Sample records for light source ii

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    , girders and components for the vacuum system started to ramp up and substantial progress was made of the deionized cooling water systems havNational Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report March 2010 Erection of structural

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source II November 2013 Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    the conformance of our injector commissioning program with the requirements of the Accelerator Safety Order and effective commissioning of the NSLS-II linac and booster. Injector commissioning is expected to last EXECUTIVE SUMMARY NOVEMBER 2013 ACTIVITY 2 OVERALL ASSESSMENT The National Synchrotron Light Source II

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    in September. Accelerator Systems progress continued with successful procurement and delivery of major. 25 ASD Secondary Cooling System Design Review Sept. 1­2 RF Bellows and Absorbers Review Sept. 8National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report July 2010 July 30: Roof surfacing

  5. 2011 Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2011 Beamline Development Proposals National Synchrotron Light Source II 1. High-energy x-ray micro- uniformity in the X-Ray and Gamma-ray Response of Large-Area/Volume Radiation Detectors (MDM) Ralph James) Konstantine Kaznatcheev, Brookhaven National Laboratory Insertion device 11. Scanning Transmission X

  6. National Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  7. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented.

  8. Top-up operation at Pohang Light Source-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, I.; Huang, J. Y.; Kim, M.; Lee, B.-J.; Kim, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Kim, M.-H.; Lee, H. S.; Moon, D.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, D.-E.; Nam, S. H.; Shin, S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After three years of upgrading work, PLS-II (S. Shin, Commissioning of the PLS-II, JINST, January 2013) is now successfully operating. The top-up operation of the 3 GeV linear accelerator had to be delayed because of some challenges encountered, and PLS-II was run in decay mode at the beginning in March 2012. The main difficulties encountered in the top-up operation of PLS-II are different levels between the linear accelerator and the storage ring, the 14 narrow gap in-vacuum undulators in operation, and the full energy injection by 3 GeV linear accelerator. Large vertical emittance and energy jitter of the linac were the major obstacles that called for careful control of injected beam to reduce beam loss in the storage ring during injection. The following measures were taken to resolve these problems: (1) The high resolution Libera BPM (see http://www.i-tech.si ) was implemented to measure the beam trajectory and energy. (2) Three slit systems were installed to filter the beam edge. (3) De-Qing circuit was applied to the modulator system to improve the energy stability of injected beam. As a result, the radiation by beam loss during injection is reduced drastically, and the top-up mode has been successfully operating since 19th March 2013. In this paper, we describe the experimental results of the PLS-II top-up operation and the improvement plan.

  9. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stohr, J

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that LCLS-II only constitutes a stepping stone to what we believe is needed over a longer time scale. At present, a practical time horizon for planning is about 15 years into the future, matching that of worldwide planning activities for competitive X-FEL facilities in Europe and Asia. We therefore envision LCLS-II as an important stage in development to what is required by about 2025, tentatively called LCLS-2025, for continued US leadership even as new facilities around the world are being completed. We envision LCLS primarily as a hard x-ray FEL facility with some soft x-ray capabilities. A survey of planned X-FEL facilities around the world suggests that US planning to 2025 needs to include an internationally competitive soft x-ray FEL facility which complements the LCLS plans outlined in this document.

  10. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienertLift Forces in a Light

  11. EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 E-mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov

  12. Measurement of coherence length and incoherent source size of hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, So Yeong; Hong, Chung Ki [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jun, E-mail: limjun@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)] [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the spatial coherence length and incoherent source size of a hard x-ray undulator beamline at Pohang Light Source-II, the stored electron energy of which has been increased from 2.5 GeV to 3 GeV. The coherence length was determined by single-slit measurement of the visibility of the Fresnel diffraction pattern. The correlated incoherent source size was cross-checked for three different optics: the single slit, beryllium parabolic compound refractive lenses, and the Fresnel zone plate. We concluded that the undulator beamline has an effective incoherent source size (FWHM) of 540 ?m (horizontal) × 50 ?m (vertical)

  13. Building the World's Most Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    View this time-lapse video showing construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Construction is shown from 2009-2012.

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  15. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  18. The Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, A.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krailo, D. A.

    can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in fila ment..., fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Man , ufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved colo'r rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take...

  20. Environmental Assessment for the National Synchrotron Light Source...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    synchrotron light source, NSLS-II, would incorporate advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors and non-destructive tools and instruments to image the structure and...

  1. Advanced Light Source (ALS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  2. X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  3. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  4. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  5. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  6. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  7. Efficient Light Sources Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, A. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews new lamp and lighting technology in terms of application and economic impact. Included are the latest advances in High Intensity Discharge systems, energy saving fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and the new state of the art high...

  8. Next Generation Light Source Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

  9. Fusion pumped light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  10. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamura Ed., Lori S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upgrade on the Advanced Light Source," Nucl. Instrum. Meth.n photoemission at the Advanced Light Source," Radiât. Phys.high-pressure studies at the Advanced Light Source w i t h a

  11. Review: Semiconductor Quantum Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J Shields

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasers and LEDs display a statistical distribution in the number of photons emitted in a given time interval. New applications exploiting the quantum properties of light require sources for which either individual photons, or pairs, are generated in a regulated stream. Here we review recent research on single-photon sources based on the emission of a single semiconductor quantum dot. In just a few years remarkable progress has been made in generating indistinguishable single-photons and entangled photon pairs using such structures. It suggests it may be possible to realise compact, robust, LED-like semiconductor devices for quantum light generation.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.N. (eds.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts from research conducted at the national synchrotron light source. (LSP)

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, Eva

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

  14. Tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powers, Peter E. (Dayton, OH); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source and a method of operating a light source are provided. The light source includes a pump laser, first and second non-linear optical crystals, a tunable filter, and light pulse directing optics. The method includes the steps of operating the pump laser to generate a pulsed pump beam characterized by a nanosecond pulse duration and arranging the light pulse directing optics so as to (i) split the pulsed pump beam into primary and secondary pump beams; (ii) direct the primary pump beam through an input face of the first non-linear optical crystal such that a primary output beam exits from an output face of the first non-linear optical crystal; (iii) direct the primary output beam through the tunable filter to generate a sculpted seed beam; and direct the sculpted seed beam and the secondary pump beam through an input face of the second non-linear optical crystal such that a secondary output beam characterized by at least one spectral bandwidth on the order of about 0.1 cm.sup.-1 and below exits from an output face of the second non-linear optical crystal.

  15. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Reflectance Model how objects reflect light. Model light sources Algorithms for computing Shading: computing intensities within polygons Determine what light strikes what

  16. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Basic fact: Light is linear Double intensity of sources, double photons reaching eye. Turn on two lights, and photons reaching eye are same as sum of number when each

  17. Light Sources on the Nylon Vessels' Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 7 Light Sources on the Nylon Vessels' Surfaces The nylon vessels are justifiably the most the IV. A set of light diffusers has been placed on pre-defined points of both vessels. These are attached to the tip of an optical fiber that carries light from a source outside the WT (LED 184 #12

  18. Advanced Light Source control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Cork, C.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Ritchie, A.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation 1--2 GeV synchrotron radiation source designed to provide ports for 60 beamlines. It uses a 50 MeV electron linac and 1.5 GeV, 1 Hz, booster synchrotron for injection into a 1--2 GeV storage ring. Interesting control problems are created because of the need for dynamic closed beam orbit control to eliminate interaction between the ring tuning requirements and to minimize orbit shifts due to ground vibrations. The extremely signal sensitive nature of the experiments requires special attention to the sources of electrical noise. These requirements have led to a control system design which emphasizes connectivity at the accelerator equipment end and a large I/O bandwidth for closed loop system response. Not overlooked are user friendliness, operator response time, modeling, and expert system provisions. Portable consoles are used for local operation of machine equipment. Our solution is a massively parallel system with >120 Mbits/sec I/O bandwidth and >1500 Mips computing power. At the equipment level connections are made using over 600 powerful Intelligent Local Controllers (ILC-s) mounted in 3U size Eurocard slots using fiber-optic cables between rack locations. In the control room, personal computers control and display all machine variables at a 10 Hz rate including the scope signals which are collected though the control system. Commercially available software and industry standards are used extensively. Particular attention is paid to reliability, maintainability and upgradeability. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3) high-temperature superconducting materials that carry electricity with no loss for efficient power transmission lines; and (4) materials for solid-state lighting with half of the present power consumption. Excitement about NSLS-II is evident in many ways, most notably the extraordinary response we had to the 2010 call for beamline development proposals for the anticipated 60 or more beamlines that NSLS-II will ultimately host. A total of 54 proposals were submitted and, after extensive review, 34 were approved. Funding from both the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health has already been secured to support the design and construction of a number of these beamlines. FY11 is a challenging and exciting year for the NSLS-II Project as we reach the peak of our construction activity. We remain on track to complete the project by March 2014, a full 15 months ahead of schedule and with even more capabilities than originally planned. The Photon Sciences Directorate is well on its way to fulfilling our vision of being a provider of choice for world-class photon sciences and facilities.

  20. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manos, Dennis M. (Williamsburg, VA); Diggs, Jessie (Norfolk, VA); Ametepe, Joseph D. (Roanoke, VA)

    2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  1. LED Light Sources for Projection Display Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    LED Light Sources for Projection Display Applications By Chenhui Peng 04-13-2012 #12;Outline · 1. · The first practical LED is in red color and it is made with gallium arsenide (GaAs). 4http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light with holes and release energy in the form of photons. 5http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode #12

  2. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

    2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  3. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  5. Microwave generated plasma light source apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshizawa, K.; Ito, H.; Kodama, H.; Komura, H.; Minowa, Y.

    1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generated plasma light source including a microwave generator, a microwave cavity having a light reflecting member forming at least a portion of the cavity, and a member transparent to light and opaque to microwaves disposed across an opening of the cavity opposite the feeding opening through which the microwave generator is coupled. An electrodeless discharge bulb is disposed at a position in the cavity such that the cavity operates as a resonant cavity at least when the bulb is emitting light. In the bulb is encapsulated at least one discharge light emissive substance. The bulb has a shape and is sufficiently small that the bulb acts substantially as a point light source.

  6. Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O'Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

  7. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  8. Take a quick trip around the experimental floor of the Lab's new light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Take a quick trip around the experimental floor of Brookhaven Lab's new light source -- the $912-million National Synchrotron Light Source II. Construction of the facility is now over 70 percent completed. With much of the conventional construction done, accelerator and experimental components are being installed.

  9. NRC Construction Light Source Flicker: What We

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    NRC Construction Light Source Flicker: What We Need to Know, and Why You Should Care NRC Construction Jennifer A. Veitch, Ph.D. (c) 2013, National Research Council Canada #12;NRC Construction Handbook: Reference & Application (9th Ed.), 2000, p. 3-20 #12;NRC Construction Flicker Effects 1

  10. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: LS-ESH-0027 06 copy of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the NSLS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0025 01 of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the NSLS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: LS-ESH-0026 4 of this file is the one on-line in the PS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the PS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  13. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    Science and Technology of Future Light Sources A White Paper Report prepared by scientists from ANL Berkeley, CA 94720 SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 Editors. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U

  14. Enhancements to the Linac Coherent Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 Enhancements to the Linac Coherent Light Source #12;2 LCLS Strategic PlanLCLS Strategic Plan Near term - 2 years "LCLS-I" Increase user capacity flexible beam delivery through optics, linac energy and pulse length changes fixed gap afterburner at second harmonic 16 keV Intermediate term ­ 5 years "LCLS

  15. Computing the Antipenumbra of an Area Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teller, Seth

    to be in umbra. If the point sees some, but not all, of the light source, it is said to be in penumbra. Otherwise, the point may see all of the light source. light source occluder umbra penumbra Figure 1: Umbra and penumbra, of the light source can be seen (Figure 2). For a given light source and set of holes or occluders, the umbra

  16. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulp, Thomas Jan (Livermore, CA); Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); Sommers, Ricky (Oakley, CA); Goers, Uta-Barbara (Campbell, NY); Armstrong, Karla M. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  17. Light Source Interpolation for Sparsely Sampled Reflectance Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Light Source Interpolation for Sparsely Sampled Reflectance Fields Billy Chen, Hendrik P. A. Lensch present a technique that approximates the correct result of relighting from intermediate light source resolution in the light source positions is rather lim- ited. As a consequence, smoothly moving high- lights

  18. Plasma-based EUV light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

  19. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY 1998, following the 50th Anniversary Year of Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven Science Associates became the new Managers of BNL. The new start is an appropriate time to take stock of past achievements and to renew or confirm future goals. During the 1998 NSLS Annual Users Meeting (described in Part 3 of this Activity Report), the DOE Laboratory Operations Board, Chaired by the Under Secretary for Energy, Ernest Moniz met at BNL. By chance all the NSLS Chairmen except Martin Blume (acting NSLS Chair 84-85) were present as recorded in the picture. Under their leadership the NSLS has improved dramatically: (1) The VUV Ring current has increased from 100 mA in October 1982 to nearly 1 A today. For the following few years 10 Ahrs of current were delivered most weeks - NSLS now exceeds that every day. (2) When the first experiments were performed on the X-ray ring during FY1985 the electron energy was 2 GeV and the current up to 100 mA - the X-Ray Ring now runs routinely at 2.5 GeV and at 2.8 GeV with up to 350 mA of current, with a very much longer beam half-life and improved reliability. (3) Starting in FY 1984 the proposal for the Phase II upgrade, mainly for a building extension and a suite of insertion devices and their associated beamlines, was pursued - the promises were delivered in full so that for some years now the NSLS has been running with two undulators in the VUV Ring and three wigglers and an undulator in the X-Ray Ring. In addition two novel insertion devices have been commissioned in the X13 straight. (4) At the start of FY 1998 the NSLS welcomed its 7000th user - attracted by the opportunity for pursuing research with high quality beams, guaranteed not to be interrupted by 'delivery failures', and welcomed by an efficient and caring user office and first class teams of PRT and NSLS staff. R & D have lead to the possibility of running the X-Ray Ring at the higher energy of 2.8 GeV. Figure 1 shows the first user beam, which was provided thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  20. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  1. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  2. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work explaining how one class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses.

  4. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    begun by others at the BESSY synchrotron in Berlin, we haveproject, SMART, at the BESSY II synchrotron. In the scheme,

  5. advanced light source: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm....

  6. Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

  7. EA-1975: LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA on the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the existing LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The proposed LCLS-II would extend the photon energy range, increase control over photon pulses, and enable two-color pump-probe experiments. The X-ray laser beams generated by LCLS-II would enable a new class of experiments: the simultaneous investigation of a material’s electronic and structural properties.

  8. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

  9. New results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source is the world's first low-energy third-generation synchrotron radiation source. It has been running reliably and exceeding design specifications since it began operation in October 1993. It is available to a wide community of researchers in many scientific fields, including atomic and molecular science and chemistry. Here, new results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source demonstrate the opportunities available in atomic and molecular physics at this synchrotron light source. The unprecedented brightness allows experiments with high flux, high spectral resolution, and nearly 100% linear polarization.

  10. Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff E. Nause; Ian Ferguson; Alan Doolittle

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.

  11. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    static pressures. Ultra-fast laser systems for intensetechniques, laser synchronization and ultra-stable timingand laser sources, and ultimately combining the THz with ultra-

  12. Mechanisms of light harvesting by photosystem II in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarnath, Kapil; Schneider, Anna R; Fleming, Graham R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light harvesting by photosystem II (PSII) in plants is highly efficient and acclimates to rapid changes in the intensity of sunlight. However, the mechanisms of PSII light harvesting have remained experimentally inaccessible. Using a structure-based model of excitation energy flow in 200 nanometer (nm) x 200 nm patches of the grana membrane, where PSII is located, we accurately simulated chlorophyll fluorescence decay data with no free parameters. Excitation movement through the light harvesting antenna is diffusive, but becomes subdiffusive in the presence of charge separation at reaction centers. The influence of membrane morphology on light harvesting efficiency is determined by the excitation diffusion length of 50 nm in the antenna. Our model provides the basis for understanding how nonphotochemical quenching mechanisms affect PSII light harvesting in grana membranes.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Solar power and other sources of renewable energy can help combat global warming but they have a draw-back: they don't produce energy as predictably as generating...

  14. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the construction of LCLS, the first hard x-ray laser, towith storage-ring sources and LCLS will extend this down todown to sub-microseconds and LCLS will cover the range from

  15. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). [Source: Michael Graetzel,is a dye- sensitized solar cell (DSSC) shown in Figure 3.6.In the DSSC (also known as Graetzel cell), solar photons are

  16. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  17. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Quigley, Gerard P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  18. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  19. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIGHT SOURCE FACILITY AT LBNL * J.N. Corlett # , B. Austin,R. Wilcox, J. Wurtele, LBNL, Berkeley, CA94720, U.S.A. A.concept, under development at LBNL, for a multi- beamline

  20. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roger Falcone

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  1. Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

  2. Advanced light source, User`s Handbook, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a national facility for scientific research and development located at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) of the University of California. Its purpose is to generate beams of very bright light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The facility is open to researchers from industry, universities, and government laboratories.

  3. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  4. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobs RunningSEABRV2/01/12 Linac Coherent Light

  5. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  6. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Stöhr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  7. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, Claudio (UCLA) [UCLA

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  9. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  10. High efficiency light source using solid-state emitter and down-conversion material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narendran, Nadarajah (Clifton Park, NY); Gu, Yimin (Troy, NY); Freyssinier, Jean Paul (Troy, NY)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A light emitting apparatus includes a source of light for emitting light; a down conversion material receiving the emitted light, and converting the emitted light into transmitted light and backward transmitted light; and an optic device configured to receive the backward transmitted light and transfer the backward transmitted light outside of the optic device. The source of light is a semiconductor light emitting diode, a laser diode (LD), or a resonant cavity light emitting diode (RCLED). The down conversion material includes one of phosphor or other material for absorbing light in one spectral region and emitting light in another spectral region. The optic device, or lens, includes light transmissive material.

  11. Electrodeless lighting RF power source development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient, solid state RF power source has been developed on this NICE project for exciting low power electrodeless lamp bulbs. This project takes full advantage of concurrent advances in electrodeless lamp technology. Electrodeless lamp lighting systems utilizing the sulfur based bulb type developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc., is an emerging technology which is based on generating light in a confined plasma created and sustained by RF excitation. The bulb for such a lamp is filled with a particular element and inert gas at low pressure when cold. RF power from the RF source creates a plasma within the bulb which reaches temperatures approaching those of high pressure discharge lamp plasmas. At these temperatures the plasma radiates substantial visible light with a spectrum similar to sunlight.

  12. Tunable light source for use in photoacoustic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bisson, Scott E.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a photoacoustic spectrometer that is field portable and capable of speciating complex organic molecules in the gas phase. The spectrometer has a tunable light source that has the ability to resolve the fine structure of these molecules over a large wavelength range. The inventive light source includes an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) having combined fine and coarse tuning. By pumping the OPO with the output from a doped-fiber optical amplifier pumped by a diode seed laser, the inventive spectrometer is able to speciate mixtures having parts per billion of organic compounds, with a light source that has a high efficiency and small size, allowing for portability. In an alternative embodiment, the spectrometer is scanned by controlling the laser wavelength, thus resulting in an even more compact and efficient design.

  13. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc H. Pinsonneault; Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis

    2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  14. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a more detailed plans for experiments (Ch. VI), highlighting the uniqueness the HEDS endstation will play in providing mission-relevant HED data and in the development of the field. One of the more exciting aspects of NNSA-relevant experiments on LCLS is that, given the extraordinary investment and consequent advances in accurate atomic-scale simulations of matter (to a large extent via the Accelerated Scientific Computing program sponsored by NNSA), the facility will provide a platform that, for the first time, will permit experiments in the regimes of interest at the time and spatial scales of the simulations. In Chapter III, the report places the potential of LCLS with an HED science endstation in the context of science required by NNSA, as well as explicating the relationship of NNSA and HED science in general. Chapter IV discusses 4th-generation light sources, like LCLS, in the context of other laboratory technologies presently utilized by NNSA. The report concludes, noting that an HED endstation on LCLS can provide access to data in regimes that are relevant to NNSA needs but no mechanism exists for providing such data. The endstation will also serve to build a broad-based community in the 'X-Games' of physics. The science generated by the facility will be a collaboration of NNSA-based laboratory scientists and university-based researchers. The LCLS endstation fulfills the need for an intermediate-scale facility capable of delivering fundamental advances and mission-relevant research in high energy density science.

  15. TRIGA MARK-II source term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usang, M. D., E-mail: mark-dennis@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hamzah, N. S., E-mail: mark-dennis@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abi, M. J. B., E-mail: mark-dennis@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Rawi, M. Z. M. Rawi, E-mail: mark-dennis@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abu, M. P., E-mail: mark-dennis@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Bahagian Teknologi Reaktor, Agensi Nuklear Malaysia, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ORIGEN 2.2 are employed to obtain data regarding ? source term and the radio-activity of irradiated TRIGA fuel. The fuel composition are specified in grams for use as input data. Three types of fuel are irradiated in the reactor, each differs from the other in terms of the amount of Uranium compared to the total weight. Each fuel are irradiated for 365 days with 50 days time step. We obtain results on the total radioactivity of the fuel, the composition of activated materials, composition of fission products and the photon spectrum of the burned fuel. We investigate the differences of results using BWR and PWR library for ORIGEN. Finally, we compare the composition of major nuclides after 1 year irradiation of both ORIGEN library with results from WIMS. We found only minor disagreements between the yields of PWR and BWR libraries. In comparison with WIMS, the errors are a little bit more pronounced. To overcome this errors, the irradiation power used in ORIGEN could be increased a little, so that the differences in the yield of ORIGEN and WIMS could be reduced. A more permanent solution is to use a different code altogether to simulate burnup such as DRAGON and ORIGEN-S. The result of this study are essential for the design of radiation shielding from the fuel.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 2, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.N. [eds.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains abstracts from research conducted at the national synchrotron light source. (LSP)

  17. A Software System for Modeling and Controlling Accelerator Physics Parameters at the Advanced Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schachinger, L.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Controlling Accelerator Physics Parameters at theLight Source for accelerator physics studies and accelerator

  18. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Annette (ed.)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

  19. Surface-electrode ion trap with integrated light source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tony Hyun

    An atomic ion is trapped at the tip of a single-mode optical fiber in a cryogenic (8 K) surface-electrode ion trap. The fiber serves as an integrated source of laser light, which drives the quadrupolequbit transition of ...

  20. October 1988 SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES IN THE LIGHT SOURCE STORAGE RING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    LS-86 T. K. Khoe October 1988 SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES IN THE LIGHT SOURCE STORAGE RING superconducting cavities. Several laboratories (CERN, KEK, DESY) are making definite plans to use them the problem of multipactoring. The main problems of using superconducting cavities in "high current" storage

  1. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  2. ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE DIVISION FY2008 SELF-ASSESSMENT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    ....................................................................3 E4. Division participates in pollution prevention, energy conservation, recycling, and wasteADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE DIVISION FY2008 SELF-ASSESSMENT REPORT November 7, 2008 Prepared by to confined space, energized electrical work); waste management criteria (SAAs, waste sampling, NCARs

  3. The light-emitting diode (LED) is an fairly new kind of light source found currently in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The light-emitting diode (LED) is an fairly new kind of light source found currently in only a few applications, such as traffic lights and exit signs. As a relatively untested technology, luminaire this technology an ideal replacement for less efficient incandescent light sources, particularly in applications

  4. Improving the Efficiency of Solid State Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joanna McKittrick

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This proposal addresses the national need to develop a high efficiency light source for general illumination applications. The goal is to perform research that would lead to the fabrication of a unique solid state, white-emitting light source. This source is based on an InGaN/GaN UV-emitting chip that activates a luminescent material (phosphor) to produce white light. White-light LEDs are commercially available which use UV from a GaN chip to excite a phosphor suspended in epoxy around the chip. Currently, these devices are relatively inefficient. This research will target one technical barrier that presently limits the efficiency of GaN based devices. Improvements in efficiencies will be achieved by improving the internal conversion efficiency of the LED die, by improving the coupling between the die and phosphor(s) to reduce losses at the surfaces, and by selecting phosphors to maximize the emissions from the LEDs in conversion to white light. The UCSD research team proposes for this project to develop new phosphors that have high quantum efficiencies that can be activated by the UV-blue (360-410 nm) light emitted by the GaN device. The main goal for the UCSD team was to develop new phosphor materials with a very specific property: phosphors that could be excited at long UV-wavelengths ({lambda}=350-410 nm). The photoluminescence of these new phosphors must be activated with photons emitted from GaN based dies. The GaN diodes can be designed to emit UV-light in the same range ({lambda}=350-410 nm). A second objective, which is also very important, is to search for alternate methods to fabricate these phosphors with special emphasis in saving energy and time and reduce pollution.

  5. LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. The LCLS's highly focused beam, which arrives in staccato bursts one-rays are scientists' best tool for probing matter on the atomic scale, and the LCLS is an x-ray source unlike any before. Shining a billion times brighter than previous X-ray sources, the LCLS probes matter in new ways

  6. The importance of 56Ni in shaping the light curves of type II supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakar, Ehud; Katz, Boaz

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What intrinsic properties shape the light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe)? To address this question we derive observational measures that are robust (i.e., insensitive to detailed radiative transfer) and constrain the contribution from 56Ni, as well as a combination of the ejecta mass, progenitor radius, and explosion energy. By applying our methods to a sample of type II SNe from the literature we find that 56Ni contribution is often significant. It is typically the source of about 20% of the radiated energy during the photospheric phase, and in extreme cases it even dominates. We find that the 56Ni relative contribution is anti-correlated with the luminosity decline rate, while it is not significantly correlated with other properties of the light curve. When added to other clues, this in turn suggests that the flat plateaus often observed in type II SNe are not a generic feature of the cooling envelope emission, and that without 56Ni many of the SNe that are classified as II-P would have shown a decline ...

  7. Efficiency and stray light measurements and calculations of diffraction gratings for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, W.R.; Mossessian, D. (Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Gullikson, E. (Materials Sciences Division, Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Heimann, P. (Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-cooled gratings manufactured for spherical grating monochromators of the Advanced Light Source beamlines 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 were measured with the laser plasma source and reflectometer in the Center for X-ray Optics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The square-wave gratings are ion milled into the polished electroless nickel surface after patterning by holographic photolithography. Absolute efficiency data are compared with exact electromagnetic theory calculation. Interorder stray light and groove depths can be estimated from the measurements.

  8. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowell, David H; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL). In addition to many other stringent requirements, the LCLS XFEL requires extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. This paper describes the analysis and design improvements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA s-band gun leading to achievement of the LCLS performance goals.

  9. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; /SLAC; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Harkay, K.; /Argonne; Hernandez-Garcia; /Jefferson Lab; Legg, R.; /Wisconsin U., SRC; Padmore, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; /Brookhaven; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  10. Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choong, Vi-En (Carlsbad, CA)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batchelor, K. (ed.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given.

  12. Single heterostructure lasers: a picosecond light pulse source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunes, F.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we suggest a new use for single heterostructure semiconductor lasers as a source of high power pulses of coherent light with halfwidths of the order of 10 psec, repetition rates up to hundreds of hertz and tunable photon energy output. Our suggestion is based on the behavior shown by single heterostructure lasers at the Q-switching regime of operation when they exhibit the properties mentioned above.

  13. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  14. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore »laser sources.« less

  15. Boron-Containing Red Light-Emitting Phosphors And Light Sources Incorporating The Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Manivannan, Venkatesan (Clifton Park, NY)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A boron-containing phosphor comprises a material having a formula of AD1-xEuxB9O16, wherein A is an element selected from the group consisting of Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, and combinations thereof; D is at least an element selected from the group consisting of rare-earth metals other than europium; and x is in the range from about 0.005 to about 0.5. The phosphor is used in a blend with other phosphors in a light source for generating visible light with a high color rendering index.

  16. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  17. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  18. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duris, J. P.; Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  19. Refrigeration options for the Advanced Light Source Superbend Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Hoyer, E.H.; Schlueter, R.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1.9 GeV Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produces photons with a critical energy of about 3.1 kev at each of its thirty-six 1.3 T gradient bending magnets. It is proposed that at three locations around the ring the conventional gradient bending magnets be replaced with superconducting bending magnets with a maximum field of 5.6 T. At the point where the photons are extracted, their critical energy will be about 12 keV. In the beam lines where the SuperBend superconducting magnets are installed, the X ray brightness at 20 keV will be increased over two orders of magnitude. This report describes three different refrigeration options for cooling the three SuperBend dipoles. The cooling options include: (1) liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryogen cooling using stored liquids, (2) a central helium refrigerator (capacity 70 to 100 W) cooling all of the SuperBend magnets, (3) a Gifford McMahon (GM) cryocooler on each of the dipoles. This paper describes the technical and economic reasons for selecting a small GM cryocooler as the method for cooling the SuperBend dipoles on the LBNL Advanced Light Source.

  20. LEVIS ion source and beam characterization on PBFA-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renk, T.J.; Tisone, G.C.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Johnson, D.J.; Pointon, T.D.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the continuing development of the LEVIS (Laser Evaporation Ion Source) lithium active ion source for the 15-cm radial focussing ion diode on PBFA-11. We found previously that DC-heating of the anode surface to 150{degrees}C maximum for 5 hours resulted in a pure lithium beam. This paper discusses the characterization of LEVIS source uniformity by Faraday cup arrays and multiple lines of sight for visible light spectroscopy. These diagnostics give some evidence of nonuniformity in both A-K gap electric fields and ion current density. Despite this, however, the measured focal spot size appears smaller than with a passive LiF source operated in the same magnetic field topology. Experiments using a curved anode for vertical beam focussing show reduced ion beam turn-on delay by 5 ns by altering the magnetic field topology as well as anode curvature. Another 3--5 ns reduction was achieved by switching from a passive LiF to the active LEVIS source.

  1. Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes: a promising molecular design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intramolecular excimer emission as a blue light source in fluorescent organic light emitting diodes Light Emitting Diode (OLED), intermolecular p­p interactions should be usually suppressed to avoid any Emitting Diodes (SMOLEDs) is almost absent from the literature. In this work, three aryl-substituted Di

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .............................................................................15 Energy Recovery Linac (ERL); Beamlines Beyond the Building Envelope; General Facility...........................................................................................20 5.8 Radiological Characteristics

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and no reportable safety incident in June. Construction of the ring building and central chilled water plant production components such as vacuum chambers, girders, BPM and power supply parts, injector transfer lines of the accelerator systems. Schedule floats for key elements in the accelerator systems are being closely monitored

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Mar 29 Science Advisory Committee (SAC) meeting Apr 4­5 Earned Value Management System (EVMS) training% complete with 31% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go. The DOE Independent activities, management of the construction site and site access process have been further strengthened

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Advisory Committee (SAC) meeting Apr 4­5 Earned Value Management System (EVMS) training Apr 13­14 Trends, with over 32% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go. The cumulative cost

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    EVENTS 2012 Installation Retreat Mar 13 Science Advisory Committee (SAC) Mar 15­16 Earned Value, the project was 72% complete with over 36% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining Budget Management System (EVMS) training Mar 20­21 Final Design Review (FDR) meetings, IXS and CSX Hutches Mar 20

  7. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Commissioning Safety Assessment Document and Accelerator Safety Envelope have been completed and submitted for the linac, booster, RF transmitter, and damping wigglers continue to progress on schedule. The Linac

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory The National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and neutron facilities, the power of the world's finest experts and facilities for fabricating and government institutions.Their myriad research programs pro- duce about 900 publications per year, with more by researchers to explain how a class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses ­ the electrical activity

  9. Project Progress Report National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and released are the tungsten blade clamp design on all Day 1 slits, drift pipe support assembly, drift pipe of the storage ring (SR) and integrated testing. The monthly SPI for Accelerator Systems in September was 2

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    continued to maintain satisfactory cost and schedule performance with cumulative cost and schedule indices is on budget and on schedule and activities continue to wind down. Monthly schedule performance for accelerator based on thorough analysis, and a number of weaknesses in current designs are being addressed. Hutch

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Project continued to maintain satisfactory cost and schedule performance with cumulative cost and schedule activities and conventional facilities project staff continue to wind down as the overall conventional for booster and storage ring are making excellent progress and enhanced radiation shielding analysis

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Performance Index (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1 cost and schedule performance, completing 65% of the project by the end of October with about 32 the current status of the conventional construction, updated magnet production and accelerator installation

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    to maintain satisfactory cost and schedule performance. The cumulative Schedule Perform- ance Index (SPI) improved to 0.97 from 0.96 in June and the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1.02. The current month SPI is 1.17, due to excellent progress in the ring building and LOB construction, and improvements

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1 and management reserve for the remaining Budget At Completion (BAC). The cumulative Schedule Performance Index.01. Construction of the ring building continues with beneficial occupancy for pentant 5, the last section

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Performance Index (SPI) for the overall project is 0.96; the cumulative Cost Performance Index (CPI) is 1.00. Construction of the ring building continues its excellent progress with beneficial occupancy for pentant 4 of the ring building occurring in December and rapid progress in construction of all five lab­office buildings

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .95 in previous month while the cumulative cost index remaining at 0.95. The Project was 86% complete with 48 excellent progress in January with the current month schedule performance index (SPI) for overall project and concurred at the DOE mini-review held in December 2012. Conventional construction activities continue

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    . The cumulative schedule index is 0.97 and the cumulative cost index is 1.02, both well within the acceptable. The project is 48% complete with 30% of contingency and management reserve for the remaining cost to go range. The current-month schedule variance is negative due to conventional construction being slowed

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    progress with the current month schedule performance index (SPI) for the overall project at 1.39 (+$2.1M). The cumulative cost and schedule indices for the overall project are 0.99 and 0.96. The project was 85% (88 construction activities are nearly complete, while work to address punchlist items continues. Proposals

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    with conventional construction, the monthly schedule perfor- mance index for the overall project was 0 progress in August, maintaining its satisfactory cost and schedule performance with cumulative cost and management reserve for the remaining Estimate at Completion. Conventional construction continued to wind down

  20. Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Neil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceElectron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The proposed facil- ity

  1. Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammer, E.E.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

  2. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  3. An integrated source of broadband quadrature squeezed light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, Ulrich B; Andersen, Ulrik L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated silicon nitride resonator is proposed as an ultra-compact source of bright single-mode quadrature squeezed light at 850 nm. Optical properties of the device are investigated and tailored through numerical simulations, with particular attention paid to loss associated with interfacing the device. An asymmetric double layer stack waveguide geometry with inverse vertical tapers is proposed for efficient and robust fibre-chip coupling, yielding a simulated total loss of -0.75 dB/facet. We assess the feasibility of the device through a full quantum noise analysis and derive the output squeezing spectrum for intra-cavity pump self-phase modulation. Subject to standard material loss and detection efficiencies, we find that the device holds promises for generating substantial quantum noise squeezing over a bandwidth exceeding 1 GHz. In the low-propagation loss regime, approximately -7 dB squeezing is predicted for a pump power of only 50 mW.

  4. Background sources and masks for Mark II detector at PEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadyk, J.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shielding masks currently at use in several of the current experiments at PEP are the result of an early organized effort to understand the sources of particle background expected at PEP, followed by the evolution of the conceptual designs into actual hardware. The degree and kind of background particle loading which could be tolerated was expected to differ significantly among the different experiments, and several designs emerged from the common study. Qualitatively, the types of radiations studied were, Synchrotron Radiation (SR), Beam Gas Bremsstrahlung (BGB), and, to a limited extent others, e.g., Electroproduction (EP). Calculations will be given of predicted occupancies in the pipe counter and other sensitive elements at small radius, since these will be most susceptible to the SR and BGB backgrounds. The calculations presented in this note are specific to the Mark II detector. Some general statements will be made first about the character of each of the various types of backgrounds considered, then some detailed calculations made for application to the Mark II detector.

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the quality and uniformity of operations at the Department of Energy`s facilities, the DOE issued Order 5480.19 ``Conduct of Operations Requirements at DOE facilities.`` This order recognizes that the success of a facilities mission critically depends upon a high level of performance by its personnel and equipment. This performance can be severely impaired if the facility`s Conduct of Operations pays inadequate attention to issues of organization, safety, health, and the environment. These guidelines are Brookhaven National Laboratory`s and the National Synchrotron Light Source`s acknowledgement of the principles of Conduct of Operations and the response to DOE Order 5480.19. These guidelines cover the following areas: (1) operations organization and administration; (2) shift routines and operating practices; (3) control area activities; (4) communications; (5) control of on-shift training; (6) investigation of abnormal events; (7) notifications; (8) control of equipment and system studies; (9) lockouts and tagouts; (10) independent verification; (11) log-keeping; (12) operations turnover; (13) operations aspects of facility process control (14) required reading; (15) timely orders to operators; (16) operations procedures; (17) operator aid posting; and (18) equipment sizing and labeling.

  6. Advanced Photon Source (APS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  7. Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Energy Recovered Light Source Technology at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  8. Final Report, Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook University

    2014-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-antimonide cathodes b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns and copper RF photoguns

  9. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  10. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Lunt, D.L.J. [Tucson Optical Research Corp., AZ (United States)

    1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously.

  11. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  12. Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

  13. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Photonic Crystal Light Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) is maximizing the efficiency of a white LED by enhancing the external quantum efficiency using photonic crystals to extract light that would normally be confined in a conventional structure. Ultimate efficiency can only be achieved by looking at the internal structure of light. To do this, UCSB is focusing on maximizing the light extraction efficiency and total light output from light engines driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based LEDs. The challenge is to engineer large overlap (interaction) between modes and photonic crystals. The project is focused on achieving high extraction efficiency in LEDs, controlled directionality of emitted light, integrated design of vertical device structure, and nanoscale patterning of lateral structure.

  14. Polymer and small molecule based hybrid light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choong, Vi-En (Carlsbad, CA); Choulis, Stelios (Nuremberg, DE); Krummacher, Benjamin Claus (Regensburg, DE); Mathai, Mathew (Monroeville, PA); So, Franky (Gainesville, FL)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic electroluminescent device, includes: a substrate; a hole-injecting electrode (anode) coated over the substrate; a hole injection layer coated over the anode; a hole transporting layer coated over the hole injection layer; a polymer based light emitting layer, coated over the hole transporting layer; a small molecule based light emitting layer, thermally evaporated over the polymer based light emitting layer; and an electron-injecting electrode (cathode) deposited over the electroluminescent polymer layer.

  15. spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    spectroscopic techniques A Multi-Source Portable Light Emitting Diode Spectrofluorometer SAFWAN only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed emitting diodes; LEDs; Animal forage; Excitation-emission matrices; EEM. INTRODUCTION Movement of chemical

  16. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  17. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

  18. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  19. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

  20. A narrow-band speckle-free light source via random Raman lasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokr, Brett H; Bixler, Joel N; Dyer, Phillip N; Noojin, Gary D; Redding, Brandon; Thomas, Robert J; Rockwell, Benjamin A; Cao, Hui; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, no light source exists which is both narrow-band and speckle-free with sufficient brightness for full-field imaging applications. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are excellent spatially incoherent sources, but are tens of nanometers broad. Lasers on the other hand can produce very narrow-band light, but suffer from high spatial coherence which leads to speckle patterns which distort the image. Here we propose the use of random Raman laser emission as a new kind of light source capable of providing short-pulsed narrow-band speckle-free illumination for imaging applications.

  1. Solar Influences Light from the Sun is the largest source of energy for Earth's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Solar Influences Light from the Sun is the largest source of energy for Earth's atmosphere. The Solar Influences group at LASP studies the light from the Sun and how it interacts with the Earth) · How and why light from the Sun varies in time from seconds to months to years to centuries · How solar

  2. Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip G. Adamo,1 K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2 metal-dielectric structure creates a new type of tunable, nanoscale radiation source--a ``light well''. In the reported demonstration, tunable light is generated at an intensity of $200 W=cm2 as electrons with energies

  3. Microsoft Word - Science and Technology of Future Light Sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ultrafast radiation sources covering the entire spectral area from THz to x-rays to gamma ray beams that are intrinsically synchronized to a laser pulse. A.6 Other Sources...

  4. PHOTOINJECTED ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC UPGRADE FOR THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BABZIEN,M.; BLUM,E.; CASEY,W.; CHANG,X.; GRAVES,W.; HASTINGS,J.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,E.; KAO,C.C.; KRAMER,S.; KRINSKY,S.; MORTAZAVI,P.; MURPHY,J.; OZAKI,S.; PJEROV,S.; PODOBEDOV,B.; RAKOWSKY,G.; ROSE,J.; SHAFTAN,T.; SHEEHY,B.; SIDDONS,D.; SMEDLEY,J.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; TOWNE,N.; WANG,J.M.; WANG,X.; WU,J.; YAKIMENKO,V.; YU,L.H.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a major paradigm shift in the approach to the production of synchrotron radiation This change will considerably improve the scientific capabilities of synchrotron light sources. We introduce plans for an upgrade of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This upgrade will be based on the Photoinjected Energy Recovering Linac (PERL). This machine emerges from the union of two technologies, the laser-photocathode RF gun (photoinjector) and superconducting linear accelerators with beam energy recovery (Energy Recovering Linac). The upgrade will bring the NSLS users many new insertion device beam lines, brightness greater than 3rd generation lightsource's and ultra-short pulse capabilities, not possible with storage ring light sources.

  5. Science at the Speed of Light: Advanced Photon Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays.

  6. High-Efficiency Nitride-Base Photonic Crystal Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Speck; Evelyn Hu; Claude Weisbuch; Yong-Seok Choi; Kelly McGroddy; Gregor Koblmuller; Elison Matioli; Elizabeth Rangel; Fabian Rol; Dobri Simeonov

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research activities performed in the framework of this project represent a major breakthrough in the demonstration of Photonic Crystals (PhC) as a competitive technology for LEDs with high light extraction efficiency. The goals of the project were to explore the viable approaches to manufacturability of PhC LEDS through proven standard industrial processes, establish the limits of light extraction by various concepts of PhC LEDs, and determine the possible advantages of PhC LEDs over current and forthcoming LED extraction concepts. We have developed three very different geometries for PhC light extraction in LEDs. In addition, we have demonstrated reliable methods for their in-depth analysis allowing the extraction of important parameters such as light extraction efficiency, modal extraction length, directionality, internal and external quantum efficiency. The information gained allows better understanding of the physical processes and the effect of the design parameters on the light directionality and extraction efficiency. As a result, we produced LEDs with controllable emission directionality and a state of the art extraction efficiency that goes up to 94%. Those devices are based on embedded air-gap PhC - a novel technology concept developed in the framework of this project. They rely on a simple and planar fabrication process that is very interesting for industrial implementation due to its robustness and scalability. In fact, besides the additional patterning and regrowth steps, the process is identical as that for standard industrially used p-side-up LEDs. The final devices exhibit the same good electrical characteristics and high process yield as a series of test standard LEDs obtained in comparable conditions. Finally, the technology of embedded air-gap patterns (PhC) has significant potential in other related fields such as: increasing the optical mode interaction with the active region in semiconductor lasers; increasing the coupling of the incident light into the active region of solar cells; increasing the efficiency of the phosphorous light conversion in white light LEDs etc. In addition to the technology of embedded PhC LEDs, we demonstrate a technique for improvement of the light extraction and emission directionality for existing flip-chip microcavity (thin) LEDs by introducing PhC grating into the top n-contact. Although, the performances of these devices in terms of increase of the extraction efficiency are not significantly superior compared to those obtained by other techniques like surface roughening, the use of PhC offers some significant advantages such as improved and controllable emission directionality and a process that is directly applicable to any material system. The PhC microcavity LEDs have also potential for industrial implementation as the fabrication process has only minor differences to that already used for flip-chip thin LEDs. Finally, we have demonstrated that achieving good electrical properties and high fabrication yield for these devices is straightforward.

  7. Recent advances in reflective optics for EUV/x-ray light sources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent advances in reflective optics for EUVx-ray light sources Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Regina Soufli, LLNL Program...

  8. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  9. 6 GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34 October 23, 1985 YCAVR To maintain uniformity in estimating the cost requirements of the various components of the 6 GeV...

  10. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Olivares E, Felipe [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Schulze, Steve [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifícia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Bolt, Luis [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Folatelli, Gastón [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Krzemi?ski, Wojtek, E-mail: janderso@eso.org [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  11. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  12. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  13. Light curve of a source orbiting around a black hole: A fitting-formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, analytical fitting-formula for a photometric light curve of a source of light orbiting around a black hole is presented. The formula is applicable for sources on a circular orbit with radius smaller than 45 gravitational radii from the black hole. This range of radii requires gravitational focusation of light rays and the Doppler effect to be taken into account with care. The fitting-formula is therefore useful for modelling the X-ray variability of inner regions in active galactic nuclei.

  14. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamil, Roy A. (Tijeras, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott (Albuquerque, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  15. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons, and spins, x-rays have proved especially valuable. Future advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation will extend the power of x-ray methods to reach greater spatial resolution, increased sensitivity, and unexplored temporal domains. The purpose of this document is threefold: (1) summarize scientific opportunities that are beyond the reach of today's x-ray sources and instrumentation; (2) summarize the requirements for advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation needed to realize these scientific opportunities, as well as potential methods of achieving them; and (3) outline the R&D required to establish the technical feasibility of these advanced x-ray sources and instrumentation.

  16. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  17. Semiconductor ridge microcavity source of quantum light at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Caillet; A. Orieux; A. Lemaitre; P. Filloux; I. Favero; G. Leo; S. Ducci

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate an integrated semiconductor ridge microcavity source of counterpropagating twin photons at room temperature in the telecom range. Based on parametric down conversion with a counterpropagating phase-matching, pump photons generate photon pairs with an efficiency of about 10^(-11) and a spectral linewidth of 0.3 nm for a 1mm long sample. The indistiguishability of the photons of the pair are measured via a two-photon interference experiment showing a visibility of 85%. This work opens a route towards new guided-wave semiconductor quantum devices.

  18. Intrinsic Lorentz violation in Doppler effect from a moving point light source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein's Doppler formula is not applicable when a moving point light source is close enough to the observer; for example, it may break down or cannot specify a determinate value when the point source and the observer overlap. In this paper, Doppler effect for a moving point light source is analyzed, and it is found that the principle of relativity allows the existence of intrinsic Lorentz violation. A conceptual scheme to experimentally test the point-source Doppler effect is proposed, and such a test could lead to an unexpected result that the frequency of a photon may change during propagation, which questions the constancy of Planck constant since the energy conservation in Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis must hold.

  19. Q2237+0305 source structure and dimensions from light curves simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Vakulik; R. E. Schild; G. V. Smirnov; V. N. Dudinov; V. S. Tsvetkova

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming a two-component quasar structure model consisting of a central compact source and an extended outer feature, we produce microlensing simulations for a population of star-like objects in the lens galaxy. Such a model is a simplified version of that adopted to explain the brightness variations observed in Q0957 (Schild & Vakulik 2003). The microlensing light curves generated for a range of source parameters were compared to the light curves obtained in the framework of the OGLE program. With a large number of trials we built, in the domain of the source structure parameters, probability distributions to find "good" realizations of light curves. The values of the source parameters which provide the maximum of the joint probability distribution calculated for all the image components, have been accepted as estimates for the source structure parameters. The results favour the two-component model of the quasar brightness structure over a single compact central source model, and in general the simulations confirm the Schild-Vakulik model that previously described successfully the microlensing and other properties of Q0957. Adopting 3300 km/s for the transverse velocity of the source, the effective size of the central source was determined to be about 2x10^15 cm, and Epsilon =2 was obtained for the ratio of the integral luminosity of the outer feature to that of the central source.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar EnergyKambaraorRENEWABLE MobileResources »

  1. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  2. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  3. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  4. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  5. Photon Sciences | NSLS-II Beamline Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BNL People National Synchrotron Light Source II Home About NSLS-II Overview Storage Ring Parameters NSLS: A History Strategic Plan (PDF) For Users & Staff PASS User Guide Proposal...

  6. The measurement and analysis of the magnetic field of a synchrotron light source magnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graf, Udo Werner

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis a unique system is used to measure the magnetic field of a superconducting synchrotron light source magnet. The magnet measured is a superferric dipole C-magnet designed to produce a magnetic field up to 3 Tesla in magnitude. Its...

  7. To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Rendering Michael Goesele , Xavier Granier , Wolfgang Heidrich , Hans-Peter Seidel 1) MPI Informatik 2) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering (from left to right and efficient rendering algorithms to deal with them. In this paper, we describe a processing pipeline

  8. To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Rendering Michael Goesele1) , Xavier Granier2) , Wolfgang Heidrich2) , Hans-Peter Seidel1) 1) MPI Informatik 2) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering and efficient rendering algorithms to deal with them. In this paper, we describe a processing pipeline

  9. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z. [ed.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  10. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel 2000 (Switzerland); Shea, H. [Microsystems for Space Technologies Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniature (light sources. Here, we report on the demonstration of optical pumping in a microfabricated alkali vapor resonance cell using (1) a microfabricated Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40?mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (?2?cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy of Laser Irradiated Dental Hard Tissues using the Advanced Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the laser ablation/drilling process and may lead to a reduction in the ablation rate and efficiencyInfrared Spectroscopy of Laser Irradiated Dental Hard Tissues using the Advanced Light Source D Dental Sciences, San Francisco, CA 94143-0758, USA INTRODUCTION Infrared lasers are ideally suited

  12. Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Ferguson

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

  13. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS capabilities and much-needed beam time for the life sciences, soft condensed matter physics, and nanoscience communities. Looking toward the future, a significant step has been made in expanding the user base and diversifying the work force by holding the first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Professors' Workshop. The workshop, which brought 11 professors to the NSLS to learn how to become successful synchrotron users, concluded with the formation of an HBCU User Consortium. Finally, significant contributions were made in optics and detector development to enhance the utilization of the NSLS and address the challenges of NSLS-II. In particular, x-ray detectors developed by the NSLS Detector Section have been adopted by an increasing number of research programs both at the NSLS and at light sources around the world, speeding up measurement times by orders of magnitude and making completely new experiments feasible. Significant advances in focusing and high-energy resolution optics have also been made this year.

  14. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LBNL; Roy, P.K.; Greenway, W.; Kwan, J.W.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter with intense ion beams, low mass ions, such as lithium, have an energy loss peak (dE/dx) at a suitable kinetic energy. The Heavy Ion Fusion Sciences (HIFS) program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will carry out warm dense matter experiments using Li{sup +} ion beam with energy 1.2-4 MeV in order to achieve uniform heating up to 0.1-1 eV. The accelerator physics design of Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) has a pulse length at the ion source of about 0.5 {micro}s. Thus for producing 50 nC of beam charge, the required beam current is about 100 mA. Focusability requires a normalized (edge) emittance {approx}2 {pi}-mm-mrad. Here, lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, of {beta}-eucryptite, are being studied within the scope of NDCX-II construction. Several small (0.64 cm diameter) lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, on 70%-80% porous tungsten substrate, were operated in a pulsed mode. The distance between the source surface and the mid-plane of the extraction electrode (1 cm diameter aperture) was 1.48 cm. The source surface temperature was at 1220 C to 1300 C. A 5-6 {micro}s long beam pulsed was recorded by a Faraday cup (+300 V on the collector plate and -300 V on the suppressor ring). Figure 1 shows measured beam current density (J) vs. V{sup 3/2}. A space-charge limited beam density of {approx}1 mA/cm{sup 2} was measured at 1275 C temperature, after allowing a conditioning time of about {approx} 12 hours. Maximum emission limited beam current density of {ge} 1.8mA/cm{sup 2} was recorded at 1300 C with 10-kV extractions. Figure 2 shows the lifetime of two typical sources with space-charge limited beam current emission at a lower extraction voltage (1.75 kV) and at temperature of 1265 {+-} 7 C. These data demonstrate a constant, space-charge limited beam current for 20-50 hours. The lifetime of a source is determined by the loss of lithium from the alumino-silicate material either as ions or as neutral atoms. Our measurements suggest that for the low duty factor ({approx}10{sup -8}) required for NDCX-II, the lifetime of an emitter depends mostly on the duration that the emitter spends at elevated temperature, that is, at {ge} 1250 C. At this temperature, lithium loss is due mostly to neutral loss (not charged ion extraction). Extension of the lifetime of the source may be possible by lowering the temperature between beam pulses, when the idling time is sufficiently long between shots. The NDCX-II design seeks to operate the ion source at the maximum current density without running into heat management and lifetime problems. In preparation to fabricate a large (10.9 cm in diameter) source for the NDCXII experiment, recently a 7.6 cm diameter source has been fabricated. The method of fabrication of this larger source is similar to that of fabrication of a 6.3mm diameter source, except a longer furnace heating time was used due to mass differences. NDCX-II construction is in progress. Progress of lithium source study for NDCX-II is available in literature.

  15. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  16. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  17. at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is transforming the face of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center LCLS #12;LCLS The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS. A New Kind of Tool The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will produce ultra-fast pulses of X, and imaging biological materials that resist crystallization. The LCLS will create X-rays that can "see" atoms

  18. Development of an electron gun for an ERL based light source in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimori, N.; Nagai, R.; Iijima, H.; Hajima, R. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Honda, Y.; Muto, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kuriki, M. [Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Yamamoto, M.; Okumi, S.; Nakanishi, T. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a prototype DC photoemission electron gun for a future energy recovery linac (ERL) based light source in Japan. The prototype gun is operated at up to 250 kV and is designed to deliver up to 50 mA beam current. A diagnostic beam line for emittance and bunch length measurements has been constructed. We have also designed a new 500 kV DC gun which is capable of producing up to 10 mA electron current with emittance lower than 1 mm-mrad. The high voltage terminal will be isolated by ten ceramics stacked in series. The new gun will satisfy performance required as an injector for the compact ERL, which will be constructed at KEK site as a prototype of the future ERL light source.

  19. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M. (eds.)

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS.

  20. Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

  1. Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, George A. (Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA); Molton, Peter M. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

  2. Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution with practical light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curty, Marcos [ETSI Telecomunicacion, Department of Signal Theory and Communications, University of Vigo, Campus Universitario, E-36310 Vigo (Pontevedra) (Spain); Ma, Xiongfeng [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, N2L 3G1 Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Qi, Bing [Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, Department of Physics and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, M5S 3G4 Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moroder, Tobias [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, N2L 3G1 Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Quantum Information Theory Group, Institute of Theoretical Physics I, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Decoy states have been proven to be a very useful method for significantly enhancing the performance of quantum key distribution systems with practical light sources. Although active modulation of the intensity of the laser pulses is an effective way of preparing decoy states in principle, in practice passive preparation might be desirable in some scenarios. Typical passive schemes involve parametric down-conversion. More recently, it has been shown that phase-randomized weak coherent pulses (WCP) can also be used for the same purpose [M. Curty et al., Opt. Lett. 34, 3238 (2009).] This proposal requires only linear optics together with a simple threshold photon detector, which shows the practical feasibility of the method. Most importantly, the resulting secret key rate is comparable to the one delivered by an active decoy-state setup with an infinite number of decoy settings. In this article we extend these results, now showing specifically the analysis for other practical scenarios with different light sources and photodetectors. In particular, we consider sources emitting thermal states, phase-randomized WCP, and strong coherent light in combination with several types of photodetectors, like, for instance, threshold photon detectors, photon number resolving detectors, and classical photodetectors. Our analysis includes as well the effect that detection inefficiencies and noise in the form of dark counts shown by current threshold detectors might have on the final secret key rate. Moreover, we provide estimations on the effects that statistical fluctuations due to a finite data size can have in practical implementations.

  3. On the interaction of FR-II radio sources with the intracluster medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Alexander

    2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the expansion of powerful FR-II radio sources into a cluster environment is discussed. The analysis considers both the thermal and temporal evolution of the ICM which has passed through the bow shock of the radio source and the effect of this swept-up gas on the dynamics of the radio source itself. The final state of the swept-up ICM is critcally dependent on the thermal conductivity of the gas. If the gas behind the bow shock expands adiabatically, and the source is expanding into a steeply falling atmosphere, then a narrow dense layer will form as the radio source lifts gas out of the cluster potential. This layer has a cooling time very much less than that of the gas just ahead of the radio source. This effect does not occur if the thermal conductivity of the gas is high, or if the cluster atmosphere is shallow. The swept-up gas also affects the dyamics of the radio source especially as it slows towards sub-sonic expansion. The preferential accumulation of the swept-up gas to the sides of the cocoon leads to the aspect ratio of the source increasing. Eventually the contact surface must become Rayleigh-Taylor unstable leading both to inflow of the swept-up ICM into the cavity created by the cocoon, but also substantial mixing of the cooler denser swept-up gas with the ambient ICM thereby creating a multi-phase ICM. The radio source is likely to have a marked effect on the cluster on timescales long compared to the age of the source.

  4. Robust CsBr/Cu Photocathodes for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, Juan R.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Liu, Zhi; Dowell, D.H.; Kirby, Robert E.; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC; Pease, Fabian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The linac coherent light source (LCLS), an x-ray free-electron laser project presently under construction at SLAC, uses a 2.856 GHz rf photocathode gun with a copper cathode for its electron source. While the copper cathode is performing well for the LCLS project, a cathode material with higher quantum efficiency would reduce the drive laser requirements and allow a greater range of operating conditions. Therefore a robust CsBr/Cu photocathode with greater than 50 times the quantum yield at 257 nm relative to the present LCLS copper cathode has been investigated. Preliminary experiments using a dedicated electron source development test stand at SLAC/SSRL are encouraging and are presented in this paper.

  5. On the efficiency of stochastic volume sources for the determination of light meson masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Endress; A. Jüttner; H. Wittig

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the efficiency of single timeslice stochastic sources for the calculation of light meson masses on the lattice as one varies the quark mass. Simulations are carried out with Nf = 2 flavours of non-perturbatively O(a) improved Wilson fermions for pion masses in the range of 450 - 760 MeV. Results for pseudoscalar and vector meson two-point correlation functions computed using stochastic as well as point sources are presented and compared. At fixed computational cost the stochastic approach reduces the variance considerably in the pseudoscalar channel for all simulated quark masses. The vector channel is more affected by the intrinsic stochastic noise. In order to obtain stable estimates of the statistical errors and a more pronounced plateau for the effective vector meson mass, a relatively large number of stochastic sources must be used.

  6. Implementation of a doubling cavity to produce a 423 nm light source for the excitation of Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashimaru, H.; Kitajima, T.; Hasegawa, S. [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For selective excitation of isotopes of Ca, a 423 nm narrow linewidth, continuous wave (CW) light source which corresponds to the S-P transition (4s{sup 21}S{sub 0}-4s4p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) is required. A solid state CW light source which generates 423 nm is difficult to commercially use. Therefore, we have developed a Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) system to obtain 423 nm lights from 846 nm lights by using a nonlinear optical crystal.

  7. EA-1321: Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of The National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to upgrade the facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron...

  8. National synchrotron light source annual report 1987: For the period of October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the reports and operational information of the National Synchrotron Light source facility for 1987. The reports are grouped mainly under VUV research and x-ray research. (LSP)

  9. Jitter Studies for a 2.4 GeV Light Source Accelerator Using LiTrack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Gregory E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S2E simulations on jitter for European XFEL project,”Jitter Studies for a 2.4 GeV Light Source Accelerator Usingpeak current, and energy chirp. Jitter in average energy is

  10. Philips Light Sources & Electronics is Developing an Efficient, Smaller, Cost-Effective Family of LED Drivers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Light Sources & Electronics is developing a new family of LED drivers that are more efficient and cost-effective as well as smaller in size than currently available drivers. The new drivers are switch-mode power supplies that are similar to today's drivers, but with an improved design. In addition, they have a different topology—boost plus LLC—for wattages of 40W and above, but they retain the commonly used flyback topology at lower wattages.

  11. Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

  12. Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; /SLAC; Sanami, T.; /SLAC /KEK, Tsukuba; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

  13. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J. [eds.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  14. Plasma studies on electron cyclotron resonance light ion source at CEA/Saclay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyckees, S.; Delferriere, O.; Duperrier, R.; Harrault, F.; Tuske, O. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SACM/LEDA, F-91191-Gif/Yvette (France)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By the 90s, the CEA has undertaken to develop the production of intense light ion beams from unconfined ECR plasma. Today, three sources for IPHI, SPIRAL2, and IFMIF projects (respectively, 100 mA of H{sup +}, 8 mA of D{sup +}, and 140 mA of D{sup +}) are installed at CEA/Saclay. In order to improve performances and decrease dimensions of these sources, it is necessary to better understand the mechanisms involved in the production and extraction of particles. As a consequence, theoretical and experimental studies are being carried out. We present a theoretical study based on SOLMAXP, a home-made particle-in-cell code. The aim is to investigate the possibility of reducing the plasma chamber size without loss of beam characteristics. This code has been validated by beam intensity measurements on a permanent magnet based source, producing a proton beam of 30 mA at 40 kV on the test bench BETSI. In order to reduce experimentally the dimensions of plasma chamber, a new source, named ALISES with variable plasma chamber volume, is under assembly.

  15. Soft X-ray Mirrors for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivovaroff, M J; Bionta, R M; Mccarville, T J; Soufli, R; Stefan, P M

    2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a 0.15-1.5 nm wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) being constructed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) by a multi-institution consortium, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). One of LLNL's responsibilities involves the design and construction of two grazing-incidence mirror systems whose primary intent is to reduce radiation levels in the experimental halls by separating the FEL beam from unwanted high-energy photons. This paper discusses one of these systems, the Soft X-ray Offset Mirror System (SOMS) that will operate in the wavelength range 0.62-1.5 nm (0.827-2.00 keV). The unusual properties of the FEL beam translate to stringent specifications in terms of stability, material choice and mirror properties. It also precludes using approaches previously developed for synchrotron light sources. This situation has led us to a unique mirror design, consisting of a reflective boron carbide layer deposited on a silicon substrate. In the first part of this paper, we discuss the basic system requirements for the SOMS and motivate the need for these novel reflective elements. In the second part of this paper, we discuss the development work we have performed, including simulation and experimental verification of the boron carbide coating properties, and the expected performance of the final system.

  16. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, Brian T.; /Notre Dame U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Jha, Saurabh W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kasen, Daniel; /UC, Santa Cruz; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble residuals in our sample.

  17. Accident source terms for Light-Water Nuclear Power Plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soffer, L.; Burson, S.B.; Ferrell, C.M.; Lee, R.Y.; Ridgely, J.N.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1962 tile US Atomic Energy Commission published TID-14844, ``Calculation of Distance Factors for Power and Test Reactors`` which specified a release of fission products from the core to the reactor containment for a postulated accident involving ``substantial meltdown of the core``. This ``source term``, tile basis for tile NRC`s Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4, has been used to determine compliance with tile NRC`s reactor site criteria, 10 CFR Part 100, and to evaluate other important plant performance requirements. During the past 30 years substantial additional information on fission product releases has been developed based on significant severe accident research. This document utilizes this research by providing more realistic estimates of the ``source term`` release into containment, in terms of timing, nuclide types, quantities and chemical form, given a severe core-melt accident. This revised ``source term`` is to be applied to the design of future light water reactors (LWRs). Current LWR licensees may voluntarily propose applications based upon it.

  18. Demonstration of simultaneous experiments using thin crystal multiplexing at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Y.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Barends, T. R. M.; Blank, V. D.; Botha, S.; Chollet, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Doak, R. B.; Glownia, J. M.; Koglin, J. M.; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiplexing of the Linac Coherent Light Source beam was demonstrated for hard X-rays by spectral division using a near-perfect diamond thin-crystal monochromator operating in the Bragg geometry. The wavefront and coherence properties of both the reflected and transmitted beams were well preserved, thus allowing simultaneous measurements at two separate instruments. In this report, the structure determination of a prototypical protein was performed using serial femtosecond crystallography simultaneously with a femtosecond time-resolved XANES studies of photoexcited spin transition dynamics in an iron spin-crossover system. The results of both experiments using the multiplexed beams are similar to those obtained separately, using amore »dedicated beam, with no significant differences in quality.« less

  19. Second user workshop on high-power lasers at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heimann, Phil; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The second international workshop on the physics enabled by the unique combination of high-power lasers with the world-class Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser beam was held in Stanford, CA, on October 7–8, 2014. The workshop was co-organized by UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratories. More than 120 scientists, including 40 students and postdoctoral scientists who are working in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, fusion research, and dynamic high-pressure science came together from North America, Europe, and Asia. The focus of the second workshop was on scientific highlights and the lessons learned from 16 newmore »experiments that were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument since the first workshop was held one year ago.« less

  20. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsch, Paul

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  1. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenholz, Elke; Belkacem, Ali; Cocke, Lew; Corlett, John; Falcone, Roger; Fischer, Peter; Fleming, Graham; Gessner, Oliver; Hasan, M. Zahid; Hussain, Zahid; Kevan, Steve; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Nelson, Keith; Neumark, Dan; Nilsson, Anders; Siegmann, Hans; Stocks, Malcolm; Schafer, Ken; Schoenlein, Robert; Spence, John; Weber, Thorsten

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past quarter century, light-source user facilities have transformed research in areas ranging from gas-phase chemical dynamics to materials characterization. The ever-improving capabilities of these facilities have revolutionized our ability to study the electronic structure and dynamics of atoms, molecules, and even the most complex new materials, to understand catalytic reactions, to visualize magnetic domains, and to solve protein structures. Yet these outstanding facilities still have limitations well understood by their thousands of users. Accordingly, over the past several years, many proposals and conceptual designs for"next-generation" x-ray light sources have been developed around the world. In order to survey the scientific problems that might be addressed specifically by those new light sources operating below a photon energy of about 3 keV and to identify the scientific requirements that should drive the design of such facilities, a workshop"Science for a New Class of Soft X-Ray Light Sources" was held in Berkeley in October 2007. From an analysisof the most compelling scientific questions that could be identified and the experimental requirements for answering them, we set out to define, without regard to the specific technologies upon which they might be based, the capabilities such light sources would have to deliver in order to dramatically advance the state of research in the areas represented in the programs of the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). This report is based on the workshop presentations and discussions.

  2. The LINAC Coherent Light Source and Radiological Issues During the Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is the world's first X-ray free electron laser (XFEL). Pulses of x-ray laser light from LCLS will be many orders of magnitude brighter and several orders of magnitude shorter than what can be produced by other x-ray sources available in the world. These characteristics will enable frontier new science in many areas. This paper describes the LCLS beam parameters and lay-out. The general radiological issues during commissioning are presented, such as radiation dose rates and integrated doses outside the enclosure. Also, specific radiological issues related to X-ray free electron lasers are discussed. XFEL with high peak power will burn through high-Z materials. The X-ray beam needs to be blocked by stoppers when the downstream areas are occupied. LCLS stoppers feature a piece of boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), 10 mm thick. B{sub 4}C is one of the best materials since it has a low absorption coefficient for X-rays and a high melting temperature. Theoretical calculations indicate that the unfocused fluence of the LCLS XFEL beam should be about one order of magnitude below the damage threshold for bulk B{sub 4}C, for 830 eV FEL radiation. However, these calculations have not been tested experimentally and cannot be validated until LCLS begins providing 830 eV XFEL pulses. This paper describes the test plan for using the initial LCLS radiation to evaluate the survivability of B{sub 4}C and reports the preliminary results. Another major issue for LCLS is the potential radiation damage to the LCLS undulator magnets during operation. TLD dosimeters were installed along the LCLS undulators for each period of two or three weeks. This paper reports the integrated doses along the undulators with and without XFEL generation.

  3. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Chandler, C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Churchwell, E. B. [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dougherty, S. M. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada)] [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gledhill, T. M. [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)] [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hindson, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jackson, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kurtz, S. E. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)] [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Marti, J., E-mail: C.R.Purcell@leeds.ac.uk [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, Edif. A3, E-23071 Jaen (Spain); and others

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  4. Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-Country Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with fluorescent lighting for off-grid applications in theProject includes an Off-Grid Lighting Technology Assessmentand the market success of off-grid lighting solutions for

  5. High voltage ignition of high pressure microwave powered UV light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, J.D.; Cekic, M.; Wood, C.H. [Fusion U.V. Curing Systems Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial microwave powered (electrodeless) light sources have been limited to quiescent pressures of {approximately}300 Torr of buffer gas and metal-halide fills. The predominant reason for such restrictions has been the inability to microwave ignite the plasma due to the collisionality of higher pressure fills and/or the electronegativity of halide bulb chemistries. Commercially interesting bulb fills require electric fields for ionization that are often large multiples of the breakdown voltage for air. Many auxiliary ignition methods are evaluated for efficiency and practicality before the choice of a high-voltage system with a retractable external electrode. The scheme utilizes a high voltage pulse power supply and a novel field emission source. Acting together they create localized condition of pressure reduction and high free electron density. This allows the normal microwave fields to drive this small region into avalanche, ignite the bulb, and heat the plasma to its operating point (T{sub e} {approx} 0.5 eV). This process is currently being used in a new generation of lamps, which are using multi-atmospheric excimer laser chemistries and pressure and constituent enhanced metal-halide systems. At the present time, production prototypes produce over 900 W of radiation in a 30 nm band, centered at 308 nm. Similarly, these prototypes when loaded with metal-halide bulb fills produce over 1 kW of radiation in 30 nm wide bands, centered about the wavelength of interest.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Light Curves in Gravitationally Lensed Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Minakov; V. G. Vakulik

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of macro-and microlensing on the spatial and temporal characteristics of images of remote sources, observed through the inner regions of lensing galaxies are discussed. A particular attention was given to the case, when microlenses, - stars, star-like or planetary bodies, - are situated near the critical curves of macrolenses, - galaxies, stellar clusters, etc. The investigation is of interest for the gravitational lens (GL) systems, where the lensed images are observed close to the critical curve of a macrolens. Annular, arched or confluent images should be regarded as an indication to such a proximity. Numerical simulation allowed to determine the structure of critical curves and caustics, formed by macro and microlenses, and to evaluate possible distortions, caused by microlenses for various locations with respect to the critical curve of a regular lens. The difference of our results from those obtained earlier with the standard (linearized) approach to describe the regular gravitational lens was shown to be the larger the closer to the critical curve the microlenses are situated. In addition to spatial redistributions in the visible images, complicated deformation of their light curves occurs in gravitational lensing of variable in time and extended sources. The magnitude of the temporal variations depend not only on the GL parameters (e.g., mass distribution), but on the parameters of the source as well, such as linear dimension of the emitting region, its location with respect to the critical curve, and the impulse duration. The analysis shows, that in this case GL acts as a filter, which passes slow temporal variations without degradations, and smoothes the rapid ones.

  7. FEMTOSECOND TIMING DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR NEXT GENERATION ACCELERATORS AND LIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Li-Jin [Idesta Quantum Electronics, LLC

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond Timing Distribution At LCLS Free-electron-lasers (FEL) have the capability of producing high photon flux from the IR to the hard x-ray wavelength range and to emit femtosecond and eventually even at-tosecond pulses. This makes them an ideal tool for fundamental as well as applied re-search. Timing precision at the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) between the x-ray FEL (XFEL) and ultrafast optical lasers is currently no better than 100 fs RMS. Ideally this precision should be much better and could be limited only by the x-ray pulse duration, which can be as short as a few femtoseconds. An increasing variety of science problems involving electron and nuclear dynamics in chemical and material systems will become accessible as the timing improves to a few femtoseconds. Advanced methods of electron beam conditioning or pulse injection could allow the FEL to achieve pulse durations less than one femtosecond. The objec-tive of the work described in this proposal is to set up an optical timing distribution sys-tem based on modelocked Erbium doped fiber lasers at LCLS facility to improve the timing precision in the facility and allow time stamping with a 10 fs precision. The primary commercial applications for optical timing distributions systems are seen in the worldwide accelerator facilities and next generation light sources community. It is reasonable to expect that at least three major XFELs will be built in the next decade. In addition there will be up to 10 smaller machines, such as FERMI in Italy and Maxlab in Sweden, plus the market for upgrading already existing facilities like Jefferson Lab. The total market is estimated to be on the order of a 100 Million US Dollars. The company owns the exclusive rights to the IP covering the technology enabling sub-10 fs synchronization systems. Testing this technology, which has set records in a lab environment, at LCLS, hence in a real world scenario, is an important corner stone of bringing the technology to market.

  8. Cryogenic refrigeration requirements for superconducting insertion devices in a light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.; Green, Michael A.

    2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses cryogenic cooling superconducting insertion devices for modern light sources. The introductory part of the report discusses the difference between wiggler and undulators and how the bore temperature may affect the performance of the magnets. The steps one would take to reduce the gap between the cold magnet pole are discussed. One section of the report is devoted to showing how one would calculate the heat that enters the device. Source of heat include, heat entering through the vacuum chamber, heating due to stray electrons and synchrotron radiation, heating due to image current on the bore, heat flow by conduction and radiation, and heat transfer into the cryostat through the magnet leads. A section of the report is devoted to cooling options such as small cryo-cooler and larger conventional helium refrigerators. This section contains a discussion as to when it is appropriate to use small coolers that do not have J-T circuits. Candidate small cryo-coolers are discussed in this section of the report. Cooling circuits for cooling with a conventional refrigerator are also discussed. A section of the report is devoted to vibration isolation and how this may affect how the cooling is attached to the device. Vibration isolation using straps is compared to vibration isolation using helium heat pipes. The vibration isolation of a conventional refrigeration system is also discussed. Finally, the cool down of an insertion device is discussed. The device can either be cooled down using liquid cryogenic nitrogen and liquid helium or by using the cooler used to keep the devices cold over the long haul.

  9. Stanford University Faculty Positions in Science related to use of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory We invite applications for faculty positions Light Source (LCLS). Applicants should at minimum hold an earned doctorate in a core science-ray capabilities of the LCLS. For example, this unique experimental facility provides new opportunities

  10. Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr-LiSrAIF6 laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr- LiSrAIF6 laser Franqois-switched operation at 10 kHz was intracavity frequency doubled by using a LiIOl crystal. The 230 ns tunable blue lasers emitting in the blue-green wavelength range are expected to be the key components for optical

  11. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tiedtke, K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Jastrow, U.; Jurani?, P.; Kreis, S.; Gerken, N.; Richter, M.; Arp, U.; Feng, Y.; Nordlund, D.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray opticalmore »elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.« less

  12. CITIUS: An infrared-extreme ultraviolet light source for fundamental and applied ultrafast science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazioli, C.; Gauthier, D.; Ivanov, R.; De Ninno, G. [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia) [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia); Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy)] [Italy; Callegari, C.; Spezzani, C. [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy)] [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Ciavardini, A. [Sapienza University, Rome (Italy)] [Sapienza University, Rome (Italy); Coreno, M. [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy) [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas (CNR-IMIP), Montelibretti, Roma (Italy); Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P.; Poletto, L. [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), Padova (Italy)] [Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), Padova (Italy); Golob, D. [Kontrolni Sistemi d.o.o., Sežana (Slovenia)] [Kontrolni Sistemi d.o.o., Sežana (Slovenia); Kivimäki, A. [Institute of Materials Manufacturing (CNR-IOM), TASC Laboratory, Trieste (Italy)] [Institute of Materials Manufacturing (CNR-IOM), TASC Laboratory, Trieste (Italy); Mahieu, B. [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy) [Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Service des Photons Atomes et Molécules, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, Bâtiment 522, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bu?ar, B.; Merhar, M. [Laboratory of Mechanical Processing Technologies, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Laboratory of Mechanical Processing Technologies, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Polo, E. [Institute of Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity (CNR-ISOF), Ferrara (Italy)] [Institute of Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity (CNR-ISOF), Ferrara (Italy); Ressel, B. [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)] [Laboratory of Quantum Optics, University of Nova Gorica, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the main features of CITIUS, a new light source for ultrafast science, generating tunable, intense, femtosecond pulses in the spectral range from infrared to extreme ultraviolet (XUV). The XUV pulses (about 10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} photons/pulse in the range 14-80 eV) are produced by laser-induced high-order harmonic generation in gas. This radiation is monochromatized by a time-preserving monochromator, also allowing one to work with high-resolution bandwidth selection. The tunable IR-UV pulses (10{sup 12}-10{sup 15} photons/pulse in the range 0.4-5.6 eV) are generated by an optical parametric amplifier, which is driven by a fraction of the same laser pulse that generates high order harmonics. The IR-UV and XUV pulses follow different optical paths and are eventually recombined on the sample for pump-probe experiments. We also present the results of two pump-probe experiments: with the first one, we fully characterized the temporal duration of harmonic pulses in the time-preserving configuration; with the second one, we demonstrated the possibility of using CITIUS for selective investigation of the ultra-fast dynamics of different elements in a magnetic compound.

  13. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  14. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar to the gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.

  15. Electron Beam Energy Chirp Control with a Rectangular Corrugated Structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bane, Karl; Ding, Yantao; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Maxwell, Timothy; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam energy chirp is an important parameter that affects the bandwidth and performance of a linac-based, free-electron laser. In this paper we study the wakefields generated by a beam passing between at metallic plates with small corrugations, and then apply such a device as a passive dechirper for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) energy chirp control with a multi-GeV and femtosecond electron beam. Similar devices have been tested in several places at relatively low energies (#24;100 MeV) and with relatively long bunches (> 1ps). In the parameter regime of the LCLS dechirper, with the corrugation size similar tomore »the gap between the plates, the analytical solutions of the wakefields are no longer applicable, and we resort to a #12;field matching program to obtain the wakes. Based on the numerical calculations, we #12;fit the short-range, longitudinal wakes to simple formulas, valid over a large, useful parameter range. Finally, since the transverse wakefields - both dipole and quadrupole-are strong, we compute and include them in beam dynamics simulations to investigate the error tolerances when this device is introduced in the LCLS.« less

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source Facility Manual Maintenance Management Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fewell, N.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this program s to meet the policy and objectives for the management and performance of cost-effective maintenance and repair of the National Synchrotron Light Source, as required by the US Department of Energy order DOE 433O.4A. It is the DOE`s policy that: The maintenance management program for the NSLS be consistent with this Order and that NSLS property is maintained in a manner which promotes operational safety, worker health, environmental protection and compliance, property preservation, and cost-effectiveness while meeting the NSLS`s programmatic mission. Structures, components and systems (active and passive) that are imporant to safe operation of the NSLS shall be subject to a maintenance program to ensure that they meet or exceed their design requirements throughout the life of the NSLS. Periodic examination of structures, systems components and equipment be performed to determine deterioration or technical obsolescence which may threaten performance and/or safety. Primary responsibility, authority, and accountability for the direction and management of the maintenance program at the NSLS reside with the line management assigned direct programmatic responsibility. Budgeting and accounting for maintenance programs are consistent with DOE Orders guidance.

  17. NSLS (National Synchrotron Light Source) X-19A beamline performance for x-ray absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C.Y.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Stefan, P.M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the X-19A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described. The beamline is designed for high resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a wide energy range. All of the beamline optical components are compatible with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) operation. This permits measurements to be made in a window-less mode, thereby facilitating lower energy (<4 KeV) studies. To upgrade the beamline performance, several possible improvements in instrumentation and practice are discussed to increase photon statistics with an optimum energy resolution, while decreasing the harmonic contamination and noise level. A special effort has been made to improve the stability and UHV compatibility of the monochromator system. Initial x-ray absorption results demonstrate the capabilities of this beamline for x-ray absorption studies of low Z elements (e.g. S) in highly dilute systems. The future use of this beamline for carrying out various x-ray absorption experiments is presented. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Wiggler, undulator, and free-electron laser-radiation sources development at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, H.; Krinsky, S.; Luccio, A.; Pellegrini, C.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of the special radiation sources development at the NSLS for incorporation in a 2.5 GeV X-ray storage ring and a 700 MeV vuv storage ring. This includes a superconducting high field multipole wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 0.5A; a permanent magnet wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 2.0A; a maximum photon energy undulator (5 to 7 keV); an undulator for a soft X-ray line or continuum spectrum and a free electron laser source tunable in the 2500 to 4500A region. Source characteristics and status of development are given. In addition, the incorporation of a backscattered Compton photon source is being studied and relevant parameters are presented.

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II: Photometry and Supernova Ia Light Curves from the 2005 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; /New Mexico State U.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Sako, Masao; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Pennsylvania U.; Dilday, Ben; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Fritz; /KICP, Chicago; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Jha, Saurabh; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U., ICRR; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Portsmouth U., ICG; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; /KICP, Chicago /Portsmouth U., ICG /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Portsmouth U., ICG /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ugriz light curves for 146 spectroscopically confirmed or spectroscopically probable Type Ia supernovae from the 2005 season of the SDSS-II Supernova survey. The light curves have been constructed using a photometric technique that we call scene modeling, which is described in detail here; the major feature is that supernova brightnesses are extracted from a stack of images without spatial resampling or convolution of the image data. This procedure produces accurate photometry along with accurate estimates of the statistical uncertainty, and can be used to derive photometry taken with multiple telescopes. We discuss various tests of this technique that demonstrate its capabilities. We also describe the methodology used for the calibration of the photometry, and present calibrated magnitudes and fluxes for all of the spectroscopic SNe Ia from the 2005 season.

  20. D/H isotope ratios of kerogen, bitumen, oil, and water in hydrous pyrolysis of source rocks containing kerogen types I, II, IIS, and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Wintsch, R.P.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immature source rock chips containing different types of kerogen (I,II,IIS,III) were artificially matured in isotopically distinct waters by hydrous pyrolysis and by pyrolysis in supercritical water. Converging isotopic trends of inorganic (water) and organic (kerogen, bitumen, oil) hydrogen with increasing time and temperature document that water-derived hydrogen is added to or exchanged with organic hydrogen, or both, during chemical reactions that take place during thermal maturation. Isotopic mass-balance calculations show that, depending on temperature (310--381 C), time (12--144h), and source rock type, between ca. 45 and 79% of carbon-bound hydrogen in kerogen is derived from water. Estimates for bitumen and oil range slightly lower, with oil-hydrogen being least affected by water-derived hydrogen. Comparative hydrous pyrolyses of immature source rocks at 330 C for 72h show that hydrogen in kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil/wax ranks from most to least isotopically influenced by water-derived hydrogen in the order IIS {gt} II {approximately} III {gt} I. Pyrolysis of source rock containing type II kerogen in supercritical water at 381 C for 12 h yields isotopic results that are similar to those from hydrous pyrolysis at 250 C for 72 h or 330 C for 133 h. Bulk hydrogen in kerogen contains several percent of isotopically labile hydrogen that exchanges fast and reversibly with hydrogen in water vapor at 115 C. The isotopic equilibration of labile hydrogen in kerogen with isotopic standard water vapors significantly reduces the analytical uncertainty of D/H ratios when compared with simple D/H determination of bulk hydrogen in kerogen. If extrapolation of their results from hydrous pyrolysis is permitted to natural thermal maturation at lower temperatures, the authors suggest that organic D/H ratios of fossil fuels in contact with formation water are typically altered during chemical reactions, but that D/H ratios of generated hydrocarbons are subsequently little or not affected by exchange with water hydrogen at typical reservoir conditions over geologic time. It will be difficult to utilize D/H ratios of thermally mature bulk or fractions or organic matter to quantitatively reconstruct isotopic aspects of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment. Hope resides in compound-specific D/H ratio of thermally stable, extractable biomarkers (molecular fossils) that are less susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water-derived hydrogen.

  1. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B. [eds.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

  2. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The SBIR program seeks to increase...

  3. Light emission of very low density hydrogen excited by an extremely hot light source; applications in astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques Moret-Bailly

    2008-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Stromgren studied the action of an extremely hot source on a diluted pure hydrogen cloud; a very ionized, spherical hydrogen plasma surrounded by neutral atomic hydrogen is formed. A relatively thin intermediate, partially ionized, hydrogen shell, is cooled by the radiation of the atoms. Stromgren was unaware of that this plasma, similar to the plasma of a gas laser, can be superradiant at several eigen frequencies of atomic hydrogen; the superradiant rays emitted tangentially with the sphere appear resulting from a discontinuous ring because of the competition of optical modes. The superradiance intensely depopulates the excited levels, including the continuum of proton-electron collisions, by cascades of transitions combined into resonant multiphotonic transitions so that the gas is cooled brutally beyond the radius of the Stromgren sphere. The extreme brightness of the rays emitted by the source allows a multiphotonic non-resonant absorption leading in stationary states or the ionization continuum. This absorption combines with the superradiant emissions in a multiphotonic diffusion induced by the superradiant rays. Although its brightness remains higher than that of the superradiant rays, the source becomes invisible if it is observed through a small solid angle. The lines emitted inside the sphere are all the more weak as they arrive of an internal area, lower in atoms, and more reddened also by a parametric transfer of energy towards the thermal radiation catalyzed by excited atomic hydrogen present in the sphere only. The Stromgren sphere appears to help to simply explain the appearance and the spectrum of supernova 1987A.

  4. SLUG - Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies. II: Quantifying the Effects of Stochasticity on Star Formation Rate Indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Robert L; Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrated light of a stellar population, measured through photometric filters that are sensitive to the presence of young stars, is often used to infer the star formation rate (SFR) for that population. However, these techniques rely on an assumption that star formation is a continuous process, whereas in reality stars form in discrete spatially- and temporally-correlated structures. This discreteness causes the light output to undergo significant time-dependent fluctuations, which, if not accounted for, introduce errors and biases in the inferred SFRs. We use SLUG (a code that Stochastically Lights Up Galaxies) to simulate galaxies undergoing stochastic star formation. We then use these simulations to present a quantitative analysis of these effects and provide tools for calculating probability distribution functions of SFRs given a set of observations. We show that, depending on the SFR tracer used, stochastic fluctuations can produce non-trivial errors at SFRs as high as 1 Msun/yr, and we suggest meth...

  5. Breakthroughs in Practical-Sized, High Quality OLED Light Panel Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    General Electric Global Research has achieved a major breakthrough, developing a fully functional 2 ft. x 2 ft. light panel that produces more than 1200 lumens of quality white light with an efficacy of 15 lumens per watt. This device offers 50% better energy performance than their previous device, breaking two world records.

  6. Search for extraterrestrial point sources of high energy neutrinos with AMANDA-II using data collected in 2000-2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Boersma, D.J.; Boeser, S.; Hauschildt, T.; Kowalski, M.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Resconi, E.; Schlenstedt, S.; Spiering, C.; Steffen, P.; Sulanke, K. H.; Tarasova, O.; Walter, M.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H. [DESY, D-15735, Zeuthen (Germany); Ahrens, J.; Becka, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [and others

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a search for point sources of high energy neutrinos in the northern hemisphere using data collected by AMANDA-II in the years 2000, 2001, and 2002 are presented. In particular, a comparison with the single-year result previously published shows that the sensitivity was improved by a factor of 2.2. The muon neutrino flux upper limits on selected candidate sources, corresponding to an E{sub {nu}}{sup -2} neutrino energy spectrum, are included. Sky grids were used to search for possible excesses above the background of cosmic ray induced atmospheric neutrinos. This search reveals no statistically significant excess for the three years considered.

  7. EA-1975: LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the photon energy range, increase control over photon pulses, and enable two-color pump-probe experiments. The X-ray laser beams generated by LCLS-II would enable a new class...

  8. Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    a , P.C. Efthimion a , I.D. Kaganovich a , J.W. Kwan b , S.M. Lidia b , P.A. Ni b , P.K. Roy b , PFerroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n , R.C. Davidson, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey, 08543, USA b Lawrence Berkeley National

  9. Calibration of Cangaroo II Telescope Using a Fast Blue LED Light Flasher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    , as well as test the data acquisition electronics. Our technique is an independent variation of the laser , and a risetime of #24; 1 ns. The LED has a double emitter giving a non-uniform light pool. By drilling a small

  10. Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Sign In About | Careers |

  11. Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources for Developing-Country Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lamp calibrated by Labsphere Spectral measurements - LEDs inLEDs we tested is exceptionally good (as good or better than many compact fluorescent lamps),lamp. Off-grid lighting products using the poorer LEDs would

  12. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, P.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-3748E Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for05CH11231. Li + alumino-silicate ion source development forlithium from the alumino-silicate material either as ions or

  13. On the Doppler effect for light from orbiting sources in Kerr-type metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cisneros; G. Goedecke; C. Beetle; M. Engelhardt

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A formula is derived for the combined motional and gravitational Doppler effect in general stationary axisymmetric metrics for a photon emitted parallel or antiparallel to the assumed circular orbital motion of its source. The same formula is derived from eikonal approximation and Killing vector approaches to elucidate connections between observational astronomy and modern Relativity. The formula yields expected results in the limits of a moving or stationary source in the exterior Kerr and Schwarzschild metrics and a moving source in flat space.

  14. Environmental chamber studies of atmospheric reactivities of volatile organic compounds: Effects of varying chamber and light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, W.; Luo, D.; Malkina, I.; Pierce, J. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photochemical oxidant models are essential tools for assessing effects of emissions changes on ground-level ozone formation. Such models are needed for predicting the ozone impacts of increased alternative fuel use. The gas-phase photochemical mechanism is an important component of these models because ozone is not emitted directly, but is formed from the gas-phase photochemical reactions of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in air. The chemistry of ground level ozone formation is complex; hundreds of types of VOCs being emitted into the atmosphere, and most of their atmospheric reactions are not completely understood. Because of this, no chemical model can be relied upon to give even approximately accurate predictions unless it has been evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data. Therefore an experimental and modeling study was conducted to assess how chemical mechanism evaluations using environmental chamber data are affected by the light source and other chamber characteristics. Xenon arc lights appear to give the best artificial representation of sunlight currently available, and experiments were conducted in a new Teflon chamber constructed using such a light source. Experiments were also conducted in an outdoor Teflon Chamber using new procedures to improve the light characterization, and in Teflon chambers using blacklights. These results, and results of previous runs other chambers, were compared with model predictions using an updated detailed chemical mechanism. The magnitude of the chamber radical source assumed when modeling the previous runs were found to be too high; this has implications in previous mechanism evaluations. Temperature dependencies of chamber effects can explain temperature dependencies in chamber experiments when Ta-300{degree}K, but not at temperatures below that.

  15. First Structural Steel Erected at NSLS-II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten steel columns were incorporated into the ever-growing framework for the National Synchrotron Light Source II last week, the first structural steel erected for the future 400,000-square-foot facility.

  16. The evolution of a jet ejection of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg II X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cseh, D; Jonker, P G; Grise, F; Paragi, Z; Corbel, S; Falcke, H; Frey, S; Kaaret, P; Koerding, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present quasi-simultaneous, multi-epoch radio and X-ray measurements of Holmberg II X-1 using the European VLBI Network (EVN), the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and the Chandra and Swift X-ray telescopes. The X-ray data show apparently hard spectra with steady X-ray luminosities 4 months apart from each other. In the high-resolution EVN radio observations, we have detected an extended milli-arcsecond scale source with unboosted radio emission. The source emits non-thermal, likely optically thin synchrotron emission and its morphology is consistent with a jet ejection. The 9-GHz VLA data show an arcsecond-scale triple structure of Holmberg II X-1 similar to that seen at lower frequencies. However, we find that the central ejection has faded by at least a factor of 7.3 over 1.5 years. We estimate the dynamical age of the ejection to be higher than 2.1 years. We show that such a rapid cooling can be explained with simple adiabatic expansion losses. These properties of Holmberg II X-1 imply that ULX r...

  17. Optical and UV Light Curves of the Accretion Disk Corona Source 4U 1822-371

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Bayless; E. L. Robinson; R. I. Hynes; T. A. Ashcraft; M. E. Cornell

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectrograms of 4U with the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band light curves with the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We present an updated ephemeris for the times of the optical/UV eclipses. Model light curves do not give acceptable fits to the UV eclipses unless the models include an optically-thick ADC.

  18. Phase Estimation with Weak Measurement Using a White Light Source Xiao-Ye Xu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidman, Lev

    , University of Science and Technology of China, CAS, Hefei 230026, People's Republic of China 2 Raymond quantum noise [2]. To reduce the influence of the noise, quantum metrology technologies [3], including N00 to be useless in quantum metrology. Recently, it has been proposed that white light can be used for a very

  19. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  20. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  1. II*

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has Hydrocarbon, a 1 II

  2. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, Joshua J.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Hwang, Harold Y.; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm?¹ electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  3. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  4. Design of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for medium charge state light ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Button, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Sydney, NSW 2234 (Australia); Milford, G. N. [University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization we are developing a new isotope ratio mass spectrometer based on the measurement of multiple charge state ions. We have carried out a review of our existing ECR ion source and identified a number of design flaws. For the new instrument, we are producing a new ECR source and have refined the design, in particular by using 3D simulations to improve the magnetic confinement field and by a combination of simulations and experiments to improve the design of the microwave coupling.

  5. Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama Description Totals R.Halls Wells- Metz Light ERS ETC SourceFour 25 25 50 degree ERS Strand Lighting 64 14 24 12 14 36 degree ERS ETC Source Four 15 15 36 degree ERS Strand Lighting 124 60 58 2 4 26 degree ERS ETC SourceFour 2 2 26 degree ERS Strand

  6. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland) [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II ? lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

  7. Quantifying sources of methane using light alkanes in the Los Angeles basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Air Resources Board (CARB) was tasked with compiling and verifying an inventory of GHG emissions of the statewide 2006 CARB GHG inventory and from a bottom-up accounting of CH4 sources, respectively. [3] Several are larger than expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories, consistent with previously

  8. A Structure-Based Model of Energy Transfer Reveals the Principles of Light Harvesting in Photosystem II Supercomplexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Graham R.

    in Photosystem II Supercomplexes Doran I. G. Bennett, Kapil Amarnath, and Graham R. Fleming* Department

  9. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunchang Shin; W. Mike Snow; Christopher M. Lavelle; David V. Baxter; Xin Tong; Haiyang Yan; Mark Leuschner

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the energy spectra were measured at the temperatures of 20K and 4K. We have also tested our newly-developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle Transport Code). Within the expected accuracy of our approximate approach, our model predicts both the neutron spectral intensity and the optimal thickness of the moderator at both temperatures. The predictions are compared to the measured energy spectra. The simulations agree with the measurement data at both temperatures.

  10. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting SignLiisaLin Wang Lin

  11. LED Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light-Emitting diodes (LEDs) efficiently produce light in a fundamentally different way than any legacy or traditional source of light.

  12. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, L. (EDITOR)

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget and the years to follow, we need to continue to educate our elected representatives about the benefits that are provided to our society and our economy by scientific investigation including research done at DOE user facilities like the NSLS. We face another interesting challenge as the NSLS-II project progresses: the formation of scientific research teams associated with particular beamlines at the new facility. In early 2007, the final draft of the conceptual design report will be available, which will describe the projected capabilities of NSLS-II, and we can expect a workshop in mid-2007 to launch the process leading to letters of intent for beamlines. This process will include lots of discussion about access modes, as we seek ways to allow scientific and technical innovators from the user community to play significant roles at NSLS-II.

  13. LUNEX5: A FRENCH FEL TEST FACILITY LIGHT SOURCE PROPOSAL A. Loulergue, C. Benabderrahmane, M. Bessire, P. Betinelli, F. Bouvet, A. Buteau, L. Cassinari,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LUNEX5: A FRENCH FEL TEST FACILITY LIGHT SOURCE PROPOSAL A. Loulergue, C. Benabderrahmane, M is a new Free Electron Laser (FEL) source project aimed at delivering short and coherent X-ray pulses seeded FEL operations aiming at producing higher coherence and energetic X-rays for the pilot user

  14. X-Ray Light Sources | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the ImpactSCDOE Office ofThe LifeUserWork forSources

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991. Volume 1, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  16. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phase, D. M., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Gupta, Mukul, E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Potdar, S., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Behera, L., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Sah, R., E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in; Gupta, Ajay, E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore, 452001 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ? 10{sup ?10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  17. A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources II: Infrared imaging and the K-z relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Brookes; P. N. Best; R. Rengelink; H. J. A. Rottgering

    2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources (CENSORS) is a 1.4 GHz radio survey selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and complete to a flux-density of 7.2mJy. It targets the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) Patch D, which is a 3 by 2 square degree field centred on 09 51 36.0 -21 00 00 (J2000). This paper presents K-band imaging of 142 of the 150 CENSORS sources. The primary motivation for beginning infrared imaging of the sample was to identify the host galaxies of the ~30% of sources for which the EIS I-band imaging failed to produce a likely candidate. In addition, K-band magnitudes allow photometric redshift estimation and I - K colours aid the identification of host galaxies (which are typically old, red ellipticals). Of the sources observed in the I and K-bands, four remain undetected, possibly indicating high redshifts for the host galaxies, and eight involve complicated radio structures, or several candidate host galaxies, which have yet to be resolved. Thus, the host galaxy identifications are brought to 92% completeness. In conjunction with spectroscopic observations, the K-band magnitudes have been aperture corrected and used to establish a K-z relation for the CENSORS radio galaxies. This relation is of interest because of its variation, at z > 1, between radio surveys of different flux-density limit. Establishing this relation for CENSORS may shed light on the origin of this variation and will allow an appropriate K-z redshift estimator for any CENSORS source which remains without a spectroscopic redshift. It is shown that whilst the K-z relation for CENSORS is fainter than that of 3CRR at all redshifts, it agrees well with that of 7C over all redshifts studied.

  18. Differential spectral responsivity measurement of photovoltaic detectors with a light-emitting-diode-based integrating sphere source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaid, Ghufron; Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Seongchong; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental realization of differential spectral responsivity measurement by using a light-emitting diode (LED)-based integrating sphere source. The spectral irradiance responsivity is measured by a Lambertian-like radiation field with a diameter of 40mm at the peak wavelengths of the 35 selectable LEDs covering a range from 280 to 1550nm. The systematic errors and uncertainties due to lock-in detection, spatial irradiance distribution, and reflection from the test detector are experimentally corrected or considered. In addition, we implemented a numerical procedure to correct the error due to the broad spectral bandwidth of the LEDs. The overall uncertainty of the DSR measurement is evaluated to be 2.2% (k=2) for Si detectors. To demonstrate its application, we present the measurement results of two Si photovoltaic detectors at different bias irradiance levels up to 120mW/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Creating an EPICS Based Test Stand Development System for a BPM Digitizer of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is required to deliver a high quality electron beam for producing coherent X-rays. As a result, high resolution beam position monitoring is required. The Beam Position Monitor (BPM) digitizer acquires analog signals from the beam line and digitizes them to obtain beam position data. Although Matlab is currently being used to test the BPM digitizer?s functions and capability, the Controls Department at SLAC prefers to use Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS). This paper discusses the transition of providing similar as well as enhanced functionalities, than those offered by Matlab, to test the digitizer. Altogether, the improved test stand development system can perform mathematical and statistical calculations with the waveform signals acquired from the digitizer and compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the signals. Finally, logging of meaningful data into files has been added.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmuer, N.F. [ed.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  1. SOURCE?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is an open-source code package designed to be a common, low-cost, standardized tool...

  2. LIFAC Demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 Volume II: Project Performance and Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The C1ean Coal Technology (CCT) Program has been recognized in the National Energy Strategy as a major initiative whereby coal will be able to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. Attainment of this goal depends upon the development of highly efficient, environmentally sound, competitive coal utilization technologies responsive to diverse energy markets and varied consumer needs. The CCT Program is an effort jointly funded by government and industry whereby the most promising of the advanced coal-based technologies are being moved into the marketplace through demonstration. The CCT Program is being implemented through a total of five competitive solicitations. LIFAC North America, a joint venture partnership of ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., and Tampella Power Corporation, is currently demonstrating the LIFAC flue gas desulfurization technology developed by Tampella Power. This technology provides sulfur dioxide emission control for power plants, especially existing facilities with tight space limitations. Sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to be reduced by up to 85% by using limestone as a sorbent. The LIFAC technology is being demonstrated at Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, a 60-MW coal-fired power plant owned and operated by Richmond Power and Light (RP&L) and located in Richmond, Indiana. The Whitewater plant consumes high-sulfur coals, with sulfur contents ranging from 2.0-2.9 $ZO. The project, co-funded by LIFAC North America and DOE, is being conducted with the participation of Richmond Power and Light, the State of Indiana, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Black Beauty Coal Company. The project has a total cost of $21.4 million and a duration of 48 months from the preliminary design phase through the testing program.

  3. METALLICITY AS A SOURCE OF DISPERSION IN THE SNIa BOLOMETRIC LIGHT CURVE LUMINOSITY-WIDTH RELATIONSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bravo, E. [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Carrer Comte d'Urgell 187, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); DomInguez, I. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Badenes, C. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, via mentore Maggini snc, 64100 Teramo (Italy)], E-mail: eduardo.bravo@upc.edu, E-mail: inma@ugr.es, E-mail: carles@wise.tau.ac.il

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The recognition that the metallicity of Type Ia supernova (SNIa) progenitors might bias their use for cosmological applications has led to an increasing interest in its role in shaping SNIa light curves. We explore the sensitivity of the synthesized mass of {sup 56}Ni, M({sup 56}Ni), to the progenitor metallicity starting from pre-main-sequence models with masses M {sub 0} = 2-7 M {sub sun} and metallicities Z = 10{sup -5}-0.10. The interplay between convective mixing and carbon burning during the simmering phase eventually raises the neutron excess, {eta}, and leads to a smaller {sup 56}Ni yield, but does not change substantially the dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z. Uncertain attributes of the progenitor white dwarf, like the central density, have a minor effect on M({sup 56}Ni). Our main results are: (1) a sizeable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized during incomplete Si-burning, which leads to a stronger dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z than obtained by assuming that {sup 56}Ni is produced in material that burns fully to nuclear statistical equilibrium; (2) in one-dimensional delayed detonation simulations a composition dependence of the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) density gives a nonlinear relationship between M({sup 56}Ni) and Z and predicts a luminosity larger than previously thought at low metallicities (however, the progenitor metallicity alone cannot explain the whole observational scatter of SNIa luminosities); and (3) an accurate measurement of the slope of the Hubble residuals versus metallicity for a large enough data set of SNIa might give clues to the physics of DDT in thermonuclear explosions.

  4. Optical reaction cell and light source for [18F] fluoride radiotracer synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.; Becker, R.J.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed for performing organic synthetic reactions, particularly no-carrier-added nucleophilic radiofluorination reactions for PET radiotracer production. The apparatus includes an optical reaction cell and a source of broadband infrared radiant energy, which permits direct coupling of the emitted radiant energy with the reaction medium to heat the reaction medium. Preferably, the apparatus includes means for focusing the emitted radiant energy into the reaction cell, and the reaction cell itself is preferably configured to reflect transmitted radiant energy back into the reaction medium to further improve the efficiency of the apparatus. The apparatus is well suited to the production of high-yield syntheses of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-Dglucose. Also provided is a method for performing organic synthetic reactions, including the manufacture of [{sup 18}F]-labeled compounds useful as PET radiotracers, and particularly for the preparation of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in higher yields than previously possible. 4 figs.

  5. Optical reaction cell and light source for ›18F! fluoride radiotracer synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David (Bellport, NY); Becker, Richard J. (Islip, NY)

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for performing organic synthetic reactions, particularly no-carrier-added nucleophilic radiofluorination reactions for PET radiotracer production. The apparatus includes an optical reaction cell and a source of broadband infrared radiant energy, which permits direct coupling of the emitted radiant energy with the reaction medium to heat the reaction medium. Preferably, the apparatus includes means for focusing the emitted radiant energy into the reaction cell, and the reaction cell itself is preferably configured to reflect transmitted radiant energy back into the reaction medium to further improve the efficiency of the apparatus. The apparatus is well suited to the production of high-yield syntheses of 2-›.sup.18 F!fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Also provided is a method for performing organic synthetic reactions, including the manufacture of ›.sup.18 F!-labeled compounds useful as PET radiotracers, and particularly for the preparation of 2-›.sup.18 F!fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in higher yields than previously possible.

  6. The Physics of the Gas Attenuator for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D.D.; Bionta, R.M.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Kishiyama, K.I.; McMahon, D.; Roeben, M.D.; Shen, S.; /LLNL, Livermore; Stefan, P.M.; /SLAC; ,

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic assessment of a variety of physics issues affecting the performance of the LCLS X-ray beam attenuator is presented. Detailed analysis of the gas flow in the gas attenuator and in the apertures is performed. A lot of attention is directed towards the gas ionization and heating by intense X-ray pulses. The role of these phenomena in possible deviations of the attenuation coefficient from its 'dialed in' value is evaluated and found small in most cases. Other sources of systematic and statistical errors are also discussed. The regimes where the errors may reach a few percent correspond to the lower X-ray energies (less than 2 keV) and highest beam intensities. Other effects discussed include chemical interaction of the gas with apertures, shock formation in the transonic flow in the apertures of the attenuator, generation of electromagnetic wakes in the gas, and head-to-tail variation of the attenuation caused by the ionization of gas or solid. Possible experimental tests of the consistency of the physics assumptions used in the concept of the gas attenuator are discussed. Interaction of X-rays with the solid attenuator (that will be used at higher X-ray energies, from 2.5 to 8 keV) is considered and thermo-mechanical effects caused by the beam heating are evaluated. Wave-front distortions induced by non-uniform heating of both the solid and the gas are found to be small. An overall conclusion drawn from the analysis presented is that the attenuator will be a reliable and highly versatile device, provided that some caution is exercised in its use for highest beam intensities at lowest X-ray energies.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  8. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  9. Copper(II) imidazolate frameworks as highly efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingtian; Luo, Deliang; Yang, Chengju; He, Shiman; Chen, Shangchao; Lin, Jiawei; Zhu, Li; Li, Xin, E-mail: xinliscau@yahoo.com

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three copper(II) imidazolate frameworks were synthesized by a hydrothermal (or precipitation) reaction. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), thermogravimetry (TG). Meanwhile, the photocatalytic activities of the samples for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol and degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation were also investigated. The results show that the as-prepared samples exhibit better photocatalytic activities for the reduction of carbon dioxide into methanol with water and degradation of MB under visible light irradiation. The orthorhombic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap of 2.49 eV and green (G) color has the best photocatalytic activity for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol, 1712.7 ?mol/g over 5 h, which is about three times as large as that of monoclinic copper(II) imidazolate frameworks with a band gap 2.70 eV and blue (J) color. The degradation kinetics of MB over three photocatalysts fitted well to the apparent first-order rate equation and the apparent rate constants for the degradation of MB over G, J and P (with pink color) are 0.0038, 0.0013 and 0.0016 min{sup ?1}, respectively. The synergistic effects of smallest band gap and orthorhombic crystal phase structure are the critical factors for the better photocatalytic activities of G. Moreover, three frameworks can also be stable up to 250 °C. The investigation of Cu-based zeolitic imidazolate frameworks maybe provide a design strategy for a new class of photocatalysts applied in degradation of contaminations, reduction of CO{sub 2}, and even water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen under visible light. - Graphical abstract: Carbon dioxide was reduced into methanol with water over copper(II) imidazolate frameworks under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Three copper(II) imidazolate frameworks were first applied in the photo-reduction of CO{sub 2}. • The photocatalytic activities of the frameworks depend on their band gap and phase structures. • The photocatalytic activity of orthorhombic frameworks is 3 times that of monoclinic frameworks. • The degradation kinetics of MB over three photocatalysts followed the first-order rate equation. • The largest yield for reduction of CO{sub 2} into methanol on green framworks was 1712.7 ?mol/g over 5 h.

  10. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy for diagnostics of high harmonics of the extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser light source at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.-J.; Fukuzawa, H.; Pruemper, G.; Ueda, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Okunishi, M.; Shimada, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Motomura, K.; Saito, N. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Iwayama, H.; Nagaya, K.; Yao, M. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Rudenko, A. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22607, Hamburg (Germany); Ullrich, J. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22607, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck-Insitut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Czasch, A.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Nagasono, M.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); and others

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy apparatus dedicated to the experiments using the extreme-ultraviolet light pulses at the free-electron laser facility, SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator, in Japan and used it to measure spatial distributions of fundamental, second, and third harmonics at the end station.

  11. Optical Design of a Broadband Infrared Spectrometer for Bunch Length Measurement at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kiel; /SLAC

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory occur on the order of tens of femtoseconds and cannot be directly measured by conventional means. The length of the pulses can instead be reconstructed by measuring the spectrum of optical transition radiation emitted by the electrons as they move toward a conducting foil. Because the emitted radiation occurs in the mid-infrared from 0.6 to 30 microns a novel optical layout is required. Using a helium-neon laser with wavelength 633 nm, a series of gold-coated off-axis parabolic mirrors were positioned to direct a beam through a zinc selenide prism and to a focus at a CCD camera for imaging. Constructing this layout revealed a number of novel techniques for reducing the aberrations introduced into the system by the off-axis parabolic mirrors. The beam had a recorded radius of less than a millimeter at its final focus on the CCD imager. This preliminary setup serves as a model for the spectrometer that will ultimately measure the LCLS electron pulse duration.

  12. Time-Resolved Imaging of the Microbunching Instability and Energy Spread at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, D.; Behrens, C.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T.; Zhou, F.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbunching instability (MBI) is a well known problem for high brightness electron beams and has been observed at accelerator facilities around the world. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are particularly susceptible to MBI, which can distort the longitudinal phase space and increase the beam’s slice energy spread (SES). Past studies of MBI at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) relied on optical transition radiation to infer the existence of microbunching. With the development of the x-band transverse deflecting cavity (XTCAV), we can for the first time directly image the longitudinal phase space at the end of the accelerator and complete amore »comprehensive study of MBI, revealing both detailed MBI behavior as well as insights into mitigation schemes. The fine time resolution of the XTCAV also provides the first LCLS measurements of the final SES, a critical parameter for many advanced FEL schemes. Detailed MBI and SES measurements can aid in understanding MBI mechanisms, benchmarking simulation codes, and designing future high- brightness accelerators.« less

  13. Time-Resolved Imaging of the Microbunching Instability and Energy Spread at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zhou, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbunching instability (MBI) is a well known problem for high brightness electron beams and has been observed at accelerator facilities around the world. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are particularly susceptible to MBI, which can distort the longitudinal phase space and increase the beam’s slice energy spread (SES). Past studies of MBI at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) relied on optical transition radiation to infer the existence of microbunching. With the development of the x-band transverse deflecting cavity (XTCAV), we can for the first time directly image the longitudinal phase space at the end of the accelerator and complete a comprehensive study of MBI, revealing both detailed MBI behavior as well as insights into mitigation schemes. The fine time resolution of the XTCAV also provides the first LCLS measurements of the final SES, a critical parameter for many advanced FEL schemes. Detailed MBI and SES measurements can aid in understanding MBI mechanisms, benchmarking simulation codes, and designing future high- brightness accelerators.

  14. Light-Source Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) - EliCenterCenterCenterSafety

  15. SSRL Light Source Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn theTreatmentSRS Economic0 - June

  16. SSRL Light Source Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR E Q U E N C4 October,3333

  17. Advanced Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are here Western Pages westernNext

  18. EK101 Engineering Light Project: Evaluate Residential Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bifano, Thomas

    EK101 Engineering Light Project: Evaluate Residential Lighting Compare technical and economic characteristics of three sources of residential light. Two teams of four complete the same project Engineering Light Project: Evaluate Residential Lighting Project Assignment: Evaluate current options

  19. Search for Lightly Ionizing Particles Using CDMS-II Data and Fabrication of CDMS Detectors with Improved Homogeneity in Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent...

  20. Two-photon excitation spectrum of light-harvesting complex II and fluorescence upconversion after one- and two-photon excitation of the carotenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walla, P.J.; Yom, J.; Krueger, B.P.; Fleming, G.R.

    2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-photon excitation (TPE) spectrum of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) has been measured in the spectral region of 1,000--1,600 nm, corresponding to one-photon wavelengths of 500--800 nm. The authors observed a band with an origin at {approximately}2 x 660 nm (ca. 15,100 {+-} 300 cm{sup {minus}1}) and a maximum at {approximately}2 x 600 nm. The line shape and origin of this band strongly suggest that the observed signal is due to the two-photon-allowed S{sub 1} state of the energy-transferring carotenoids (Car ) in LHC II. The authors also report the time dependence of the upconverted chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence after TPE at the maximum of the observed band. Surprisingly, a fast rise of 250 {+-} 50 fs followed by a multiexponential decay on the picosecond time scale was observed. This result provides strong indication that there is a fast energy transfer even from the dipole-forbidden Car S{sub 1} state to the Chl's. The sub picosecond energy transfer from the Car S{sub 1} state is likely a consequence of the large number of energy-accepting Chls in van der Waals contact with the central Car's in LHC II. They also present upconversion data of the Car S{sub 2}, Chl a, and Chl b fluorescence observed after one-photon excitation into the dipole-allowed Car S{sub 2} state. The lifetime of the Car S{sub 2} state is {approximately}120 {+-} 30 fs. With the observed time constants they are able to calculate quantum yields for the different possible pathways contributing to the overall Car to Chl energy transfer in LHC II.

  1. Light NMSSM Neutralino Dark Matter in the Wake of CDMS II and a 126 GeV Higgs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozaczuk, Jonathan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment have renewed interest in light dark matter with a large spin-independent neutralino-nucleon scattering cross-section. Here, we examine the regions of the NMSSM capable of producing a light neutralino with a large direct detection cross-section, with scattering mediated by a light singlet-like scalar, and a 126 GeV Higgs consistent with the LHC results. We focus on two different scenarios for annihilation in the early universe, namely annihilation mediated by (1) a light scalar or by (2) a light pseudoscalar. We find that there exists viable parameter space in which a very light CP-even Higgs boson mediates both the neutralino-nucleon spin-independent elastic scattering and the neutralino pair-annihilation in the early universe. These regions can feature significant tree-level contributions to the SM-like Higgs mass and hence not require very heavy or highly-mixed stops. The strongest constraints in this case come from the decays of the SM-...

  2. J. Phys. II France 6 (1996) 175-185 FEBRUARY 1996, PAGE 175 ~He Optical Pumping with frequency Modulated Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J. Phys. II France 6 (1996) 175-185 FEBRUARY 1996, PAGE 175 ~He Optical Pumping with frequency) PACS.32.80.Bx Level crossing and optical pumping PACS.42.60.-v Laser optical systems: design) for helium optical pumping experiments. An interesting feature of the new device is the possibility

  3. Minor Complexes at Work: Light-Harvesting by Carotenoids in the Photosystem II Antenna Complexes CP24 and CP26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    , Photosystems I and II, perform the first stages of the solar energy storage reactions. Each photo- system is composed of two elements: the reaction center, where the actual energy conversion takes place, The Netherlands; and Department of Biophysical Chemistry, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology

  4. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenholz, Elke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polarization control is the slicing beamline at BESSY.Recent BESSY results on ferromagnetic Ni have unambiguously200 eV) NSLS-II (10 keV) BESSY FEL (1 keV) 3rd Generation

  5. EUV reflectance characterization of the 94/304 ? flight secondary AIA mirror at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Spiller, E; Aquila, A L; Gullikson, E M; Windt, D L

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The AIA secondary flight mirror, previously coated at Columbia University with Mg/SiC for the 303.8 {angstrom} channel and Mo/Y for the 93.9 {angstrom} channel was characterized by means of EUV reflectance measurements at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at LBNL on January 10, 2006. Paul Boerner (LMSAL) also participated in these measurements.

  6. Continuous detection of physiological pH and PCO? by fiber optic spectroscopy using a low power light source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costello, David James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the light transmitted through the sample, e is an empirical constant, called the transmissivity, determined at the wavelength of interest, 1 is the length of the light path through the sample, and [c] is the molar concentration of the absorbing molecule... changes in ambient lighting conditions. The effect of these factors is to change the output value of the system by some additive constant representing a change in the total transmission ei'ficiency of the transducer. The effects of these factors can...

  7. Specific light in sculpture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, John William

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

  8. TESTING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS THE SOURCE OF ENHANCED STRONG Mg II ABSORPTION TOWARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapoport, Sharon; Onken, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tucker, Brad E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixty percent of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reveal strong Mg II absorbing systems, which is a factor of {approx}2 times the rate seen along lines of sight to quasars. Previous studies argue that the discrepancy in the strong Mg II covering factor is most likely to be the result of either quasars being obscured due to dust or the consequence of many GRBs being strongly gravitationally lensed. We analyze observations of quasars that show strong foreground Mg II absorption. We find that GRB lines of sight pass closer to bright galaxies than would be expected for random lines of sight within the impact parameter expected for strong Mg II absorption. While this cannot be explained by obscuration in the GRB sample, it is a natural consequence of gravitational lensing. Upon examining the particular configurations of galaxies near a sample of GRBs with strong Mg II absorption, we find several intriguing lensing candidates. Our results suggest that lensing provides a viable contribution to the observed enhancement of strong Mg II absorption along lines of sight to GRBs, and we outline the future observations required to test this hypothesis conclusively.

  9. An Analytic Linear Accelerator Source Model for Monte Carlo dose calculations. II. Model Utilization in a GPU-based Monte Carlo Package and Automatic Source Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently built an analytical source model for GPU-based MC dose engine. In this paper, we present a sampling strategy to efficiently utilize this source model in GPU-based dose calculation. Our source model was based on a concept of phase-space-ring (PSR). This ring structure makes it effective to account for beam rotational symmetry, but not suitable for dose calculations due to rectangular jaw settings. Hence, we first convert PSR source model to its phase-space let (PSL) representation. Then in dose calculation, different types of sub-sources were separately sampled. Source sampling and particle transport were iterated. So that the particles being sampled and transported simultaneously are of same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergence. We also present an automatic commissioning approach to adjust the model for a good representation of a clinical linear accelerator . Weighting factors were introduced to adjust relative weights of PSRs, determined by solving a quadratic minimization ...

  10. ALMA Census of Faint 1.2 mm Sources Down to ~0.01 mJy: Extragalactic Background Light and Dust-Poor High-z Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Seiji; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishigaki, Masafumi; Momose, Rieko

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present statistics of 89 faint 1.2-mm continuum sources with a flux density of ~0.01-1 mJy detected by about 100 deep ALMA pointing data that include the complete deep datasets archived by 2015 March. These faint sources are identified in 50 blank fields and behind one cluster, Abell 1689, that magnifies the background sources by gravitational lensing. Evaluating various important effects including the false detection, detection completeness, and flux boosting as well as the lensing magnification by modeling and simulations, we derive number counts of 1.2 mm continuum sources. We find that the number counts are well represented by the Schechter function down to ~0.01 mJy, and that the total integrated 1.2 mm flux of the securely identified sources is 22.8^(+6.1)_(-6.4) Jy deg^(-2) that corresponds to 104^(+27)_(-30)% of the extragalactic background light (EBL) measured by COBE observations. These results suggest that the major 1.2 mm EBL contributors are sources with >~0.01 mJy, and that very faint 1.2 mm ...

  11. Searching for radiative pumping lines of OH masers: II. The 53.3um absorption line towards 1612MHz OH maser sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. He; P. S. Chen

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the 53.3um line in the ISO LWS spectra towards a similar sample of OH/IR sources. We find 137 LWS spectra covering 53.3um and associated with 47 galactic OH/IR sources. Ten of these galactic OH/IR sources are found to show and another 5 ones tentatively show the 53.3um absorption while another 7 sources highly probably do not show this line. The source class is found to be correlated with the type of spectral profile: red supergiants (RSGs) and AGB stars tend to show strong blue-shifted filling emission in their 53.3um absorption line profiles while HII regions tend to show a weak red-shifted filling emission in the line profile. GC sources and megamasers do not show filling emission feature. It is argued that the filling emission might be the manifestation of an unresolved half emission half absorption profile of the 53.3um doublet. The 53.3 to 34.6um equivalent width (EW) ratio is close to unity for RSGs but much larger than unity for GC sources and megamasers while H II regions only show the 53.3um line. The pump rate defined as maser to IR photon flux ratio is approximately 5% for RSGs. The pump rates of GC sources are three order of magnitude smaller. Both the large 53.3 to 34.6um EW ratio and the small pump rate of the GC OH masers reflect that the two detected `pumping lines' in these sources are actually of interstellar origin. The pump rate of Arp 220 is 32%--much larger than that of RSGs, which indicates that the contribution of other pumping mechanisms to this megamaser is important.

  12. Accident source terms for light-water nuclear power plants using high-burnup or MOX fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salay, Michael (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Gauntt, Randall O.; Lee, Richard Y. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative accident source terms patterned after the NUREG-1465 Source Term have been developed for high burnup fuel in BWRs and PWRs and for MOX fuel in a PWR with an ice-condenser containment. These source terms have been derived using nonparametric order statistics to develop distributions for the timing of radionuclide release during four accident phases and for release fractions of nine chemical classes of radionuclides as calculated with the MELCOR 1.8.5 accident analysis computer code. The accident phases are those defined in the NUREG-1465 Source Term - gap release, in-vessel release, ex-vessel release, and late in-vessel release. Important differences among the accident source terms derived here and the NUREG-1465 Source Term are not attributable to either fuel burnup or use of MOX fuel. Rather, differences among the source terms are due predominantly to improved understanding of the physics of core meltdown accidents. Heat losses from the degrading reactor core prolong the process of in-vessel release of radionuclides. Improved understanding of the chemistries of tellurium and cesium under reactor accidents changes the predicted behavior characteristics of these radioactive elements relative to what was assumed in the derivation of the NUREG-1465 Source Term. An additional radionuclide chemical class has been defined to account for release of cesium as cesium molybdate which enhances molybdenum release relative to other metallic fission products.

  13. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  14. Generation of circularly polarized radiation from a compact plasma-based extreme ultraviolet light source for tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Daniel; Rudolf, Denis, E-mail: d.rudolf@fz-juelich.de; Juschkin, Larissa [RWTH Aachen University, Experimental Physics of EUV, Steinbachstraße 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Schneider, Claus M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Winkler, Gerrit; Frömter, Robert [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Danylyuk, Serhiy [RWTH Aachen University, Chair for Technology of Optical Systems, JARA-FIT, Steinbachstraße 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bergmann, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Steinbachstrasse 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Grützmacher, Detlev [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of circularly polarized light in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (about 25 eV–250 eV) is highly desirable for applications in spectroscopy and microscopy but very challenging to achieve in a small-scale laboratory. We present a compact apparatus for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation from a gas-discharge plasma light source between 50 eV and 70 eV photon energy. In this spectral range, the 3p absorption edges of Fe (54 eV), Co (60 eV), and Ni (67 eV) offer a high magnetic contrast often employed for magneto-optical and electron spectroscopy as well as for magnetic imaging. We simulated and designed an instrument for generation of linearly and circularly polarized EUV radiation and performed polarimetric measurements of the degree of linear and circular polarization. Furthermore, we demonstrate first measurements of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co 3p absorption edge with a plasma-based EUV light source. Our approach opens the door for laboratory-based, element-selective spectroscopy of magnetic materials and spectro-microscopy of ferromagnetic domains.

  15. Light Curves of Core-Collapse Supernovae with Substantial Mass Loss using the New Open-Source SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morozova, V; Renzo, M; Ott, C D; Clausen, D; Couch, S M; Ellis, J; Roberts, L F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the SuperNova Explosion Code SNEC, an open-source Lagrangian code for the hydrodynamics and equilibrium-diffusion radiation transport in the expanding envelopes of supernovae. Given a model of a progenitor star, an explosion energy, and an amount and distribution of radioactive nickel, SNEC generates the bolometric light curve, as well as the light curves in different wavelength bands assuming black body emission. As a first application of SNEC, we consider the explosions of a grid of 15 Msun (at zero-age main sequence) stars whose hydrogen envelopes are stripped to different extents and at different points in their evolution. The resulting light curves exhibit plateaus with durations of ~20-100 days if >~1.5-2 Msun of hydrogen-rich material is left and no plateau if less hydrogen-rich material is left. The shorter plateau lengths are unlike the Type IIP supernova light curves typically observed in nature. This suggests that, at least for zero-age main sequence masses <~ 20 Msun, hydrogen mass l...

  16. The outer regions of the giant Virgo galaxy M87 II. Kinematic separation of stellar halo and intracluster light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longobardi, Alessia; Gerhard, Ortwin; Hanuschik, Reinhard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectroscopic study of 287 Planetary Nebulas (PNs) in a total area of ~0.4 deg^2 around the BCG M87 in Virgo A. With these data we can distinguish the stellar halo from the co-spatial intracluster light (ICL). PNs were identified from their narrow and symmetric redshifted lambda 5007\\4959 Angstrom [OIII] emission lines, and the absence of significant continuum. We implement a robust technique to measure the halo velocity dispersion from the projected phase-space to identify PNs associated with the M87 halo and ICL. The velocity distribution of the spectroscopically confirmed PNs is bimodal, containing a narrow component centred on the systemic velocity of the BCG and an off-centred broader component, that we identify as halo and ICL, respectively. Halo and ICPN have different spatial distributions: the halo PNs follow the galaxy's light, whereas the ICPNs are characterised by a shallower power-law profile. The composite PN number density profile shows the superposition of different PN populations...

  17. A Chandra X-ray Study of NGC 1068: II. The Luminous X-ray Source Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Smith; Andrew S. Wilson

    2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the compact X-ray source population in the Seyfert~2 galaxy NGC 1068, imaged with Chandra. We find a total of 84 compact sources, of which 66 are projected onto the galactic disk of NGC 1068. Spectra of the brightest sources have been modeled with both multi-color disk blackbody and power-law models. The power-law model provides the better description of the spectrum for most of these sources. Five sources have 0.4-8 keV intrinsic luminosities greater than 10^{39} erg/s, assuming that their emission is isotropic and that they are associated with NGC 1068. We refer to these sources as Intermediate Luminosity X-ray Objects (IXOs). If these five sources are X-ray binaries accreting with luminosities that are both sub-Eddington and isotropic, then the implied source masses are >7 solar masses, and so they are inferred to be black holes. The brightest source has a much harder spectrum (Gamma = 0.9\\pm0.1) than that found in Galactic black hole candidates and other IXOs. It also shows large-amplitude variability on both short-term and long-term timescales. The ratio of the number of sources with luminosities greater than 2.1 x 10^{38} erg/s in the 0.4-8 keV band to the rate of massive star formation is the same, to within a factor of two, for NGC 1068, the Antennae, NGC 5194 (the main galaxy in M51), and the Circinus galaxy. This suggests that the rate of production of X-ray binaries per massive star is approximately the same for galaxies with currently active star formation, including ``starbursts''.

  18. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  19. X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gorkhover, T. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. med. Forschung, Jahnstr. 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rouzee, A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

  20. The Surface Expression of Semidiurnal Internal Tides near a Strong Source at Hawaii. Part II: Interactions with Mesoscale Currents*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Interactions with Mesoscale Currents* C. CHAVANNE, P. FLAMENT, AND D. LUTHER School of Ocean and Earth Science in the light of the interaction of internal tides with energetic surface-intensified mesoscale currents locations at critical topographic slopes through idealized mesoscale currents approximating the observed

  1. Nanograting-based compact VUV spectrometer and beam profiler for in-situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, versatile device for VUV beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a micro-channel plate based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 nm to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25 nm to 0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for non-intrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

  2. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW) ROSAT HRI source catalog. II: application to the HRI and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Campana; Davide Lazzati; Maria Rosa Panzera; Gianpiero Tagliaferri

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The wavelet detection algorithm (WDA) described in the accompanying paper by Lazzati et al. is made suited for a fast and efficient analysis of images taken with the High Resolution Imager (HRI) instrument on board the ROSAT satellite. An extensive testing is carried out on the detection pipeline: HRI fields with different exposure times are simulated and analysed in the same fashion as the real data. Positions are recovered with few arcsecond errors, whereas fluxes are within a factor of two from their input values in more than 90% of the cases in the deepest images. At variance with the ``sliding-box'' detection algorithms, the WDA provides also a reliable description of the source extension, allowing for a complete search of e.g. supernova remnant or cluster of galaxies in the HRI fields. A completeness analysis on simulated fields shows that for the deepest exposures considered (~120 ks) a limiting flux of \\~3x10^{-15} erg/cm2/s can be reached over the entire field of view. We test the algorithm on real HRI fields selected for their crowding and/or presence of extended or bright sources (e.g. cluster of galaxies and of stars, supernova remnants). We show that our algorithm compares favorably with other X-ray detection algorithms such as XIMAGE and EXSAS. A complete catalog will result from our analysis: it will consist of the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Bright Source Catalog (BMW-BSC) with sources detected with a significance >4.5 sigma and of the Faint Source Catalog (BMW-FSC) with sources at >3.5 sigma. A conservative estimate based on the extragalactic log(N)-log(S) indicates that at least 16000 sources will be revealed in the complete analysis of the whole HRI dataset.

  3. OLED lighting devices having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus (Regensburg, DE); Antoniadis, Homer (Mountain View, CA)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  4. Device structure for OLED light device having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Antoniadis; Homer (Mountain View, CA), Krummacher; Benjamin Claus (Regensburg, DE)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  5. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W., E-mail: khill@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, J. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/?E of order 10?000 and spatial resolution better than 10 ?m. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  6. Single shot spatial and temporal coherence properties of the SLAC linac coherent light source in the hard x-ray regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutt, C.; Wochner, P.; Fischer, B.; Conrad, H.; Castro-Colin, M.; Lee, S.; Lehmkuhler, F.; Steinke, I.; Sprung, M.; Roseker, W.; Zhu, D.; Lemke, H.; Bogle, S.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Robert, A.; Grubel, G. (Materials Science Division); (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron); (Max-Planck-Institut fur Intelligene Systeme); (LCLS, SLAC Nat. Accelerator Lab.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the transverse and longitudinal coherence properties of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC in the hard x-ray regime at 9 keV photon energy on a single shot basis. Speckle patterns recorded in the forward direction from colloidal nanoparticles yielded the transverse coherence properties of the focused LCLS beam. Speckle patterns from a gold nanopowder recorded with atomic resolution allowed us to measure the shot-to-shot variations of the spectral properties of the x-ray beam. The focused beam is in the transverse direction fully coherent with a mode number close to 1. The average number of longitudinal modes behind the Si(111) monochromator is about 14.5 and the average coherence time {tau}{sub c} = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) fs. The data suggest a mean x-ray pulse duration of (29 {+-} 14) fs behind the monochromator for (100 {+-} 14) fs long electron pulses.

  7. Exploring Mbar shock conditions and isochorically heated aluminum at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Lee, H. J.; Gauthier, M.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Döppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); White, T.; Gregori, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Wei, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 87544 (United States); Zastrau, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Institute for Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller-University, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatter x-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. The combination of experiments fully demonstrates the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.

  8. Lithographic measurement of EUV flare in the 0.3-NA Micro ExposureTool optic at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of flare present in a 0.3-NA EUV optic (the MET optic) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is measured using a lithographic method. Photoresist behavior at high exposure doses makes analysis difficult. Flare measurement analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy is compared, and optical microscopy is found to be a more reliable technique. In addition, the measured results are compared with predictions based on surface roughness measurement of the MET optical elements. When the fields in the exposure matrix are spaced far enough apart to avoid influence from surrounding fields and the data is corrected for imperfect mask contrast and aerial image proximity effects, the results match predicted values quite well. The amount of flare present in this optic ranges from 4.7% for 2 {micro}m features to 6.8% for 500 nm features.

  9. EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bifano, Thomas

    EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting Homework for 9/10 1. Make an estimate (using if the patent is granted.) 3. What is a lumen? A lux? How are the two related? How would you use a lux meter, (Lux, Lumens/m2) Luminous Flux: Perceivable light power from a source, (Lumens) Use the lux meter

  10. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume II, appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains 2 appendices. The first documents the methodologies used to calculate production, unit energy consumption, fuel type and emission estimates for 16 industries and 35 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired industrial combustion processes, located in 26 states (and the District of Columbia) east of the Mississippi River. As discussed in the text of this report, a U.S. total of 16 industries and 45 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired combustion processes were identified by an elimination type method that was developed based on evaluation of fuel use in industrial SIC codes 20-39 to identify pollutant sources contributing to acid rain. The final population included only plants that have direct-fired fuel consumption greater than or equal to 100 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/yr of equivalent energy consumption. The goal for this analysis was to provide at least a 1980 base year for the data. This was achieved for all of the industries and in fact, 1981 data were used for a number of the industries evaluated. The second contains an analysis of all consumption of major fossil fuels to: (1) identify all fuel usage categories, and (2) identify the kinds of combustion equipment used within each category. This analysis provides a frame of reference for the balance of the study and permits using an energy accounting methodology to quantify the degree to which the inventoried sources in individual consuming sectors are complete and representative of the total population for the sector.

  11. Light Source Notes | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Huang, K. Harkay, J. Lewellen, S.V. Milton, and V. Sajaev LS-302 Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Nicholas Sereno,Suk Hong Kim LS-301 Analysis of Short-Bunch...

  12. Turbo-Charged Lighting Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. H. II

    TURBO-CHARGED LIGHTING DESIGN William H. Clark II Design Engineer O'Connell Robertson & Assoc Austin/ Texas ABSTRACT The task of the lighting designer has become very complex, involving thousands of choices for fixture types and hundreds...

  13. Year 6 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring and Phase II Source Investigation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, encompasses the property of the former United Heckathorn pesticide packaging plant and the adjacent waterway, Lauritzen Channel. The site was used from 1945 to 1966 by several operators to produce various agricultural chemicals. The site was placed on the National Priorities List of Superfund sites in 1990, which resulted in the removal of pesticide-contaminated soil from the upland portion of the site and dredging the marine portion of the site. Post-remediation marine monitoring and associated studies conducted through 2002 indicate that the contamination in the channel continues to pose a significant risk to biota and human health. This report documents continued marine monitoring and source investigation studies conducted in 2003.

  14. Relativistic Winds from Compact Gamma-Ray Sources: II. Pair Loading and Radiative Acceleration in Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Thompson; Piero Madau

    2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effects of rapid pair creation by an intense pulse of gamma-rays propagating ahead of a relativistic shock. Side-scattered photons colliding with the main gamma-ray beam amplify the density of scattering charges. The acceleration rate of the pair-loaded medium is calculated, and its limiting bulk Lorentz factor related to the spectrum and compactness of the photon source. One obtains, as a result, a definite prediction for the relative inertia in baryons and pairs. The deceleration of a relativistic shock in the moving medium, and the resulting synchrotron emissivity, are compared with existing calculations for a static medium. The radiative efficiency is increased dramatically by pair loading. When the initial ambient density exceeds a critical value, the scattering depth traversed by the main gamma-ray pulse rises above unity, and the pulse is broadened. These considerations place significant constraints on burst progenitors: a pre-burst mass loss rate exceeding 10^{-5} M_\\odot per year is difficult to reconcile with individual pulses narrower than 10 s, unless the radiative efficiency is low. An anisotropic gamma-ray flux (on an angular scale \\Gamma^{-1} or larger) drives a large velocity shear that greatly increases the energy in the seed magnetic field forward of the propagating shock.

  15. Welcome to Linac Coherent Light Source | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHEWeekly Reports 2014CCSTA BLE OF CON

  16. VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS Andrea Basso method to improve the lighting conditions of a real scene or video sequence. In particular we concentrate on modifying real light sources intensities and inserting virtual lights into a real scene viewed from a fixed

  17. Safety | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Overview Each person who works at LCLS is required to be familiar with and identify in advance the hazards associated with hisher work, the hazards associated with work...

  18. Next Generation Light Source Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2April 2013 ESH&SNext Big Idea ComingNext

  19. Safety | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR EMaterials

  20. SAC - Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15Rotary FiringRobertSAC Home | Project

  1. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNewsOurAD SLACPortal >LCLS

  2. Development of Novel RTP-like Processing for Solar Cell Fabrication using UV-Rich Light Sources: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-11-442

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Mattson Technology are interested in developing new processing techniques for fabrication of solar cells using UV-rich optical processing. UV light has a very high absorption coefficient in most semiconductors, allowing the semiconductor surface to be heated locally and, in some cases, without a significant increase in the substrate temperature. NREL has several projects related to cell processing that currently use an optical furnace (having a spectrum rich in visible and infrared light). Mattson Technology has developed a UV rich light source that can be used in either pulse or continuous modes. The objective of this CRADA is to explore applications in solar cell processing where absorption characteristics of UV light can lead to lower cell cost and/or higher efficiencies.

  3. Time-Multiplexed Measurements of Nonclassical Light at Telecom Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Harder; C. Silberhorn; J. Rehacek; Z. Hradil; L. Motka; B. Stoklasa; L. L. Sanchez-Soto

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the experimental reconstruction of the statistical properties of an ultrafast pulsed type-II parametric down conversion source in a periodically poled KTP waveguide at telecom wavelengths, with almost perfect photon-number correlations. We used a photon-number-resolving time-multiplexed detector based on a fiber-optical setup and a pair of avalanche photodiodes. By resorting to a germane data-pattern tomography, we assess the properties of the nonclassical light states states with unprecedented precision.

  4. LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SECTION 3 LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology 2. Sources & luminaires 3. Controls #12;SECTION 3SECTION 3 DISCUSSION: COMMON LIGHTING TERMINOLOGY 1. What are the definitions of the following lighting terms? 2. Do you use these terms in professional practice? 3. What other lighting terminology do you use

  5. LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology 2. Sources and luminaires 3. Controls #12;SECTION 2 DISCUSSION: COMMON LIGHTING TERMINOLOGY 1. What are the definitions of the following lighting terms? 2. Do you use these terms in professional practice? 3. What other lighting terminology do you use on the job? SLIDE 14

  6. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Slaughter, Daniel S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Rude, Bruce S.; Bluhm, Hendrik [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neppl, Stefan; Cryan, James P.; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Fraund, Matthew W.; Khurmi, Champak; Wright, Travis W.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Gessner, Oliver, E-mail: ogessner@lbl.gov [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hertlein, Marcus P.; Tyliszczak, Tolek [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Huse, Nils [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of Hamburg and Max-Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ?0.1 mm spatial resolution and ?150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E{sub p} = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503–508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ?9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ?1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with the retarding ratio can be well approximated by applying Liouville's theorem of constant emittance to the electron trajectories inside the lens system. The performance of the setup is demonstrated by characterizing the laser fluence-dependent transient surface photovoltage response of a laser-excited Si(100) sample.

  7. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Achermann, Marc (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  8. LCLS-II Undulator Tolerance Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Marks, S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is building a new FEL user facility, LCLS-II, as a major upgrade to the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The upgrade will include two new Free Electron Lasers (FELs), to generate soft (SXR) and hard x-ray (HXR) SASE FEL radiation, based on planar, variable gap hybrid undulators with two different undulator periods (SXU: 55 mm, HXU: 32 mm). An algebraic FEL tolerance analysis for the undulator lines, including tuning, alignment, and phase correction tolerances has been performed. The methods and results are presented in this paper.

  9. Novel phosphors for solid state lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Joshua D

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state white light emitting diode lighting devices outperform conventional light sources in terms of lifetime, durability, and lumens per watt. However, the capital contribution is still to high to encourage widespread adoption. Furthermore...

  10. Illuminating system and method for specialized and decorative lighting using liquid light guides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zorn, Carl J. (Yorktown, VA); Kross, Brian J. (Yorktown, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Wojcik, Randolph F. (Yorktown, VA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention comprises an illumination system for specialized decorative lighting including a light source, a flexible plastic tube sheath for distributing the light to a remote location, a transparent liquid core filling the tube that has an index of refraction greater than that of the plastic tube and an arrangement where light coupled from the light source is caused to leak from the liquid light guide at desired locations for the purposes of specialized lighting, such as underwater illumination in swimming pools.

  11. LED Lighting Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw-Meadow, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Municipal Street Lighting Consortium ? American Public Power Association (APPA) ? Demonstration in Energy Efficiency Development (DEED) ? Source of funding and database of completed LED roadway projects 6 Rules of the Road ESL-KT-11-11-57 CATEE 2011..., 2011 ? 9 Solar-Assisted LED Case Study LaQuinta Hotel, Cedar Park, Texas ? Utilizes 18 - ActiveLED Solar-Assisted Parking Lot Lights ? Utilizes ?power management? to extend battery life while handling light output ? Reduces load which reduces PV...

  12. Trapping Light With Mirrors David Milovich Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milovich, David

    Trapping Light With Mirrors David Milovich Jr. February 20, 2004 Abstract. We show that, given finitely many line-segment mirrors in the plane, that do not touch, and an arbitrary point source of light emitted light beams escape. This result is shown to imply that, for a given point source of light

  13. Effect of temperature on the optical and structural properties of hexadecylamine capped ZnS nanoparticles using Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate as single source precursor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onwudiwe, Damian C., E-mail: dconwudiwe@webmail.co.za [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Strydom, Christien [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)] [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi S., E-mail: oluwafemi.oluwatobi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha Campus, Private Bag X1, Mthatha (South Africa); Songca, Sandile P. [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Walter Sisulu University, P.O. Box 19712, Tecoma, East London (South Africa)] [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Walter Sisulu University, P.O. Box 19712, Tecoma, East London (South Africa)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? HDA-capped ZnS nanoparticles were synthesized via thermolysis of a single source precursor. ? Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate was used as the single source precursor. ? The growth temperature was varied to study the optical properties of the nanocrystals. ? Change in growth temperature affects the structural properties of the ZnS nanoparticles. ? Hexagonal wurtzite phase was obtained at lower temperatures while cubic sphalerite phase was obtained at higher growth temperatures. -- Abstract: Reported in this work is the synthesis of HDA (hexadecylamine)-capped ZnS nanoparticles by a single source route using Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate as a precursor. By varying the growth temperature, the temporal evolution of the optical properties and morphology of the nanocrystals were investigated. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All the particles exhibited quantum confinement in their optical properties with band edge emission at the early stage of the reaction. The XRD showed transition from hexagonal wurtzite phase to cubic sphalerite phase as the growth temperature increases. The TEM image showed that the particles are small and spherical in shape while the HRTEM image confirmed the crystalline nature of the material.

  14. Abstract--This paper deals with halogen luminaries, ones of the main used lighting sources in residential area. The use of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    power systems were performed to show the accuracy of developed models. Index Terms--halogen lamp, EMTP is with Schneider Electric Industries (Business Unit Power ­ Systems and Mechatronic Integration), 31 Pierre Mendes and the LV power systems. But studies regarding the power up problem of electrical lighting systems where ETs

  15. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  16. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  17. PERFORMANCE OF THE DIAGNOSTICS FOR NSLS-II LINAC COMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Padrazo, D.; Wang, G.M.; Heese, R.; Hseuh H.-C.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Pinayev, I.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The transfer lines not only provide a means to deliver the beam from one machine to another, they also provide a suite of diagnostics and utilities to measure the properties of the beam to be delivered. In this paper we discuss the suite of diagnostics that will be used to commission the NSLS-II linac and measure the beam properties. The linac to booster transfer line can measure the linac emittance with a three screens measurement or a quadrupole scan. Energy and energy spread are measured in a dispersive section. Total charge and charge uniformity are measured with wall current monitors in the linac and transformers in the transfer line. We show that the performance of the diagnostics in the transfer line will be sufficient to ensure the linac meets its specifications and provides a means of trouble shooting and studying the linac in future operation.

  18. Warm intermediate inflation in the Randall-Sundrum II model in the light of Planck 2015 and BICEP2 results: A general dissipative coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramón; Olivares, Marco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary Universe in the Randall-Sundrum II model during intermediate inflation is studied. For this purpose, we consider a general form for the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma(T,\\phi)=C_{\\phi}\\,\\frac{T^{m}}{\\phi^{m-1}}$, and also analyze this inflationary model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We study the evolution of the Universe under the slow-roll approximation and find solutions to the full effective Friedmann equation in the brane-world framework. In order to constrain the parameters in our model, we consider the recent data from the BICEP2-Planck 2015 data together with the necessary condition for warm inflation $T>H$, and also the condition from the weak (or strong) dissipative regime.

  19. Warm intermediate inflation in the Randall-Sundrum II model in the light of Planck 2015 and BICEP2 results: A general dissipative coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramón Herrera; Nelson Videla; Marco Olivares

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary Universe in the Randall-Sundrum II model during intermediate inflation is studied. For this purpose, we consider a general form for the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma(T,\\phi)=C_{\\phi}\\,\\frac{T^{m}}{\\phi^{m-1}}$, and also analyze this inflationary model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We study the evolution of the Universe under the slow-roll approximation and find solutions to the full effective Friedmann equation in the brane-world framework. In order to constrain the parameters in our model, we consider the recent data from the BICEP2-Planck 2015 data together with the necessary condition for warm inflation $T>H$, and also the condition from the weak (or strong) dissipative regime.

  20. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  1. ORFEUS II and IUE Spectroscopy of EX Hydrae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Mauche

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ORFEUS-SPAS II FUV spectra, IUE UV spectra, and archival EUVE deep survey photometry, we present a detailed picture of the behavior of the magnetic cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae. Like HUT spectra of this source, the FUV and UV spectra reveal broad emission lines of He II, C II-IV, N III and V, O VI, Si III-IV, and Al III superposed on a continuum which is blue in the UV and nearly flat in the FUV. Like ORFEUS spectra of AM Her, the O VI doublet is resolved into broad and narrow emission components. Consistent with its behavior in the optical, the FUV and UV continuum flux densities, the FUV and UV broad emission line fluxes, and the radial velocity of the O VI broad emission component all vary on the spin phase of the white dwarf, with the maximum of the FUV and UV continuum and broad emission line flux light curves coincident with maximum blueshift of the broad O VI emission component. On the binary phase, the broad dip in the EUV light curve is accompanied by strong eclipses of the UV emission lines and by variations in both the flux and radial velocity of the O VI narrow emission component. The available data are consistent with the accretion funnel being the source of the FUV and UV continuum and the O VI broad emission component, and the white dwarf being the source of the O VI narrow emission component.

  2. Light extraction enhanced white light-emitting diodes with multi-layered phosphor configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Jiun Pyng; Tran, Nguyen T.; Shi, Frank G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. K. Kim, “Solid-state light sources getting smart,”power phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes based on III-for phosphor- based white-light-emitting diodes,” Appl.

  3. LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 4.4 Portable Office Lighting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 4.4 Portable Office Lighting Systems FINAL REPORT Prepared For, Governor October 2005 CEC-500-2005-141-A13 #12;Portable Office Lighting Systems ­ Final Report Architectural Energy Corporation/CLTC PIER Lighting Research Program ii 500-01-041 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  4. Smart lighting: New Roles for Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Smart lighting: New Roles for Light in the Solid State Lighting World Robert F. Karlicek, Jr. Director, Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center Professor, Electrical, Systems and Computer Lighting · What is Smart Lighting · Technology Barriers to Smart Lighting · Visible Light Communications

  5. Commercial Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial lighting accounts for more than 20 percent of total commercial building energy use. The Energy Department works to reduce lighting energy use through research and deployment.

  6. Control of Light-matter Interaction Using Dispersion Engineered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and non-classical light sources using quantum dots, metamaterials for controlling light-matter interaction, and engineered nonlinear optical materials using hybrid nanocomposites...

  7. Physics of a magnetic filter for negative ion sources. II. E Multiplication-Sign B drift through the filter in a real geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boeuf, J. P.; Claustre, J.; Chaudhury, B.; Fubiani, G. [LAboratoire PLAsma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), Universite de Toulouse, Bt. 3R2, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics of a magnetic filter under conditions similar to those of the negative ion source for the ITER neutral beam injector is analyzed with the help of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. A detailed analysis of the different terms of the electron momentum equations shows how diamagnetic and drift currents can be dominant in different regions of the filter. Electron transport through the filter is due to an E Multiplication-Sign B drift current on one side of the chamber induced by the presence of the chamber walls perpendicular to the electron diamagnetic current. The filter design of the ITER negative ion source, which does not allow a closed electron diamagnetic current, induces an asymmetry of the plasma that is analyzed with the particle model. It is shown that electron transport through the filter in this geometry is very different from the transport in an ideal, one-dimensional magnetic filter often considered in the literature and described in detail in the companion paper [Boeuf et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 113509 (2012)].

  8. Cine-animé: adaptations of realistic lighting styles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinh, Ellen Man Ngoc

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I.1. Origins of Anim?e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I.2. Definition of Cinematography . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 I.3. Statement of Intent... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 II BACKGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 II.1. Anim?e in CG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 II.2. Cinematography Styles - Classic Film Lighting . . . . 7 II.3. Film Noir in CG...

  9. Text-Alternative Version LED Lighting Forecast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE report Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications estimates the energy savings of LED white-light sources over the analysis period of 2013 to 2030....

  10. Light Dark Matter in the light of CRESST-II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4? significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results andmore »with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.« less

  11. Light Dark Matter in the light of CRESST-II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4? significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results and with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.

  12. Lighting system with heat distribution face plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

  13. Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light is a "wave packet" A photon is a "light particle" #12;Electromagnetic Radiation and You Light is sometimes

  14. LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Daniel

    . A light-emitting diode (LED) is a solid-state lighting source that switches on instantly, is readily

  15. VOLTTRONTM as an Open Source Platform for Energy Management Applicatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virginia Tech VOLTTRON TM as an Open Source Platform for Energy Management Applications HVAC Controllers Lighting Controllers Lighting circuit(s) Plug load Controllers July 23,...

  16. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T. [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 9808578 (Japan); Miyazaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  17. Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Betty Lise

    1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if://blogs.stthomas.edu/realestate/2011/01/24/residential-real-estate-professionals-how-do-you- develop feedback! There is a connection between the output and the input! Therefore forces inputs to same voltage

  18. Illuminating system and method for specialized and decorative lighting using liquid light guides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zorn, C.J.; Kross, B.J.; Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.F.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention comprises an illumination system for specialized decorative lighting including a light source, a flexible plastic tube sheath for distributing the light to a remote location, a transparent liquid core filling the tube that has an index of refraction greater than that of the plastic tube and an arrangement where light coupled from the light source is caused to leak from the liquid light guide at desired locations for the purposes of specialized lighting, such as underwater illumination in swimming pools. 5 figs.

  19. Integrated LED-based luminare for general lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowling, Kevin J.; Lys, Ihor A.; Roberge, Brian; Williamson, Ryan C.; Roberts, Ron; Datta, Michael; Mollnow, Tomas; Morgan, Frederick M.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting apparatus and methods employing LED light sources are described. The LED light sources are integrated with other components in the form of a luminaire or other general purpose lighting structure. Some of the lighting structures are formed as Parabolic Aluminum Reflector (PAR) luminaires, allowing them to be inserted into conventional sockets. The lighting structures display beneficial operating characteristics, such as efficient operation, high thermal dissipation, high output, and good color mixing.

  20. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sbir. The Phase II awards related to SSL are listed below: Recipient: Physical Optics Corporation (POC) Title: Highly Efficient Organic Light-Emitting Devices for General...

  1. LEDs for Energy Efficient Greenhouse Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Devesh; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light energy is an important factor for plant growth. In regions where the natural light source, i.e. solar radiation, is not sufficient for growth optimization, additional light sources are being used. Traditional light sources such as high pressure sodium lamps and other metal halide lamps are not very efficient and generate high radiant heat. Therefore, new sustainable solutions should be developed for energy efficient greenhouse lighting. Recent developments in the field of light source technologies have opened up new perspectives for sustainable and highly efficient light sources in the form of light-emitting diodes, i.e. LEDs, for greenhouse lighting. This review focuses on the potential of LEDs to replace traditional light sources in the greenhouse. In a comparative economic analysis of traditional vs. LED lighting, we show that the introduction of LEDs allows reduction of the production cost of vegetables in the long-run of several years, due to the high energy efficiency, low maintenance cost and lon...

  2. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  3. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  4. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  5. Renewal of the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. M.

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure that state-of-the-art hard x-ray tools are available for US scientists and engineers who are solving key problems in energy, environment, technology development and human health, the nation's unique high-energy x-ray source needs a major renewal of its capabilities. The Advanced Photon Source renewal program responds to key scientific needs driven by our user community. The renewal encompasses many innovations in beamlines and accelerator capabilities, each of which will transform our tools and allow new problems to be solved. In particular the APS renewal dramatically expands two compelling avenues for research. Through x-ray imaging, we can illuminate complex hierarchical structures from the molecular level to the macroscopic level, and study how they change in time and in response to stimuli. Images will facilitate understanding how proteins fit together to make living organisms, contribute to development of lighter, higher-strength alloys for fuel-efficient transportation and advance the use of biomass for alternative fuels. Hard x-rays are also especially suited to the study of real materials, under realistic conditions and in real-time. The advances proposed in this area would help develop more efficient catalysts, enhance green manufacturing, point the way to artificial light-harvesting inspired by biology and help us develop more efficient lighting. The scope of the renewal of our {approx}$1.5B facility is estimated to be {approx}$350M over five years. It is vital that the investment begin as soon as possible. The renewed APS would complement other national investments such as the National Synchrotron Light Source-II and would keep the U.S. internationally competitive.

  6. A heat-driven monochromatic light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefani, F.; Lawless, J.L.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates theoretically the efficiency with which heat may be converted into resonance radiation in a cesium thermionic diode. An analytical model of a thermionic converter is employed which combines the coupled effects of line radiation transport, excited-state kinetics, and plasma diffusion. Operating regimes are established for various degrees of optical density in the plasma. The results indicate that monochromatic radiation can be produced with efficiencies on the order of 30 percent provided there is an adequate voltage drop across the plasma. In this study, a drop of one volt was used since it can be maintained without any electrical power input to the device. It is found that high efficiencies come by virtue of the higher interelectrode distances which the solutions will accommodate, and that radiation can be generated efficiently, even with optically dense gases.

  7. National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

  8. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UV). Powerful, ultrafast pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (recorded with individual ultrafast pulses may be compared.electronic damage” with ultrafast pulses. Only at a delay

  9. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal Review | PCS Proposal Review | MEC Optical-Laser-Only Proposal Review | Other LCLS Policies SUBMIT NEW PROPOSALS BY 4 pm PACIFIC on February 3, 2015. View the latest long...

  10. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Support Contact information for LCLS scientific, operations and user support staff. User Support For information about user research administration at LCLS or SSRL. Cathy...

  11. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Publications and Press | Proposal Preparation | Proposal Review| Beam Time Allocation LCLS Access Policy Overview LCLS aims to attract diverse users and to enable a broad set of...

  12. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Proposal Submission and Scheduling Step-By-Step Instructions to Working at LCLS Review LCLS Policies Review Machine FAQ & Parameters Register and Submit Proposals...

  13. Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2.5.3 Temperature distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2-X radiative transition that is responsible for the sulfur lamp's bright sun-like spectrum #12;Contents 1

  14. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    harvesting by natural and artificial systems, energy storageof both natural and artificial photosynthetic systems isand synthesis of artificial photosynthetic systems based-on

  15. Industry Group Learns About Light Source Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SVLG pointed out that many Fortune 500 companies as well as small businesses and start-ups already use these facilites and listed a few examples: The Bay Area Photovoltaic...

  16. Next Generation Light Source CEO & President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    + Lamps Ballast Ballast + Lamps LED 1.5 60,000 1.00 2.50 1.00 2.50 FL 0.063 20,000 0.20 0.39 0.70 0.89 FPL GROWTH FORUM 2 Flat Panel Lamp (FPL) & Applications 24x12 12x12 24x4 12x3 #12;tm THE 22nd NREL INDUSTRY GROWTH FORUM 3 Company Overview Background ­ Inc. 02/07 ­ HQ Cupertino, CA Product ­ Flat panel lamp

  17. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamura Ed., Lori S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliable evidence of high hydrogen storage capacity at roommechanism could provide hydrogen storage capacity thatthe feasi­ bility of hydrogen storage through chemisorption

  18. Activity Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    .B. Parise, and G. Artioli, "First Structural Investigation of a Super-hydrated Zeolite," page 2-87. 4. from

  19. Advanced Light Source Beam Position Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems is done in C or PLM languages, generally by thetranslated BASIC code to PLM, Chris Timossi built and coded

  20. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probe. The development of CW SCRF technology, also used inCW superconducting RF (SCRF) linac provides high repetitionThe great attractions of CW SCRF for future FEL facilities

  1. Advanced Light Source Beam Position Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Diagram of storage ring BPM button test set. The 290 ohmmodules. Fig. 6 Drawing of BPM modules and bin. The chassis7 Basic signal flow between BPM plug-in modules. Throughout

  2. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by pressure, radiation, or electric and magnetic fields). Tocycle pulses of THz radiation with electric-field strengths

  3. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamura Ed., Lori S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PLoS Biology 3, 1549 Beetz, T , M . R . Howells, C.Shapiro, D . , P. Thibault, T. Beetz, V. Elser, M . Howells,P i t h l b a u J t T . Beetz, V. Eiser, M, Howells, C,

  4. Laser-Compton Light Source Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured VideosTechnologies |

  5. Spokesperson Checklist | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report: IG-0900MarketSpokesperson Checklist These

  6. LightSource Renewables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarmsPower Co LtdTNLianyungang

  7. User Agreements | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4. UraniumUsed FuelFAQ »WPP/JH/SDH

  8. User Financial Accounts | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4. UraniumUsedFacilities HighFinancial

  9. User Shipments | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4.CCSM4large.jpg BER:Services

  10. LCLS Parameters Update | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157Bioenergy09913 35LCLS

  11. LCLS Policies | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157Bioenergy09913 35LCLSPolicies

  12. Collaborator Checklist | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i tCollaboration March 16, 2010 DuringCollaborator

  13. Committees & Contacts | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the following commentsCurrent-Promotions015

  14. Contact Us | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws | NationalContactAboutContact Us

  15. Linac Coherent Light SourCe

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing | Department ofEnergyEnergy9Linac Coherent

  16. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to the LCLS User Resources Site Resource

  17. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to the LCLS User Resources Site

  18. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to the LCLS User Resources SiteLCLS

  19. Becoming a User | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like3.3 PrintVulture Spatial EcologyGraya

  20. Bioimaging Workshop - Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More LikeAndreas Hampel Dr.

  1. Industry Group Learns About Light Source Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News link to facebook linkProtection

  2. Working at SLAC | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresented inEmployment Opportunities

  3. The Linac Coherent Light Source is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print ItEnergy

  4. After Beamtime | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14Scripting forForcingProtect Yourself from

  5. Food Options | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorkingEnergyGo modelP e r f o r

  6. Proposal Submission | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromising Magnesium BatteryProposalProposal

  7. Advanced Photon Source, Canadian Light Source Strengthen Ties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Influenza Virus Clever Apes on WBEZ: Breaking the Fossil Record Gerig to Chair Particle Accelerator School Board APS News Archives: 2014 | 2013 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 |...

  8. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  9. Insurance Risk Management in the Light of Paul Embrechts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    Insurance Risk Management in the Light of Basel II Paul Embrechts ETH Zurich and London School of Economics also in the light of Solvency II. c RiskLab (Paul Embrechts) #12;This talk is based · Remark: Don't shoot me, I am only the piano player! c RiskLab (Paul Embrechts) 1 #12;Background and Goals

  10. Solid State Lighting ECE 198 Lab Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasserman, Daniel M.

    will take the role of a consultant to either a large company, a government institution, or an academic A significant fraction of the electricity used in this country is used for lighting applications, whether countries require sources of light, there has been a significant increase in light consumption globally

  11. Energy Conversion: Solid-State Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 Energy Conversion: Solid-State Lighting E. Kioupakis1,2 , P. Rinke1,3 , A. Janotti1 , Q. Yan1 fraction of the world's energy resources [1]. Lighting has been one of the earliest applications. The inefficiency of existing light sources that waste most of the power they consume is the reason for this large

  12. Solid State Lighting Program (Falcon)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, Steven

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two years, KLA-Tencor and partners successfully developed and deployed software and hardware tools that increase product yield for High Brightness LED (HBLED) manufacturing and reduce product development and factory ramp times. This report summarizes our development effort and details of how the results of the Solid State Light Program (Falcon) have started to help HBLED manufacturers optimize process control by enabling them to flag and correct identified killer defect conditions at any point of origin in the process manufacturing flow. This constitutes a quantum leap in yield management over current practice. Current practice consists of die dispositioning which is just rejection of bad die at end of process based upon probe tests, loosely assisted by optical in-line monitoring for gross process deficiencies. For the first time, and as a result of our Solid State Lighting Program, our LED manufacturing partners have obtained the software and hardware tools that optimize individual process steps to control killer defects at the point in the processes where they originate. Products developed during our two year program enable optimized inspection strategies for many product lines to minimize cost and maximize yield. The Solid State Lighting Program was structured in three phases: i) the development of advanced imaging modes that achieve clear separation between LED defect types, improves signal to noise and scan rates, and minimizes nuisance defects for both front end and back end inspection tools, ii) the creation of defect source analysis (DSA) software that connect the defect maps from back-end and front-end HBLED manufacturing tools to permit the automatic overlay and traceability of defects between tools and process steps, suppress nuisance defects, and identify the origin of killer defects with process step and conditions, and iii) working with partners (Philips Lumileds) on product wafers, obtain a detailed statistical correlation of automated defect and DSA map overlay to failed die identified using end product probe test results. Results from our two year effort have led to “automated end-to-end defect detection” with full defect traceability and the ability to unambiguously correlate device killer defects to optically detected features and their point of origin within the process. Success of the program can be measured by yield improvements at our partner’s facilities and new product orders.

  13. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Robert J., E-mail: robert.cooper@ucl.ac.uk; Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C. [Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  14. Radioluminescent lighting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The glow-in-the-dark stereotype that characterizes the popular image of nuclear materials is not accidental. When the French scientist, Henri Becquerel, first discovered radioactivity in 1896, he was interested in luminescence. Radioluminescence, the production of light from a mixture of energetic and passive materials, is probably the oldest practical application of the unstable nucleus. Tritium-based radioluminescent lighting, in spite of the biologically favorable character of the gaseous tritium isotope, was included in the general tightening of environmental and safety regulations. Tritium light manufacturers would have to meet two fundamental conditions: (1) The benefit clearly outweighed the risk, to the extent that even the perceived risk of a skeptical public would be overcome. (2) The need was significant enough that the customer/user would be willing and able to afford the cost of regulation that was imposed both in the manufacture, use and eventual disposal of nuclear materials. In 1981, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were investigating larger radioluminescent applications using byproduct nuclear material such as krypton-85, as well as tritium. By 1982, it appeared that large source, (100 Curies or more) tritium gas tube, lights might be useful for marking runways and drop zones for military operations and perhaps even special civilian aviation applications. The successful development of this idea depended on making the light bright enough and demonstrating that large gas tube sources could be used and maintained safely in the environment. This successful DOE program is now in the process of being completed and closed-out. Working closely with the tritium light industry, State governments and other Federal agencies, the basic program goals have been achieved. This is a detailed report of what they have learned, proven, and discovered. 91 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (JF)

  15. Science Highlights 2012 | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Argonne Advanced Photon Source and two other U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science synchrotron light sources. Their breakthrough results pave the way for development of...

  16. Science Highlights 2013 | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from experiments carried out using x-rays from two U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science light sources including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory...

  17. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  18. SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

  19. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  20. Windows and lighting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity -- factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout the indoor environment, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Windows and lighting are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program. Despite important achievements in reducing building energy consumption over the past decade, significant additional savings are still possible. These will come from two complementary strategies: (1) improve building designs so that they effectively apply existing technologies and extend the market penetration of these technologies; and (2) develop advanced technologies that increase the savings potential of each application. Both the Windows and Daylighting Group and the Lighting System Research Group have made substantial contributions in each of these areas, and continue to do so through the ongoing research summarized here. 23 refs., 16 figs.

  1. Numerical Modelling of Light Emission and Propagation in (Organic) LEDs with the Green's Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    light emitting diodes, light emission, light extraction, dipole radiation, stratified media, layered surpasses incandescent sources by a factor of 2 and with further improvements light emitting diodes could on light extraction techniques from inorganic light emitting diodes we recommend chapter 5 in 1 . Organic

  2. Nonequilibrium lighting plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakin, J.T. (GE Lighting, Nela Park, Cleveland, OH (US))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the science of a variety of devices employing nonequilibrium lighting plasmas is reviewed. The devices include the fluorescent lamp, the low-pressure sodium lamp, the neon sign, ultraviolet lamps, glow indicators, and a variety of devices used by spectroscopists, such as the hollow cathode light source. The plasma conditions in representative commercial devices are described. Recent research on the electron gas, the role of heavy particles, spatial and temporal inhomogeneities, and new electrodeless excitation schemes is reviewed. Areas of future activity are expected to be in new applications of high-frequency electronics to commercial devices, new laser-based diagnostics of plasma conditions, and more sophisticated models requiring more reliable and extensive rate coefficient data.

  3. Role of minerals in thermal alteration of organic matter. II. A material balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis experiments were performed on Green River and Monterey Formation kerogens (Types I and II, respectively) with and without calcite, illite, or montmorillonite at 300/sup 0/C for 2 to 1000 hours under dry and hydrous conditions. Pyrolysis products were identified and quantified, and a material balance of product and reactants resulted. Applying the results to maturation of organic matter in natural environments, they suggest that a given type of organic matter associated with different minerals in source rocks will yield different products. Furthermore, the different adsorption capacities of minerals exert a significant influence on the migration of polar and high molecular weight compounds generated from the breakdown of kerogen. Therefore, the overall accumulated products from carbonate source rocks are mainly heavy oils with some gas, whereas light oils and gases are the main products from source rocks that contain expandable clays with catalytic and adsorptive properties. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  4. White organic light-emitting diodes: Status and perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reineke, Sebastian

    White organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ultrathin, large-area light sources made from organic semiconductor materials. Over the past decades, much research has been spent on finding suitable materials to realize ...

  5. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size and shape to optimize temperature and emission spectra.

  6. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical squestionnairesquestionnaires AgreementLighting

  7. Reduction of background clutter in structured lighting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jeffrey J.; Giles, Michael K.; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson Jr., Patrick A.; Novick, David K.; Wilson, Christopher W.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for segmenting the reflected light of an illumination source having a characteristic wavelength from background illumination (i.e. clutter) in structured lighting systems can comprise pulsing the light source used to illuminate a scene, pulsing the light source synchronously with the opening of a shutter in an imaging device, estimating the contribution of background clutter by interpolation of images of the scene collected at multiple spectral bands not including the characteristic wavelength and subtracting the estimated background contribution from an image of the scene comprising the wavelength of the light source and, placing a polarizing filter between the imaging device and the scene, where the illumination source can be polarized in the same orientation as the polarizing filter. Apparatus for segmenting the light of an illumination source from background illumination can comprise an illuminator, an image receiver for receiving images of multiple spectral bands, a processor for calculations and interpolations, and a polarizing filter.

  8. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Page, Erik (Berkeley, CA); Gould, Carl T. (Medford, OR)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  9. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (El Sobrante, CA); Page, Erik (Berkeley, CA); Gould, Carl T. (Medford, OR)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  10. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  11. Controls for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

  12. Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pumps Lighting Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: 100 - 200 Air Source Heat Pumps: 100 - 400 Geothermal Heat...

  13. Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    light trucks. Source: Used vehicles - Ward's Automotive, New cars - Bureau of Economic Analysis, National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) Underlying Detail Tables, Table 7.2.5S...

  14. assessing light scattering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    430 Brookhaven National Laboratory LIGHT SOURCES DIRECTORATE Subject: Building 725 Fire Hazard AnalysisFire Hazard Assessment Physics Websites Summary: Brookhaven National...

  15. Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A NOVEL LIGHT GUIDING PLATE FOR BACKLIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is applied in TFT-LCD which consists of light source (as a fluorescent lamp), a light guiding plate, prism. A white LED is used to be light sources of the CCLGP and optical illuminator is applied to measure AND CONCEPT The cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) was used to be the light sources of the traditional

  16. BTO Awards Small Business Grants for Lighting, Building-Integrated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) and building-integrated heat and moisture exchange technology: VoltServer, Inc. (Phase II)-Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and...

  17. Lighting studies: interpreting lighting styles from traditional media in computer-generated imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Cindy Christine

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is particularly important. Often, characters are given a preliminary lighting set-up without regard for or knowledge o f the background. Adjustments are made once the character is added to the background. That the characters' lighting differs ? sometimes quite..., many 3D objects w i l l hide a light placed directly behind them (Figure II. La . ) . A digital lighter must know how to work around this problem, in this case either by placing the light at a slightly different angle (Figure I l . l .b . ) , adding...

  18. New possible resonance for population II Cepheids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.N.; Kidman, R.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light and velocity curves of some radial mode variable stars seem to indicate a resonance where the second overtone has a period exactly half that of the fundamental mode. The two classes of stars that show this resonance by bumps in their light curves are the classical Cepheids and the population II BL Her variables. We here propose that there is another resonance for the population II W Vir variables where the ratio of the first overtone to the fundamental periods is 0.5.

  19. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

  20. A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II (491st Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieme, Juergen [BNL Photon Sciences Directorate

    2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Time is money and for scientists who need to collect data at research facilities like Brookhaven Lab’s National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), “beamtime” can be a precious commodity. While scanning a complex material with a specific technique and standard equipment today would take days to complete, researchers preparing to use brighter x-rays and the new sub-micron-resolution x-ray spectroscopy (SRX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) could scan the same sample in greater detail with just a few hours of beamtime. Talk about savings and new opportunities for researchers! Users will rely on these tools for locating trace elements in contaminated soils, developing processes for nanoparticles to deliver medical treatments, and much more. Dr. Thieme explains benefits for next-generation research with spectroscopy and more intense x-rays at NSLS-II. He discusses the instrumentation, features, and uses for the new SRX beamline, highlighting its speed, adjustability, and versatility for probing samples ranging in size from millimeters down to the nanoscale. He will talk about complementary beamlines being developed for additional capabilities at NSLS-II as well.

  1. Sustainable Office Lighting Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

  2. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  3. II f

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W.f - f

  4. Ii1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c*1r' (-r

  5. absolute source activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm....

  6. Far UV excitation of hydrogen and light emission; applications in astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques Moret-Bailly

    2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming a spherical symmetry, the extreme UV emitted by a very hot source ionizes low pressure molecular hydrogen making a transparent bubble of H II (Protons and electrons). For an increase of radius, intensity of extreme UV and temperature decrease, so that the plasma contains more and more atoms. A spherical shell, mainly of neutral atoms (H I) appears. If this shell is optically thick at Lyman frequencies of H I, it is superradiant and a competition of modes selects modes tangent to a sphere for which many atoms are excited. Thus, a shell of plasma emits, into a given direction, tangential rays showing a ring in which selected modes are brighter. While at Lyman frequencies, absorption of rays emitted by the source excites the atoms able to amplify the superradiance, a more powerful amplification of superradiance results from an induced scattering of the radial beams, which extends to feet of lines and progressively to the whole spectrum. Thermodynamics says that the brightness of radial and tangential beams tends to be equal; if the solid angle of observation is much larger for the ring than for the source, almost the whole light emitted by the source is transferred to the rings, and the source becomes invisible. Paradoxically, a glow due to incoherent scattering and impurities around the source remains visible. As the scattering decreases with the decrease of the radial intensity, the brightness of the ring decreases with radius. These characteristics are found in supernova remnant 1987A.

  7. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

    1990-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counter electrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films. 4 figs.

  8. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Rauh, R. David

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  9. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cogan, Stuart F. (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062); Rauh, R. David (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  10. Solid state electrochromic light modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogan, Stuart F. (Sudbury, MA); Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

  11. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, Graeme [OSRAM SYLVANIA, CRSL, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA (United States); Curry, John J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  13. Generation and manipulation of nonclassical light using photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelena Vuckovic; Dirk Englund; David Fattal; Edo Waks; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystal cavities can localize light into nanoscale volumes with high quality factors. This permits a strong interaction between light and matter, which is important for the construction of classical light sources with improved properties (e.g., low threshold lasers) and of nonclassical light sources (such as single and entangled photon sources) that are crucial pieces of hardware of quantum information processing systems. This article will review some of our recent experimental and theoretical results on the interaction between single quantum dots and photonic crystal cavity fields, and on the integration of multiple photonic crystal devices into functional circuits for quantum information processing.

  14. Photometric Stereo with General, Unknown Lighting Ronen Basri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    Photometric Stereo with General, Unknown Lighting Ronen Basri£ David Jacobs Dept. of Computer properties of an object using multiple images taken with a fixed viewpoint and variable lighting conditions. This work has primarily relied on the presence of a single point source of light in each image. In this pa

  15. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  16. Ultrafast Magnetic Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarov, Sergey V; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel concept for efficient dynamic tuning of optical properties of a high refractive index subwavelength nanoparticle with a magnetic Mie-type resonance by means of femtosecond laser radiation. This concept is based on ultrafast generation of electron-hole plasma within such nanoparticle, drastically changing its transient dielectric permittivity. This allows to manipulate by both electric and magnetic nanoparticle responses, resulting in dramatic changes of its extinction cross section and scattering diagram. Specifically, we demonstrate the effect of ultrafast switching-on a Huygens source in the vicinity of the magnetic dipole resonance. This approach enables to design ultrafast and compact optical switchers and modulators based on the "ultrafast magnetic light" concept.

  17. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  18. Light disappears rapidly (exponentially)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    #12;#12;#12;#12;Light disappears rapidly (exponentially) with depth At the same time, the color of the light shifts #12;#12;#12;#12;· Euphotic zone ­ plentiful light ­ 0-100 m (about) · Dysphotic zone ­ very, very little light ­ 100-1000 m (about) · Aphotic zone ­ no light ­ below 1000 m #12;Sunlight in Water

  19. Science Highlights 2009 | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of geologists and geophysicists using the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source has shed light on a fluid transfer in the middle continental crust, a phenomenon...

  20. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  1. Solid-state lighting technology perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Coltrin, Michael Elliott

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL) uses inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to convert electricity into light for illumination. SSL has the potential for enormous energy savings and accompanying environmental benefits if its promise of 50% (or greater) energy efficiencies can be achieved. This report provides a broad summary of the technologies that underlie SSL. The applications for SSL and potential impact on U.S. and world-wide energy consumption, and impact on the human visual experience are discussed. The properties of visible light and different technical metrics to characterize its properties are summarized. The many factors contributing to the capital and operating costs for SSL and traditional lighting sources (incandescent, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge lamps) are discussed, with extrapolations for future SSL goals. The technologies underlying LEDs and OLEDs are also described, including current and possible alternative future technologies and some of the present limitations.

  2. Lighting system with thermal management system having point contact synthetic jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Sharma, Rajdeep

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting system having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system includes a plurality of synthetic jets. The synthetic jets are arranged within the lighting system such that they are secured at contact points.

  3. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  4. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  5. Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the 'Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products' project is to demonstrate thin film packaging solutions based on SiC hermetic coatings that, when applied to glass and plastic substrates, support OLED lighting devices by providing longer life with greater efficiency at lower cost than is currently available. Phase I Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on optical glass with lifetime of 1,000 hour life, CRI greater than 75, and 15 lm/W. Phase II Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on plastic or glass composite with 25 lm/W, 5,000 hours life, and CRI greater than 80. Phase III Objective: Demonstrate 2 x 2 ft{sup 2} thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED with 40 lm/W, 10,000 hour life, and CRI greater than 85. This report details the efforts of Phase III (Budget Period Three), a fourteen month collaborative effort that focused on optimization of high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED devices and thin-film encapsulation of said devices. The report further details the conclusions and recommendations of the project team that have foundation in all three budget periods for the program. During the conduct of the Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products program, including budget period three, the project team completed and delivered the following achievements: (1) a three-year marketing effort that characterized the near-term and longer-term OLED market, identified customer and consumer lighting needs, and suggested prototype product concepts and niche OLED applications lighting that will give rise to broader market acceptance as a source for wide area illumination and energy conservation; (2) a thin film encapsulation technology with a lifetime of nearly 15,000 hours, tested by calcium coupons, while stored at 16 C and 40% relative humidity ('RH'). This encapsulation technology was characterized as having less than 10% change in transmission during the 15,000 hour test period; (3) demonstrated thin film encapsulation of a phosphorescent OLED device with 1,500 hours of lifetime at 60 C and 80% RH; (4) demonstrated that a thin film laminate encapsulation, in addition to the direct thin film deposition process, of a polymer OLED device was another feasible packaging strategy for OLED lighting. The thin film laminate strategy was developed to mitigate defects, demonstrate roll-to-roll process capability for high volume throughput (reduce costs) and to support a potential commercial pathway that is less dependent upon integrated manufacturing since the laminate could be sold as a rolled good; (5) demonstrated that low cost 'blue' glass substrates could be coated with a siloxane barrier layer for planarization and ion-protection and used in the fabrication of a polymer OLED lighting device. This study further demonstrated that the substrate cost has potential for huge cost reductions from the white borosilicate glass substrate currently used by the OLED lighting industry; (6) delivered four-square feet of white phosphorescent OLED technology, including novel high efficiency devices with 82 CRI, greater than 50 lm/W efficiency, and more than 1,000 hours lifetime in a product concept model shelf; (7) presented and or published more than twenty internal studies (for private use), three external presentations (OLED workshop-for public use), and five technology-related external presentations (industry conferences-for public use); and (8) issued five patent applications, which are in various maturity stages at time of publication. Delivery of thin film encapsulated white phosphorescent OLED lighting technology remains a challenging technical achievement, and it seems that commercial availability of thin, bright, white OLED light that meets market requirements will continue to require research and development effort. However, there will be glass encapsulated white OLED lighting products commercialized in niche markets during the 2008 calendar year. This commercializ

  6. Exciting White Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Windows that emit light and are more energy efficient? Universal Display’s PHOLED technology enables windows that have transparent light-emitting diodes in them.

  7. 3654 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 24, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2006 High-Sensitivity Detection of Narrowband Light in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    -emitting diode (LED), narrowband-filtered white light, and LED signal sources in a more intense tungsten-halogen-lamp

  8. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs), with high efficiency, dimmabil-ity, long life, and directional light output, could be the ideal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Issue Light-emitting diodes (LEDs), with high efficiency, dimmabil- ity, long life, and directional light output, could be the ideal light source for the common recessed-can downlight. How- ever, many existing LED downlight products fail to live up to expectations, providing poor light distribution

  9. EXTERIOR LIGHTING CASE STUDY CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER, UC DAVIS PHONE: (530) 747-3838 FAX: (530) 747-3812 CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    . This energy waste can easily be averted by implementing energy-efficient light sources and lighting controls.S. health care facilities to install an energy-efficient, ultra-smart outdoor LED lighting system. The award schedules, light levels and time-out settings, monitor the system's energy use, and receive automated alerts

  10. Metallic halide lights and lighting systems. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the design and operation of metallic halide lights and lighting systems. High pressure, high intensity, and low wattage discharge lamps are described. Citations discuss power sources, lamp life, lamp control circuits, thermal switches, and heat reflective coatings. Applications in sport stadium lighting, vehicle headlights, and crop-lighting are included. (Contains a minimum of 170 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. PFP Emergency Lighting Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUSCH, M.S.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    NFPA 101, section 5-9 mandates that, where required by building classification, all designated emergency egress routes be provided with adequate emergency lighting in the event of a normal lighting outage. Emergency lighting is to be arranged so that egress routes are illuminated to an average of 1.0 footcandle with a minimum at any point of 0.1 footcandle, as measured at floor level. These levels are permitted to drop to 60% of their original value over the required 90 minute emergency lighting duration after a power outage. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) has two designations for battery powered egress lights ''Emergency Lights'' are those battery powered lights required by NFPA 101 to provide lighting along officially designated egress routes in those buildings meeting the correct occupancy requirements. Emergency Lights are maintained on a monthly basis by procedure ZSR-12N-001. ''Backup Lights'' are battery powered lights not required by NFPA, but installed in areas where additional light may be needed. The Backup Light locations were identified by PFP Safety and Engineering based on several factors. (1) General occupancy and type of work in the area. Areas occupied briefly during a shiftly surveillance do not require backup lighting while a room occupied fairly frequently or for significant lengths of time will need one or two Backup lights to provide general illumination of the egress points. (2) Complexity of the egress routes. Office spaces with a standard hallway/room configuration will not require Backup Lights while a large room with several subdivisions or irregularly placed rooms, doors, and equipment will require Backup Lights to make egress safer. (3) Reasonable balance between the safety benefits of additional lighting and the man-hours/exposure required for periodic light maintenance. In some plant areas such as building 236-Z, the additional maintenance time and risk of contamination do not warrant having Backup Lights installed in all rooms. Sufficient light for egress is provided by existing lights located in the hallways.

  12. A Catalog of CH_3OH 7_0-6_1 A^+ Maser Sources in Massive Star-Forming Regions. II. Masers in NGC 6334F, G8.67-0.36, and M17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Laura; Hernandez-Curiel, Idalia; Kurtz, Stan; Hofner, Peter; Araya, Esteban

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Very Large Array observations of the 7_0-6_1 A^+ methanol maser transition at 44 GHz towards NGC 6334F, G8.67-0.36, and M17. These arcsecond resolution observations complete a previous, larger VLA survey of this maser transition in high-mass star-forming regions reported by Kurtz et al. We confirm the presence of 44 GHz methanol maser emission in all three sources, detecting eight distinct maser components in NGC 6334F, twelve components in G8.67-0.36 and one in M17.

  13. Lighting and Daylight Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bos, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposing us to the latest products and technologies. Daylight Harvesting A system of controlling the direction and the quantity of light both natural and artificial within a given space. This implies: Control of fenestration in terms of size..., transmission and direction. Control of reflected light within a space. Control of electric light in terms of delivery and amount Daylight harvesting systems are typically designed to maintain a minimum recommended light level. This light level...

  14. Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a long-range plan for a broad-based, coordinated research, development and market transformation program for reducing the lighting energy intensities in commercial and residential buildings in California without compromising lighting quality. An effective program to advance lighting energy efficiency in California must be based on an understanding that lighting is a mature field and the lighting industry has developed many specialized products that meet a wide variety of light needs for different building types. Above all else, the lighting field is diverse and there are applications for a wide range of lighting products, systems, and strategies. Given the range of existing lighting solutions, an effective energy efficient lighting research portfolio must be broad-based and diverse to match the diversity of the lighting market itself. The belief that there is one solution--a magic bullet, such as a better lamp, for example--that will propel lighting efficiency across all uses to new heights is, in the authors' opinion, an illusion. A multi-path program is the only effective means to raising lighting efficiency across all lighting applications in all building types. This report presents a list of 27 lighting technologies and concepts (key activities) that could form the basis of a coordinated research and market transformation plan for significantly reducing lighting energy intensities in California buildings. The total 27 key activities into seven broad classes as follows: Light sources; Ballasts; Luminaires; Lighting Controls; Lighting Systems in Buildings; Human Factors and Education. Each of the above technology classes is discussed in terms of background, key activities, and the energy savings potential for the state. The report concludes that there are many possibilities for targeted research, development, and market transformation activities across all sectors of the building lighting industry. A concerted investment by the state to foster efficiency improvements in lighting systems in commercial and residential buildings would have a major positive impact on energy use and environmental quality in California.

  15. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  16. Surface plasmon enhanced InGaN light emitter Koichi Okamoto*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamoto, Koichi

    is a very promising method for developing the super bright light emitting diodes (LEDs). Moreover, we foundGaN/GaN, light emitting diode, quantum well, internal quantum efficiency, solid-state light source 1. INTRODUCTION Since 1993, InGaN quantum wells (QW)-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been continuously

  17. On the advantages of using green light to study fluorescence yield changes in leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , at variance with the commonly used set-ups, uses of a weakly absorbed light source (light-emitting diodes. Although the exciting light is weakly absorbed, the possibility to tune the intensity of the light emitting diodes allows one to reach photochemical rates ranging from 104 s- 1 to 0.25 s- 1 rendering

  18. ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By ANDREW D. CHIASSON Bachelor of Applied 1999 #12;ii ADVANCES IN MODELING OF GROUND-SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: Thesis Adviser..............................................................................................................1 1.1. Overview of Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems ..............................................1 1

  19. Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

  20. Studies of atomic hydrogen beam sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, Todd William

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the Penning ion trap and data acquisition system, and to Mr. Shigu Tu for assisting him with the RF ion trap system and collection of data. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION II BACKGROUND . II. 1 Atomic Hydrogen Production II. 2 Polarized..., and hexapole magnet present. However, testing was done on the Penning system with both discharge tubes. Atomrc hydrogen was produced in the source system by a rf discharge (30 MHz g: 73 MHz for the new and old discharge tubes, respectively) through a pyrex...