information For more information on this project, please contact: Steve Johnson Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4274 SGJohnson@lbl.gov Sponsor Information This project is...

212

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: Charge Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information For more information on this project, please contact: Steve Johnson Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4274 SGJohnson@lbl.gov Sponsor Information This project is...

213

A Web Site about the International Light Source Community  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Web Site about the International Light Source Community A Web Site about the International Light Source Community On February 17, 2005, the international light source community, including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, launched the first website dedicated to providing the media, general public, and scientific community with the latest news and information about and from the world's accelerator-driven light sources (synchrotrons and free-electron lasers) and about the science carried out by users of these facilities. The web site - www.lightsources.org - was developed and is jointly maintained by the lightsource.org Collaboration, whose members represent the world's light source facilities in Europe, North America, and Asia. Support for the project is provided by science funding agencies of many

214

The Phase I MX Beamlines at Diamond Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, I02, I03 and I04 at Diamond Light Source are presented. These beamlines formed the life science component of Phase 1 of Diamond Light Source. The article provides details of the design and the current status of the beamlines.

Duke, E. M. H.; Evans, G.; Flaig, R.; Hall, D. R.; Latchem, M.; McAuley, K. E.; Sandy, D. J.; Sorensen, T. L-M.; Waterman, D.; Johnson, L. N. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon. OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michigan University and ALS), J.D. Bozek and G.D. Ackerman (Shining light on met als in the environment," EleinentsStray field reduc tion of als eddy current septum magnets,"

Tamura Ed., Lori S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.

Nause, Jeff E; Ferguson, Ian; Doolittle, Alan

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Linac Coherent Light Source Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linac Coherent Light Source Overview Linac Coherent Light Source Overview Linac Coherent Light Source Overview Addthis Description Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall. Duration 5:50 Topic Physics Credit Energy Department Video MR. : The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is located in the heart of California's beautiful San Francisco Bay Area. Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy, SLAC has been home to the world's longest particle accelerator for nearly 50 years. In 2009 SLAC ushered in a new era in its long history of physics research with a new kind of laser called the Linac Coherent Light Source, or LCLS. The LCLS is the first laser in the world to produce hard X-rays, which can

218

Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, powerful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia.

Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: OLED Cathodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OLED Cathodes OLED Cathodes Development of New Cathodes for OLED's Objective The objective of this project is to develop improved cathodes for use in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Approach A major challenge for organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology is to improve electron injection into the organic electroluminescent layer, which limits the efficiency of the device and the luminous flux per unit area. This project aims at overcoming such barriers by developing “structured cathodes” based on functional materials (nanotubes and nanoclusters) with characteristic size smaller than the optical wavelength. The incorporation of such nanostructured cathodes in OLEDs can significantly improve device efficiency by lowering operating voltage, and increase device stability and light extraction.

220

Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ulyanov Street, Nizhny Novgorod 603950, Russia I. Y. Dodin and N. J particles could not travel faster than light. Hence, the final energy is estimated from Eq. 52 as a -1 Research through Grant No. 08-02-01209-a and the NNSA under the SSAA Program through DOE Research un- der

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the construction of LCLS, the first hard x-ray laser, towith storage-ring sources and LCLS will extend this down todown to sub-microseconds and LCLS will cover the range from

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Rf power systems for the national synchrotron light source  

SciTech Connect

The booster synchrotron and the two storage rings at the NSLS are provided with rf power systems of 3 kW, 50 kW, and 500 kW nominal output power, all at 53 MHz. This power is supplied by grounded grid tetrode amplifiers designed for television broadcast service. These amplifiers and associated power supplies, control and interlock systems, rf controls, and computer interface are described.

Dickinson, T.; Rheaume, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (ALS, LBL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed toas a third-generation synchrotron radiation source, that is,latest generation of synchrotron light sources, l extremely

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress...

226

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Linac Coherent Light Source...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCLS - Linac Coherent Light Source Banner image of LCLS undulator hall. LCLS, the world's first hard X-ray free-electron laser, pushes science to new extremes with ultrabright,...

227

Status report on the Advanced Light Source control system  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a status report on the ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) control system. The current status, performance data, and future plans will be discussed. Manpower, scheduling, and costs issues are addressed.

Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.; Young, J.

1991-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

HIGH INTENSITY LIGHT SOURCES (Part II of Thesis)  

SciTech Connect

A stable carbon arc operated in controlled atmosphere is described. The arc was designed to serve as a light source during lifetime studies of the B/sup 2/ SIGMA state of the CN molecule. The CN radiation from the plasma of the arc was investigated and found to have a brightness temperature of 5500 icient laborato K at lambda 3883 A. This is considerably higher than an estimate of the value required for lifetime measurements. The stability of the carbon arc under various conditions is discussed. For successful lifetime measurements, the light source employed must have a high brightness temperature (intensity). A method for the determination of the brightness temperature of a light source at a specific wave length is described. The method was used for determining the brightness temperatures of some available light sources. Sodium, thallium, and mercury discharge lamps, a medium-pressure mercury arc lamp, and the carbon arc were studied. (auth)

Worden, E.F. Jr.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

SERVER DEVELOPMENT FOR NSLS-II PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. The server software under development is available via an open source sourceforge project named epics-pvdata, which consists of modules pvData, pvAccess, pvIOC, and pvService. Examples of two services that already exist in the pvService module are itemFinder, and gather. Each service uses pvData to store in-memory transient data, pvService to transfer data over the network, and pvIOC as the service engine. The performance benchmarking for pvAccess and both gather service and item finder service are presented in this paper. The performance comparison between pvAccess and Channel Access are presented also. For an ultra low emittance synchrotron radiation light source like NSLS II, the control system requirements, especially for beam control are tight. To control and manipulate the beam effectively, a use case study has been performed to satisfy the requirement and theoretical evaluation has been performed. The analysis shows that model based control is indispensable for beam commissioning and routine operation. However, there are many challenges such as how to re-use a design model for on-line model based control, and how to combine the numerical methods for modeling of a realistic lattice with the analytical techniques for analysis of its properties. To satisfy the requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture for the software framework for beam commissioning and operation is critical. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating and plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology, and client interface is undergoing. The design and implementation adopted a new EPICS implementation, namely epics-pvdata [9], which is under active development. The implementation of this project under Java is close to stable, and binding to other language such as C++ and/or Python is undergoing. In this paper, we focus on the performance benchmarking and comparison for pvAccess and Channel Access, the performance evaluation for 2 services, gather and item finder respectively.

Shen, G.; Kraimer, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Sthr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL Author: Corlett, J.N. Publication Date: 04-12-2011 Publication Info: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/81t3h97w Keywords: NGLS, FEL, 2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, high-brightness, highrepetition- rate, high- repetition-rate (1 MHz) Local Identifier: LBNL Paper LBNL-4391E Preferred Citation:

233

Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources  

SciTech Connect

Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

Falkenstein, Zoran (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

INSERTION DEVICES R AND Ds FOR NSLS-II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NSLS-II is a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also for broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are for polarization control. Rigorous R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the above devices as well as building new types of insertion devices such as high temperature superconducting wiggler/undulators. This paper describes the details of these activities and discuss technical issues.

TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; RAKOWSKY, G.; SHAFTAN, T.; SKARITKA, J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source

Walker, R P; Christou, C; Han, J H; Kay, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Achieving Stability Requirements for Nanoprobe and Long Beam Lines at NSLS II. A Comprehensive Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving Stability Requirements for Nanoprobe and Long Beam Lines at NSLS II. A Comprehensive Study

Simos, N; Broadbent, A J; Evans-Lutterodt, K; Fallier, M; Hill, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

Pellegrini, Claudio [UCLA

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

239

Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Rose of APS and CNM One of Four DOE Early Career Award Winners Scientists Close-In on Artificial Spider Silk Ekiert Earns 2012 APSUO Franklin Award for Studies of Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties, Expand X-ray Technology and Research JUNE 18, 2012 Bookmark and Share The interiors of the Canadian Light Source (top) and Advanced Photon Source experiment halls. (CLS photo courtesy of Canadian Light Source) Seeking to solve some of today's greatest global problems, scientists using x-ray light source facilities at national research laboratories in

240

NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, Ji

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SciDAC advances in beam dynamics simulation: from light sources to colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations of next generation light sources and of high-RF linac for a next generation FEL light source at LBNL. Ain light sources The next generation of accelerator based

Qiang, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008-2009 data) Outline * Receptor modeling overview * Results from 2007 data set * New goals arising from analysis of 2007 data * New data for 2008 * New data for 2009 * Tentative conclusions * Future analysis i Factor profiles from 2007 analysis Source attribution of Black Carbon from 2007 analysis Goals/Issues suggested by the analysis of the 2007 data set * Are there seasonal differences in the source strengths? * Are there other LAA chemical components besides black carbon. What are their sources? * Can the various data sets available (e.g., 2007, 2008, 2009) be combined in a single large PMF analysis 2008 Data Set For Receptor Analysis * 42 samples from Eastern Siberia including 4 depth profiles

244

Electrodeless lighting RF power source development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An efficient, solid state RF power source has been developed on this NICE project for exciting low power electrodeless lamp bulbs. This project takes full advantage of concurrent advances in electrodeless lamp technology. Electrodeless lamp lighting systems utilizing the sulfur based bulb type developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc., is an emerging technology which is based on generating light in a confined plasma created and sustained by RF excitation. The bulb for such a lamp is filled with a particular element and inert gas at low pressure when cold. RF power from the RF source creates a plasma within the bulb which reaches temperatures approaching those of high pressure discharge lamp plasmas. At these temperatures the plasma radiates substantial visible light with a spectrum similar to sunlight.

NONE

1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma Light Sources Help Discover New Drug Against Melanoma July 18, 2011 - 12:07pm Addthis The new anti-cancer drug, vemurafenib, is the green honeycomb structure at middle left. Four dotted red lines show where it attaches to a target area in the mutated enzyme, disabling it from promoting the growth of tumors. | Image courtesy of Plexxikon Inc. The new anti-cancer drug, vemurafenib, is the green honeycomb structure at middle left. Four dotted red lines show where it attaches to a target area in the mutated enzyme, disabling it from promoting the growth of tumors. | Image courtesy of Plexxikon Inc. Mike Ross Science Writer at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory What does this mean for me? A new drug designed to fight melanoma was discovered thanks to the

246

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery  

Office of Science (SC) Website

GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 06.13.11 GE Uses DOE Advanced Light Sources to Develop Revolutionary Battery Technology Company is constructing a new battery factory in Upstate New York that is expected to create 300+ jobs. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo GE's new Image courtesy of GE GE's new "Durathon(tm)" sodium metal halide battery. The story of American manufacturing over the past two decades has too often been a tale of outsourcing, off-shoring, and downsizing-not least in

247

Multi-Photon Phosphor Feasibility Research: Advanced Light Source Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiencies of commercial light sources have reached a plateau at about 33 percent of the maximum possible, but these efficiencies will have to be doubled to achieve the energy savings in lighting needed in the future. One possibility is to develop phosphor materials for application to fluorescent lamps that emit two visible photons for each absorbed ultraviolet photon. Scientists discussed the possibility of developing such phosphor materials at a workshop held May 8 through May 10, 2001 in Peabody, Ma...

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Generating polarization controllable FELs at Dalian coherent light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The property of the FEL polarization is of great importance to the user community. FEL pulses with ultra-high intensity and flexible polarization control ability will absolutely open up new scientific realms. In this paper, several polarization control approaches are presented to investigate the great potential on Dalian coherent light source, which is a government-approved novel FEL user facility with the capability of wavelength continuously tunable in the EUV regime of 50-150 nm. The numerical simulations show that both circularly polarized FELs with highly modulating frequency and 100 microjoule level pulse energy could be generated at Dalian coherent light source.

Zhang, T; Wang, D; Zhao, Z T; Zhang, W Q; Wu, G R; Dai, D X; Yang, X M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Solid-state radioluminscent compsitions and light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new types of radioluminescent (RL) compositions light sources are provided. The first type is an all-organic system, consisting of covalently bound tritium within a solid, optically clear polymeric matrix. The matrix contains organic scintillation dyes that capture excitation energy from beta decay and red-shift the energy in a stepwise fashion, after which a chosen wavelength is emitted as fluorescence. The second type of RL light source consists of a zeolite crystalline material, in which material's intralattice spaces a tritiated compound and a luminophore are sorbed, and which material is optionally further dispersed in a refractive index-matched polymer matrix. 10 refs.

Clough, R.L.; Gill, J.T.; Hawkins, D.B. Renschler, C.L.; Shepodd, T.J.; Smith, H.M.

1989-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

250

High efficiency light source using solid-state emitter and down-conversion material  

SciTech Connect

A light emitting apparatus includes a source of light for emitting light; a down conversion material receiving the emitted light, and converting the emitted light into transmitted light and backward transmitted light; and an optic device configured to receive the backward transmitted light and transfer the backward transmitted light outside of the optic device. The source of light is a semiconductor light emitting diode, a laser diode (LD), or a resonant cavity light emitting diode (RCLED). The down conversion material includes one of phosphor or other material for absorbing light in one spectral region and emitting light in another spectral region. The optic device, or lens, includes light transmissive material.

Narendran, Nadarajah (Clifton Park, NY); Gu, Yimin (Troy, NY); Freyssinier, Jean Paul (Troy, NY)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Study of Transverse Coupled Bunch Instabilities by Using Non-Linear Taylor Maps for the Advanced Light Source (ALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Advanced Light Source (ALS) M. Meddahi and J. Bengtssonthe Advanced Light Source (ALS)* M. Meddahi and J. Bengtssongeneration light source, ALS, it is insufficient to rely on

Meddahi, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

Greiner, Annette (ed.)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Photonic crystal fibre-based light source for STED lithography  

SciTech Connect

A light source having a relative noise level in the order of 10{sup -6} and sufficient stability for application in STED lithography has been obtained using the generation of Cherenkov peaks in a supercontinuum spectrum. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Glubokov, D A; Sychev, V V; Vitukhnovsky, Alexey G; Korol'kov, A E

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Beam Loss Monitors for NSLS-II Storage Ring  

SciTech Connect

The shielding for the NSLS-II storage ring will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam losses in two cells of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of <10% top-off injection beam current. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring system will have beam loss monitors that will measure where the beam charge is lost around the ring, to warn operators if losses approach the design limits. To measure the charge loss quantitatively, we propose measuring the electron component of the shower as beam electrons hit the vacuum chamber (VC) wall. This will be done using the Cerenkov light as electrons transit ultra-pure fused silica rods placed close to the inner edge of the VC. The entire length of the rod will collect light from the electrons of the spread out shower resulting from the small glancing angle of the lost beam particles to the VC wall. The design and measurements results of the prototype Cerenkov BLM will be presented.

Kramer, S.L.; Cameron, P.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Lighting Group: Sources and Ballasts: LED Reflector Lamp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED Reflector Lamp LED Reflector Lamp LED Reflector Lamp Objective LED reflector lamp The goal of this project is to develop a revolutionary new reflector lamp which offers many advantages over current incandescent reflector lamps, including: three times greater efficiency ten times the rated life greater optical and performance properties use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) to generate the light. Although LEDs have been commercially available since the late 1960’s, recent dramatic improvements in LED technology have led to white light devices with efficiencies that meet or exceed those of a standard incandescent lamp. This project will build upon these improvements to develop a new type of source for focusing light. Contact Information For more information on this project, please contact:

257

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Linear Fluorescent Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update is one of four in a series that addresses the basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sources8212linear electronic fluorescent ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluores...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Microsoft Word - NSLS-II Call for First Experiment Proposals...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to biological and life science research. NSLS-II is scheduled to start science-commissioning operations in October 2014 with an initial suite of the following seven beamlines:...

259

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources

Ivanyan, M I; Tsakanov, V M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Short-pulse limits in optical instrumentation design for the SLAC Linac Cohereent Light Source (LCLS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-pulse limits in optical instrumentation design for the SLAC Linac Cohereent Light Source (LCLS)

Tatchyn, R

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Fixtures, Lamps, and Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and LED sources. Chapter 3 ad...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

NSLS Services | Repair & Equipment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repair & Equipment Services Repair & Equipment Services Cleaning Facility (BNL Central Shops) Solvent cleaning of vacuum parts and leak checking service is also available. Work is billed to each user via a BNL ILR. Contact the NSLS Building Manager to arrange for any of these services. Electronics Repair Limited repairs for electronic equipment are available from an outside contractor through the Control Room. Contact Control Room Supervisor Randy Church (x2550 or x2736, pager 5310). Shipping memos are filled out on the web, and pick ups are on Fridays. Come to the Control Room for assistance. The user should call the contractor on the day before scheduled pickups to alert the contractor of the pickup. Items to be repaired should be left in the Control Room with the completed shipping memo. Costs are charged to the

263

A Novel Light Source Based on a RF-Driven High Intensity Discharge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90-3122 Almost all the lighting news recently has been about advances in LED (Light Emitting Diode) lighting. But several companies are quietly developing new light sources that...

264

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A L S many other 3rd generation sources have been and arcthe soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, andconstructed third generation light sources. In this paper we

Sannibale, Fernando

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ideas for a Future PEP-X Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SLAC is developing a long-range plan to transfer the evolving scientific programs at SSRL from the SPEAR3 light source to a much higher performing synchrotron source -- PEP-X -- a new storage ring that would occupy the existing PEP-II tunnel and support two experimental halls, each containing 16 x-ray beam lines. Operating at 4.5 GeV and 1.5 A with a horizontal emittance of 0.14 nm-rad, reached using 90 m of damping wigglers, PEP-X would have an order of magnitude higher average brightness and flux in the 1-{angstrom} x-ray range than any existing or planned future storage ring sources. Higher brightness in the soft x-ray regime might be reached with partial lasing in long undulators, and high peak brightness could be reached with seeded FEL emission. The status of preliminary studies of PEP-X is presented.

Hettel, R.O.; Bane, K.L.F.; Bentson, L.D.; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Brennan, S.M.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; DeBarger, S.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Huang, X.; Huang, Z.; Kharakh, D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Rabedeau, T.; Safranek, J.A.; Seeman, J.; Stohr, J.; Stupakov, G.V.; Tantawi, S.G.; Wang, L.; Wang, M.H.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UCLA

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device  

SciTech Connect

At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

Choong, Vi-En (Carlsbad, CA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

267

ALSNews 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Paris, France; the NSLS (Brookhaven); CHESS (Cornell);Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) user meeting at BrookhavenLab, ALBA in Spain, NSLS, and the Swiss Light Source, and

McCullough Ed., Julie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Optimization of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of blade type X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, configuration and operation principle was analyzed to improve XBPM performance. Optimization is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission blades, Diamond Detector Blade (DDB) was analyzed as XBPM signal source. Analyses revealed, that Diamond Detector Blade XBPM would allow overcoming drawbacks of the photoemission type XBPMs.

Ilinski, Petr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Rainbow X-ray Rainbow An Insulating Breakthrough Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks JANUARY 10, 2007 Bookmark and Share The atomic structure of the protein 53BP1 identified by Mayo researchers. (Courtesy: Mayo Clinic) A team of Mayo Clinic researchers has uncovered a key step in the molecular pathway of repairing DNA double-strand breaks. The studies were carried out using the 19-ID beamline (SBC-CAT) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS, Argonne) and the X12-C beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory). Both the APS and the NSLS are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy

270

Heterogeneous teleportation with laser and quantum light sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum information technology is set to transform critical network security using quantum cryptography, and complex scientific and engineering simulations with quantum computing. Quantum computer nodes may be based on a variety of systems, such as linear optics, ions, or solid state architectures such as NV-centers in diamond, semiconductor quantum dots or spins in silicon. Interfacing any of these platforms with photonic qubits in secure quantum networks will require quantum teleportation protocols to transfer the information, and matter-light teleportation has for some of these systems been demonstrated. However, although it is conceivable that the input photon originates from a dissimilar source to that supplying the entangled resources, every demonstration so far of teleportation using linear optics use the same or identical sources for the input and entangled photons, often accompanied by a fourth heralding photon. Here we show that photons from fundamentally different sources can be used in the optical quantum teleportation protocol. Input photons are generated by a laser, and teleported using polarisation-entangled photon pairs electrically generated by an entangled-light-emitting diode (ELED). The sources have bandwidth differing by a factor 1000, different photon statistics and need not be precisely degenerate- but we still observe a teleportation fidelity of 0.77, beating the quantum limit by 10 standard deviations. This is a significant leap towards practical applications, such as extending the range of existing QKD systems using quantum relays and repeaters, which usually use weak coherent laser pulses for quantum information transport. The use of an ELED offers practical advantages of electrical control, and as we show erases the multi-photon character of the laser input field, thus eliminating errors if used in a quantum optics circuit.

R. M. Stevenson; J. Nilsson; A. J. Bennett; J. Skiba-Szymanska; I. Farrer; D. A. Ritchie; A. J. Shields

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

Linac Coherent Light Source Video and Multimedia Collection  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a DOE Scientific User Facility, began operation in 2009. SLAC's two-mile-long linear accelerator (linac) has long produced high-energy electrons for physics experiments. Now the linac is driving a new kind of laser, creating X-ray pulses more than a billion times brighter than the most powerful existing sources. Intense x-ray beams are not new. However, atoms are constantly moving or vibrating, and synchrotron X-ray sources produce long pulses which yield only blurred images of these motions. LCLS is the first source to produce X-rays that are both very intense and clumped into ultrafast pulses. By sequencing together images of the ultrasmall, taken with the ultrafast pulses of the LCLS, scientists are for the first time creating molecular movies, revealing the frenetic action of the atomic world for us to see. [Extracted, with edits, from http://lcls.slac.stanford.edu/WhatIsLCLS_1.aspx] The LCLS Multimedia gallery currently includes four short videos about the science and several clips that provide animated tours or flyovers of the facility and its instruments. Podcasts are an opportunity to hear key staff members address details of LCLS operations, and blog entries from five team members provide behind-the-scenes glimpses of this physics adventure.

272

Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we have made significant progress with the design of PEP-X, a USR that would inhabit the decommissioned PEP-II tunnel at SLAC. The enlargement of the dynamic aperture is largely a result of the cancellations of the 4th-order resonances in the 3rd-order achromats and the effective use of lattice optimization programs. In this paper, we will show those cancellations of the 4th-order resonances using an analytical approach based on the exponential Lie operators and the Poisson brackets. Wherever possible, our analytical results will be compared with their numerical counterparts. Using the derived formulae, we will construct 4th-order geometric achromats and use them as modules for the lattice of the PEP-X USR, noting that only geometric terms are canceled to the 4th order.

Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

273

NSLS Industrial User Enhancement Plan The overall goal of this plan for enhancing the NSLS Industrial Users' Program is to encourage greater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial User Enhancement Plan Industrial User Enhancement Plan The overall goal of this plan for enhancing the NSLS Industrial Users' Program is to encourage greater use of synchrotron tools by industry researchers, improve access to NSLS beamlines by industrial researchers, and facilitate research collaborations between industrial researchers and NSLS staff, as well as researchers from university and government laboratories. The implementation of this plan will also involve modifications of the existing user access policy. The plan includes the following major elements: Improve the NSLS proposal review system:  Proposal rating review criteria has been modified to reflect the importance of technology

274

Structure and Biochemistry of IKappaB Zeta : : A Nuclear IKappaB Protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NF-?B Nuclear factor -?B NSLS National Synchrotron LightSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in Brookhaven. We used thePDB accession code NSLS#25 P65 Data in parentheses are for

Zhu, Norman L.

275

int. j. radiat. biol 2002, vol. 78, no. 12, 1065 1067 Routine screening mammography: how important is the radiation-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- mended starting ages for routine mammography mightBrookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS

276

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes: a promising molecular design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes Light Emitting Diode (OLED), intermolecular p­p interactions should be usually suppressed to avoid any Emitting Diodes (SMOLEDs) is almost absent from the literature. In this work, three aryl-substituted Di

277

National Synchrotron Light Source A View of Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

managed for the U.S. Department of Energy managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company founded by Stony Brook University and Battelle National Synchrotron Light Source A View of Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multipurpose re- search laboratory funded by the U.S. Department of En- ergy. Located on a 5,300-acre site on Long Island, New York, the Laboratory operates large-scale facilities for studies in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, applied science, and advanced technology. Brookhaven's 2,600 scientists, engineers, and support staff are joined each year by more than 5,000 visiting research- ers from around the world.

278

Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

Hinkson, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Design of the Advanced Light Source timing system  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation synchrotron radiation facility, and as such, has several unique timing requirements. Arbitrary Storage Ring filling patterns and high single bunch purity requirements demand a highly stable, low jitter timing system with the flexibility to reconfigure on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This modular system utilizes a highly linear Gauss Clock with ``on the fly`` programmable setpoints to track a free-running Booster ramping magnet and provides digitally programmable sequencing and delay for Electron Gun, Linac, Booster Ring, and Storage Ring RF, Pulsed Magnet, and Instrumentation systems. It has proven itself over the last year of accelerator operation to be reliable and rock solid.

Fahmie, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires  

SciTech Connect

Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

Hammer, E.E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Shedding Light on Protein Drug Interactions JANUARY 23, 2008 Bookmark and Share In this e-coli cell, the proteins (shown in blue) crowd around ribosomes (purple). These regions have a high concentration of protein, typically greater than 30 percent, which limits the ensemble of states into which the proteins can bend themselves. Download hi-res image.) Proteins, the biological molecules that are involved in virtually every action of every organism, may themselves move in surprising ways, according to a recent study carried out at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team x-ray beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source, a national user

284

ALS Beamline Design Requirements - Revision 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source Photon Beam LinesBNL/NSLS XI Beamline Mirror SystemSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven NationalMay 1996. ' R Stefan, NSLS-BNL, personal communication.

Heimann, Phil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Spin-out in cutting-edge light source technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Biochemsitry Organic light emitting diode (OLED) synthesis Information and Safety Research Facilities Education: Vojislav Sradnov Faculty Supervisor: Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING DIODE

Mottram, Nigel

286

Stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on blue ultra bright LEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on single quantum well (SQW) InGaN/GaN ultra bright blue LEDs. It is shown that the light yield of such light sources and their timing characteristics don't deteriorate even after 10^10 total pulses. The longterm stability of the sources light yield is better than 1%.

B. K. Lubsandorzhiev; Y. E. Vyatchin

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on blue ultra bright LEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on single quantum well (SQW) InGaN/GaN ultra bright blue LEDs. It is shown that the light yield of such light sources and their timing characteristics don't deteriorate even after 10^10 total pulses. The longterm stability of the sources light yield is better than 1%.

Lubsandorzhiev, B K

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Status of PEP-X Light Source Design Study  

SciTech Connect

The SLAC Beam Physics group and other SLAC collaborators continue to study options for implementing a near diffraction-limited ring-based light source in the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel that will serve the SSRL scientific program in the future. The study team has completed the baseline design for a 4.5-GeV storage ring having 160 pm-rad emittance with stored beam current of 1.5 A, providing >10{sup 22} brightness for multi-keV photon beams from 3.5-m undulator sources. The team has also investigated possible 5-GeV ERL configurations which, similar to the Cornell and KEK ERL plans, would have {approx}30 pm-rad emittance with 100 mA current, and {approx}10 pm-rad emittance with 25 mA or less. Now a 4.5-GeV 'ultimate' storage ring having emittance similar to the ERL and operating with {approx}200 mA is under study. An overview of the progress of the PEP-X design study and SSRL's plans for defining performance parameters that will guide the choice of ring options is presented.

Bane, K.L.F.; Bertsche, K.J.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; Huang, X.; Jiao, Y.; Ng, C.-K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Rivetta, C.H.; Safranek, J.A.; Stupakov, G.V.; Wang, L.; Wang, M.-H.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC; Rabedeau, T.; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,Introduction The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a

Thompson, Neil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Challenges of Third-Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the list of third-generation sources developed by Professorthe design of third-generation sources arise directly fromparameters of the third-generation sources planned, or under

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE \\\\ LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE ? M. Venturini ,of designing a 4th generation light source in the 0.27 ? 1.2

Ventturini, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness in halogen light bulbs can have a significant impact on the illumination patterns generatedTo appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition 2) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering

Heidrich, Wolfgang

293

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness in halogen light bulbs can have a significant impact on the illumination patterns generatedTo appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering (from left to right

Recanati, Catherine

294

Tungsten Lamps as an Affordable Light Source for Testing of Photovoltaic Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved Tungsten light source system for photovoltaic cell testing made from low-cost, commercially available materials is presented as an alternative to standard expensive testing equipment. In this work, spectral correction of the Tungsten light ... Keywords: I-V measurement, Light source, Photovoltaic, Testing

Jeydmer Aristizabal; Badr Omrane; Clint Landrock; Sasan Vosoogh-Grayli; Yindar Chuo; Jasbir N. Patel; Bozena Kaminska; Carlo Menon

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

LOW HORIZONTAL BETA FUNCTION IN LONG STRAIGHTS OF THE NSLS-II LATTICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NSLS-II storage ring lattice is comprised of 30 DBA cells arranged in 15 superperiods. There are 15 long straight sections (9.3m) for injection, RF and insertion devices and 15 short straights (6.6m) for insertion devices. In the baseline lattice, the short straights have small horizontal and vertical beta functions but the long straights have large horizontal beta function optimized for injection. In this paper, we explore the possibility of maintaining three long straights with large horizontal beta function while providing the other 12 long straights with smaller horizontal beta function to optimize the brightness of insertion devices. Our study considers the possible linear lattice solutions as well as characterizing the nonlinear dynamics. Results are reported on optimization of dynamic aperture required for good injection efficiency and adequate Touschek lifetime. This paper discusses dynamic aperture optimization for the NSLS-II lattice with alternate high and low horizontal beta function in the long straights, which is proposed for the optimization of the brightness of insertion devices. The linear optics is optimized to meet the requirements of lattice function and source properties. Nonlinear optimization for a lattice with working point at (37.18, 16.2) is performed. Considering the realistic magnets errors and physical apertures, we calculate the frequency maps and plot the tune footprint. The results show that the lattice with high-low beta function has adequate dynamic aperture for good injection efficiency and sufficient Touschek lifetime.

Fanglei, L.; Bengtsson, J.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Yang, L.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact of SciDAC on Accelerator Science & Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at BNL, the StanfordFigure 8. Aerial photos the NSLS at BNL (top left), SSRL at

Ryne, Robert D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) will continue. In addition,NIH NMFECC NMR NRC NSAC NSF NSLS OASIS OECD OER OFA OHER

Various

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1993-98  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and has been used in a largeNIH NMR NPDES NSCORT NSF NSLS OAA OER OFA OHER OPD ORNL OSHA

Chartock, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), the European X-FEL,3]. The beamlines for LCLS, NSLS-II, and planned upgrade to

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Alternate Tunings for the Linac Coherent Light Source Photoinjector  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The LCLS Photoinjector beamline has been designed to deliver 10-ps long electron bunches of 1 nC with a normalized projected transverse emittance smaller than 1.2 mm-mrad at 135 MeV. Tolerances and regulation requirements are tight for this tuning. Half of the total emittance at the end of the injector comes from the ''cathode emittance'' which is 0.7 mm-mrad for our nominal 1nC tuning. As the ''cathode emittance'' scales linearly with laser spot radius, the emittance will be dramatically reduced for smaller radius, but this is only possible at lower charge. In particular, for a 0.2 nC charge, we believe we can achieve an emittance closer to 0.4 mm-mrad. This working point will be easier to tune and the beam quality should be much easier to maintain than for the 1 nC case. In the second half of this paper, we discuss optimum laser pulse shapes. We demonstrate that the benefits of the ellipsoidal shapes seem to be important enough so that serious investigations should be carried out in the production of such pulses.

Limborg-Deprey, C.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

302

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

X-Ray Light Sources X-Ray Light Sources Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This activity supports the operation of five DOE light sources. The unique properties of synchrotron radiation include its continuous spectrum, high flux and brightness, and in the case of the Linac Coherent Light Source, high coherence, which makes it an indispensable tool in the exploration of matter. The wavelengths of the emitted photons span a range of dimensions

304

Light in the dark; the new German neutron source FRM-II for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Light in the dark; the new German neutron source FRM-II for science, medicine and industry. Winfried Petry, ZWE FRM-II ...

305

Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives...

306

Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.  

SciTech Connect

X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97  

SciTech Connect

Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Immobilization of 99-Technetium (VII) by Fe(II)-Goethite and Limited Reoxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) or on beamline 4-1 at theTc uptake in goethite (%) NSLS NA SSRL NA SSRL NA SSRL XAFSNA indicates not applicable; NSLS = National Synchrotron

Um, Wooyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

High Performance Abrasion-Resistant Materials: Lessons from Nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

endstation X13B. The NSLS is supported under USDOE ContractSynchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in Brookhaven NationalX13B, Dr. Vesna Stanic of the NSLS in BNL for her help in

Wang, Qianqian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic components of the SXRFM at NSLS (beamline X26A) FigureChicago), and the staff at NSLS; George Parks, John Bargar,Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National

Zawislanski, P.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Comparison of EXAFS Foil Spectra from Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Stanford SynchrotronTechnology Program. Use of the NSLS, BNL, was supported byafter mono slits = 300 NSLS X23A2 Si(311) Cu (4 ), Pd(15

Kelly, S. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Formation of Zn-rich phyllosilicate, Zn-layered double hydroxide and hydrozincite in contaminated calcareous soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS, Brookhaven, USA) and at theedge at 9659 eV). At NSLS, the Si(111) monochromator wasand Kumi Pandya (X11A, NSLS, USA) are acknowledged for their

Jacquat, Olivier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Impedance Calculations for the NSLS-II Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impedance of two vacuum chamber components, Bellows and BPM, is considered in some detail. In order to avoid generation of Higher-Order Modes (HOM's) in the NSLS-II bellows, we designed a new low-impedance RF shielding consisting of 6 wide and 2 narrow metal plates without opening slots between them. The short-range wakepotential has been optimized taking into account vertical offset of RF fingers from their nominal position. The results were compared with data of bellows designed at other laboratories. Narrow-band impedance of the BPM Button has been studied. TE-modes in the BPM button were suppressed by a factor of 8 by modification of existing housings. Two new types of housings are shown. The total impedance of the NSLS-II storage ring is discussed in terms of the loss factor and the vertical kick factor for a 3mm-Gaussian bunch.

Blednykh,A.; Ferreira, M.; Krinsky, S.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Advanced Lighting Technologies:Energy Efficiency and Power Quality of Lighting Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his EPRI technical update is the third in a series of technical assessments of advanced lighting technologies. A total of seven lighting products were assessed in 2013: low cost screw based light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, retrofit LED ceiling fixtures, suspended LED fixtures, LED-based 2x4 troffers, LED high bay fixtures, innovative LED screw based lamps, and LED hospitality lighting. Prior to beginning an in-depth assessment, the EPRI Lighting Group evaluated each of the tested technologies to ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

315

Top-Off Safety Analysis for NSLS-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-off injection will be adopted in NSLS-II. To ensure no injected beam can pass into experimental beamlines with open photon shutters during top-off injection, simulation studies for possible machine fault scenarios are required. We compare two available simulation methods, backward (H. Nishimura-LBL) and forward tracking (A. Terebilo-SLAC). We also discuss the tracking settings, fault scenarios, apertures and interlocks considered in the analysis.

Li,Y.; Casey, B.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.; Job, O.; Krinsky, S.; Parker, B.; Shaftan, T.; Sharma, S.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Source with a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a relatively low-energy (keV. The beam size in the ALS is small, due to the smallCompared to the prototype ALS superconducting bend magnet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

PROGRESS WITH NSLS-II INJECTION STRAIGHT SECTION DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS-II injection straight section (SR) consists of pulsed and DC bumps, septa system, beam trajectory correction and diagnostics systems. In this paper we discuss overall injection straight layout, preliminary element designs, specifications for the pulsed and DC magnets and their power supplies, vacuum devices and chambers and diagnostics devices. Prior to selecting the current 'conventional' design of the injection straight section we analyzed an option of injection via pulsed multipole pioneered at PF-AR. We found that this promising approach was not suited to the NSLS-II storage ring optics, since it would require a impractically compact arrangement of the injection straight section components and a complex modification of the transport line optics due to the strong focusing of the injected beam passing off the pulsed multipole axis. In addition, the requirement for a small injection transient of the stored beam orbit severely constrains the vertical alignment tolerance of the pulsed multipole. The design of the NSLS-II injection straight section is now completed with exception of transition chamber details, which will be adjusted to accommodate the actual layouts of the pulsed magnets.

Shaftan, T.; Blednykh, A.; Casey, B.; Dalesio, B.; Faussete, R.; Ferreira, M.; Fliller, R.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Job, P.K.; Johnson, E.; Kosciuk, B.; Kowalski, S.; Padrazo, D.; Parker, B.; Pinayev, I.; Sharma, S.; Singh, O.; Spataro, C.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microsoft Word - Science and Technology of Future Light Sources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ultrafast radiation sources covering the entire spectral area from THz to x-rays to gamma ray beams that are intrinsically synchronized to a laser pulse. A.6 Other Sources...

319

lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light SourceCommunication  

SciTech Connect

Research at the world's accelerator- (storage-ring and linac) based light sources is one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of science. It frequently results in direct benefits to society, thereby demonstrating the value of the research with very concrete examples, but this is not widely understood or appreciated outside of the immediate user community. Our growing group of light source communicators from facilities in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, inspired by the Interactions.org Web site created by high-energy (elementary-particle)physics communicators, concluded that a light source community Web site (lightsources.org) would be the best tool for establishing effective collaboration between the communications offices of the world's light sources and to maximize the impact of our efforts. We envision lightsources.org to serve as a one-stop-shopping site for information about all aspects of light sources and the research they make possible. Audiences to be served include science communicators, the press, policymakers, the light source community, the wider scientific community, the science-interested public, and students and educators. Our proposal has been sent to the world's light source facility directors by J. Murray Gibson (APS) and William G. Stirling (ESRF). As a result,light sources.org is now being supported by a growing list of facilities from Europe, North America, and Asia. We hope to launch lightsources.org before the end of 2004.

Robinson, Art

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer SAFWAN only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed emitting diodes; LEDs; Animal forage; Excitation-emission matrices; EEM. INTRODUCTION Movement of chemical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fast-switching elliptically polarized soft X-ray beam X13A at NSLS  

SciTech Connect

The X13A beamline at NSLS is dedicated to the generation and uses of fast-switching elliptically polarized soft X-ray radiation in the energy range from 250 to {approx}1600 eV. The source for this beamline is an elliptically polarized wiggler (EPW) that delivers linearly elliptically polarized soft X-rays at a switching rate, between right- and left-handed polarization, up to 100 Hz. The optical design is a spherical grating monochromator (SGM) that focuses and diffracts in plane orthogonal to the polarization switching direction. The X13A beamline scientific program is dedicated to spectroscopy and scattering studies of magnetism and magnetic materials. The fast-switching capability of the EPW enables the use of lock-in techniques, thereby greatly enhancing the detection sensitivity for small polarization-dependent signals.

Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Kao, C.; Hulbert, S.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

Phase estimation with weak measurement using a white light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a high precision phase estimation based on a weak measurements scheme using commercial light-emitting diode. The method is based on a measurement of the imaginary part of the weak value of a polarization operator. The imaginary part of the weak value appeared due to the measurement interaction itself. The sensitivity of our method is equivalent to resolving light pulses of order of attosecond and it is robust against chromatic dispersion.

Xiao-Ye Xu; Yaron Kedem; Kai Sun; Lev Vaidman; Chuan-Feng Li; Guang-Can Guo

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

328

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

329

STUDY OF FODO STRUCTURES FOR A SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source of Very High Brilliance, SSRL-ACD-Note 1128. K. Kim,proposed by Wiedemann for the SSRL [7] has been studied as a

Wrulich, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

ICFA Workshop on Future Light Sources Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources Overview C. Pellegrini Overview of SASE Theory and Planned Experiments D. Nguyen Overview of Gun and Linac FEL Experimental Results H. Kitamura Advanced Insertion...

331

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

High-Efficiency Nitride-Base Photonic Crystal Light Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research activities performed in the framework of this project represent a major breakthrough in the demonstration of Photonic Crystals (PhC) as a competitive technology for LEDs with high light extraction efficiency. The goals of the project were to explore the viable approaches to manufacturability of PhC LEDS through proven standard industrial processes, establish the limits of light extraction by various concepts of PhC LEDs, and determine the possible advantages of PhC LEDs over current and forthcoming LED extraction concepts. We have developed three very different geometries for PhC light extraction in LEDs. In addition, we have demonstrated reliable methods for their in-depth analysis allowing the extraction of important parameters such as light extraction efficiency, modal extraction length, directionality, internal and external quantum efficiency. The information gained allows better understanding of the physical processes and the effect of the design parameters on the light directionality and extraction efficiency. As a result, we produced LEDs with controllable emission directionality and a state of the art extraction efficiency that goes up to 94%. Those devices are based on embedded air-gap PhC - a novel technology concept developed in the framework of this project. They rely on a simple and planar fabrication process that is very interesting for industrial implementation due to its robustness and scalability. In fact, besides the additional patterning and regrowth steps, the process is identical as that for standard industrially used p-side-up LEDs. The final devices exhibit the same good electrical characteristics and high process yield as a series of test standard LEDs obtained in comparable conditions. Finally, the technology of embedded air-gap patterns (PhC) has significant potential in other related fields such as: increasing the optical mode interaction with the active region in semiconductor lasers; increasing the coupling of the incident light into the active region of solar cells; increasing the efficiency of the phosphorous light conversion in white light LEDs etc. In addition to the technology of embedded PhC LEDs, we demonstrate a technique for improvement of the light extraction and emission directionality for existing flip-chip microcavity (thin) LEDs by introducing PhC grating into the top n-contact. Although, the performances of these devices in terms of increase of the extraction efficiency are not significantly superior compared to those obtained by other techniques like surface roughening, the use of PhC offers some significant advantages such as improved and controllable emission directionality and a process that is directly applicable to any material system. The PhC microcavity LEDs have also potential for industrial implementation as the fabrication process has only minor differences to that already used for flip-chip thin LEDs. Finally, we have demonstrated that achieving good electrical properties and high fabrication yield for these devices is straightforward.

James Speck; Evelyn Hu; Claude Weisbuch; Yong-Seok Choi; Kelly McGroddy; Gregor Koblmuller; Elison Matioli; Elizabeth Rangel; Fabian Rol; Dobri Simeonov

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.

Garren, A.A. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Accelerators]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.J. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Accelerators; Green, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.; Johnson, D.E. [Particle Beam Lasers, Inc., Northridge, CA (United States); Leung, E.M.; Madura, D.D. [Martin Marietta Technologies, Inc., Rancho Bernardo, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NSLS beam line data acquisition and analysis computer system  

SciTech Connect

A versatile computer environment to manage instrumentation alignment and experimental control at NSLS beam lines has been developed. The system is based on a 386/486 personal computer running under a UNIX operating system with X11 Windows. It offers an ideal combination of capability, flexibility, compatibility, and cost. With a single personal computer, the beam line user can run a wide range of scattering and spectroscopy experiments using a multi-tasking data collection program which can interact with CAMAC, GPIB and AT-Bus interfaces, and simultaneously examine and analyze data and communicate with remote network nodes.

Feng-Berman, S.K.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Discreteness and the transmission of light from distant sources  

SciTech Connect

We model the classical transmission of a massless scalar field from a source to a detector on a background causal set. The predictions do not differ significantly from those of the continuum. Thus, introducing an intrinsic inexactitude to lengths and durations--or more specifically, replacing the Lorentzian manifold with an underlying discrete structure--need not disrupt the usual dynamics of propagation.

Dowker, Fay [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Henson, Joe; Sorkin, Rafael D. [Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline Street N., Waterloo, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources forDeveloping-Country Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources haverecently attained levels of efficiency and cost that allow them tocompete with fluorescent lighting for off-grid applications in thedeveloping world. Additional attributes (optics, size, ruggedness, andservice life) make them potentially superior products. Enormousreductions in energy use and greenhouse-gas emissions are thus possible,and system costs can be much lower given the ability to downsize thecharging and energy storage components compared to a fluorescentstrategy. However, there is a high risk of "market-spoiling" if inferiorproducts are introduced and result in user dissatisfaction. Completesystems involve the integration of light sources and optics, energysupply, and energy storage. A natural starting point for evaluatingproduct quality is to focus on the individual light sources. This reportdescribes testing results for batches of 10 5mm white LEDs from 26manufacturers. Efficacies and color properties are presented.

Mills, Evan

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

Novel broadband light sources and pulse generation techniques at 1.5 [mu]m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wide diversity of applications, in both fundamental science and practical technology, has come to rely on broadband optical light sources as key enabling tools. In this thesis, we investigate three devices that contribute ...

Shen, Hanfei M, 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-Country Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stewart Craine collected the LED samples in Shenzen, China4. Variation in efficacy of LEDs tested. Figure 5. Figure 6.Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-

Mills, Evan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/papers/syncpanel.pdf. M.F.Coherent Light Source 5 (LCLS) in the United States andwww-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/lcls/ Accelerator 6 (TESLA) in

Chong, Henry Herng Wei

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

LS-35 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnet Field Calculations Robert J. Lari September 23, 1985 Quadrupole Magnet Figure 1 shows the cross section of...

342

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Science Highlights high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy image Nanocrystal Catalyst Transforms Impure Hydrogen into Electricity September 18, 2013 Brookhaven Lab scientists use simple, 'green' process to create novel core-shell catalyst that tolerates carbon monoxide in fuel cells and opens new, inexpensive pathways for zero-emission vehicles. Organic Solar Cells Shedding New Light on the 'Electron Highways' of Organic Solar Cells August 30, 2013 Researchers at Brookhaven Lab and Stony Brook University have developed a way to map out the degree of "traffic congestion" on the electron highways within the photoactive layer of organic solar cells. Li-ion Batteries For Better Li-ion Batteries, Scientists Watch One at Work August 29, 2013

344

New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics First Molecular-Level Enzyme Images Could Improve Breast-Cancer Therapy Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies MARCH 3, 2009 Bookmark and Share The DOE, as part of its Clean Coal & Natural Gas Power Systems initiative, has a "Turbines of Tomorrow" program with the Program Performance Goal to: "By 2010, develop turbine technology that is capable of efficiently

345

An Overview of near-field vs. far-field radiation characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Overview of near-field vs. far-field radiation characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLS)

Tatchyn, R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic High-Intensity Discharge Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the dimming performance of electronic high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts. Chapter 1 provides a discussion of basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth the dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and controls for incandescent, fluorescent, high-intensity discharge (HID) and light-emit...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

Assessment of Electrical, Efficiency, and Photometric Performance of Advanced Lighting Sources: Dimmable Advanced Lighting Technolog ies -- Electronic (Hot and Cold Cathode) Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update (EPRI report 1018477) is one of four in a series that addresses basic dimming performance of advanced lighting sourceselectronic (hot and cold cathode) compact fluorescent lamps and ballasts Chapter 1 discusses basic lighting control, the importance of considering power quality in lighting control, lighting control methods and parameters, and the advantages and future of lighting control. Chapter 2 addresses in more depth dimming methods used in advanced lighting sources and co...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Multilayer Laue Lens Growth at NSLS-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new NSLS-II deposition laboratory has been commissioned to include a variety of thin-film characterization equipment and a next-generation deposition system. The primary goal for this effort is R&D on the multilayer Laue lens (MLL), which is a new type of x-ray optic with the potential for an unprecedented level of x-ray nano-focusing. This unique deposition system contains many design features in order to facilitate growth of combined depth-graded and laterally graded multilayers with precise thickness control over many thousands of layers, providing total film growth in one run of up to 100 {micro}m thick or greater. A precision in-vacuum linear motor servo system raster scans a substrate over an array of magnetrons with shaped apertures at well-defined velocities to affect a multilayer coating. The design, commissioning, and performance metrics of the NSLS-II deposition system will be discussed. Latest growth results of both MLL and reflective multilayers in this machine will be presented.

Conley R.; Bouet, N.; Lauer, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Biancarosa, J.; Boas, L.; Drannbauer, J.; Feraca, J.; Rosenbaum, L.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Orbit Stability Improvement At The Nsls X-Ray Ring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe recent improvements in both the short and long-term orbit stability at the NSLS X-Ray Ring. The short-term stability has been improved by increasing the gain and the bandwidth of the global harmonic feedback systems. The long-term horizontal orbit drift over the course of a fill has been reduced by including the rf-frequency in the orbit feedback. Work is in progress to further reduce orbit drift by compensating for thermally induced mechanical motions of the beam position monitors (BPMs). I. INTRODUCTION At the NSLS storage rings, the harmonic based analog global feedback system has provided excellent orbit stability [1]. For most users, the level of this beam stability (short and long-term) has been satisfactory, however, further stabilization is desirable. During the Fall of 1994, the gain and bandwidth of the global feedback systems were increased resulting in significantly reduced short-term orbit fluctuations. The long-term drift in the horizontal orbit has been red...

Safranek Singh And; J. Safranek; O. Singh; L. Solomon

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Statistical Analysis of X-ray Speckle at the NSLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a statistical analysis of the static speckle produced by illuminating a disordered aerogel sample by a nominally coherent x-ray beam at wiggler beamline X25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The results of the analysis allow us to determine that the coherence delivered to the X25 hutch is within 35% of what is expected. The rate of coherent photons is approximately two times smaller than expected on the basis of the X25 wiggler source brilliance.

Ophelia K. C. Tsui; S. G. J. Mochrie; L. E. Berman

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Videos on the YouTube Channel of the Advanced Light Source (ALS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a DOE Scientific User Facility and a division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is one of the world's brightest sources of ultraviolet and soft-x-ray beams, generating intense light for scientific and technical research. The ALS produces light in the x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum that is one billion times brighter than the sun. This extraordinary tool offers unprecedented opportunities for state-of-the art research in materials science, biology, chemistry, physics, and the environmental sciences. The channel includes twelve presentations from the ALS 2012 Users Meeting.

352

Modern lighting sources and controls for energy efficient lighting and a smart control algorithm application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important measure of prosperity of a nation. Energy has been the life-blood for continual progress of human civilization. Since the beginning of industrial revolution around two centuries ago, the global energy consumption has increased ... Keywords: energy efficiency, energy saving, fuzzy logic, modern lighting, sensors, smart controls

?afak Sa?lam; Blent Oral

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Photon Sciences | Operating the National Synchrotron Light Source,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Coordinator Program Coordinator Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide

354

High-Brightness Beams from a Light Source Injector The Advanced Photon Source Low-Energy Undulator Test Line Linac  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of existing linacs, and in particular light source injectors, for free-electron laser (FEL) experiments is becoming more common due to the desire to test FELs at ever shorter wavelengths. The high-brightness, high-current beams required by high-gain FELs impose technical specifications that most existing linacs were not designed to meet. Moreover, the need for specialized diagnostics, especially shot-to-shot data acquisition, demands substantial modification and upgrade of conventional linacs. Improvements have been made to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac in order to produce and characterize high-brightness beams. Specifically, effort has been directed at generating beams suitable for use in the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL in support of fourth-generation light source research. The enhancements to the linac technical and diagnostic capabilities that allowed for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) operation of the FEL at 530 nm are described. Recent results, includi...

Travish, G; Borland, M; Hahne, M; Harkay, K C; Lewellen, J W; Lumpkin, Alex H; Milton, S V; Sereno, N S

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Development of an LED reference light source for calibration of radiographic imaging detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stable reference light source based on an LED (Light Emission Diode) is presented for stabilizing the conversion gain of the opto-electronic system of a gamma- and fast-neutron radiographic and tomographic imaging device. A constant fraction of the LED light is transported to the image plane of the camera and provides a stable reference exposure. This is used to normalize the images during off-line image processing. We have investigated parameters influencing the stability of LEDs and developed procedures and criteria to prepare and select LEDs suitable for delivering stable light outputs for several 100 h of operation.

Weierganz, M; Bromberger, B; Dangendorf, V; Feldman, G; Goldberg, M B; Lindemann, M; Mor, I; Tittelmeier, K; Vartsky, D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of an LED reference light source for calibration of radiographic imaging detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stable reference light source based on an LED (Light Emission Diode) is presented for stabilizing the conversion gain of the opto-electronic system of a gamma- and fast-neutron radiographic and tomographic imaging device. A constant fraction of the LED light is transported to the image plane of the camera and provides a stable reference exposure. This is used to normalize the images during off-line image processing. We have investigated parameters influencing the stability of LEDs and developed procedures and criteria to prepare and select LEDs suitable for delivering stable light outputs for several 100 h of operation.

M. Weierganz; D. Bar; B. Bromberger; V. Dangendorf; G. Feldman; M. B. Goldberg; M. Lindemann; I. Mor; K. Tittelmeier; D. Vartsky

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

357

Air-Source Heat Pumps for Residential and Light Commercial Space Conditioning Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology brief provides the latest information on current and emerging air-source heat pump technologies for space heating and space cooling of residential and light commercial buildings. Air-source heat pumps provide important options that can reduce ownership costs while reducing noise and enhancing reliability and customer comfort. The tech brief also describes new air-source heat pumps with an important load shaping and demand response option.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fifth Annual Meeting of the Advanced Light Source User`s Association  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: ALS Project Status; Accelerator Commissioning; Experimental Systems: Supersmooth Optics and Ultra-Precise Undulators; Planning for Users and User Services; ALS Scientific Program; High Resolution Core-Level Photoemission; Photoelectron Diffraction and Holography; Soft X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy of Solids at the NSLS and the ALS; Gas-Phase Spectrometry; Spectromicroscopy; X-Ray Dichroism Experiments Using Circular Polarization; Magnetic Circular X-Ray Dichroism and MCXD Microscopy; Applications of Soft X-Ray Optics to Sub-Micron Silicon Device Technology; Bend Magnet Microprobe; Protein Crystallography: Recent Developments and Plans for the ALS; and Applications of High-Brightness Synchrotron Radiation to Protein Crystallography.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

6 GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34 October 23, 1985 YC/AVR To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV Light Source, the following procedure will be used by all the task groups. The procedure uses a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) to break down the project into manageable, easy to estimate, components. The project is first broken down into major tasks or categories. Then each major division is continuously subdivided until the desired level of detail is achieved. This can be shown best by using the example of the WBS of the Aladdin Upgrade Project, excerpts of which are included in Appendix A. As shown in the example, the project is first divided into: 1.1 Project Management and Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Recovered Light Source Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Energy-recovered linac/TJNAF Free Electron Laser Developed at: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Brookhaven National

362

Recent Beam Measurements and New Instrumentation at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

Sannibale, F.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Chin, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Filippetto, D.; /Frascati; Jaegerhofer, L.; /Vienna, Tech. U.; Julian, J.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Low, R.; Plate, D.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.; Scarvie, T.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC; Weber, J.; Zolotorev, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

Sannibale, Fernando; Baptiste, Kenneth; Barry, Walter; Chin, Michael; Filippetto, Daniele; Jaegerhofer, Lukas; Julian, James; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Low, Raymond; Plate, David; Portmann, Gregory; Robin, David; Scarvie, Tomas; Stupakov, Gennady; Weber, Jonah; Zolotorev, Max

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

Watching an uniformly moving source of light using a telescope and a frequency-meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scenario that involves a stationary observer who detects a point like source of light moving with constant velocity at a constant altitude, using a telescope and a frequency-meter. We derive a formula for the angular velocity at which we should rotate the axis of the telescope and a formula that relates the proper period at which the source emits successive wave crests and the proper period at which the stationary observer receives them

Bernhard Rothenstein; Ioan Damian

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination  

SciTech Connect

This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

Ian Ferguson

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

Rothman, E.Z. [ed.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Solid-state radioluminescent zeolite-containing composition and light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new type of RL light source consisting of a zeolite crystalline material, the intralattice spaces of which a tritiated compound and a luminophore are sorbed, and which material is optionally further dispersed in a refractive index-matched polymer matrix.

Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, John T. (Miamisburg, OH); Hawkins, Daniel B. (Fairbanks, AK); Renschler, Clifford L. (Tijeras, NM); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source is discussed with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nightime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision is disclosed. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode. 1 fig.

Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

Frank, Alan M. (Livermore, CA); Edwards, William R. (Modesto, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

1982--1992: A decade of research on the vacuum ultraviolet ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses highlights of research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and X-ray lithography.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commisioned, will produce X-ray s of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 meters in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 ma of beam and a greater than 10 hour lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34 m long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamlline X28A and Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of M, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per meter. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}0 are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamlline U1OB and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum.

Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

X-Ray Microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... generated at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) located at Brookhaven National Laboratory using Exxon's microtomography scanner ...

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at present, no others are planned.

Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Optimizing ring-based CSR sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synchrotron radiation from the NSLS VUV ring", NIMA, 463 (of Coherent Emission from the NSLS VUV Ring, Proc. 1999

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Biomolecular solution X-ray scattering at the National Synchrotron Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years there has been a growing interest in the application of X-ray scattering techniques to biomolecules in solution. At NSLS, a new undulatorbased beamline, X9, has been constructed to address the oversubscribed user demand for X-ray scattering. Beamline X9 has the capability to perform small/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) all in one single instrument. This is accomplished by utilizing a vacuum sample/detector chamber that is an integral part of the SAXS scattering flight path. This vacuum chamber allows a WAXS detector to be positioned at a close distance from the sample, while not interfering with scattered X-rays at small angles from reaching the SAXS detector. A regular training program, the X9 workbench, has also been established to allow users to become familiar with beamline X9 for solution X-ray scattering. Keywords: SAXS; WAXS; beamline; proteins; DNA/RNA. 1.

Marc Allaire; Lin Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | Close-Up: NSLS Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Close-Up: NSLS Users Close-Up: NSLS Users From Alabama to Australia, more than 2,200 visiting scientists from over 400 institutions came to NSLS to conduct their research in FY10, exactly 700 of which were new to the facility. These scientists, known as "users," primarily are awarded beam time by submitting a general user proposal through a peer-reviewed, web-based system. The proposal is rated based on various scientific criteria and can remain active for up to six cycles of operation (about two years). In FY10, about 1,000 requests for beam time were submitted, with about one-third of those requests on new proposals. Beam time is given without charge, as long as the research results are published in open literature. Work that is proprietary in nature is charged on a full-cost recovery basis

378

Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Protein Structures Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Protein Structures Through use of Superbends at the Advance Light Source Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

379

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel Advanced Photon Source lights the way to 2012 Chemistry Nobel By Jared Sagoff * October 10, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Thanks in part to research performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded today to Americans Brian Kobilka and Robert Lefkowitz for their work on G-protein-coupled receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors, or GPCRs, are a large family of proteins embedded in a cell's membrane that sense molecules outside the cell and activate a cascade of different cellular processes in response. They constitute key components of how cells interact with their environments and are the target of nearly half of today's pharmaceuticals. These medicines work by connecting with many of the 800 or so human GPCRs.

380

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE H. J. Moe V. R. Veluri LS-55-Revised Harch 1987 2 1.0 Introduction Shielding estimates for the linac, positron converter, booster synchrotron and the positron storage ring have been computed using preliminary design information. Calculations have been made of the resulting radiation for several types of operations involving normal beam loss, as well as, certain accidental beam losses. When available, experimental data from existing accelerator and light source facilities have been used in lieu of theoretical estimates. 2.0 Shielding Design Objective The Department of Energy's basic occupational exposure limit is 5 rem per year (DOE 81). However, in its guidance for maintaining exposures "as

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381

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE-Il  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE-Il PROJECT SLAC NATIONAL ACCELERATOR LABORATORY AGENCY: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1904) on a project to expand the existing Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). One of SLAC's major scientific facilities is the LCLS, the world's first hard X-ray free electron laser. The LCLS X-ray laser beams enable the simultaneous investigation of a material's electronic and structural properties on the size (sub-nanometer) and time (femto-second) scales that determine their function. Research programs at SLAC include materials science, catalytic sciences, structural molecular biology, and molecular environmental

382

The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC. Radiological Considerations and Shielding calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC will be the world's first X-ray free electron laser when it becomes operational in 2009. Pulses of X-ray laser light from LCLS will be many orders of magnitude brighter and several orders of magnitude shorter than what can be produced by other X-ray sources available in the world. These characteristics will enable frontier new science in many areas. This paper describes the LCLS beam parameters and its lay-out. Results of the Monte Carlo calculations for the shielding design of the electron dump line, radiation damage to undulator, the residual radiation and the soil activation around the electron dump are presented.

Mao, X.S.; Fasso, A.; Nakao, N.; Rokni, S.H.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility (12/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Stanford Linear A ccelerator Center DOE/EA-1426 Environmental Assessment for Linac Coherent Light Source Experimental Facility LCLS December 2002 LCLS Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1426 December 2002 Page - i - Environmental Assessment for LCLS Experimental Facility Table of Contents Preface ............................................................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Summary ................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Purpose and Need for LCLS ..................................................................................................... 6 3.0 Description of Proposed Action and Alternatives

384

Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

Jensen, George A. (Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA); Molton, Peter M. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

New implementation of an SX700 undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly engineered implementation of a collimated SX700-style beam line for soft x-rays is described. This facility is operational at the Advanced Light Source and delivers high brightness undulator beams to a scanning zone plate microscope and to an array of end stations for x-ray spectroscopic studies of wet surfaces. Switching between branches is motorized, servo-steering systems maintain throughput and the monochromator works together with the elliptical undulator for a fully automated facility.

Warwick, T.; Andresen, N.; Comins, J.; Kaznacheyev, K.; Kortright, J.B.; McKean, P.J.; Padmore, H.A.; Shuh, D.K.; Stevens, T.; Tyliszczak, T.

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Robust CsBr/Cu Photocathodes for the Linac Coherent Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linac coherent light source (LCLS), an x-ray free-electron laser project presently under construction at SLAC, uses a 2.856 GHz rf photocathode gun with a copper cathode for its electron source. While the copper cathode is performing well for the LCLS project, a cathode material with higher quantum efficiency would reduce the drive laser requirements and allow a greater range of operating conditions. Therefore a robust CsBr/Cu photocathode with greater than 50 times the quantum yield at 257 nm relative to the present LCLS copper cathode has been investigated. Preliminary experiments using a dedicated electron source development test stand at SLAC/SSRL are encouraging and are presented in this paper.

Maldonado, Juan R.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Liu, Zhi; Dowell, D.H.; Kirby, Robert E.; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC; Pease, Fabian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses.Types of lighting include:

390

Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; /SLAC; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 6 MECHANICAL ­ HVAC SYSTEMS 6.1 Design Criteria 6.1.1 Codes and Standards The latest edition of the codes, standards have adequate capacity and head, no chilled water pumps #12;Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC

Ohta, Shigemi

392

Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Successful Completion of the Top-off Upgrade of the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An upgrade of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to enable top-off operation has been completed during the last four years. The final work centered around radiation safety aspects, culminating in a systematic proof that top-off operation is equally safe as decaying beam operation. Commissioning and transition to full user operations happened in late 2008 and early 2009. Top-off operation at the ALS provides a very large increase in time-averaged brightness (by about a factor of 10) as well as improvements in beam stability. The following sections provide an overview of the radiation safety rationale, commissioning results, as well as experience in user operations.

Steier, C.; Bailey, B.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Biocca, A.; Byrne, W.; Casey, P.; Chin, M.; Donahue, R.; Duarte, R.; Fahmie, M.; Gath, B.; Jacobson, S.; Julian, J.; Jung, J. Y.; Kritscher, M.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Marks, S.; McKean, P.; Mueller, R. [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; /SLAC; Sanami, T.; /SLAC /KEK, Tsukuba; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities.

Warwick, T.; Padmore, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Hitchcock, A.P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Rightor, E.G. [Dow Texas Polymer Center, Freeport, TX (United States); Tonner, B.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

National synchrotron light source annual report 1987: For the period of October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the reports and operational information of the National Synchrotron Light source facility for 1987. The reports are grouped mainly under VUV research and x-ray research. (LSP)

White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century, light-source user facilities have transformedagreement that a new user facility that provides an array ofon which large-scale user facilities in this domain might be

Arenholz, Elke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

LED Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are semiconductor devices that produce light when an electrical current is applied....

400

Development of large volume double ring penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the development of large volume double ring Penning plasma discharge source for efficient light emissions is reported. The developed Penning discharge source consists of two cylindrical end cathodes of stainless steel having radius 6 cm and a gap 5.5 cm between them, which are fitted in the top and bottom flanges of the vacuum chamber. Two stainless steel anode rings with thickness 0.4 cm and inner diameters 6.45 cm having separation 2 cm are kept at the discharge centre. Neodymium (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) permanent magnets are physically inserted behind the cathodes for producing nearly uniform magnetic field of {approx}0.1 T at the center. Experiments and simulations have been performed for single and double anode ring configurations using helium gas discharge, which infer that double ring configuration gives better light emissions in the large volume Penning plasma discharge arrangement. The optical emission spectroscopy measurements are used to complement the observations. The spectral line-ratio technique is utilized to determine the electron plasma density. The estimated electron plasma density in double ring plasma configuration is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, which is around one order of magnitude larger than that of single ring arrangement.

Prakash, Ram; Vyas, Gheesa Lal; Jain, Jalaj; Prajapati, Jitendra; Pal, Udit Narayan [Microwave Tubes Division, CSIR-Central Electronics and Engineering Research Institute, Pilani-333031 (India); Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Manchanda, Ranjana [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428 (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

Bakeman, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

An ALS handbook: A summary of the capabilities and characteristics of the advanced light source  

SciTech Connect

This booklet aims to provide the prospective user of the Advanced Light Source with a concise description of the radiation a researcher might expect at his or her experimental station. The focus is therefore on the characteristics of the light that emerges from insertion devices and bending magnets and on how components of the beam lines further alter the properties of the radiation. The few specifications and operating parameters of the ALS storage ring that are of interest are those that directly determine the radiation characteristics. Sections 4 through 5 are primarily devoted to summary presentations, by means of performance plots and tabular compilations, of radiation characteristics at the ALS--spectral brightness, flux, coherent power, resolution, etc.--assuming a representative set of three undulators and one wiggler and a corresponding set of four beam lines. As a complement to these performance summaries, Section 1 is a general introductory discussion of synchrotron radiation and the ALS, and Section 2 discusses the properties of the stored electron beam that affect the radiation. Section 3 then provides an introduction to the characteristics of synchrotron radiation from bending magnets, wigglers, and undulators. In addition, Section 5 briefly introduces the theory of diffraction-grating and crystal monochromators. As compared with previous editions of this booklet, the performance plots and tabular compilations of the ALS radiation characteristics are now based on conservative engineering designs rather than preliminary physics designs.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Microsoft PowerPoint - Presentation1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENCE ASSOCIATES BE Distribution - DOE Light Sources * All NSLS beamlines will go off-line by the end of FY14 * 17 NSLS-II beamlines are on-line at beginning of FY15 (Project +...

404

Insertion device development in the X13 straight of the NSLS X-Ray Ring  

SciTech Connect

On the NSLS X-Ray Storage Ring, the X13 straight section and beamline have been used for insertion-device-related R and D since 1990. The authors will describe three important projects: The Prototype Small-Gap Undulator (PSGU), the In-Vacuum Undulator (IVUN), and the Time Varying Elliptically Polarized Wiggler (EPW). The PSGU has successfully operated with a vertical aperture of only 3 mm, with minimal reduction in electron beam lifetime. The EPW has successfully run during regular user operations while switching at either 2 Hz or 100 Hz, with no adverse effects on other experiments. The IVUN project is a collaboration between NSLS and Spring-8, and installation is scheduled for May 1997.

Stefan, P.M.; Krinsky, S.; Kao, C.C.; Rakowsky, G.; Singh, O.; Solomon, L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Estimate of the coupling impedance for the storage rings of the NSLS  

SciTech Connect

The most important ingredient to evaluate the stability of a particle beam in a storage ring is the longitudinal coupling impedance Z/n and the transverse impedance Z/sub perpendicular/ which is usually associated to the former. These impedances are calculated for the two storage rings which are part of the NSLS, namely the Ultra Violet Ring (UVR) and the X-Ray Ring (XRR)-the parameters for these two rings which are used throughout the paper are shown.

Ruggiero, A.G.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light  

SciTech Connect

The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

Ozaki,S.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light  

SciTech Connect

The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

Ozaki,S.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Solar energy as an alternate energy source to mixed oxide fuels in light-water cooled reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supplemental information pertaining to the generic environmental impact statement on the Pu recycling process for mixed oxide light-water cooled reactors (GESMO) was requested from several sources. In particular, the role of alternate sources of energy was to be explored and the implications of these alternate sources to the question of Pu recycle in LWRs were to be investigated. In this vein, solar energy as an alternate source is the main subject of this report, along with other information related to solar energy. The general conclusion is that solar energy should have little effect on the decisions concerning GESMO.

Bertini, H.W.

1977-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

SUMMAR OF DISCUSSIONS OF USES OF THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) FOR EARTH SCIENCES RESEARCH: WORKSHOP REPORT OF THE ALS USERS' ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING, LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY, BERKELEY,CA, JUNE 2-3, 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Advanced Light Source (ALS) for Earth Sciences Research:Workshop Report of the ALS Users' Association Annual Meetingthe Advanced Light Source (ALS) for Earth Sciences Research:

Dillard, J.; Wallenberg, H.; Perry, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources  

SciTech Connect

We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Rajkovic, Ivan; Quevedo, Wilson; Gruebel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko [IFG Structural Dynamics of (Bio)chemical Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kalus, Christian [Abteilung Betrieb Beschleuniger BESSYII, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J. [PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kennedy, Brian [MAX-lab, PO Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); and others

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

The 19th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ICFA2000t.GIF (31362 bytes) ICFA2000t.GIF (31362 bytes) The 19th ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on Future Light Sources Physics of and Science with The X-ray Free-Electron Laser (Arcidosso, Italy, September 10-15, 2000) Workshop Summary The19th Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on "The Physics of, and the Science with, X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers" took place in Arcidosso (Italy) from the 10th to the 15th of September, 2000. The Workshop was sponsored by the International Committee for Future Accelerators, the US Department of Energy, the University of California at Los Angeles, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, together with local authorities of the Tuscany, Grosseto and Arcidosso areas. The Workshop's chairmen were M. Cornacchia (SLAC), I. Lindau (SLAC/Lund. Un.) and C. Pellegrini (UCLA). Seventy-five scientists, of which 50 are involved in the physics and technology of accelerators, free-electron lasers and x-ray optics, and 25 in the scientific applications, attended the workshop. There were plenary and parallel sessions and many lively discussions, during and after the regular workshop schedule.

413

The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

Boutet, Sebastien

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

414

Michelson interferometer design for Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) applications in the 15 Anstrom to 1.5 Anstrom wavelength range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michelson interferometer design for Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) applications in the 15 Anstrom to 1.5 Anstrom wavelength range

Tatchy, R

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B. [eds.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of a CW Superconducting RF Booster Cryomodule for Future Light Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future light sources based on seeded free electron lasers (FEL) have the potential to increase the soft xray flux by several orders of magnitude with short bunch lengths to probe electron structure and dynamics. A low emittance, high rep-rate radio frequency (RF) photocathode electron gun will generate the electron beam that will require very stringent beam control and manipulation through the superconducting linear accelerator to maintain the high brightness required for an x-ray FEL. The initial or booster cavities of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linear accelerator will require stringent control of transverse kicks and higher order modes (HOM) during the beam manipulation and conditioning that is needed for emittance exchange and bunch compression. This SBIR proposal will develop, fabricate and test a continuous-wave SRF booster cryomodule specifically for this application. Phase I demonstrated the technical feasibility of the project by completing the preliminary SRF cavity and cryomodule design and its integration into an R&D test stand for beam studies at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The five-cell bulk niobium cavities operate at 750 MHz, and generate 10 MV each with strong HOM damping and special care to eliminate transverse kicks due to couplers. Due to continuous-wave operation at fairly modest beam currents and accelerating gradients the complexity of the two cavity cryomodule is greatly reduced compared to an ILC type system. Phase II will finalize the design, and fabricate and test the booster cryomodule. The cryomodule consists of two five-cell cavities that will accelerate megahertz bunch trains with nano-coulomb charge. The accelerating gradient is a very modest 10 MV/m with peak surface fields of 20 MV/m and 42.6 mT. The cryogenic system operates at 2 K with a design dynamic load of 20 W and total required cryogenic capacity of 45 W. The average beam current of up to 1 mA corresponds to a beam power of 10 kW per 5- cell cavity and will require 20 kW of RF power for transmission, control and regulation. The RF power will be supplied by a commercial tetrode. Cryogenic tests will be carried out at LBNL to make use of their test facilities, cryogenics and laser systems, and for future use with beam. Demonstration of this new type of booster cryomodule will open many new applications of SRF linear accelerators.

Grimm, Terry L; Bogle, Andrew; Deimling, Brian; Hollister, Jerry; II, Randall Jecks; Kolka, Ahren; Romel, Chandra

2009-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

417

Lighting Research Center Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Four Cell Lattice for the UCLA Compact Light Source Synchrotron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCMAG-659 A Four Cell Lattice for the UCLA Compact Lightof California A Four Cell Lattice for the UCLA Compact LightT m-2) SF SO Table 2: Lattice Parameters for the Six Cell

Garren, A.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

420

Quantifying sources of methane using light alkanes in the Los Angeles basin, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operations in Chino, and from the two largest landfills in the L.A. basin, and show these sources distribution systems and/or geologic seeps, as well as landfills and dairies. The local oil and gas industry are accurately represented in the California Air Resources Board greenhouse gas inventory for CH4. We then use

Cohen, Ronald C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A preliminary comparison of beam instabilities among ESRF, APS, and spring-8 x-ray storage ring light sources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A collaboration has been established among the three highest energy storage ring synchrotron light sources: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) (6 GeV), Advanced Photon Source (APS) (7 GeV), and Super Photon Ring (SPring-8) (8 GeV). The goal is to enhance understanding of impedance and beam instability characteristics for present performance and future machine development. In this paper, we compare the beam instability characteristics of the three rings and present a preliminary discussion of the similarities and differences. Topics for future, in-depth study, such as comparing the effect on the beam of in-vacuum insertion devices (IDs) and small-gap chambers, will be described.

Harkay, K.; Nagaoka, R.; Revol, J.-L.; Nakamura, T.

2002-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

422

A new bend magnet beam line for scanning transmission x-ray microscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high brightness of the bend magnets at the Advanced Light Source has been exploited to illuminate a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM). This is the first diffraction-limited scanning x-ray microscope to operate with useful count rate on a synchrotron bend magnet source. A simple, dedicated beam line has been built covering the range of photon energy from 250 eV to 600 eV. Ease of use and operational availability are radically improved compared to previous installations using undulator beams. This facility provides radiation for C 1s, N 1s and O 1s near edge x-ray absorption spectro-microscopy with a spectral resolution up to about 1:5000 and with STXM count rates in excess of 1 MHz.

Warwick, Tony; Ade, Harald; Kilcoyne, A.L. David; Kritscher, Michael; Tylisczcak, Tolek; Fakra, Sirine; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Hitchcock, Peter; Padmore, Howard A.

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Final cover ES&H BNL.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Association NSLS National Synchrotron Light Source PPE Personal Protective Equipment R&D Research and Development SBMS Standards Based Management System SC Office of Science 1...

424

Steve Kevan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He focused in particular on high-resolution...

425

Senator Gillibrand Visits Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While on site, the senator toured the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and the Center for Functional ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

LCLS - Activities of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Members of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) Bill Colson Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Chairman Jerry Hastings National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Pat O'Shea...

427

Molybdenum reduction in a sulfidic lake: Evidence from X-ray...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all times. Samples were dried with Kimwipes and eventually transported in an anaerobic jar (AnaeroPack) to the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National...

428

Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source  

SciTech Connect

The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a {sup 252}Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for {sup 23}Na{sup 7+} and 17.9% for {sup 39}K{sup 10+} were obtained injecting stable Na{sup +} and K{sup +} beams from a surface ionization source.

Vondrasek, R.; Kutsaev, Sergey [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Blvd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

NSLS Detectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detectors Multi-Element Silicon Detectors High-rate multi-element detector for fluorescence measurements Powder diffraction and x-ray scattering User interface Avalanche photodiode...

430

NSLS II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maldonado (T) C. Messana T. Stein C. Herbst T. Leighley J. Marshall B. Moebes P. Callejas-Lynn K. Loverro BUSINESS SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT B. Bindert (SLA) MANAGER T. Campbell (SLA) A....

431

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

432

Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that LCLS-II only constitutes a stepping stone to what we believe is needed over a longer time scale. At present, a practical time horizon for planning is about 15 years into the future, matching that of worldwide planning activities for competitive X-FEL facilities in Europe and Asia. We therefore envision LCLS-II as an important stage in development to what is required by about 2025, tentatively called LCLS-2025, for continued US leadership even as new facilities around the world are being completed. We envision LCLS primarily as a hard x-ray FEL facility with some soft x-ray capabilities. A survey of planned X-FEL facilities around the world suggests that US planning to 2025 needs to include an internationally competitive soft x-ray FEL facility which complements the LCLS plans outlined in this document.

Stohr, J

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC_s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)  

SciTech Connect

The LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be the world's first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelengths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast x-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, with pulses powerful enough to take diffraction images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. Ultrafast conventional lasers will be used as the pump. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray Hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized Laser Hall, containing up to three Class 4 laser systems, three x-ray Hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the Hutches. The main components of the NEH laser systems are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a regen amplifier, green pump lasers for the oscillator and regen, a pulse compressor and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues are discussed.

Woods, Michael; Anthony, Perry; /SLAC; Barat, Ken; /LBL, Berkeley; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Greg; White, William E.; /SLAC

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Creating an EPICS Based Test Stand Development System for a BPM Digitizer of the Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is required to deliver a high quality electron beam for producing coherent X-rays. As a result, high resolution beam position monitoring is required. The Beam Position Monitor (BPM) digitizer acquires analog signals from the beam line and digitizes them to obtain beam position data. Although Matlab is currently being used to test the BPM digitizer?s functions and capability, the Controls Department at SLAC prefers to use Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS). This paper discusses the transition of providing similar as well as enhanced functionalities, than those offered by Matlab, to test the digitizer. Altogether, the improved test stand development system can perform mathematical and statistical calculations with the waveform signals acquired from the digitizer and compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the signals. Finally, logging of meaningful data into files has been added.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

A compact, sample-in-atmospheric-pressure soft x-ray microscope developed at Pohang Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A full-field transmission soft x-ray microscope (TXM) was developed at the Pohang Light Source. With a 2 mm diameter condenser zone plate and a 40 nm outermost-zone-width objective zone plate, the TXM's achieved spatial resolution is better than 50 nm at the photon energy of 500 eV (wavelength: 2.49 nm). The TXM is portable and mounted in tandem with a 7B1 spectroscopy end station. The sample position is outside the vacuum, allowing for quick sample changes and enhanced in situ experimental capability. In addition, the TXM is pinhole-free and easy to align, having commercial mounts located outside the vacuum components.

Lim, Jun; Shin, Hyun-Joon [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Keun Hwa [Materials Science and Technology Research Division, KIST, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chan-Cuk; Hwang, Han-Na [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, San31, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Differential spectral responsivity measurement of photovoltaic detectors with a light-emitting-diode-based integrating sphere source  

SciTech Connect

We present an experimental realization of differential spectral responsivity measurement by using a light-emitting diode (LED)-based integrating sphere source. The spectral irradiance responsivity is measured by a Lambertian-like radiation field with a diameter of 40mm at the peak wavelengths of the 35 selectable LEDs covering a range from 280 to 1550nm. The systematic errors and uncertainties due to lock-in detection, spatial irradiance distribution, and reflection from the test detector are experimentally corrected or considered. In addition, we implemented a numerical procedure to correct the error due to the broad spectral bandwidth of the LEDs. The overall uncertainty of the DSR measurement is evaluated to be 2.2% (k=2) for Si detectors. To demonstrate its application, we present the measurement results of two Si photovoltaic detectors at different bias irradiance levels up to 120mW/cm{sup 2}.

Zaid, Ghufron; Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Seongchong; Lee, Dong-Hoon

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

Ajemian, R.C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

LED Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LED Lighting LED Lighting August 16, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are...

439

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50 50 Hazards of Elastic Tie-Downs (Bungee Cords) Date: April 3, 2012 Editor: Lori Stiegler Elastic (bungee) cords are common, inexpensive tools used for a variety of fastening applications. They can be safe if their use is planned and evaluated. However, a recent injury points out the hazard potential of these common tools. Bungee cords are made of an elastic material with metal J or S shaped hooks on each end. They are convenient to use since the hooks are versatile connectors that can be easily applied using one hand. Bungee cords can also contain stored energy which can be suddenly and forcefully released if not handled carefully. The heavy elastic cords contain tremendous force when they recoil, particularly when stretched beyond the appropriate limits. This can result

440

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Sciences Directorate EMS/OHSAS Documents and Links Photon Sciences Directorate EMS/OHSAS Documents and Links The Photon Sciences Directorate follows the BNL requirements in the SBMS Program and Subject Areas for EMS and OHSAS. The links below contain information that is specific to the Directorate in these areas. The Photon Sciences Directorate follows the BNL Environmental, Safety, Security and Health (ESSH) Policy. Planning Photon Sciences Significant Environmental Aspects Matrix Photon Sciences QA Procedures Policies and Requirements Manual EMS, FUA and SAD/ASE Checklist for Directorate Reviews Job Risk Assessments Facility Risk Assessments ESH Improvement Plans Implementation and Operation Each employee has an associated Roles, Responsibilities, Accountability and Authority (R2A2) listing for their position. Control of Documents is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Inspections of Step Stools, Ladder Stands, and Portable Ladders Date: May 21, 2009 Editors: L. Stiegler There are times when we all need to reach something that is not accessible from the ground level. It could be something just out of reach, so we use a step stool. Or, it could be higher. In those cases we would need to use a ladder stand (a self-supported, portable set of steps), or portable ladder. Any of these devices require inspection prior to each use. The guidelines below will help you with this inspection. General Guidance for all devices: Surfaces must be free from oil, grease and slippery substances All exposed surfaces must be free from sharp edges, burrs, or other safety hazards Stepping surface, including rungs, must be skid resistant All feet or bottom surfaces must be skid resistant (i.e. rubber feet

442

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Risk Assessments (JRAs) Job Risk Assessments (JRAs) JRA Blank Form Word Completed JRAs Accelerator Operations PS-JRA-0030 Accelerator or Beam Line Commissioning and Fault Studies PS-JRA-0028 Accelerator or Beam Line Components, Mechanical Assembly PS-JRA-0006 Using a Beamline PS-JRA-0029 Cable Pulling PS-JRA-0042 Chemical Use (Routine Chemicals) PS-JRA-0021 Chemical Work (Hazardous Chemicals) PS-JRA-0020 Chemicals and Radioactive Materials Transport PS-JRA-0022 Compressed Gas Cylinders and Systems Work PS-JRA-0009 Cooling Water Systems Work PS-JRA-0012 Cryogenic Work (General Cryogens) LS-JRA-0010 Driving Electrical and Electronic Shop Work PS-JRA-0001 Electrical Equipment (Zero Energy State) Work PS-JRA-0002 Electrical Equipment, Energized (Troubleshooting in Range >=50V and <=240V) PS-JRA-0003

443

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Because you are not running JavaScript or allowing active scripting, some features on this page my not work. >> Enable Javascript << Site Navigation General Information search Menu...

444

Advanced Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the charging and discharging dynamics of lithium iron phosphate, a promising positive battery electrode. Summary Slide Handout Read more... ALS in the News Roman Seawater...

445

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as to protect his fellow workers; he placed a barrier along the length of the crate. The Human Performance Improvement "Am I Ready?" Checklist can help us: Do I understand the...

446

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as historical events, shows that communication and self checking are crucial to avoiding Human Performance Error Traps. During commissioning of the X-ray lines last week, a...

447

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Management Review Photon Sciences Directorate 2012 Integrated Management Review Presentation 2011 Integrated Management Review Presentation 2010 Integrated Management...

448

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minutes of Integrated Mgmt Rev Presentation Photon Sciences Directorate 2012 Minutes of Integrated Management Review 2011 Minutes of Integrated Management Review 2010 Minutes of...

449

SSRL Light Source Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource An Office of Science User Facility Beam Current: 0.00 mA Beam Status: Down Loss Rate: 0.00 mAmin SPEAR Operator Messages 4-SEP-2013...

450

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Physicists icon Beamline Support - Technicians icon Building Management icon Controls & Detectors - Electronic Group icon Electrical Distribution Group icon ESH&Q...

451

Optical Design of a Broadband Infrared Spectrometer for Bunch Length Measurement at the Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The electron pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory occur on the order of tens of femtoseconds and cannot be directly measured by conventional means. The length of the pulses can instead be reconstructed by measuring the spectrum of optical transition radiation emitted by the electrons as they move toward a conducting foil. Because the emitted radiation occurs in the mid-infrared from 0.6 to 30 microns a novel optical layout is required. Using a helium-neon laser with wavelength 633 nm, a series of gold-coated off-axis parabolic mirrors were positioned to direct a beam through a zinc selenide prism and to a focus at a CCD camera for imaging. Constructing this layout revealed a number of novel techniques for reducing the aberrations introduced into the system by the off-axis parabolic mirrors. The beam had a recorded radius of less than a millimeter at its final focus on the CCD imager. This preliminary setup serves as a model for the spectrometer that will ultimately measure the LCLS electron pulse duration.

Williams, Kiel; /SLAC

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taiwan, ALBA in Spain,, and NSLS II at Brookhaven) . GroupsRing Cornell BESSY FEL NSLS II ERL SPring-8 Ring ELETTRAat SLAC and recently funded NSLS II at Brookhaven, thereby

Falcone, Roger

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Prospects for high power Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) development in the 1000{angstrom} {minus} 1{angstrom} wavelength range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron bunch requirements for single-pass saturation of a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating at full transverse coherence in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mode include: (1) a high peak current, (2) a sufficiently low relative energy spread, and (3) a transverse emittance {var_epsilon}[r-m] satisfying the condition {var_epsilon} {le} {lambda}A/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength of the FEL. In the insertion device that induces the coherent amplification, the prepared electron bunch must be kept on a trajectory sufficiently collinear with the amplified photons without significant dilution of its transverse density. In this paper we discuss a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) based on a high energy accelerator such as, e.g., the 3km S-band structure at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), followed by a long high-precision undulator with superimposed quadrupole (FODO) focusing, to fulfill the given requirements for SASE operation in the 1000{Angstrom}--1{Angstrom} range. The electron source for the linac, an RF gun with a laser-excited photocathode featuring a normalized emittance in the 1--3 mm-mrad range, a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 3 ps, and approximately 10{sup {minus}9} C/bunch, is a primary determinant of the required low transverse and longitudinal emittances. Acceleration of the injected bunch to energies in the 5--25 GeV range is used to reduce the relative longitudinal energy spread in the bunch, as well as to reduce the transverse emittance to values consistent with the cited wavelength regime. Two longitudinal compression stages are employed to increase the peak bunch current to the 2--5 kA levels required for sufficiently rapid saturation. The output radiation is delivered, via a grazing-incidence mirror bank, to optical instrumentation and a multi-user beam line system. Technological requirements for LCLS operation at 40{Angstrom}, 4.5{Angstrom}, and 1.5{Angstrom} are examined.

Tatchyn, R.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R. [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t ron user facilities (ALS, NSLS, and SSRL). By frequentNational Science Foundation NSLSNational Synchrotron Light

DePaolo, Donald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Coupling Fibers to Semiconductor Sources To learn to couple an injection laser diode (ILD) and a light emitting diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and a light emitting diode (LED) to an optical fiber. Equipment: · 1 ~ 2 meters of F-MLD-50 multimode fiber off any other part of the circuit. Light Emitting Diode- 1.) Post mount the LED assembly the same way

Collins, Gary S.

456

Photon Sciences | About the Photon Sciences Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Photon Sciences Directorate About the Photon Sciences Directorate The Photon Sciences Directorate operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), both funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science. These facilities support a large community of scientists using photons (light) to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. NSLS National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS-II National Synchrotron Light Source II This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven Lab and a time of unprecedented growth for the directorate. The NSLS-II Project is progressing rapidly and smoothly through design and construction, driven by

457

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

458

Light Laboratory, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

459

Hubbell Lighting Photometric Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

460

LBNL Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED and ballast berkeley lamp workstation light switch Overview | What's New | Publications | Software | Facilities | People | Contact Us | Links Sources and Ballasts | Light...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light source nsls" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-4 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Shizuoka (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

EUV reflectance characterization of the 94/304 ? flight secondary AIA mirror at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AIA secondary flight mirror, previously coated at Columbia University with Mg/SiC for the 303.8 {angstrom} channel and Mo/Y for the 93.9 {angstrom} channel was characterized by means of EUV reflectance measurements at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at LBNL on January 10, 2006. Paul Boerner (LMSAL) also participated in these measurements.

Soufli, R; Spiller, E; Aquila, A L; Gullikson, E M; Windt, D L

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 Audit Letter Report: OAS-RA-L-10-01 April 6, 2010 The Department of Energy's Management of the NSLS-II Project The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Science is currently constructing the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven) in Upton, New York. The NSLS-II is designed to replace the existing National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which began operations in 1982. Approximately 2,100 researchers utilize the NSLS each year for research in such areas as biology and medicine, chemistry and environmental sciences, physics, and materials science. Construction of the NSLS-II began in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 and the facility is scheduled to begin operations in FY 2015.

464

Light Emitting Diode (LED) Lighting and Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the most promising and unique energy efficient light source light emitting diode (LED) lighting. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the upcoming growth of the LED and LED lighting market. Future technical improvements to LEDs and systems are also emphasized. Discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from traditional lighting to LED lighting is provided. LED lighting technologies are covered in...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

Accident source terms for light-water nuclear power plants using high-burnup or MOX fuel.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Representative accident source terms patterned after the NUREG-1465 Source Term have been developed for high burnup fuel in BWRs and PWRs and for MOX fuel in a PWR with an ice-condenser containment. These source terms have been derived using nonparametric order statistics to develop distributions for the timing of radionuclide release during four accident phases and for release fractions of nine chemical classes of radionuclides as calculated with the MELCOR 1.8.5 accident analysis computer code. The accident phases are those defined in the NUREG-1465 Source Term - gap release, in-vessel release, ex-vessel release, and late in-vessel release. Important differences among the accident source terms derived here and the NUREG-1465 Source Term are not attributable to either fuel burnup or use of MOX fuel. Rather, differences among the source terms are due predominantly to improved understanding of the physics of core meltdown accidents. Heat losses from the degrading reactor core prolong the process of in-vessel release of radionuclides. Improved understanding of the chemistries of tellurium and cesium under reactor accidents changes the predicted behavior characteristics of these radioactive elements relative to what was assumed in the derivation of the NUREG-1465 Source Term. An additional radionuclide chemical class has been defined to account for release of cesium as cesium molybdate which enhances molybdenum release relative to other metallic fission products.

Salay, Michael (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Gauntt, Randall O.; Lee, Richard Y. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Resonant soft x-ray reflectivity of organic thin films Cheng Wang, Tohru Araki, and Benjamin Watts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were acquired at Beam- line X10B of the National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS , Brookhaven National, and 14.2 keV recorded at X10B, NSLS and fits solid line for 270, 280, and 283.4 eV. FIG. 7. Reflectance at X10B, NSLS--circle and fit solid line . The inset shows a Fourier analysis of the data. Note

Beichner, Robert J.

467

Specific light in sculpture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

Powell, John William

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Lighting Options for Homes.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

Baker, W.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Evaluation of Lighting and Lighting Control Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting and lighting controls have been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. Advances in lighting sources often allow for the conservation of quality of light while providing more flexibility in the control of light. Additionally, advances in core technologies within the lighting marketplace regularly lead to the introduction of new lamps, fixtures and controls. With the rapid introduction of new products and designs, it is important to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Radiometric and Engineering Performance of the SeaWiFS Quality Monitor (SQM): A Portable Light Source for Field Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable and stable source of radiant flux, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Quality Monitor (SQM), was developed as a field instrument for use in experiments away from the calibration laboratory such as those encountered ...

B. Carol Johnson; Ping-Shine Shaw; Stanford B. Hooker; Don Lynch

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gorkhover, T. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. med. Forschung, Jahnstr. 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rouzee, A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

473

Techniques and use of a tunable, laser-based, MeV-Class Compton scattering light source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1%bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photoelectron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M; Semenov, V; Shverdin, M Y; Rusnak, B; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nanograting-based compact VUV spectrometer and beam profiler for in-situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources  

SciTech Connect

A compact, versatile device for VUV beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a micro-channel plate based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 nm to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25 nm to 0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for non-intrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

475

112 STERN ET AL. Decontamination and BeneficialUse of Dredged Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jersey Maritime Resources Department of Transportation 28 West State Street, Trenton, NJ 08625 USA~ i Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) (http://nslsweb.nsls.bn1.gov)and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. In Proceedings, Vis98 (IEEE Visualization 1998), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, October 18-23, 1998

Brookhaven National Laboratory

476

PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

477

Photon Sciences Directorate | 2010 Annual Report | DISCOVERY at Light Speed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Division Delivers Reliable NSLS Beams, Key NSLS-II Components Accelerator Division Delivers Reliable NSLS Beams, Key NSLS-II Components Ferdinand Willeke "We had 14 goals for the year and checked off 11, with 'in progress' noted on the balance. This achievement is a testament to the talent and hard work of the Accelerator Division staff, our vendors, and our supporters at Brookhaven and elsewhere." - Ferdinand Willeke Director, Accelerator Division Photon Sciences' Accelerator Division had a full workload in 2010. While it was generally business as usual at NSLS, maintaining an older synchrotron at a high performance level is not easy. The NSLS-II Project placed increasing demands on the division, with 2010 seeing great growth in construction and design, and preparations ongoing for the eventual transition from NSLS to the new facility.

478

Light Source Notes | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Linear Lattice of the APS Storage Ring Vadim Sajaev,Louis Emery LS-292 Direct-Drive and Eddy-Current Septum Magnets Suk Hong Kim LS-291 Calculation of Pulsed Kicker...

479

Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Single shot spatial and temporal coherence properties of the SLAC linac coherent light source in the hard x-ray regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We measured the transverse and longitudinal coherence properties of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC in the hard x-ray regime at 9 keV photon energy on a single shot basis. Speckle patterns recorded in the forward direction from colloidal nanoparticles yielded the transverse coherence properties of the focused LCLS beam. Speckle patterns from a gold nanopowder recorded with atomic resolution allowed us to measure the shot-to-shot variations of the spectral properties of the x-ray beam. The focused beam is in the transverse direction fully coherent with a mode number close to 1. The average number of longitudinal modes behind the Si(111) monochromator is about 14.5 and the average coherence time {tau}{sub c} = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) fs. The data suggest a mean x-ray pulse duration of (29 {+-} 14) fs behind the monochromator for (100 {+-} 14) fs long electron pulses.

Gutt, C.; Wochner, P.; Fischer, B.; Conrad, H.; Castro-Colin, M.; Lee, S.; Lehmkuhler, F.; Steinke, I.; Sprung, M.; Roseker, W.; Zhu, D.; Lemke, H.; Bogle, S.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Robert, A.; Grubel, G. (Materials Science Division); (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron); (Max-Planck-Institut fur Intelligene Systeme); (LCLS, SLAC Nat. Accelerator Lab.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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