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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment must be ENERGY STAR®–qualified. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. This product overview explains how to meet energy-efficiency requirements for Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment and how to maximize energy savings throughout products' useful lives.

2

Commercial Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial lighting accounts for more than 20 percent of total commercial building energy use. The Energy Department works to reduce lighting energy use through research and deployment.

3

Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

capacities of 240,000 British thermal units per hour (Btuhr) or less. Packaged terminal air conditioners and heat pumps are excluded. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for...

4

Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

5

OTEC- Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers a commercial lighting retrofit program that provides rebates for commercial businesses that change existing lighting to more energy...

6

Concord Municipal Light Plant- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to commercial customers for a variety of appliances, ETS heating systems, general lighting upgrades, CFL bulbs, and exit sign retrofit kits. A...

7

Peninsula Light Company- Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Peninsula Light Company (PLC) offers a rebate program for commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient lighting. Participating customers must be served by PLC commercial service....

8

Flathead Electric Cooperative- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Flathead Electric Cooperative, in conjunction with Bonneville Power Administration, encourages energy efficiency in the commercial sector by providing a commercial lighting retro-fit rebate program...

9

Columbia Water and Light- Commercial Super Saver Loans  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light (CWL) provides Commercial Super Saver Loans, which allow C&I rate customers to replace a furnace along with a new central air conditioner or heat pump with an...

10

Lakeview Light and Power- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lakeview Light and Power offers a commercial lighting rebate program. Rebates apply to the installation of energy efficient lighting retrofits in non-residential buildings. The rebate program is...

11

Pedernales Electric Cooperative- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For existing and new commercial construction, Pedernales Electric Cooperative provides incentives for kW saved through efficient lighting. Rebates vary based upon whether construction is new or...

12

Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 In this...

13

Poudre Valley REA- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (Colorado)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association (PVREA), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, offers a variety of lighting rebates to commercial customers. Rebates are available on commercial lighting...

14

2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification...

15

Natural Refrigerant High-Performance Heat Pump for Commercial...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(DE-FOA-0000823) Project Objective This project aims to develop a regenerative air source heat pump for commercial and industrial heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)...

16

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cedarburg Light and Water Utility provides incentives for commercial, industrial and agricultural customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Upon request, Cedarburg Light...

17

Lighting system with heat distribution face plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-2514E The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings F for Offices and Commercial Buildings Francis Rubinstein and Dmitriy Bolotov, Lawrence Berkeley National 25% of the electrical energy used in US commercial buildings (DOE 2007). Advanced lighting controls

19

Commercial Lighting Solutions, Webtool Peer Review Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the beta version of the CLS webtool, which contains retail box lighting solutions. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed about which feedback should be addressed for the release of version 1.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in New York City in May 2009. Due to the volume of data (~500 comments) the methodology for addressing the peer review comments was central to the success of the ultimate goal of improving the tool. The comments were first imported into a master spreadsheet, and then grouped and organized in several layers. Solutions to each comment were then rated by importance and feasibility to determine the practicality of resolving the concerns of the commenter in the short-term or long-term. The rating system was used as an analytical tool, but the results were viewed thoughtfully to ensure that they were not the sole the factor in determining which comments were recommended for near-term resolution. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 1.0 as well as appendices containing the short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 1.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Jones, Carol C.; Meyer, Tracy A.

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Chicopee Electric Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a Pilot Energy Efficiency Program to encourage non-residential, commercial, and industrial facilities to pursue energy saving measures and install energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Richland Energy Services- Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Richland (COR) provides rebates to encourage commercial utility customers to increase the energy efficiency of facilities by replacing existing lighting systems with more efficient...

22

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Central Hudson Gas and Electric's (Central Hudson) Commercial Lighting Rebate Program is for businesses, retailers, institutional customers and non-profit customers of Central Hudson. The progam...

23

Detroit Public Lighting Department- Commercial and Industrial Energy Wise Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Detroit Public Lighting Department (PLD) offers commercial and industrial customers rebates for energy efficient equipment. Specific rebate amounts, equipment requirements, and applications are...

24

Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

exhaust heat exchanger for waste heat recovery using mixed radiant and convective heat transfer Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for waste heat recovery...

25

Seattle City Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Seattle City Light offers a variety of rebates to commercial and industrial customers through the [http://www.seattle.gov/light/conserve/business/cv5_fi.htm Energy Smart Services Program]. Energy...

26

Many exterior entry and walkway lights in residential and commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many exterior entry and walkway lights in residential and commercial applications use incandescent combines cutting-edge LED technology with an occupancy sensor and incandescent lighting to reduce operating costs below those of incandescent lamps and CFL fixtures. The low wattage LED light turns on at dusk

27

Commercialization of Industrialized Absorption Heat Pumps in the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMERCIALIZATION OF INDUSTRIAL ABSORPTION HEAT PUMPS IN THE US MALCOLM G. PETTIGREW LITWIN ENGINEERS &CONSTRUCTORS, INC. HOUSTON, ABSTRACT The recovery of waste heat through absorption heat pumping is quite appeal ing to U.S. industry.... However, although this technology has been successfully applied in Europe and Japan, a cauti ous atmosphere wi 11 continue to prevail in the U.S. until the first absorption heat pump is built and successfully demonstrates it's viability...

Pettigrew, M. G.

28

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Characteristics  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of a light source's accuracy in rendering different colors when compared to a reference light source. The highest attainable CRI is 100. Lamps with CRIs above 70 are...

29

City Water Light and Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City Water Light and Power (CWLP) offers rebates to help commercial customers increase the energy efficiency of participating facilities. Energy efficient air-to-air, geothermal and water-loop...

30

Duquesne Light Company- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Duquesne Light provides rebates on energy-saving equipment to commercial and industrial customers in the eligible service territory. There are 2 types of rebate programs available to all C&I...

31

Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground-source heat pump technology.

Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

Applications Tests of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field application tests have been conducted on three 4 to 6-ton commercial heat pump water heater systems in a restaurant, a coin-operated laundry, and an office building cafeteria in Atlanta. The units provide space cooling while rejecting heat...

Oshinski, J. N..; Abrams, D. W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

High Efficiency R-744 Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project investigated the development and improvement process of a R744 (CO2) commercial heat pump water heater (HPWH) package of approximately 35 kW. The improvement process covered all main components of the system. More specific the heat exchangers (Internal heat exchanger, Evaporator, Gas cooler) as well as the expansion device and the compressor were investigated. In addition, a comparison to a commercially available baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint was made in order to compare performance as well as package size reduction potential.

Elbel, Dr. Stefan W.; Petersen, Michael

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

Commercial high efficiency dehumidification systems using heat pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved heat pipe design using separately connected two-section one-way flow heat pipes with internal microgrooves instead of wicks is described. This design is now commercially available for use to increase the dehumidification capacity of air conditioning systems. The design also includes a method of introducing fresh air into buildings while recovering heat and controlling the humidity of the incoming air. Included are applications and case studies, load calculations and technical data, and installation, operation, and maintenance information.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Commercial Air-Source Heat Pumps, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy efficiency purchasing specifications for federal procurements of commercial air-source heat pumps.

Not Available

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Types  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 QPDF LightingLighting

37

Hybrid Solar Lighting Provides Energy Savings and Reduces Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dish and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.

Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Earl, Dennis Duncan [ORNL; Beshears, David L [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Parks, James Edgar [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Characteristics  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 QPDF Lighting

39

LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This March 26, 2009 webcast presented information about the Commercial Building Energy Alliances' (CBEA) efforts to explore the viability of LED site lighting in commercial parking lots. LED...

40

LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings Wm performance in fifteen systems located in eight northern California buildings. Abstract Light commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Commercial Lighting Solutions Webtool Peer Review Report, Office Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the CLS webtool for offices. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed for the release of version 2.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in Las Vegas in May 2010. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 2.0 as well as appendices containing the comments and short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 2.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Beeson, Tracy A.; Jones, Carol C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Overview of DOE-Sponsored Heat Pump Research DOE research activities related to residential and commercial heat pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Overview of DOE-Sponsored Heat Pump Research DOE research activities related to residential and commercial heat pump technology are supported by the Office of Building Energy Research and Development%) allocated to elec- tric and heat-actuated heat pump research. The remaining 15% is allocated to appliance

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

44

Duquesne Light Company- Residential Solar Water Heating Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Duquesne Light provides rebates to its residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a flat rebate of $286 per qualifying...

45

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

46

Industrial and Commercial Heat Pump Applications in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compression cycle. Using readily available fluorocarbon refrigerants as the heat pump working fluid, this cycle is commonly used because of its wide application opportunities. Compressed Vapors Heat Pump Compressor Heat Sink PrOCess (Condenser... and refrigerants most commonly used and the open-cycle mechanical vapor compression heat pumps. Waste heat sources, heat loads served by heat pumps--and typical applications using heat pumps for large-scale space heating, domestic water heating, and industrial...

Niess, R. C.

47

A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a capital cost comparison of commercial ground source heat pump systems. The study includes groundwater systems, ground-coupled systems and hybrid systems.

Rafferty, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Applications of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat pump water heaters can provide high-efficiency water heating and supplemental space cooling and dehumidification in commercial buildings throughout the United States. They are particularly attractive in hot, humid areas where cooling loads...

Johnson, K. F.; Shedd, A. C.

49

Cape Light Compact- Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Through a multi-member partnership, Cape Light Compact (CLC) and Masssave offer a variety of financial incentives for commercial, industrial, and municipal facilities. Custom rebate options are...

50

Lansing Board of Water and Light- Hometown Energy Savers Commercial Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Franklin Energy Services and the Lansing Board of Water and Light (LBWL) partner together to offer the Hometown Energy Savers® Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program. Eligible...

51

Kansas City Power and Light- Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) provides financial incentives for commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Rebates are available for...

52

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (CLFP) offers incentives to commercial and industrial gas customers who install energy efficient equipment in existing buildings. Incentives are available for boilers...

53

Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Omaha Public Power District- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) offers incentives for commercial and industrial customers to install energy-efficient heat pumps and replace/retrofit existing lighting systems. The Commercial...

55

Technology data characterizing lighting in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with commend 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

End-use forecasting models typically utilize technology tradeoff curves to represent technology options available to consumers. A tradeoff curve, in general terms, is a functional form which relates efficiency to capital cost. Each end-use is modeled by a single tradeoff curve. This type of representation is satisfactory in the analysis of many policy options. On the other hand, for policies addressing individual technology options or groups of technology options, because individual technology options are accessible to the analyst, representation in such reduced form is not satisfactory. To address this and other analysis needs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has enhanced its Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND) to allow modeling of specific lighting and space conditioning (HVAC) technology options. This report characterizes the present commercial floorstock in terms of lighting technologies and develops cost-efficiency data for these lighting technologies. This report also characterizes the interactions between the lighting and space conditioning end uses in commercial buildings in the US In general, lighting energy reductions increase the heating and decrease the cooling requirements. The net change in a building`s energy requirements, however, depends on the building characteristics, operating conditions, and the climate. Lighting/HVAC interactions data were generated through computer simulations using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program.

Sezgen, A.O.; Huang, Y.J.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Koomey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

COMPREHENSIVE DIAGNOSTIC AND IMPROVEMENT TOOLS FOR HVAC-SYSTEM INSTALLATIONS IN LIGHT COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proctor Engineering Group, Ltd. (PEG) and Carrier-Aeroseal LLP performed an investigation of opportunities for improving air conditioning and heating system performance in existing light commercial buildings. Comprehensive diagnostic and improvement tools were created to address equipment performance parameters (including airflow, refrigerant charge, and economizer operation), duct-system performance (including duct leakage, zonal flows and thermal-energy delivery), and combustion appliance safety within these buildings. This investigation, sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, a division of the U.S. Department of Energy, involved collaboration between PEG and Aeroseal in order to refine three technologies previously developed for the residential market: (1) an aerosol-based duct sealing technology that allows the ducts to be sealed remotely (i.e., without removing the ceiling tiles), (2) a computer-driven diagnostic and improvement-tracking tool for residential duct installations, and (3) an integrated diagnosis verification and customer satisfaction system utilizing a combined computer/human expert system for HVAC performance. Prior to this work the aerosol-sealing technology was virtually untested in the light commercial sector--mostly because the savings potential and practicality of this or any other type of duct sealing had not been documented. Based upon the field experiences of PEG and Aeroseal, the overall product was tailored to suit the skill sets of typical HVAC-contractor personnel.

Abram Conant; Mark Modera; Joe Pira; John Proctor; Mike Gebbie

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements.Unlike permanent nuclear reactor core components, nuclearof the first nuclear reactors, commercial nuclear fuel still

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Commercial Building Energy Alliance Exterior Lighting Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a scoping study about challenges and energy saving potential regarding exterior lighting.

Myer, Michael

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

Commercialization of Quantum Dot White Light Emitting Diode technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that the use of high-brightness LEDs for illumination has the potential to substitute conventional lighting and revolutionize the lighting industry over the next 10 to 20 years. However, successful penetration ...

Zhao, Xinyue, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Energymaster Desiccant System Application to Light Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Desiccant cooling systems offer unique advantages over conventional equipment in certain applications. AskCorp's Energymaster unit has been applied in several commercial situations where these advantages are most significant. The magnitude...

Blanpied, M. C.; Coellner, J. A.; Macintosh, D. S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Hosts Solid-State Lighting Commercial Product Testing Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Department of Energy (DOE) hosted a workshop on October 27, 2006, to introduce the DOE SSL Commercial Product Testing Program. The workshop, held in Washington, D.C., drew over...

62

Maine Public Service Company- Residential and Small Commercial Heat Pump Program (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Public Service Company offers a two-tiered incentive program for residential and small commercial customers. Mini-Split Heat Pumps are eligible for a rebate of $600, as well as a loan to cover...

63

Bangor Hydro Electric Company- Residential and Small Commercial Heat Pump Program (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bangor Hydro Electric Company offers a two-tiered incentive program for residential and small commercial customers. Mini-Split Heat Pumps are eligible for a rebate of $600, as well as a loan to...

64

2014-02-21 Issuance: Test Procedure for Commercial Water Heating Equipment; Request for Information  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information regarding test procedures for commercial water heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency (February 21, 2014).

65

Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartmentfor EngineeringDepartment ofBoilersDataHot Food Holdingofof

66

Chapter 3, Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

operating hours information usually require an external sensor, such as a current transformer (CT) or photocell. Data loggers with CTs can monitor amperage to a lighting...

67

CoServ Electric Cooperative- Commercial Energy Efficient Lighting Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

CoServ Electric Cooperative provides rebates for commercial and industrial customers who upgrade to high efficiency lighting for the workplace. A rebate of $0.30/watt saved is available on custom...

68

Randolph EMC- Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial and industrial members who upgrade to energy-efficient light bulbs which meet Randolph EMC's standards are eligible for a prescriptive incentive payment. The cooperative will provide a...

69

McMinnville Water and Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

McMinnville Water and Light Company offers a variety of rebates for commercial and industrial customers to make energy efficient improvements to eligible facilities. MW&L offers rebates in...

70

EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS) evaluates the environmental impacts associated with producing tritium at one or more...

71

ThermalEngineeringLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Convection Heat Transfer of Nanofluids in Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EngineeringLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Experimental Setup Straight Tube Setup Constant Temperature Bath Parastaltic Pump Nanofluid Reservoir Heated.91 od di Commercial System Setup Heater Insulation Water block 4/10 #12;Thermal gain across the heated tube for the DI-water and the 0.5% nanofluid · Greater temperature gain in the 1

Walker, D. Greg

72

A heat-driven monochromatic light source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work investigates theoretically the efficiency with which heat may be converted into resonance radiation in a cesium thermionic diode. An analytical model of a thermionic converter is employed which combines the coupled effects of line radiation transport, excited-state kinetics, and plasma diffusion. Operating regimes are established for various degrees of optical density in the plasma. The results indicate that monochromatic radiation can be produced with efficiencies on the order of 30 percent provided there is an adequate voltage drop across the plasma. In this study, a drop of one volt was used since it can be maintained without any electrical power input to the device. It is found that high efficiencies come by virtue of the higher interelectrode distances which the solutions will accommodate, and that radiation can be generated efficiently, even with optically dense gases.

Stefani, F.; Lawless, J.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

US manufacturers of commercially available stand-alone photovoltaic lighting systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report introduces photovoltaic (PV) lighting systems, gives some specifications for ordering these systems, and provides a list of some of the manufacturers of these systems in the United States. These PV lighting systems are all commercially available. They are stand-alone systems because they are not tied to the electric utility power grid.

McNutt, P.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings. Keywords--Energy, daylighting, occupancy sensors, controls, tuning. 1 INTRODUCTION Lighting buildings in the United States have daylighting sensors and only 1 percent have energy management, such as those by the National Research Council Canada and Florida Solar Energy Center, present results from lab

76

Development of High Efficiency Carbon Dioxide Commercial Heat Pump Water Heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in both Japan and Europe, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such products in the US has been limited. While this trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but acceptance remains low in the commercial sector. The objective of the presented work is the development of a high efficiency R744 heat pump water heater for commercial applications with effective utilization of the cooling capability for air conditioning and/or refrigeration. The ultimate goal is to achieve total system COP of up to 8. This unit will be targeted at commercial use where some cooling load is typically needed year round, such as restaurants, hotels, nursing homes, and hospitals. This paper presents the performance results from the development of four R744 commercial heat pump water heater packages of approximately 35 kW and comparison to a commercially available baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, the influences of an internal heat exchanger and an enhanced evaporator on the system performance are described and recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system.

Michael PETERSEN; Chad D. BOWERS; Stefan ELBEL; Pega HRNJAK

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Black Hills Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Black Hills Power provides rebates for its commercial customers who install energy efficient heat pumps, motors, variable frequency drives, lighting, and water heaters. Custom rebates for approved...

78

Combined heat and power (CHP or cogeneration) for saving energy and carbon in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems simultaneously deliver electric, thermal and mechanical energy services and thus use fuel very efficiently. Today's small-scale CHP systems already provide heat, cooling and electricity at nearly twice the fuel efficiency of heat and power based on power remote plants and onsite hot water and space heating. In this paper, the authors have refined and extended the assessments of small-scale building CHP previously done by the authors. They estimate the energy and carbon savings for existing small-scale CHP technology such as reciprocating engines and two promising new CHP technologies--microturbines and fuel cells--for commercial buildings. In 2010 the authors estimate that small-scale CHP will emit 14--65% less carbon than separate heat and power (SHP) depending on the technologies compared. They estimate that these technologies in commercial buildings could save nearly two-thirds of a quadrillion Btu's of energy and 23 million tonnes of carbon.

Kaarsberg, T.; Fiskum, R.; Romm, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Koomey, J.; Teagan, W.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

High-Efficiency Commercial Cold Climate Heat Pump  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii HIGH PERFORMANCEDOEDepartment ofEngines

80

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 QPDF Lighting in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lighting in Commercial Buildings (1986 data) -- Executive Summary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396After8986 Lighting in

82

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396After8986 Lighting

83

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396After8986 LightingLit

84

Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

Lewis, M.R.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN LIGHTING AND SPACE CONDITIONING ENERGY USE IN U.S. COMMERCIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reductions in lighting energy have secondary effects on cooling and heating energy consumption. In general significant savings nor significant penalties from associated changes in HVAC primary energy and energyLBNL-39795 UC-1600 INTERACTIONS BETWEEN LIGHTING AND SPACE CONDITIONING ENERGY USE IN U

86

Text-Alternative Version: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification webcast.

87

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat pump water heater, rangehoods, ventilating fans, external power supply, vending machines, LED lamps, grid lighting, commercial

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics-integral molecular dynamics has been used to calculate the constant-volume heat capacities of light and heavy water

Nielsen, Steven O.

90

NEXT GENERATION COMMERCIAL HEAT PUMPWATER HEATER USING CARBON DIOXIDE USING DIFFERENT IMPROVEMENT APPROACHES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in Japan, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such a product in the U.S. has been slow. This trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but remains in the commercial sector. Barriers to heat pump water heater acceptance in the commercial market have historically been performance, reliability and first/operating costs. The use of carbon dioxide (R744) as the refrigerant in such a system can improve performance for relatively small increase in initial cost and make this technology more appealing. What makes R744 an excellent candidate for use in heat pump water heaters is not only the wide range of ambient temperatures within which it can operate, but also the excellent ability to match water to refrigerant temperatures on the high side, resulting in very high exit water temperatures of up to 82�ºC, as required by sanitary codes in the U.S. (Food Code, 2005), in a single pass, temperatures that are much more difficult to reach with other refrigerants. This can be especially attractive in applications where this water is used for the purpose of sanitation. While reliability has also been of concern historically, dramatic improvements have been made over the last several years through research done in the automotive industry and commercialization of R744 technology in residential water heating mainly in Japan. This paper presents the performance results from the development of an R744 commercial heat pump water heater of approximately 35 kW and a comparison to a baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system which could result in possible energy savings of up to 20 %.

Chad Bowers; Michael Petersen; Stefan Elbel; Pega Hrnjak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS IN COMMERCIAL HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS USING CARBON DIOXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in Japan, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such a product in the U.S. has been slow. This trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but remains in the commercial sector. Barriers to heat pump water heater acceptance in the commercial market have historically been performance, reliability and first/operating costs. The use of carbon dioxide (R744) as the refrigerant in such a system can improve performance for relatively small increase in initial cost and make this technology more appealing. What makes R744 an excellent candidate for use in heat pump water heaters is not only the wide range of ambient temperatures within which it can operate, but also the excellent ability to match water to refrigerant temperatures on the high side, resulting in very high exit water temperatures of up to 82�ºC (180�ºF), as required by sanitary codes in the U.S.(Food Code, 2005), in a single pass, temperatures that are much more difficult to reach with other refrigerants. This can be especially attractive in applications where this water is used for the purpose of sanitation. While reliability has also been of concern historically, dramatic improvements have been made over the last several years through research done in the automotive industry and commercialization of R744 technology in residential water heating mainly in Japan. This paper presents the performance results from the development of an R744 commercial heat pump water heater of approximately 35kW and a comparison to a baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system which could result in possible energy savings of up to 20%.

BOWERS C.D.; ELBEL S.; PETERSEN M.; HRNJAK P.S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Union Light, Heat & Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy Now Jump(EC-LEDS) | Open EnergyUmatillaLight, Heat

93

PPL Electric Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers rebates for lighting, heat pumps, refrigeration...

94

Florida Public Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Florida Public Utilities offers the Energy for Life Conservation program to commercial electric customers to save energy in facilities. Rebates are available for lighting, chiller, heat pump, air...

95

Johnson County REMC- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Johnson County REMC offers rebates to commercial and industrial customers who install or replace new motors, variable frequency drives, air conditioners, heat pump systems and lighting equipment....

96

Marshall Municipal Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Marshall Municipal Utilities offers incentives to commercial customers which help cover the installation costs of energy efficient lighting, heating and cooling equipment, motors, variable...

97

An Improved Procedure for Developing a Calibrated Hourly Simulation Model of an Electrically Heated and Cooled Commercial Buildling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lighting, energy efficient heat pumps, a photovoltaic system, envelope measures, and a solar domestic water heating system. To accomplish this, a DOE-2 baseline model was calibrated to the measured hourly data and compared to a building model constructed...

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

98

Pilot study of commercial water-loop heat pump compressor life  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study of the service life of water-loop heat pump compressors in commercial office buildings, using data gathered from the service records of one heat pump service contractor, focused on the replacement of compressors in small console ( perimeter'') water-loop heat pumps and in larger vertical and horizontal ( core'') units. A statistical methodology for dealing with censored data was developed for this study which is an extension of the methodologies used in other EPRI studies of heat pump and heat pump compressor life. By extrapolating a Weibull distribution curve fitted to the data, the median service life of the sample of perimeter unit compressors (the age at which 50% of the original population of compressors would be expected to have been replaced) was estimated to be 47 years. The median service life of a sample that excluded compressors with a known manufacturing defect was estimated to be 69 years. Core unit compressor replacements were analyzed in the same manner. Extrapolation of a Weibull distribution yielded an estimated median service life of core unit compressors of 12 years. As with the perimeter unit compressors, there was an identified manufacturing defect. When the compressors with the identified fault were excluded from the sample and the data reanalyzed, the median service life for the compressors in the remainder of the buildings was estimated to be 18 years.

Ross, D.P. (Policy Research Associates, Inc., Reston, VA (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Harvesting the Sun's Energy Through Heat as Well as Light | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Harvesting the Sun's Energy Through Heat as Well as Light Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News Stories of...

100

2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding certification of commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning, water-heating, and refrigeration equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 7, 2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

2014-10-10 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Water Heating Equipment; Request for Information  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information regarding energy conservation standards for commercial water heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on October 10, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

102

Computer Modeling VRF Heat Pumps in Commercial Buildings using EnergyPlus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are increasingly used in commercial buildings in the United States. Monitored energy use of field installations have shown, in some cases, savings exceeding 30% compared to conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. A simulation study was conducted to identify the installation or operational characteristics that lead to energy savings for VRF systems. The study used the Department of Energy EnergyPlus? building simulation software and four reference building models. Computer simulations were performed in eight U.S. climate zones. The baseline reference HVAC system incorporated packaged single-zone direct-expansion cooling with gas heating (PSZ-AC) or variable-air-volume systems (VAV with reheat). An alternate baseline HVAC system using a heat pump (PSZ-HP) was included for some buildings to directly compare gas and electric heating results. These baseline systems were compared to a VRF heat pump model to identify differences in energy use. VRF systems combine multiple indoor units with one or more outdoor unit(s). These systems move refrigerant between the outdoor and indoor units which eliminates the need for duct work in most cases. Since many applications install duct work in unconditioned spaces, this leads to installation differences between VRF systems and conventional HVAC systems. To characterize installation differences, a duct heat gain model was included to identify the energy impacts of installing ducts in unconditioned spaces. The configuration of variable refrigerant flow heat pumps will ultimately eliminate or significantly reduce energy use due to duct heat transfer. Fan energy is also studied to identify savings associated with non-ducted VRF terminal units. VRF systems incorporate a variable-speed compressor which may lead to operational differences compared to single-speed compression systems. To characterize operational differences, the computer model performance curves used to simulate cooling operation are also evaluated. The information in this paper is intended to provide a relative difference in system energy use and compare various installation practices that can impact performance. Comparative results of VRF versus conventional HVAC systems include energy use differences due to duct location, differences in fan energy when ducts are eliminated, and differences associated with electric versus fossil fuel type heating systems.

Raustad, Richard

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

106

TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION TO END-USE FORECASTING WITH COMMEND 4.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-34243 UC - 1600 TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION Technologies, and the Office of Environmental Analysis, Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;Technology Data Characterizing Lighting

107

Life cycle assessment of buildings technologies: High-efficiency commercial lighting and residential water heaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the life cycle emissions and energy use are estimated for two types of energy technologies. The first technology evaluated is the sulfur lamp, a high-efficiency lighting system under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Fusion Lighting, the inventor of the technology. The sulfur lamp is compared with conventional metal halide high-intensity discharge lighting systems. The second technology comparison is between standard-efficiency and high-efficiency gas and electric water heaters. In both cases the life cycle energy use and emissions are presented for the production of an equivalent level of service by each of the technologies. For both analyses, the energy use and emissions from the operation of the equipment are found to dominate the life cycle profile. The life cycle emissions for the water heating systems are much more complicated. The four systems compared include standard- and high-efficiency gas water heaters, standard electric resistance water heaters, and heat pump water heaters.

Freeman, S.L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is “lost” in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 3: Appendix F through I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described. Compiled data included in numerous figures, tables and graphs.

NONE

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 2: Appendix A through E  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described. Compiled data included in numerous figures, tables and graphs.

NONE

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

NorthWestern Energy (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NorthWestern Energy offers multiple rebate programs for commercial and industrial customers to make energy efficient improvements to their businesses. This includes lighting, heating, irrigators,...

112

The Heat Loss Analysis and Commissioning of a Commercial Helium Dewar (SULI paper)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature cryostat suitable for many different experiments will be commissioned at the cryogenic test facility at SLAC. The scope of the project is to make commission a commercial Helium dewar. The building of the top flange will be followed from its design phase through to its finished assembly. In addition, diagnostic tools such as thermometry, level detector, pressure gauge, transfer lines for He and N2, vent lines with relief valves for He and N2 will be incorporated. Instrumentation to read and plot this data will also be included. Once the cryostat is assembled, we will cool down the cryostat to measure its performance. A typical consumption rate of Helium will be measured and from this, the overall heat leak to the dewar will be calculated. A processing instrumentation diagram (PID) of the dewar system was created with SolidEdge and was later approved and published as an official SLAC document. The plots comparing the liquid level changes of the 36 inch probe with the time and the heat loss as a function of time proved to be a valid indication that the data was interpreted and recorded correctly and that the dewar was put together successfully.

Bellamy, Marcus; /New Mexico U. /SLAC

2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

113

Screening analysis for EPACT-covered commercial HVAC and water-heating equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPCA requirements state that if the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) amends efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90.1-1989, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in amended Standard 90.1. However, DOE can establish higher efficiency levels if it can show through clear and convincing evidence that a higher efficiency level, that is technologically feasible and economically justified, would produce significant additional energy savings. On October 29, 1999, ASHRAE approved the amended Standard 90.1, which increases the minimum efficiency levels for some of the commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment covered by EPCA 92. DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential of the efficiency levels listed in Standard 90.1-1999. The analysis estimates the annual national energy consumption and the potential for energy savings that would result if the EPACT-covered products were required to meet these efficiency levels. The analysis also estimates additional energy-savings potential for the EPACT-covered products if they were to exceed the efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90-1-1999. In addition, a simple life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was performed for some alternative efficiency levels. This paper will describe the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis. The magnitude of HVAC and SWH loads imposed on equipment depends on the building's physical and operational characteristics and prevailing climatic conditions. To address this variation in energy use, coil loads for 7 representative building types at 11 climate locations were estimated based on a whole-building simulation.

S Somasundaram; PR Armstrong; DB Belzer; SC Gaines; DL Hadley; S Katipumula; DL Smith; DW Winiarski

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,”Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaJuly 23, 2009 Combined Heat and Power Installation

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Origins of Analysis Methods Used to Design High Performance Commercial Buildings: Part III, Lighting and Daylighting Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Origins of analysis methods used to design high performance commercial buildings: Part III, Lighting and daylighting simulation Sukjoon Oh Jeff S. Haberl Student Member ASHRAE Fellow ASHRAE This study is the third part of the review... methods used in lighting and daylighting simulation programs are described. In companion papers, the origins of the analysis methods of whole-building energy and solar energy analysis programs are reviewed(Oh and Haberl 2014a, 2014b). Introduction...

Oh, S.; Haberl, J.S.

116

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000: 131-142. California Lighting Technology Center. Hybrid2011 01 July. California Lighting Technology Center.2007. Lighting research program project 4.1 hotel and

Williams, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Occupancy-Based Lighting Control Systems: AReview. ” Lighting Residential Technology 42:415-431. Itron,Information Template – Indoor Lighting Controls. Pacific Gas

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s “ambient” and “task” lighting components, 2) occupancy

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Supplemental EIS updates the environmental analyses in DOE’s 1999 EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS). The CLWR EIS addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors in Tennessee using tritium-producing burnable absorber rods.

120

Solar Heat Gain through a Skylight in a Light Well J. H. Klems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Heat Gain through a Skylight in a Light Well J. H. Klems Building Technologies Department on a skylight mounted on a light well of significant depth are presented. It is shown that during the day much of the solar energy that strikes the walls of the well does not reach the space below. Instead, this energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a Demand Response (DR) strategy for commercial buildings.demand response program because the added demand reduction from different buildingsdemand response, thermal mass INTRODUCTION The structural mass within existing commercial buildings

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. This project studied the potential of pre-cooling and demand limiting in a heavy mass and a light mass building in the Bay Area of California. The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling has the potential to improve the demand responsiveness of commercial buildings while maintaining acceptable comfort conditions. Results indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the shed capacity of a given building, all other factors being equal. Due to the time necessary for pre-cooling, it is only applicable to day-ahead demand response programs. Pre-cooling can be very effective if the building mass is relatively heavy. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling under hot weather conditions has not been tested. Further work is required to quantify and demonstrate the effectiveness of pre-cooling in different climates. Research is also needed to develop screening tools that can be used to select suitable buildings and customers, identify the most appropriate pre-cooling strategies, and estimate the benefits to the customer and the utility.

Xu, Peng; Zagreus, Leah

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorptioncells; • photovoltaics (PV) and solar thermal collectors; •for application of solar thermal and recovered heat to end-

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.C. (2001), “Introduction to Advancd Batteries for EmergingPV) and solar thermal collectors; • conventional batteries,flow batteries, and heat storage; • heat exchangers for

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lighting in existing non-residential buildings: a comparisonComparison of control options in private offices in an advanced lightingLighting Energy Only Actual Installation Only Fig. 7. Comparison

Williams, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO PREDICT RETROFIT SAVINGS . 211 6, 1 Methodology . . . . 2 1 3 6. 2 Energy Efficient Lighting. . . . . . 217 6. 3 Photovoltaic System. . 6. 4 Energy Management and Control System. . . . . 2 1 8 . . . . 219 6. 5 Lighting Controls. 6. 6 Envelope... Sections . . . . 85 4. 7 Daycare Center . . . . . . . 86 4, 8 Sun Angle Calculator and Altitude Measurement Device . . . 4. 9 Photovoltaic and Domestic Hot Water Solar Panels. . . . . . . . . . 92 4. 10 Heating, Ventilating, and Air...

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Geothermal potential for commercial and industrial direct heat applications in Salida, Colorado. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salida Geothermal Prospect (Poncha Hot Springs) was evaluated for industrial and commercial direct heat applications at Salida, Colorado, which is located approximately five miles east of Poncha Hot Springs. Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd., holds the geothermal leases on the prospect and the right-of-way for the main pipeline to Salida. The Poncha Hot Springs are located at the intersection of two major structural trends, immediately between the Upper Arkansas graben and the Sangre de Cristo uplift. Prominent east-west faulting occurs at the actual location of the hot springs. Preliminary exploration indicates that 1600 gpm of geothermal fluid as hot as 250/sup 0/F is likely to be found at around 1500 feet in depth. The prospective existing endusers were estimated to require 5.02 x 10/sup 10/ Btu per year, but the total annual amount of geothermal energy available for existing and future endusers is 28.14 x 10/sup 10/ Btu. The engineering design for the study assumed that the 1600 gpm would be fully utilized. Some users would be cascaded and the spent fluid would be cooled and discharged to nearby rivers. The economic analysis assumes that two separate businesses, the energy producer and the energy distributor, are participants in the geothermal project. The producer would be an existing limited partnership, with Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. as one of the partners; the distributor would be a new Colorado corporation without additional income sources. Economic evaluations were performed in full for four cases: the Base Case and three alternate scenarios. Alternate 1 assumes a three-year delay in realizing full production relative to the Base Case; Alternate 2 assumes that the geothermal reservoir is of a higher quality than is assumed for the Base Case; and Alternate 3 assumes a lower quality reservoir. 11 refs., 34 figs., 40 tabs.

Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.; Galloway, M.J.; Gross, J.T.; Meyer, R.T.; Raskin, R.; Zocholl, J.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Lighting Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Coldwater Board of Public Utility, in conjunction with American Municipal Power's "Efficiency Smart" program, offers a wide range of incentives that encourage commercial and industrial to...

130

Condensing heat exchanger systems for residential/commercial furnaces and boilers. Phase IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of condensing heat exchanger systems is studied. In the work reported here, the focus is on the corrosion resistance of materials to condensate produced by gas-fired heating equipment, and the characterization of the spatial variation of condensation corrosivity in condensing heat exchangers.

Razgaitis, R.; Payer, J.H.; Talbert, S.G.; Hindin, B.; White, E.L.; Locklin, D.W.; Cudnik, R.A.; Stickford, G.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Commercialization of gallium nitride nanorod arrays on silicon for solid-state lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One important component in energy usage is lighting, which is currently dominated by incandescent and fluorescent lamps. However, due to potentially higher efficiencies and thus higher energy savings, solid-state lighting ...

Wee, Qixun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Side-by-Side Testing of Commercial Office Lighting Systems: Two-lamp Fluorescent Fixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Guide to Performance Evaluation of Efficient Lighting Products, Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. IES, 1987. IES Lighting Handbook: 1987 Ap~lications Volume, Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, New... Transactions on Industrv A~plications, No. 5, pp. 1189-1 197. Verderber, R.R. and Rubinstein, F.M. and Ward, G., 1989. Photoelectric Control of Daylight Following Lighting Systems, CU- 6243, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA. Rubinstein, F...

Parker, D. S.; Schrum, L.; Sonne, J. K.; Stedman, T. C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Darrow, K et al. (2009), “CHP Market Assessment” Integratedwith combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment ingas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Kentucky Utilities Company- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kentucky Utilities Company (KU) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps,...

136

Kentucky Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kentucky Utilities Company (KU) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps,...

137

Louisville Gas and Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Louisville Gas and Electric (LGE) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps...

138

Carbon Power and Light- Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Carbon Power and Light, in collaboration with Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, offers financial incentives for members to increase the energy efficiency of homes and facilities....

139

Estes Park Light and Power Department- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Estes Park Power and Light, in conjunction with the Platte River Power Authority provides businesses incentives for new construction projects and existing building retrofits. The Electric...

140

Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for waste heat recovery  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001 Letter Report:Life-CycleDutyR&DPart of ausing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW), in partnership with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), offers a variety of energy efficient incentives to non-residential customers. The program provides...

143

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

daylighting control for low energy buildings. Proceedings ofAIVC Conference on Building Low Energy Cooling and Advancedlow, federal energy conservation standards do not include lighting controls, and state and local building

Williams, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Reduced heat flow in light water (H2O) due to heavy water (D2O)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The flow of heat, from top to bottom, in a column of light water can be decreased by over 1000% with the addition of heavy water. A column of light water cools from 25 C to 0 C in 11 hours, however, with the addition of heavy water it takes more than 100 hours. There is a concentration dependence where the cooling time increases as the concentration of added (D2O) increases, with a near maximum being reached with as little as 2% of (D2O) added. This phenomenon will not occur if the water is mixed after the heavy water is added.

William R. Gorman; James D. Brownridge

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Studies on Feed Spoilage: Heating Inhibiting Activity of Various Compounds and Commercial Products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sorbic acid at a level of 0.3 perceiit prevented hearlng completely in all feed ingredients tested. Smaller amounts of the inhibitors only delayed heating. Propion- ic acid and propionic anhydride, each at a level of 0.1 percent, prevented heating.... Sodium propionate was not effective as a fungistatic agent at a level of 0.6 percent. Propionamide and propionanalide alsc -xrnra not effective at a level of 0.1 percent which was the maximum level tested. Short-chain fatty acids-butyric, valeric...

Halick, John V.; Richardson, L. R.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: a quantum heat engine picture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system's power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle, and quantify its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle's applicability for realistic biological structures.

Killoran, Nathan; Plenio, Martin B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Enhancing light-harvesting power with coherent vibrational interactions: a quantum heat engine picture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent evidence suggests that quantum effects may have functional importance in biological light-harvesting systems. Along with delocalized electronic excitations, it is now suspected that quantum coherent interactions with certain near-resonant vibrations contribute to light-harvesting performance. However, the actual quantum advantage offered by such coherent vibrational interactions has not yet been established. We investigate a quantum design principle, whereby coherent exchange of single energy quanta between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom can enhance a light-harvesting system's power above what is possible by thermal mechanisms alone. We present a prototype quantum heat engine which cleanly illustrates this quantum design principle, and quantify its quantum advantage using thermodynamic measures of performance. We also demonstrate the principle's applicability for realistic biological structures.

Nathan Killoran; Susana F. Huelga; Martin B. Plenio

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Microencapsulated Fuel Technology for Commercial Light Water and Advanced Reactor Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential application of microencapsulated fuels to light water reactors (LWRs) has been explored. The specific fuel manifestation being put forward is for coated fuel particles embedded in silicon carbide or zirconium metal matrices. Detailed descriptions of these concepts are presented, along with a review of attributes, potential benefits, and issues with respect to their application in LWR environments, specifically from the standpoints of materials, neutronics, operations, and economics. Preliminary experiment and modeling results imply that with marginal redesign, significant gains in operational reliability and accident response margins could be potentially achieved by replacing conventional oxide-type LWR fuel with microencapsulated fuel forms.

Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SEIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , onLightThePrices andSEE HOW

151

Application of advanced Stirling engine technology to a commercial size gas-fired heat pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute sponsored work on the kinematic Stirling engine-driven heat pump, which offers practical improvements in the use of natural gas. Results from the first phase of the program led to the selection of a method of introducing low pressure natural gas into the V160 engine's combustor and testing of the ejector system. Further engine modifications will be needed as well as demonstrations of the performance and reliability of the units. The first phase found all developmental needs to be achievable, making the concept technically feasible. Computer projections based on the system performance of components indicate the gas-fired pump will work better than electric models and be economically feasible as well. 5 figures, 1 table.

Johansson, L.; Agno, J.; Wurm, J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of an integrated building load and ground source heat pump model to assess heat pump and ground loop design and performance in a commercial office building.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) offer an efficient method for cooling and heating buildings, reducing energy usage and operating cost. In hot, arid regions such… (more)

Blair, Jacob Dale

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Industrial Heat Pumps- A Reexamination in Light of Current Energy Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat pumps have been used for nearly one hundred years mostly providing heating and cooling for homes and residential settings. However, industrial heat pumps are also used and may be driven by waste heat streams from the manufacturing facility...

Lewis, N.; Simon, M.; Terry, S.; Leach, J.

154

Phase I-B development of kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, September 1983-December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-ton, and a COP (heating) of 1.8 and COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1989. In this phase, an HVAC systems manufacturer (Borg-Warner) is working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, a piston-type open-shaft refrigeration compressor was selected as the best match for the engine. Both the engine and compressor have been tested and characterized by performance maps, and the experimental heat-pump systems designed, built, and preliminary testing performed. Close agreement with computer model output has been achieved. SPS has continued to focus on improving the Stirling-engine performance and reliability for the gas-heat-pump application.

Monahan, R.E.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power, and heat generation), and grid-side benefits (peakpre-) heat/cool, etc. ); home recharging using off-peak grid

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Commercial / Industrial Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean CommunitiesEFRC seekschief-science-officer/

157

Lighting a building with a single bulb : toward a system for illumination in the 21st c.; or, A centralized illumination system for the efficient decoupling and recovery of lighting related heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piping light represents the first tenable method for recovery and reutilization of lighting related heat. It can do this by preserving the energy generated at the lamp as radiative, departing from precedent and avoiding ...

Levens, Kurt Antony, 1961-

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Spatial light modulator array with heat minimization and image enhancement features  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An enhanced spatial light modulator (ESLM) array, a microelectronics patterning system and a projection display system using such an ESLM for heat-minimization and resolution enhancement during imaging, and the method for fabricating such an ESLM array. The ESLM array includes, in each individual pixel element, a small pixel mirror (reflective region) and a much larger pixel surround. Each pixel surround includes diffraction-grating regions and resolution-enhancement regions. During imaging, a selected pixel mirror reflects a selected-pixel beamlet into the capture angle of a projection lens, while the diffraction grating of the pixel surround redirects heat-producing unused radiation away from the projection lens. The resolution-enhancement regions of selected pixels provide phase shifts that increase effective modulation-transfer function in imaging. All of the non-selected pixel surrounds redirect all radiation energy away from the projection lens. All elements of the ESLM are fabricated by deposition, patterning, etching and other microelectronic process technologies.

Jain, Kanti (Briarcliff Manor, NY); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Zemel, Marc (New Rochelle, NY)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reduced heat flow in light water (H2O) due to heavy water (D2O) William R. Gormana)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced heat flow in light water (H2O) due to heavy water (D2O) William R. Gormana) and James D by over 1000% with the addition of heavy water. A column of light water cools from 25°C to 0°C in 11 hours, however, with the addition of heavy water it takes more than 100 hours. There is a concentration

Suzuki, Masatsugu

160

Phase 1-supplemental development of a kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, January 1989-June 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10 tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for the mid-1990's. In previous phases, an HVAC-systems manufacturer (York International) had been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Under the program, a number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described. The adaptation and operation of a computer optimization code was accomplished under the program and is reported herein.

Monahan, R.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Characterization of commercial building appliances. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on ``other`` end-uses category. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of energy end-use functions other than HVAC and lighting for commercial buildings, and to identify general avenues and approaches for energy use reduction. Specific energy consuming technologies addressed include non-HVAC and lighting technologies in commercial buildings with significant energy use to warrant detailed analyses. The end-uses include office equipment, refrigeration, water heating, cooking, vending machines, water coolers, laundry equipment and electronics other than office equipment. The building types include offices, retail, restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels/motels, grocery stores, and warehouses.

Patel, R.F.; Teagan, P.W.; Dieckmann, J.T.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

2014-12-22 Issuance: Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Final Rule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, refrigeration, and water heating equipment , as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on December 22, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

163

Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Visible light plasmonic heating of Au-ZnO for the catalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} reactants to CH{sub 4} and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat Au–ZnO from 30 to #1;~600 {degrees}#3;C and simultaneously tune the CH{sub 4} : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH{sub 4} : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperatureprogrammed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resulting from the plasmonic heating of the Au–ZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO{sub 2} conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser illumination is 0.030%. The Au–ZnO catalysts are robust and remain active after repeated laser exposure and cycling. The light intensity required to initiate CO{sub 2} reduction is low (#1;~2.5 x#4; 10{sup 5} W m{sup #5;-2}) and achievable with solar concentrators. Our results illustrate the viability of plasmonic heating approaches for CO{sub 2} utilization and other practical thermal catalytic applications.

Wang, Congjun; Ranasingha, Oshadha; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Ohodnicki, Andio, Mark; Lewis, James; P Matranga, Christopher

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility...

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allows high temperature waste heat utilization. Phosphoricnatural gas chillers, waste heat or solar heat; • hot wateris limited by generated waste heat Regulatory constraints: -

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Motor VFDs, Motors, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Control Sensors, Economizers Active...

169

Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Light Duty Diesel Engines A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power System of Diesel and WHR-ORC Engines High Efficiency Engine Systems Development and...

170

Anoka Municipal Utility- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Anoka Municipal Utility (AMU) offers the Commercial and Industrial Lighting and Motor Rebate Program for commercial and industrial customers who install high efficiency lighting, motors, and...

171

The (safety-related) heat exchangers aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants, and developments since 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and US nuclear power plant utilities, is preparing a series of aging management guidelines (AMGs) for commodity types of components (e.g., heat exchangers, electrical cable and terminations, pumps). Commodities are included in this series based on their importance to continued nuclear plant operation and license renewal. The AMGs contain a detailed summary of operating history, stressors, aging mechanisms, and various types of maintenance and surveillance practices that can be combined to create an effective aging management program. Each AMG is intended for use by the systems engineers and plant maintenance staff (i.e., an AMG is intended to be a hands-on technical document rather than a licensing document). The heat exchangers AMG, published in June 1994, includes the following information of interest to nondestructive examination (NDE) personnel: aging mechanisms determined to be non-significant for all applications; aging mechanisms determined to be significant for some applications; effective conventional programs for managing aging; and effective unconventional programs for managing aging. Since the AMG on heat exchangers was published four years ago, a brief review has been conducted to identify emerging regulatory issues, if any. The results of this review and lessons learned from the collective set of AMGs are presented.

Clauss, J.M.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

NSTAR (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NSTAR Gas offers incentives for their commercial customers to save energy in existing facilities. Rebates are for high efficiency gas space heating equipment, water heating equipment, infrared...

174

Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy DutyLow

175

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,End-Use Survey combined heat and power Consolidated Edisonengine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

More Heat than Light? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticut RegionsScience (SC)Missouri RegionsMontanaMore Heat

177

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas chillers, waste heat or solar heat; • hot wateris limited by generated waste heat Regulatory constraints: -might favor the use of waste heat from DG units or from

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

WASTE HEAT RECOVERY USING THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES IN THE LIGHT METALS INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently discovered thermoelectric materials and associated manufacturing techniques (nanostructures, thin-film super lattice, quantum wells...) have been characterized with thermal to electric energy conversion efficiencies of 12-25+%. These advances allow the manufacture of small-area, high-energy flux (350 W/cm2 input) thermoelectric generating (TEG) devices that operate at high temperatures (~750°C). TEG technology offers the potential for large-scale conversion of waste heat from the exhaust gases of electrolytic cells (e.g., Hall-Hèroult cells) and from aluminum, magnesium, metal and glass melting furnaces. This paper provides an analysis of the potential energy recovery and of the engineering issues that are expected when integrating TEG systems into existing manufacturing processes. The TEG module must be engineered for low-cost, easy insertion and simple operation in order to be incorporated into existing manufacturing operations. Heat transfer on both the hot and cold-side of these devices will require new materials, surface treatments and design concepts for their efficient operation.

Choate, William T.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Majumdar, Rajita

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Heat removal aspects of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor safety in light of the Three Mile Island incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety aspects of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) loop design are compared with those of the Light Water Reactor (LWR), in light of the Three Mile Island (TMI) incident. The events at TMI are briefly described, the fundamental differences between the LWR water coolant and the LMFBR sodium coolant are presented, and the design of analogous LMFBR safety systems under similar events as those at TMI is discussed. A preliminary qualitative evaluation of a TMI-equivalent accident for an LMFBR indicates that there is likely to be: (1) negligible pressure transients in the primary loop, (2) no core damage, (3) isolation of the incident at the steam generator, and (4) no radiation release to the environment, except a negligible amount of tritium from the secondary sodium. Furthermore, with the absence of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System), pressurizer, and other pressure-related components in the LMFBR design, operator action for a LMFBR should be much simpler in dealing with the coolant upset condition and the decay heat removal problems.

Victor, H.R.; Graf, D.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Phases I-C, I-D and I-E development of Kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat pump system. Final report, January 1986-September 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas-heat-pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine under development for over a decade. The engine was converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1990. In these phases, an HVAC systems manufacturer (York International) has been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Data are presented for environmental laboratory testing of both prototype gas heat pumps as well as durability, reliability, performance, and emission testing of the V160 Stirling engine. A number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described.

Monahan, R.E.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA nursing homes is the constant total NYC heating load. Theand heating demand were performed for the CA nursing home.home meets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases and heating

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power, and heat generation), and grid-side benefits (peakpre-) heat/cool, etc. ); home recharging using off-peak grid

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power, and heat generation), and grid-side benefits (peakpre-) heat/cool, etc. ); home recharging using off-peak grid

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Commercial Weatherization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial buildings consume 19 percent of the energy used in the U.S. Learn how the Energy Department is supporting research and deployment on commercial weatherization.

185

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,4422.492.34.3226

186

Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Commercial Building HVAC This report assesses 182 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. commercial buildings to identify and provide...

187

Cool energy savings opportunities in commercial refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consumes over 13 quads of primary energy annually. Most of this consumption (two-thirds) meets the energy needs of lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. The largest consuming group of the remaining one-third is commercial refrigeration at about one quad annually (990 trillion Btu), valued at over $7 billion per year to the commercial sector consumer. Potential energy savings are estimated to be about 266 trillion Btu, with consumer savings valued at about $2 billion. This study provides the first known estimates of these values using a bottom-up approach. The authors evaluated numerous self-contained and engineered commercial refrigeration systems in this study, such as: supermarket central systems, beverage merchandisers, ice machines, and vending machines. Typical physical characteristics of each equipment type were identified at the component level for energy consumption. This information was used to form a detailed database from which they arrived at the estimate of 990 trillion Btu energy consumption for the major equipment types used in commercial refrigeration. Based on the implementation of the most cost-effective technology improvements for the seven major equipment types, they estimated an annual potential energy savings of 266 trillion Btu. Much of the savings can be realized with the implementation of high-efficiency fan motors and compressors. In many cases, payback can be realized within three years.

Westphalen, D.; Brodrick, J.; Zogg, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Muscatine Power and Water- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Muscatine Power and Water (MP&W) offers rebates for energy efficient upgrades to commercial and industrial customers. Rebates are available for commercial lighting retrofits, energy efficient...

190

Indiana Michigan Power- Commercial and Industrial Rebates Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Indiana Michigan Power offers rebates for HVAC equipment, variable frequency drives, commercial refrigeration equipments, food service equipment and lighting measures for commercial and industrial...

191

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

192

Columbia Water and Light- HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain...

193

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams, Barbara Atkinson, Karina Garbesi and Francis savings. Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings

194

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

2014-04-28 Issuance: Certification of Commercial HVAC, Water...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Register final rule regarding the certification of commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC), water heating (WH), and refrigeration (CRE) equipment, as issued...

196

Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential and commercial members for purchasing energy efficient add-on heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, dishwashers...

197

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistance and heat pump water heaters are not covered.other than commercial heat pump water heaters). 10CFR431.110

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

New Mexico Gas Company- Commercial Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Gas Company Commercial Energy Efficiency programs provide energy savings for businesses using natural gas for cooking and water heating. Prescriptive incentives for specified...

199

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating value internal combustion engine Internationalbased variable speed internal combustion engine genset withdescription of internal combustion engines (ICE) as well as

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimal could be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughlylead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, withcell electric storage heat storage flow battery abs. chiller

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Abbreviations AC CA CCHP CEC CERTS CEUS CHP ConEd COPcombined cooling heat and power (CCHP) system was installed

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Heat Pumps Room Air Conditioners Water Heaters Gas Furnaces Clothes Washers Clothes Dryers Dishwashers COMMERCIAL

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Roseville Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Roseville Electric offers incentives for its commercial customers to increase the efficiency of existing facilities. Rebates are offered for energy efficient lighting equipment, HVAC system...

205

Commercialization and Licensing | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exclusive Patent License for ORNL Graphite Foam Technology January 28, 2010 - Light-emitting diode (LED) lamps are increasingly in demand in industrial and commercial...

206

Georgia Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Georgia Power offers rebates to business customers who pay taxes and non-tax paying commercial customers. Incentives are available for lighting, HVAC, food service equipment, refrigeration...

207

2014-11-25 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large Air-cooled Commercial Package Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment; Extension of Public Comment Period  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register extension of the public comment period regarding energy conservation standards for small, large and very large air-cool commercial package air conditioning and heating equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on November 25, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

208

2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods, Basic Model Definition, and Compliance for Commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment; Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for alternative efficiency determination methods, basic model definition, and compliance for commercial HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 18, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

209

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation ManagementMobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ab’), photovoltaic (‘pv’), and solar thermal (‘st’)} t u Daym,t,h Net heat from solar thermal during hour h, type of daysame alignment of the solar thermal panel it can be used for

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Exploring Mbar shock conditions and isochorically heated aluminum at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatter x-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. The combination of experiments fully demonstrates the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.

Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Lee, H. J.; Gauthier, M.; Galtier, E.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Physics Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94709 (United States); Döppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Turnbull, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); White, T.; Gregori, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Wei, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 87544 (United States); Zastrau, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Institute for Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller-University, 07743 Jena (Germany)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9: Lighting Energy Usage for Commercial Building Lighting incommercial buildings. 4.2. Energy The California Energy Commission has analyzed lighting energy usageCommercial Sector on 2003 Peak Day [Source: CEC 2003 Data] Figure 9: Lighting Energy Usage for Commercial Building

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

± 10.5 1 ) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 14.6 [± 12.4]± 4.0) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 25.5 [± 12.2]Primary Energy Space Heating Space Cooling Figure 2: Higher space conditioning end-use energy consumption

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Chapter 2, Commercial and Industrial Lighting Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2 Injection Begins8: Variable Frequency Drive2: Commercial and

215

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time:...

216

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

`Heat pumps in Smart Grids' IEA Annex 42  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facility Scandinavian interconnections Demand side Response (via smart grid) Industrial Residential.M. Wagener Managing Consultant OPERATING AGENT: #12;GAS HEAT PUMPS COMMERCIAL SECTOR RESEARCH, STRATEGY AUTOMATION HEAT PUMPS DOMESTIC AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS WORKING GROUP THERMAL DRIVEN HEAT PUMPS TARGET

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

218

Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

was launched in 2008 to promote excellence in the design of energy-efficient light-emitting diode (LED) commercial lighting fixtures or "luminaires." Solid-state lighting...

219

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Commercial Norms, Commercial Codes, and International Commercial Arbitration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The article defends the incorporation of commercial norms into commercial codes, through provisions such as statute 1-205 of the Uniform Commercial Code. It finds significant reliance on trade usages in international ...

Drahozal, Christopher R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Low Level Heat Recovery Through Heat Pumps and Vapor Recompression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The intent of this paper is to examine the methods and economics of recovering low level heat through heat pumps and vapor recompression. Actual commercially available equipment is considered to determine the near-term and future economic viability...

Gilbert, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Methodology to Measure Retrofit Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This dissertation develops a methodology to measure retrofit energy savings and the uncertainty of the savings in commercial buildings. The functional forms of empirical models of cooling and heating energy use in commercial buildings are derived from an engineering...

Kissock, John Kelly

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

A SCOPING STUDY: Development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Reactivity Insertion Accidents During Shutdown In U.S. Commercial Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the scoping study of developing generic simplified fuel damage risk models for quantitative analysis from inadvertent reactivity insertion events during shutdown (SD) in light water pressurized and boiling water reactors. In the past, nuclear fuel reactivity accidents have been analyzed both mainly deterministically and probabilistically for at-power and SD operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, many NPPs had power up-rates and longer refueling intervals, which resulted in fuel configurations that may potentially respond differently (in an undesirable way) to reactivity accidents. Also, as shown in a recent event, several inadvertent operator actions caused potential nuclear fuel reactivity insertion accident during SD operations. The set inadvertent operator actions are likely to be plant- and operation-state specific and could lead to accident sequences. This study is an outcome of the concern which arose after the inadvertent withdrawal of control rods at Dresden Unit 3 in 2008 due to operator actions in the plant inadvertently three control rods were withdrawn from the reactor without knowledge of the main control room operator. The purpose of this Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Model development project is to develop simplified SPAR Models that can be used by staff analysts to perform risk analyses of operating events and/or conditions occurring during SD operation. These types of accident scenarios are dominated by the operator actions, (e.g., misalignment of valves, failure to follow procedures and errors of commissions). Human error probabilities specific to this model were assessed using the methodology developed for SPAR model human error evaluations. The event trees, fault trees, basic event data and data sources for the model are provided in the report. The end state is defined as the reactor becomes critical. The scoping study includes a brief literature search/review of historical events, developments of a small set of comprehensive event trees and fault trees and recommendation for future work.

S. Khericha

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Solar Congeneration for Commercial Rooftops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Cogeneration for Commercial Rooftops Arun Gupta, PhD agupta@skyentechnologies.com ESL-KT-13-12-36 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Introduction What is Solar Cogeneration? ? Fun fact...: Typical photovoltaic (PV) solar panels waste roughly 85% of their energy as heat ? Q: Why not capture that heat and use it to heat water? What is Concentrating Solar? ? Using mirrors or lenses to concentrate sunlight ? Why? Less PV material, higher...

Gupta, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mississippi Power- EarthCents Commercial Incentives Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Mississippi Power offers rebates to commercial customers to help offset the cost of conversions from gas equipment to energy efficient electric equipment. Rebates are eligible for heat pumps,...

227

Kissimmee Utility Authority- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kissimmee Utility Authority (KUA) offers several rebates to commercial customers for energy efficiency improvements. Rebates are available for HVAC maintenance, heat pumps, duct leak repairs,...

228

Delta-Montrose Electric Association- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Delta-Montrose Electric Association (DMEA) offers a variety of rebates to commercial customers which upgrade to energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available for energy efficient heat pumps,...

229

Avista Utilities (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Avista Utilities offers numerous incentives to commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of customer facilities or equipment. Incentive options are available for heating...

230

Xcel Energy (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Xcel Energy offers a variety of incentives to commercial and industrial customers in the New Mexico service territory. Rebates are available for central air conditioning systems, heat pumps,...

231

Characterizing Commercial Sites Selected for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selected for energy efficiency monitoring Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean such as solar thermal absorption chillers, building energy management systems, and advanced lighting. The twoCharacterizing Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring This report presents data

232

Ashland Electric Utility- Commercial Conservation Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City of Ashland Conservation District has no-interest loans to help commercial customers finance energy efficiency improvements in facilities. The loans can be used for lighting retrofits, water...

233

Benton PUD- Commercial and Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Benton PUD offers a variety of incentives to non-residential customers for energy efficiency improvements. Projects are available for commercial customers interested in energy efficient lighting...

234

Nebraska Public Power District- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nebraska Public Power District offers multiple rebates for commercial and industrial customers to save energy in eligible facilities. Rebates are available for energy efficient lighting, HVAC...

235

City Utilities of Springfield- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City Utilities of Springfield offers incentives for commercial customers to increase the efficiency of eligible facilities. Rebates are available for efficient lighting upgrades, controls and for...

236

Montana-Dakota Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers a variety of rebates to commercial customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient lighting measures, air conditioning equipment, variable...

237

City of Lompoc Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City of Lompoc Utilities offers rebates to commercial customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficiency lighting, clothes washers, dishwashers, replaced refrigerators, new...

238

Empire District Electric- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Empire District Electric Company offers rebates to certain commercial and industrial customers for the installation of energy efficiency equipment. Prescriptive rebates for lighting, air...

239

Idaho Falls Power- Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Idaho Falls Power is offering a zero interest loan program to qualifying commercial customers to install efficient lighting and other energy conservation measures. The building must receive its...

240

Columbia River PUD- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia River PUD offers a variety of rebates to commercial and industrial customers who make energy saving improvements to facilities. Rebates are available for lighting retrofits, weatherization...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mason County PUD 3- Commercial and Industrial Energy Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Mason County PUD 3 offers rebates to its non-residential customers for implementing energy efficient lighting, motor rewinds, refrigeration, commercial cooking equipment, and custom projects....

242

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Changes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q

244

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore Shale ProvedCountry:Data FilesTypes

245

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

246

Application of industrial heat pumps Proven applications in 2012 for Megawatt+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of industrial heat pumps Proven applications in 2012 for Megawatt+ Heatpumps within a technical, commercial and sustainable framework Application of industrial heat pumps Proven applications Emerson Climate Technologies Core Offerings & Key Brands Residential Heating & Air Conditioning Commercial

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

247

Danfoss Commercial Compressors October 2013 | 2 Inverter compressors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Danfoss Commercial Compressors October 2013 | 2 Inverter compressors Geothermal energy taps to improve heat pump efficiency : compressor technology focus Efficiency boost in Ground Source Heat Pump-sized or require additional electrical heaters #12;Danfoss Commercial Compressors October 2013 | 6 What difference

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

248

The development of a kinematic Stirling-engine-driven heat pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuing development of a 10-ton light commercial natural-gas-fired kinematic Stirling-engine-driven heat pump system is described. Basic Stirling cycle thermodynamics are presented, and a complete engine heat balance is shown to detail the inherent advantages of the V160 Stirling engine as a prime mover in a heat pump package. Results from environmental laboratory testing of a breadboard prototype are reviewed, and the test procedures used in the evaluation are explained. Seasonal performance of the heat pump package was predicted using a bin-temperature method based on Chicago and Dallas climatic data. Annual energy costs, as predicted by the seasonal performance analytical computer program, have been calculated for a gas furnace, standard electric heat pump, and the Stirling engine-driven prototype heat pump package. These computed costs for these systems are listed and compared.

Monahan, R.E.; Kountz, K.J.; Clinch, J.M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Indianapolis Power and Light- Business Energy Incentives Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Power and Light Business (IPL) Energy Incentives Program assists commercial and industrial customers with reducing energy consumption through three common types of equipment: lighting,...

250

COMMERCIAL SPACE ACCOMPLISHMENTS Commercial Cargo Space Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/13/2013 COMMERCIAL SPACE ACCOMPLISHMENTS Commercial Cargo Space Accomplishments The Obama Administration's ambitious commercial space program, which has bipartisan support in Congress, has enabled NASA's successful partnership with two American companies now able to resupply the station - SpaceX and Orbital

Waliser, Duane E.

251

High-Performance Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Technological Solutions 11 Solar control facades 11 Spectrally-selective solar control 11 Angular selective solar control 13 Solar filters 14 Exterior solar control 15 Daylighting facades 17 Sunlight redirection 17 Sky-light redirection 18 Double skin facades and natural ventilation 18 Heat extraction double

252

Research and Commercialization Grants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Board of Research and Commercialization Technology provides grants for renewable resource research and development projects, among other types, to be conducted at research and commercialization...

253

Natural Refrigerant (R-729) Heat Pump  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Manufactured in the U.S. 2 Problem Statement * Current commercial and industrial heat pumps - Poor coefficient of performance (COP) at low temperatures * HFC refrigerant...

254

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams;ABSTRACT Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings and Garbesi 2011). Lighting represents approximately one-third of electricity use in commercial buildings

255

Heating device for semiconductor wafers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

Vosen, Steven R. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Heating device for semiconductor wafers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

Vosen, S.R.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Problems and Opportunities in OLED Lighting Manufacturing  

Energy Savers [EERE]

NY. * Our first product was introduced last year - an amber marker light for the health care market. * We have will soon complete our commercialization of a competitive...

258

Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as heat pump water heaters and commercial lighting.heat pump water heaters. Advanced lighting controls in commercial

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Technology Commercialization Fund - EERE Commercialization Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fund The Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) is designed to complement angel investment or early stage corporate product development. The fund totaled nearly 14.3 million in...

260

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

Policy Supporting Energy Efficiency and Heat Pump Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Supporting Energy Efficiency and Heat Pump Technology Antonio M. Bouza, DOE/BTP Technology Space Heating ResidentialMELs Residential Lighting ResidentialWashing & drying Residential Cooking Residential Refrigeration Residential Water Heating Residential Space Cooling Residential Space Heating 80

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

263

26 ASHRAE Transactions: Research Cooling-dominated commercial and institutional build-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ings served by ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems generally reject more heat to a closed ground design of hybrid ground- source heat pump systems. INTRODUCTION Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems offer an attractive alternative for both residential and commercial heat- ing and cooling applications

264

Riverland Energy Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Riverland Energy Cooperative offers a number of rebates for the purchase and installation of efficient lighting fixtures, air conditioners, heat pumps, water heaters, central electric thermal...

265

Limited Lawn & Limited Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited Lawn & Ornamental Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Review and Exams Limited for Commercial Landscape Maintenance Application: http://www.flaes.org/ pdf/lndspckt.pdf Limited Certification.floridatermitehelp.org or request by phone at 850-921-4177. Limited Lawn & Ornamental/Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance

Watson, Craig A.

266

Limited Lawn & Limited Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited Lawn & Ornamental Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Review and Exams Limited-921-4177. Limited Lawn & Ornamental/Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance: Ornamental and Turf Pest Control (SM 7&O/Structural only). See web locations below for applications. Limited Certification for Commercial Landscape

Jawitz, James W.

267

Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial-package air-conditioning and heating equipment, packaged terminal air condi- tioners and heat pumps, warm-air furnaces, packaged boilers, storage water heaters,

McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

MidAmerican Energy (Electric)- Commercial EnergyAdvantage Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

MidAmerican Energy offers a variety of incentives for their commercial customers to improve the energy efficiency of their facilities. Qualified equipment includes air conditioners, heat pumps,...

270

Summer HeatSummer Heat Heat stress solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occur (then drink a lightly salted beverage like a sports drink). The water's temperature should be cool How should gardeners avoid becoming a safety threat to themselves and others when it's hot? Start to the heat. Become a weather watcher. Set up a small weather station (with a high/low thermom eter, rain

Liskiewicz, Maciej

271

Thermal Issues Associated with the Lighting Systems, Electronics Racks, and Pre-Amplifier Modules in the National Ignition System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an investigation of the thermal issues related to the National Ignition Facility. The influence of heat sources such as lighting fixtures, electronics racks, and pre-amplifier modules (PAMs) on the operational performance of the laser guide beam tubes and optical alignment hardware in the NE laser bays were investigated with experiments and numerical models. In particular, empirical heat transfer data was used to establish representative and meaningful boundary conditions and also serve as bench marks for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Numerical models, constructed with a commercial CFD code, were developed to investigate the extent of thermal plumes and radiation heat transfer from the heat sources. From these studies, several design modifications were recommended including reducing the size of all fluorescent lights in the NIF laser bays to single 32 W bulb fixtures, maintaining minimum separation distances between light fixtures/electronics racks and beam transport hardware, adding motion sensors in areas of the laser bay to control light fixture operation during maintenance procedures, properly cooling all electronics racks with air-water heat exchangers with heat losses greater than 25 W/rack to the M1 laser bay, ensuring that the electronics racks are not overcooked and thus maintain their surface temperatures to within a few degrees centigrade of the mean air temperature, and insulating the electronic bays and optical support structures on the PAMs.

A. C. Owen; J. D. Bernardin; K. L. Lam

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A simplified methodology for sizing ground coupled heat pump heat exchangers in cooling dominated climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between GSIM and two commercially available heat exchanger sizing methods, the National Water Well Association (NWWA) and the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA) methods, was performed. GSIM heat exchanger lengths for Dallas were... Pump Capacity and Cooling Load. . . . . Oversizing and Undersizing the Heat Pump. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summary. . 72 74 76 78 80 82 85 87 90 92 IX COMPARISON OF HEAT EXCHANGER SIZING METHODS . . 93 International Ground Source Heat...

Gonzalez, Jose Antonio

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor, is sized for a 10-ton heat pump system - will be scaled to power a commercial product line ranging from 7 of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

274

Lewis County PUD- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

[http://www.lcpud.org/index.html Lewis County PUD] offers rebates for commercial and industrial lighting, as well as industrial process upgrades, on a case-by-case basis. Eligible industrial...

275

In-Situ Measurement of Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation in Damp Heat Stress Testing for Estimation of Low-Light Power Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extent of potential-induced degradation of crystalline silicon modules in an environmental chamber is estimated using in-situ dark I-V measurements and applying superposition analysis. The dark I-V curves are shown to correctly give the module power performance at 200, 600 and 1,000 W/m2 irradiance conditions, as verified with a solar simulator. The onset of degradation measured in low light in relation to that under one sun irradiance can be clearly seen in the module design examined; the time to 5% relative degradation measured in low light (200 W/m2) was 28% less than that of full sun (1,000 W/m2 irradiance). The power of modules undergoing potential-induced degradation can therefore be characterized in the chamber, facilitating statistical analyses and lifetime forecasting.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Florida Power and Light- Business Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Florida Power and Light (FPL) offers incentives for its business customers to upgrade the HVAC system, building envelope, water heating, refrigeration and lighting systems. The individual rebates...

277

An Integrated Solid-State LED Luminaire for General Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strong systems approach to designing and building practical LED-based replacement lamps is lacking. The general method of taking high-performance LEDs and marrying them to standard printed circuit boards, drivers and a heat sink has fallen short of the promise of LED lighting. In this program, a top-down assessment of requirements and a bottom-up reinvention of LED sources, electronics, optics and mechanics have resulted in the highest performance lamp possible. The team, comprised of Color Kinetics, the leaders in LED lighting and Cree, the leaders in LED devices took an approach to reinvent the package, the driver and the overall form and aesthetic of a replacement source. The challenge was to create a new benchmark in LED lighting - the resultant lamp, a PAR38 equivalent, met the light output, color, color quality and efficacy marks set out in the program as well as being dimmable, which is important for market acceptance. The approach combined the use of multiple source die, a chip-on-board approach, a very efficient driver topology, the use of both direct emission and phosphor conversion, and a unique faceted optic to avoid the losses, artifacts and hotspots of lensed approaches. The integral heat sink provided a mechanical base and airflow using a chimney-effect for use in a wide variety of locations and orientations. These research results led to a much better understanding of the system effects of component level technologies. It was clear that best-of-breed sub-system results do not necessarily result in the best end result for the complete system. In doing this work, we did not neglect the practical aspects of these systems. These were not rarified results and commercially impractical but lent themselves to eventual commercial products in the marketplace. The end result - a high performance replacement lamp - will save significant energy while providing a high-quality light source.

Kevin Dowling; Fritz Morgan Ihor Lys; Mike Datta; Bernd Keller; Thomas Yuan

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effect of different heat treatments during processing of soybean meal in a commercial solvent-extraction plant on the performance of pigs weaned at four weeks of age and growing swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(P). 05), although diet 3 had numerically betr. er gains (. 59 vs . 55 kg/d) and F/G (4. 07 vs 4. 41). Diet 1 failed to support normal growth (. 47 kg/d), however, F/G was similar to diet 2 (4. 36). It would appear that application of heat up... Condensed weights of amino acids were used in calculat- ing percentages. 28 TABLE 7. COMPOSITION OF OIETS FOR NURSERY TRIAL 3 Heat treatment classification Ingredient Rumen Under Normal Over Escape Corn, ground (IFN 4-02-935) 67. 92 Soybean meal...

Hansen, Blaine Curt

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Austin Utilities offers incentives to its commercial and industrial customers for the installation of energy-efficient equipment in eligible facilities. Rebates are available for lighting equipment...

280

Commercial New Construction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Commercial fertilizers 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compendium of tables on consumption of commercial fertilizers in the USA in 1993, including types of different fertilizers and consumption of each.

Berry, J.T.; Montgomery, M.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Small Commercial Refrigeration Incentive  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Efficiency Vermont offers financial incentives to cover the incremental costs of energy efficient refrigeration for commercial, industrial, agricultural and institutional buildings. To receive the...

283

Evaluation of the near-term commercial potential of technologies being developed by the Office of Building Technologies Volune II - Survey Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of the results from each Equipment and Practice Form completed by the program managers and principal investigators. Information collected from the Equipment and Practice Form include the following: name and description of the technology; energy characteristics; when the technology will be ready for commercialization; estimated payback period; market sectors that would benefit; important commercialization barriers to overcome; energy-related benefits; and non-energy benefits of the technology to customers. Some of these technologies include: heat pumps, heat exchangers, insulation lighting systems; cooling systems, ventilation systems, burners, leak detection systems, retrofit procedure, operating and maintenance procedures, wall systems, windows, sampling equipment, measuring methods and instruments, thermal analysis methods, and computer codes.

Weijo, R.O. (Portland General Electric Co., OR (USA)); Nicholls, A.K.; Weakley, S.A.; Eckert, R.L.; Shankle, D.L.; Anderson, M.R.; Anderson, A.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Garland Power and Light- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Garland Power and Light (GP&L) offers the incentives to its residential, small commercial and commercial customers to increase the energy efficiency of homes and facilities. Rebates for...

285

THERMOELECTRICAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM THE EXHAUST OF A LIGHT TRUCK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team formed by Clarkson University is engaged in a project to design, build, model, test, and develop a plan to commercialize a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system for recovering energy from the exhaust of light trucks and passenger cars. Clarkson University is responsible for project management, vehicle interface design, system modeling, and commercialization plan. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (sub-contractor to Clarkson) is responsible for TEG design and construction. Delphi Corporation is responsible for testing services and engineering consultation and General Motors Corporation is responsible for providing the test vehicle and information about its systems. Funds were supplied by a grant from the Transportation Research Program of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), through Joseph R. Wagner. Members of the team and John Fairbanks (Project Manager, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology). Currently, the design of TEG has been completed and initial construction of the TEG has been initiated by Hi-Z. The TEG system consists of heat exchangers, thermoelectric modules and a power conditioning unit. The heat source for the TEG is the exhaust gas from the engine and the heat sink is the engine coolant. A model has been developed to simulate the performance of the TEG under varying operating conditions. Preliminary results from the model predict that up to 330 watts can be generated by the TEG which would increase fuel economy by 5 percent. This number could possibly increase to 20 percent with quantum-well technology. To assess the performance of the TEG and improve the accuracy of the modeling, experimental testing will be performed at Delphi Corporation. A preliminary experimental test plan is given. To determine the economic and commercial viability, a business study has been conducted and results from the study showing potential areas for TEG commercialization are discussed.

Karri, M; Thacher, E; Helenbrook, B; Compeau, M; Kushch, A; Elsner, N; Bhatti, M; O' Brien, J; Stabler, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanotechnology Commercialization in Oregon February 27, 2012 Portland State University Physics Seminar Robert D. "Skip" Rung President and Executive Director #12;2 Nanotechnology Commercialization on "green" nanotechnology and gap fund portfolio company examples #12;3 Goals of the National Nanotechnology

Moeck, Peter

287

PHOTOVOLTAICS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of electricity demand. · PV applications are now being integrated directly into building roofs, Valuation of Demand-Side Commercial PV Systems in the United States, we sought to measure the costPHOTOVOLTAICS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS-- A NATURAL MATCH A study highlighting strategic

Perez, Richard R.

288

Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

290

Southwest Gas Corporation- Combined Heat and Power Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers incentives to qualifying commercial and industrial facilities who install efficient Combined Heat and Power systems (CHP). CHP systems produce localized, on...

291

Passive solar heating and natural cooling of an earth-integrated design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research is being designed with innovative features that will greatly reduce its energy consumption for heating, cooling, and lighting. A reference design has been studied and the effects of extending the overhang during summer and fall, varying glazing area, employing RIB, and reducing internal heat by natural lighting have been considered. The use of RIB and the extendable overhang increases the optimum window glazing area and the solar heating fraction. A mass-storage wall which will likely be included in the final design has also been considered. A figure of merit for commercial buildings is the total annual energy consumption per unit area of floor space. A highly efficient office building in the Oak Ridge area typically uses 120 to 160 kWhr/m/sup 2/. The Joint Institute reference design with natural lighting, an annual average heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) equal to 1.8, RIB, and the extendable overhang uses 71 kWhr/m/sup 2/. This figure was determined from NBSLD simulations corrected for the saving from RIB. The internal heat energy from lighting and equipment used in the simulation was 1653 kWhrs/month (high natural lighting case) which is much lower than conventional office buildings. This value was adopted because only a portion of the building will be used as office space and efforts will be made to keep internal heat generation low. The mass-storage wall and ambient air cooling will reduce energy consumption still further. The combined savings of the innovative features in the Joint Institute building are expected to result in a very energy efficient design. The building will be instrumented to monitor its performance and the measured data will provide a means of evaluating the energy-saving features. The efficiency of the design will be experimentally verified over the next several years.

Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Solid state lighting component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solid state lighting component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

NONE

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

299

High Performance Commercial Fenestration Framing Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy is to have a zero energy commercial building by the year 2025. Windows have a major influence on the energy performance of the building envelope as they control over 55% of building energy load, and represent one important area where technologies can be developed to save energy. Aluminum framing systems are used in over 80% of commercial fenestration products (i.e. windows, curtain walls, store fronts, etc.). Aluminum framing systems are often required in commercial buildings because of their inherent good structural properties and long service life, which is required from commercial and architectural frames. At the same time, they are lightweight and durable, requiring very little maintenance, and offer design flexibility. An additional benefit of aluminum framing systems is their relatively low cost and easy manufacturability. Aluminum, being an easily recyclable material, also offers sustainable features. However, from energy efficiency point of view, aluminum frames have lower thermal performance due to the very high thermal conductivity of aluminum. Fenestration systems constructed of aluminum alloys therefore have lower performance in terms of being effective barrier to energy transfer (heat loss or gain). Despite the lower energy performance, aluminum is the choice material for commercial framing systems and dominates the commercial/architectural fenestration market because of the reasons mentioned above. In addition, there is no other cost effective and energy efficient replacement material available to take place of aluminum in the commercial/architectural market. Hence it is imperative to improve the performance of aluminum framing system to improve the energy performance of commercial fenestration system and in turn reduce the energy consumption of commercial building and achieve zero energy building by 2025. The objective of this project was to develop high performance, energy efficient commercial fenestration framing systems, by investigating new technologies that would improve the thermal performance of aluminum frames, while maintaining their structural and life-cycle performance. The project targeted an improvement of over 30% (whole window performance) over conventional commercial framing technology by improving the performance of commercial framing systems.

Mike Manteghi; Sneh Kumar; Joshua Early; Bhaskar Adusumalli

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling, heating, and power, CCHP, commercial buildings,bln $ CAA CAISO Cal/EPA CARB CCHP CEUS CHP CSI CPP DER DER-heating, and electric power (CCHP) adoption in California’s

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hudson Light and Power- Photovoltaic Incentive Program (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Starting in 2011, Hudson Light and Power Department, the municipal utility for the Town of Hudson, started offering a limited number of photovoltaic rebates for residential, commercial, industrial,...

303

Commercial GSHPs: Benefits Belie Lack of Popularity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for commercial building application as an alternative to conventional HVAC systems. A technology overview is presented as there are several types of GSHP and each has features making them better suited for certain building and lot types in addition to location climate. The article concludes with potential energy and cost savings offered by GSHPs and a brief market overview.

Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

IID Energy- Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Imperial Irrigation District (IID) offers incentives to its commercial customers to encourage the adoption of energy efficient technologies. Several distinct programs cover general commercial...

305

Commercial Space Activities at Goddard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, environmental verification, and engineering `Best Practices' requirements #12;Commercial Utilization's commercial practices and processes · Brief summary of procurement activities under the three Rapid Catalogs Quantity ­ Leverage commercial practices and processes when possible ­ NASA mission assurance

Waliser, Duane E.

306

Nonequilibrium lighting plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the science of a variety of devices employing nonequilibrium lighting plasmas is reviewed. The devices include the fluorescent lamp, the low-pressure sodium lamp, the neon sign, ultraviolet lamps, glow indicators, and a variety of devices used by spectroscopists, such as the hollow cathode light source. The plasma conditions in representative commercial devices are described. Recent research on the electron gas, the role of heavy particles, spatial and temporal inhomogeneities, and new electrodeless excitation schemes is reviewed. Areas of future activity are expected to be in new applications of high-frequency electronics to commercial devices, new laser-based diagnostics of plasma conditions, and more sophisticated models requiring more reliable and extensive rate coefficient data.

Dakin, J.T. (GE Lighting, Nela Park, Cleveland, OH (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

Holton, J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy use comparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heating Coolinguse comparison Annual EUI, kBtu/sf-yr Lighting Heating

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Columbia Water and Light- Solar Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia Water and Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and residential customers for the purchase of solar water heaters and solar photovoltaic systems. These rebates are available for...

311

Seattle City Light- New Construction Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Seattle City Light (SCL) works with design teams of their commercial and industrial customers to create high performance buildings with low long-term operating costs. The utility provides financial...

312

Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF lamination users. A path to industrial energy benefits and revenue through industrial equipment sales was established in a partnership with Thermex Thermatron, a manufacturer of RF equipment.

Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

313

Research and Development Roadmap for Water Heating Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although water heating is an important energy end-use in residential and commercial buildings, efficiency improvements in recent years have been relatively modest. However, significant advancements related to higher efficiency equipment, as well as improved distribution systems, are now viable. DOE support for water heating research, development and demonstration (RD&D) could provide the impetus for commercialization of these advancements.

Goetzler, William [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Gagne, Claire [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Lutz, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Merrigan, Tim [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Commercial Vehicles Collaboration for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

events (level derived from integrated design and safety analysis) · Protection against fire, depress Vehicle Transition Concepts Astronaut Office letter (June, 2010) describes position on crew suit as a resource to expedite this transition to the commercial market The current astronaut corps can be used

Waliser, Duane E.

316

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL STORAGE APPLICATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES Roger 1. Knipp, PE. Dallas Power & Light Company Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage... since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either...

Knipp, R. L.

317

Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark 94720, USA Abstract Digital addressable, dimmable lighting controls were introduced to the US market

318

Sixth International Conference on Solid State Lighting, edited by Ian T. Ferguson, Nadarajah Narendran, Tsunemasa Taguchi, Ian E. Ashdown,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial white light emitting diodes (LEDs) rely on complicated fabrication methods to produce white light: Cadmium Selenide, Nanocrystal, Photoluminescence, Phosphor, White Light, Light Emitting Diode, LED 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Solid state lighting Solid state lighting, in the form of white light emitting diodes (LEDs

Weiss, Sharon

319

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA); Rubenstein, Francis M. (Berkeley, CA); Whitman, Richard E. (Richmond, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 4.1. LightingEvaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, andcomparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heating Cooling Pumps/C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformation AdministrationEnvironmentalCommercialization

323

Commercial Building Partnership  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codesthe NaturalCommercial Building Energy

324

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codesthe NaturalCommercial Building

325

Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codesthe NaturalCommercial Building1 | Energy

326

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codesthe NaturalCommercial Building1 | Energy

327

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaftColumbiaCommercial and Residential

328

Proceedings: Commercial Refrigeration Research Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving refrigeration systems for commercial use can enhance both utility load factors and supermarket profits. This workshop has pinpointed research needs in commercial refrigeration and systems integration for a supermarket environment.

None

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Proceedings: commercial refrigeration research workshop. Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this workshop was to identify the state-of-the-art and determine research needs for improving energy use and demand in commercial refrigeration applications. Workshop attendees included research and development, technical operations and marketing people from manufacturers of supermarket refrigeration, space conditioning, and energy management systems equipment, and from supermarket chains and electric utilities. Presentations were given on best current practice and research needs from the perspective of each of these industry segments. Working groups identified ten important research, development and equipment demonstration projects to improve the efficiency of refrigerating equipment, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment, and other energy-using systems in supermarkets.

Blatt, M.H.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Commercial Building Funding Opportunity Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar provide an overview of the Commercial Building Technology Demonstrations Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001084.

331

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

332

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

333

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

334

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

335

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

336

Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The NASA Food Commercial Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The NASA Food Technology Commercial Space Center and How Your Company Can Participate space Commercial Space Center Iowa State University 2901 South Loop Drive, Suite 3700 Ames, IA 50010-8632 Phone Manager NASA Food Technology Commercial Space Center Iowa State University 2901 South Loop Drive, Suite

Lin, Zhiqun

339

Commercialization of clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steps to commercialization are reviewed in respect of their relative costs, the roles of the government and business sectors, and the need for scientific, technological, and economic viability. The status of commercialization of selected clean coal technologies is discussed. Case studies related to a clean coal technology are reviewed and conclusions are drawn on the factors that determine commercialization.

Bharucha, N. [Dept. of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra (Australia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Passive Solar Commercial Demonstration Program: Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passive solar retrofit of a small existing commercial/residential building is described. An add on gallery/sunspace is integrated into the existing structure both in terms of energy and architectural functioning. The sunspace solution maximizes the amount of south facing glass for solar heat gain, while still allowing a deep penetration of daylight into the existing buildings. (MHR)

none,

1981-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Foundation Heat Exchanger Final Report: Demonstration, Measured Performance, and Validated Model and Design Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal heat pumps, sometimes called ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs), have been proven capable of significantly reducing energy use and peak demand in buildings. Conventional equipment for controlling the temperature and humidity of a building, or supplying hot water and fresh outdoor air, must exchange energy (or heat) with the building's outdoor environment. Equipment using the ground as a heat source and heat sink consumes less non-renewable energy (electricity and fossil fuels) because the earth is cooler than outdoor air in summer and warmer in winter. The most important barrier to rapid growth of the GSHP industry is high first cost of GSHP systems to consumers. The most common GSHP system utilizes a closed-loop ground heat exchanger. This type of GSHP system can be used almost anywhere. There is reason to believe that reducing the cost of closed-loop systems is the strategy that would achieve the greatest energy savings with GSHP technology. The cost premium of closed-loop GSHP systems over conventional space conditioning and water heating systems is primarily associated with drilling boreholes or excavating trenches, installing vertical or horizontal ground heat exchangers, and backfilling the excavations. This project investigates reducing the cost of horizontal closed-loop ground heat exchangers by installing them in the construction excavations, augmented when necessary with additional trenches. This approach applies only to new construction of residential and light commercial buildings or additions to such buildings. In the business-as-usual scenario, construction excavations are not used for the horizontal ground heat exchanger (HGHX); instead the HGHX is installed entirely in trenches dug specifically for that purpose. The potential cost savings comes from using the construction excavations for the installation of ground heat exchangers, thereby minimizing the need and expense of digging additional trenches. The term foundation heat exchanger (FHX) has been coined to refer exclusively to ground heat exchangers installed in the overcut around the basement walls. The primary technical challenge undertaken by this project was the development and validation of energy performance models and design tools for FHX. In terms of performance modeling and design, ground heat exchangers in other construction excavations (e.g., utility trenches) are no different from conventional HGHX, and models and design tools for HGHX already exist. This project successfully developed and validated energy performance models and design tools so that FHX or hybrid FHX/HGHX systems can be engineered with confidence, enabling this technology to be applied in residential and light commercial buildings. The validated energy performance model also addresses and solves another problem, the longstanding inadequacy in the way ground-building thermal interaction is represented in building energy models, whether or not there is a ground heat exchanger nearby. Two side-by-side, three-level, unoccupied research houses with walkout basements, identical 3,700 ft{sup 2} floor plans, and hybrid FHX/HGHX systems were constructed to provide validation data sets for the energy performance model and design tool. The envelopes of both houses are very energy efficient and airtight, and the HERS ratings of the homes are 44 and 45 respectively. Both houses are mechanically ventilated with energy recovery ventilators, with space conditioning provided by water-to-air heat pumps with 2 ton nominal capacities. Separate water-to-water heat pumps with 1.5 ton nominal capacities were used for water heating. In these unoccupied research houses, human impact on energy use (hot water draw, etc.) is simulated to match the national average. At House 1 the hybrid FHX/HGHX system was installed in 300 linear feet of excavation, and 60% of that was construction excavation (needed to construct the home). At House 2 the hybrid FHX/HGHX system was installed in 360 feet of excavation, 50% of which was construction excavation. There are six pipes in all excavations (three par

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

343

Advances in Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

colour rendition. The quartz-halogen incandescent lam s operate at higher temperatures, and have a somewhat higher efficacy, but they are rarely used except for special applicati ns. 3-2 High Intensity Discharge Lamps. Mercury is the grandfather... of the H.I.D. lamps. Its blue-green light, has been used almost exclusively for streetlighti and, often with colour-improving phospho it is still being used in industrial and commercial applications. Reactor-type ballasted mercury lamps can now...

Tumber, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

2013 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve3. LightingImports35 2013Commercial

345

ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent {sup 235}U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU).

A.H. Wells

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if://blogs.stthomas.edu/realestate/2011/01/24/residential-real-estate-professionals-how-do-you- develop feedback! There is a connection between the output and the input! Therefore forces inputs to same voltage

Anderson, Betty Lise

347

Commercial Grade Dedication Guidance  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI: AddressingEnergy Commercial Ethanol

348

Heating system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heating system utilizing solar panels and buried ground conduits to collect and store heat which is delivered to a heatpump heat exchanger. A heat-distribution fluid continuously circulates through a ground circuit to transfer heat from the ground to the heat exchanger. The ground circuit includes a length of buried ground conduit, a pump, a check valve and the heat exchanger. A solar circuit, including a solar panel and a second pump, is connected in parallel with the check valve so that the distribution fluid transfers solar heat to the heat exchanger for utilization and to the ground conduit for storage when the second pump is energized. A thermostatically instrumented control system energizes the second pump only when the temperature differential between the solar panel inlet and outlet temperatures exceeds a predetermined value and the ground temperature is less than a predetermined value. Consequently, the distribution fluid flows through the solar panel only when the panel is capable of supplying significant heat to the remainder of the system without causing excessive drying of the ground.

Nishman, P.J.

1983-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

349

Commercial Buildings Integration Program Overview - 2013 BTO...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Integration Program Overview - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Program Overview - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration...

350

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

One Machine for Heating Cooling & Domestic Hot Water: Multi-Function Heat Pumps to Enable Zero Net Energy Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advances to commercialize stand-alone electric heat-pump storage hot water heaters. These systems offer design uses multiple systems and fuels to provide thermal services, the emerging generation of heat to experience this change as air-source heat-pump water heaters deliver obvious energy savings over electric

California at Davis, University of

352

Thermal sensitivity of the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the thermal sensitivity of building total loads and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) loads in all nine commercial building types. In groceries and restaurants, refrigeration loads were also studied. The data indicated that the thermal sensitivity of building total and HVAC loads is small for all types of buildings. We found the thermal sensitivity of refrigeration loads also to be small for groceries and restaurants. These findings led us to conclude that, although corrections for weather might improve forecasted loads, the improvement is probably too small to justify the effort required to do so. We next examined the effects of building size, age, and primary heating fuel on thermal sensitivity. We compared our results with common expectations that small buildings are more thermally sensitive than larger buildings, old buildings are more thermally sensitive than new buildings, and electrically-heated buildings are more thermally sensitive than those heated by other fuels. As expected, small buildings were found to be more sensitive to the weather because of the higher ratios of envelope area to conditioned volume. However, neither vintage nor fuel type was found to affect HVAC loads. We investigated the use of hearing and cooling degree-days calculated to a base temperature of 65{degree}F as the basis for a weather-adjustment procedure. We concluded that a simple degree-day correlation is a promising prospect because it would be easy to develop and implement.

Taylor, Z.T.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

Aerocapacitor commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Power-One Aerocapacitor Commercialization Plan is to communicate to members of management and to all employees the overall objectives of the corporation. Power-One, Inc., has participated in a US Federal Government Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}: the project is a group effort, with Lawrence Livermore National Labs, GenCorp/Aerojet, PolyStor Corp. (a start-up company), and Power-One forming the consortium. The expected resulting technology is the {open_quotes}Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}, which possesses much higher performance levels than the usual capacitors on the market today. Power-One hopes to incorporate the Aerocapacitor into some of its products, hence enhancing their performance, as well as market privately-labeled aerocapacitors through its distribution channels. This document describes the details of Power-One`s plan to bring to market and commercialize the Aerocapacitor and Aerocapacitor-based products. This plan was formulated while Power-One was part of the Oerocap project. It has since pulled out of this project. What is presented in this plan is the work which was developed prior to the business decision to terminate this work.

NONE

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zircaloy); iii) hydrogen embrittlement of the cladding.cladding, even though hydrogen embrittlement has occurred.

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Golden Valley Electric Association- Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

BusBusiness $ense is a Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) program designed to increase the efficiency with which energy is used on GVEA's system. It provides rebates of up to $20,000 to...

358

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity generation capacity and operating efficiency of nuclear plants [Nuclear Plant Capacity Factor Nuclear Electricity Generationelectricity generation capacity and operating efficiency of nu- clear plants [

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

10,846 9,231 730 942 382 268 -Public Assembly 3,939 2,807 1,876 339 241 386 166 -Public Order and Safety 1,090 940 856 58 58 Q Q -Religious Worship 3,754 2,419 1,543 755 139 28 105...

360

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 Q 0.6Constructed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Principal Building Activity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 QPDF

362

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 QPDFL1. Floorspace Lit by

363

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L2  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 QPDFL1. Floorspace Lit

364

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L3  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198 18 Q 10 14.0 12.2 1.1 QPDFL1. Floorspace LitL3.

365

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 data) --  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 328 370 396After8986

366

Alexandria Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed. GovernmentFed.DepartmentSeptember 22,Btuand

367

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore Shale ProvedCountry:Data FilesTypes of

368

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year in Review1,213 136,422 133,4422.492.34.3226Types

369

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity and operating efficiency of nuclear plants [31,operating efficiency of nuclear plants in the past decades.cost of the fuel Nuclear Plant Capacity Factor Nuclear

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydride fueled BWRs. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:Fueled PWR Cores. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:1489–Hydride Fueled LWRs. Nuclear Engineering and Design, 239:

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermo-electrically pumped semiconductor light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermo-electric heat exchange in semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs) allows these devices to emit optical power in excess of the electrical power used to drive them, with the remaining power drawn from ambient heat. ...

Santhanam, Parthiban

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codesthe Natural Resources Defenseon SmartAbsorption

373

Commercial Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codesthe Natural Resources Defenseon

374

Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate EarthEnergyDistrict EnergyCensus, Survey, and

375

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramof EnergyDepartment ofDOE SecretaryDepartment

376

Natural Refrigerant High-Performance Heat Pump for Commercial Applications  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32Department U.S.NationalNatural GasHighEnergy1-93 July

377

Lighting Renovations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

378

Cerenkov Light  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

Slifer, Karl

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Cerenkov Light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

Slifer, Karl

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Department of Energy Opens Investigation into Alleged Lighting...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Opens Appliance Standards Investigation for Certain Air Con International Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps DOE Closes Investigation into Alleged Lighting Efficiency Violations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heat Pumps Lighting Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate...

382

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Construction Residential Savings Category Lighting Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount...

383

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heat Pumps Lighting Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: 100 -...

384

Peninsula Light Company- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Peninsula Light Company offers a rebate program for residential customers who want to install energy efficient products in homes. Rebates are provided for window replacements, water heaters, heat...

385

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Government Savings Category Heat Pumps Lighting Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New...

386

Dayton Power and Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dayton Power and Light offers rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient products for the home. Eligible systems and measures include heat pumps, air conditioning...

387

City Water Light and Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City Water Light and Power (CWLP) offers rebates to Springfield residential customers for increasing the energy efficiency of participating homes. Rebates are available for geothermal heat pumps,...

388

Independence Power and Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Independence Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates to residential customers for purchasing new, energy efficient appliances. Rebates are available on central air conditioning systems, heat pumps,...

389

Using Fourier Series to Model Hourly Energy Use in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fourier series analysis is eminently suitable for modeling strongly periodic data. Weather independent energy use such as lighting and equipment load in commercial buildings is strongly periodic and is thus appropriate for Fourier series treatment...

Dhar, A.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The thermal performance of fixed and variable selective transmitters in commercial architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A parametric model is developed for use in evaluating the relative thermal and lighting performance of a variety of existing and proposed types of commercial glazing materials. The glazing materials considered are divided ...

Bartovics, William A

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Piedmont EMC- Residential Energy Efficient Heat Pump Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Piedmont Electric Membership Corporation (PEMC) offers a financial incentive for residential members to install energy efficient heat pumps and compact fluorescent lighting in eligible homes....

392

Traffic Light Mapping and Detection Nathaniel Fairfield Chris Urmson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by lines painted on the road, traffic lights indicate precedence at intersections, brake lights show when, are becoming common- place as part of commercial driver-assistance systems. With power steering, power brakes obstructions or false positives such as those induced by the brake lights of other vehicles. Happily, both

Tomkins, Andrew

393

Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass...

394

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for windows/sashes, programmable thermostats, water...

395

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chapter 21: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol. Uniform...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of use HVAC heating, ventilation, and air conditioning ISR in-service rate LED light-emitting diode TRM Technical Reference Manual W Watt v This report is available at no cost...

397

BPA Transmission Commercial Project Roadmap  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Project Roadmap 15-Minute Scheduling Dynamic Transfer Program NT Redispatch WECC-Bal- 002 ST Comp & Preemption ST ATC Method. PCM Monthlyweekly Implementation PCM...

398

Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

399

Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

400

Portland's Commercial Solar Permitting Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program guide outlines the application and review procedures for obtaining the necessary permits to install a solar energy system on a new or existing commercial building.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Prior to 2007, wind energy devices generating electricity for commercial sale were assessed differently depending on where they were located. Some counties valued the entire turbine structure ...

402

Diurnal cool thermal energy storage: Research programs, technological developments, and commercial status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the major federal and private research and development efforts in diurnal cool thermal energy storage for electric load management in buildings. Included are brief technical descriptions and research histories of the technologies and applications of cool thermal storage. The goals, accomplishments, and funding levels of major thermal storage research programs also are summarized. The report concludes with the results of recent field performance evaluations of cool thermal storage installations and a discussion of the current commercial status of thermal storage equipment, including utility participation programs. This report was sponsored by the Technology and Consumer Products (TCP) Division within the Office of Conservation of the US Department of Energy. This report is part of TCP's ongoing effort to examine and evaluate technology developments and research efforts in the areas of lighting, space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and other building energy conversion equipment. Information obtained through this effort is used as an input in developing the US research agenda in these areas.

Wise, M A

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve3. LightingImports Building7.p e uData

404

Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Process Heat Exchanger Options for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Heat collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Heat collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

409

Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

Polcyn, Adam D

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Applications and Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper presents an overview of ground loops for space-conditioning heat pumps, hot water, ice machines, and water-cooled refrigeration in residential and commercial applications. In Louisiana, a chain of hamburger drive-ins uses total ground...

Braud, H. J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Optimal Design for a Hybrid Ground-Source Heat Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the advantages of ground-source heat pumps over their conventional alternatives make these systems a very attractive choice for air conditioning, not only for residential buildings but increasingly also for institutional and commercial...

Yu, Z.; Yuan, X.; Wang, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

York Electric Cooperative- Dual Fuel Heat Pump Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

York Electric Cooperative, Inc. (YEC) offers a $400 rebate to members who install a dual fuel heat pump in homes or businesses. The rebates are for primary residence and/or commercial and...

413

City of Palo Alto Utilities- Solar Water Heating Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City of Palo Alto Utilities is offering incentives for their residential, commercial and industrial customers to install solar water heating systems on their homes and facilities with a goal of 1...

414

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Electric Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles: Electric-Powered Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a new class of advanced nanomaterial called an electrical metal organic framework (EMOF) for EV heating and cooling systems. The EMOF would function similar to a conventional heat pump, which circulates heat or cold to the cabin as needed. However, by directly controlling the EMOF's properties with electricity, the PNNL design is expected to use much less energy than traditional heating and cooling systems. The EMOF-based heat pumps would be light, compact, efficient, and run using virtually no moving parts.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

COMMERCIAL SERVICES SUSTAINABLE FOOD POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMERCIAL SERVICES SUSTAINABLE FOOD POLICY February 2013 Commercial Services (CS) provides a range high standards of sustainability across all its activities. This policy supports CS aim to become a `Sustainable, Efficient and Effective Organisation' that "....will carefully consider the impact of our

Haase, Markus

417

Energy-Efficient Commercial Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses energy-efficient technologies such as boilers, air conditioners, heat pumps, humidity controls, combined heat and power (CHP), and more.

418

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

419

Sub-metering to Electricity Use in Large-scale Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;?#0;? Practice??Project example #0;?#0;? Use of data??Analysis Software Sub-metering and statistics to electricity use in commercial buildings 8 Method of sub-metering Whole electric power consumption of a building Hvac system Heating Circulating pump Oter... systems and equipments Equipments on Socket Special function room Electrically driven heating equipment Chiller Fan of cooling tower Chilled pump cooling pump Air hand unit Fresh air hand unit Fan coil unit Air conditioner Heating water system drinking...

Yuan, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and industrial customers. Rebates of up to $50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Forest Grove Light and Power- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Forest Grove Light and Power offers a variety of rebates through their Conservation Services Department. Rebates vary based on technology, and are available to residential, commercial, and/or...

422

QLEDs for displays and solid-state lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mainstream commercialization of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) for light-emitting applications has begun: Sony televisions emitting QD-enhanced colors are now on sale. The bright and uniquely size-tunable colors of ...

Supran, Geoffrey James Sasaji

423

Central Electric Cooperative- Non-Residential Lighting Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Central Electric Cooperative offers a commercial lighting system improvement incentive for any customer not on a residential utility rate. To use the program and learn how much the rebates can...

424

Heat transfer analysis in Stirling engine heat input system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major factor in commercialization of Stirling engine is mass productivity, and the heat input system including tubular heater is one of the obstacles to mass production because of its complexity in shape and difficulty in manufacturing, which resulted from using oxidation-resistant, low-creep alloys which are not easy to machine and weld. Therefore a heater heat exchanger which is very simple in shape and easy to make has been devised, and a burner system appropriate to this heater also has been developed. In this paper specially devised heat input system which includes a heater shell shaped like U-cup and a flame tube located in the heater shell is analyzed in point of heat transfer processes to find optimum heat transfer. To enhance the heat transfer from the flame tube to the heater shell wall, it is required that the flame tube diameter be enlarged as close to the heater shell diameter as possible, and the flame tube temperature be raised as high as possible. But the enlargement of the flame tube diameter should be restricted by the state of combustion affected by hydraulic resistance of combustion gas, and the boost of the flame tube temperature should be considered carefully in the aspects of the flame tube`s service life.

Chung, W.; Kim, S. [LG Electronics Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Living System Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

Day, Nancy

426

Chapter 15: Commercial New Construction Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This protocol is intended to describe the recommended method when evaluating the whole-building performance of new construction projects in the commercial sector. The protocol focuses on energy conservation measures (ECMs) measures (or packages of measures) where evaluators can best analyze impacts using building simulation. These ECMs typically require the use of calibrated building simulations under Option D of the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol. Examples of such measures include Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design building certification, novel and/or efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system designs, and extensive building controls systems. In general, it is best to evaluate any ECM (or set of measures) expected to significantly interact with other systems within the building and with savings sensitive to seasonal variations in weather.

Keates, S.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Heat flux solarimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solarimeter presented in this work is easy to assemble. It is calibrated and its performance is validated by means of Hottel's method. Finally, the curves obtained with this solarimeter are compared to the ones obtained with a commercial solarimeter. This device is based on the evaluation of the heat flow in a metal rod. In consequence, measurements are not affected by ambient temperature variations. On the other hand, there is a linear relationship between the temperatures measured at the rod ends and the incident radiation, as can be concluded both from the theory of its operation and the calibration lines obtained. The results obtained from the global irradiance measurements in the area of Los Polvorines (Buenos Aires Province), together with a preliminary evaluation of the solarimeter's response time, are presented in this work. (author)

Sartarelli, A.; Vera, S.; Cyrulies, E. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Echarri, R. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Samson, I. [INTEC (Instituto Tecnologico Santo Domingo), Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Citizens Gas- Commercial Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Citizens Gas of Indiana offers rebates to commercial customers for the installation of several types of efficient natural gas appliances, as well as certain equipment upgrades and tune-up services....

429

Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Trust of Oregon’s Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up...

430

Radiotherapy dosimetry using a commercial OSL system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercial optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) system developed for radiation protection dosimetry by Landauer, Inc., the InLight microStar reader, was tested for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy. The system uses carbon-doped aluminum oxide, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, as a radiation detector material. Using this OSL system, a percent depth dose curve for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation was measured in solid water. Field size and SSD dependences of the detector response were also evaluated. The dose response relationship was investigated between 25 and 400 cGy. The decay of the response with time following irradiation and the energy dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL detectors were also measured. The results obtained using OSL dosimeters show good agreement with ionization chamber and diode measurements carried out under the same conditions. Reproducibility studies show that the response of the OSL system to repeated exposures is 2.5% (1sd), indicating a real possibility of applying the Landauer OSL commercial system for radiotherapy dosimetric procedures.

Viamonte, A.; Rosa, L. A. R. da; Buckley, L. A.; Cherpak, A.; Cygler, J. E. [Programa de Qualidade em Radioterapia, Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA/MS), Rua do Resende 128 3 Andar. Centro. Rio de Janeiro, CEP: 20231-092, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box: 68509, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Rio de Janeiro, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, 503 Smyth Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1H 1C4 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre, 503 Smyth Rd. Ottawa, Ontario K1H 1C4 (Canada) and Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Light Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

Gordon Chalmers

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Advanced Lighting Program Development (BG9702800) Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a long-range plan for a broad-based, coordinated research, development and market transformation program for reducing the lighting energy intensities in commercial and residential buildings in California without compromising lighting quality. An effective program to advance lighting energy efficiency in California must be based on an understanding that lighting is a mature field and the lighting industry has developed many specialized products that meet a wide variety of light needs for different building types. Above all else, the lighting field is diverse and there are applications for a wide range of lighting products, systems, and strategies. Given the range of existing lighting solutions, an effective energy efficient lighting research portfolio must be broad-based and diverse to match the diversity of the lighting market itself. The belief that there is one solution--a magic bullet, such as a better lamp, for example--that will propel lighting efficiency across all uses to new heights is, in the authors' opinion, an illusion. A multi-path program is the only effective means to raising lighting efficiency across all lighting applications in all building types. This report presents a list of 27 lighting technologies and concepts (key activities) that could form the basis of a coordinated research and market transformation plan for significantly reducing lighting energy intensities in California buildings. The total 27 key activities into seven broad classes as follows: Light sources; Ballasts; Luminaires; Lighting Controls; Lighting Systems in Buildings; Human Factors and Education. Each of the above technology classes is discussed in terms of background, key activities, and the energy savings potential for the state. The report concludes that there are many possibilities for targeted research, development, and market transformation activities across all sectors of the building lighting industry. A concerted investment by the state to foster efficiency improvements in lighting systems in commercial and residential buildings would have a major positive impact on energy use and environmental quality in California.

Rubinstein, Francis; Johnson, Steve

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

MAE Seminar Series NYSERDA Biomass Heating R&D for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAE Seminar Series NYSERDA Biomass Heating R&D for Residential and Small- Scale Commercial Systems Ellen Burkhard, Ph.D. NYSERDA Program Manager Abstract In an effort to develop a high-efficiency biomass's Environmental R&D and Building R&D Programs jointly developed the Biomass Heating R&D Program. The objectives

Krovi, Venkat

434

Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-47669 Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain Walker of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey A. Siegel Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems of 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters

435

Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial kitchen equipment represents a large set of water users in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high volume...

436

New Energy Efficiency Standards for Commercial Refrigeration...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment to Cut Businesses' Energy Bills and Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment to Cut...

437

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement The Office of International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation...

438

Local Option- Commercial PACE Financing (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In June 2012, Connecticut passed legislation enabling Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy financing (C-PACE), targeting commercial, industrial and multifamily property owners. C-PACE is a...

439

El Paso Electric Company- Commercial Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The El Paso Electric (EPE) Commercial Efficiency Program pays incentives to commercial and industrial customers who install energy efficiency measures in facilities located within EPE's New Mexico...

440

Sawnee EMC- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sawnee EMC provides a variety of rebates for commercial customers who wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. If recommended by a Sawnee Commercial Marketing Representative ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

National Grid (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

National Grid’s Commercial Energy Efficiency Program provides support services and incentives to commercial customers who install energy efficient natural gas related measures. Prescriptive...

442

commercial buildings initiative | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Initiative The DOE Building Technologies Office works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the use of energy efficiency technologies in both...

443

Idaho Power- Large Commercial Custom Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Large commercial and industrial Idaho Power customers that reduce energy usage through more efficient electrical commercial and industrial processes may qualify for an incentive that is the lesser...

444

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geothermal heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the study is to demonstrate the viability of geothermal heating projects in energy and economic terms and to provide nomograms from which an initial estimate may be made without having to use data-processing facilities. The effect of flow rate and temperature of the geothermal water on drilling and on the network, and the effect of climate on the type of housing are considered.

Aureille, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and steam (i.e. district heating) from the facility level,from electricity and district heating (hourly peak in oneelectricity and facility district heating consumption the

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resembles magnetic lines of force Eclipse observations show the `solar corona' Thomson-scattered white light ­ photospheric light scattered from dust, solar spectrum remains ­ `zodiacal light' E corona ­ emission linesTurbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric dark energy problem Stuart D. Bale

448

"Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

449

Daylighting: Measuring the Performance of Light Shelves and Occupant-Controlled Blinds on a Dimmed Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of a day lighted space is both an art and a science. The biggest challenge facing the lighting designer is to admit only as much light as necessary and distribute it evenly throughout the space without introducing glare or heat. In warm...

Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 1: Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity can provide, such as heat for homes, lights for commercial buildings, or motors for industrial

452

Water and Space Heating Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the design and operation of the Trane Weathertron III Heat Pump Water Heating System and includes a comparison of features and performance to other domestic water heating systems. Domestic water is generally provided through...

Kessler, A. F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Today in Energy - commercial consumption & efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends.

2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Energy Optimization (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Optimization Programs, administered by WECC, provides commercial electric incentives for the following Michigan utilities:

456

Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama Description Totals R.Halls Wells- Metz Light ERS ETC SourceFour 25 25 50 degree ERS Strand Lighting 64 14 24 12 14 36 degree ERS ETC Source Four 15 15 36 degree ERS Strand Lighting 124 60 58 2 4 26 degree ERS ETC SourceFour 2 2 26 degree ERS Strand

Indiana University

457

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct insulation, and improved equipment sizing; and (3) to develop and evaluate innovative techniques applicable to large buildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation. In the UCB fan project, the goals were: (1) to develop a protocol for testing, analyzing and diagnosing problems in large commercial building built-up air handling systems, and (2) to develop low-cost measurement techniques to improve short term monitoring practices. To meet our stated goals and objectives, this project: (1) continued to investigate and characterize the performance of thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings; (2) performed energy analyses and evaluation for duct-performance improvements for both small and large commercial buildings; (3) developed aerosol injection technologies for both duct sealing and liner encapsulation in commercial buildings; and (4) designed energy-related diagnostic protocols based on short term measurement and used a benchmarking database to compare subject systems with other measured systems for certain performance metrics. This year's efforts consisted of the following distinct tasks: performing characterization measurements for five light commercial building systems and five large-commercial-building systems; analyzing the potential for including duct performance in California's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Non-Residential Buildings (Title 24), including performing energy and equipment sizing analyses of air distribution systems using DOE 2.1E for non-residential buildings; conducting laboratory experiments, field experiments, and modeling of new aerosol injection technologies concepts for sealing and coating, including field testing aerosol-based sealing in two large commercial buildings; improving low-cost fan monitoring techniques measurements, and disseminating fan tools by working with energy practitioners directly where possible and publishing the results of this research and the tools developed on a web-site. The final report consists of five sections listed below. Each section includes its related

Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

459

Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A physically realistic description of fuel swelling and fission-gas release is needed to aid in predicting the behavior of fuel rods and fission gases under certain hypothetical light-water-reactor (LWR) accident conditions. To satisfy this need, a comprehensive computer-base model, the Steady-State and Transient Gas-Release and Swelling Subroutine (GRASS-SST), its faster-running version, FASTGRASS, and correlations based on analyses performed with GRASS-SST, PARAGRASS, are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This model is being incorporated into the Fuel-Rod Analysis Program (FRAP) code being developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The analytical effort is supported by a data base and correlations developed from characterization of irradiated LWR fuel and from out-of-reactor transient heating tests of irradiated commercial and experimental LWR fuel under a range of thermal conditions. 7 refs., 2 figs.

Massey, W.E.; Till, C.E.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, P.J.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Light Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceEfeedstocks and the climateLife a Light

463

Light' Darkness  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceEfeedstocks and the climateLifeLight to

464

Residential Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S. EnergyEnergy EfficiencyLighting

465

Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

Hayes, S.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

BIODIESEL BLENDS IN SPACE HEATING EQUIPMENT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is a diesel-like fuel that is derived from processing vegetable oils from various sources, such as soy oil, rapeseed or canola oil, and also waste vegetable oils resulting from cooking use. Brookhaven National laboratory initiated an evaluation of the performance of blends of biodiesel and home heating oil in space heating applications under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This report is a result of this work performed in the laboratory. A number of blends of varying amounts of a biodiesel in home heating fuel were tested in both a residential heating system and a commercial size boiler. The results demonstrate that blends of biodiesel and heating oil can be used with few or no modifications to the equipment or operating practices in space heating. The results also showed that there were environmental benefits from the biodiesel addition in terms of reductions in smoke and in Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). The latter result was particularly surprising and of course welcome, in view of the previous results in diesel engines where no changes had been seen. Residential size combustion equipment is presently not subject to NOx regulation. If reductions in NOx similar to those observed here hold up in larger size (commercial and industrial) boilers, a significant increase in the use of biodiesel-like fuel blends could become possible.

KRISHNA,C.R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2013 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

468

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

469

Accepted Manuscript Title: A critical approach to the determination of optimal heat rejection pressure in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A commercial refrigeration plant and a heat pump water heater were finally simulated to verify their energy. Keywords: CO2, Transcritical cycle, Optimisation, Refrigeration, Heat pump, Gas cooler. Nomenclature CAccepted Manuscript Title: A critical approach to the determination of optimal heat rejection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

score Figure 43 Lighting faults Comparison of the total84 Figure 45 Comparison of lighting power consumption (left)2011 Figure 45 Comparison of lighting power consumption (

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Office of Intellectual Property Commercialization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to commercialize intellectual property. Local businesses are key to the development of UAF IP designed defense, local companies will likely be the first to develop technologies around mining, fisheries, and energy development in the North. We are grateful to those companies who have contacted us to date and we

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

472

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boilers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

473

International Commercial Vehicle Technology Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cluster (CVC), the Fraunhofer Innovations Cluster for Digital Commercial Vehicle Technology (DNT Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster DNT/FUMI, Fraunhofer ITWM Opening of exhibition and come together WEDNESDAY, 12 innovation projects between the industry and the scientific fraternity. A network like the CVA works like

Steidl, Gabriele

474

commercializaTion office Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology commercializaTion office Agriculture ·Biotechnology ·Blueberries ·Cotton ·Forages Utilization, Renewable Energy ·Algalbiofuels ·Biodiesel ·Biomassengineering ·Biomasspre,skincare,andwoundhealing ·Vaccines Information Technology ·Bioinformaticstools ·Imagerenderingandenhancement ·3

Arnold, Jonathan

475

Starfire - a commercial tokamak reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic objective of the STARFIRE Project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. 10 refs.

Baker, C.C.; Abdou, M.A.; DeFreece, D.A.; Trachsel, C.A.; Kokoszenski, J.; Graumann, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and... Eligibility: Commercial, Residential Savings Category: Heat Pumps, Lighting, Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat California Enterprise Development Authority (Figtree PACE)-...

477

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Eligibility: Commercial, Residential Savings Category: Heat Pumps, Lighting Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative- Heat Pump Loan Program Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative...

478

UDC Teaming with Acuity to Make Commercial-Sector PHOLED Luminaire  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With support from DOE's Small Business Innovation Research program, Universal Display Corporation (UDC) is working with Acuity Brands Lighting to make an efficient, color-tunable luminaire for use in the commercial sector using UDC's proprietary phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) technology. The present project aims to adapt this technology—which increases the energy efficiency of OLEDs by as much as fourfold—to high-end commercial and institutional building applications.

479

Commercial and Industrial Conservation and Load Management Programs at New England Electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL CONSERVAT~ON AND LOAD MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS AT NEW ENGLAND ELECTRIC PETER H. GIBSON Manager, Load Management and Conservation Services New England Power Service Company Westborough, Massachusetts ABSTRACT New... is directed mainly toward the commercial and industrial classes, which mske up 62% of sales. The overall program, called Partners In Energy Planning, includes a performance contracting or modified shared savings program, a lighting subsidy program, a...

Gibson, P. H.

480

Energy and lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in research for new types of lighting with increased efficacies (lumens/watt) are discussed in the following areas: (1) high-frequency, solid-state ballasts, (2) isotopic enhancement of mercury isotopes, (3) magnetic augmentation, (4) electrodeless, ultra-high frequency, (5) tuned phosphors, (6) two-photon phosphors, (7) heat mirrors, and (3) advanced control circuits to take advantage of daylight and occupancy. As of 1985, improvements in efficacy have been accomplished on an economic basis to save energy for (1) high-frequency ballasts (25%), (2) isotopic enhancement (5%), and (8) advanced control circuits (up to 50%). Most of these advances depend on a deeper understanding of the weakly ionized plasma as a radiating and diffusing medium. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Berman, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "light commercial heating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Commercial Clean Energy Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) is offering grants for mid-sized photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heating systems (SWH) installed by businesses, non-profits, and local governments...

482

Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in Voc were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of ~1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in Voc after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale.

Deline, C.; del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential and commercial sector installations, for a total of 9 GW. Clearly, commercial DG with CHP

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Cooling by heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce the idea of actually cooling quantum systems by means of incoherent thermal light, hence giving rise to a counter-intuitive mechanism of "cooling by heating". In this effect, the mere incoherent occupation of a quantum mechanical mode serves as a trigger to enhance the coupling between other modes. This notion of effectively rendering states more coherent by driving with incoherent thermal quantum noise is applied here to the opto-mechanical setting, where this effect occurs most naturally. We discuss two ways of describing this situation, one of them making use of stochastic sampling of Gaussian quantum states with respect to stationary classical stochastic processes. The potential of experimentally demonstrating this counter-intuitive effect in opto-mechanical systems with present technology is sketched.

A. Mari; J. Eisert

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Dual source heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Segmented heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

487

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the amount of commercial building energy usage, particularlycommercial building sector. To compare the aggregated energy usagecommercial buildings. For the residential sector, the total heating and cooling energy usages

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

LEDs for Energy Efficient Greenhouse Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light energy is an important factor for plant growth. In regions where the natural light source, i.e. solar radiation, is not sufficient for growth optimization, additional light sources are being used. Traditional light sources such as high pressure sodium lamps and other metal halide lamps are not very efficient and generate high radiant heat. Therefore, new sustainable solutions should be developed for energy efficient greenhouse lighting. Recent developments in the field of light source technologies have opened up new perspectives for sustainable and highly efficient light sources in the form of light-emitting diodes, i.e. LEDs, for greenhouse lighting. This review focuses on the potential of LEDs to replace traditional light sources in the greenhouse. In a comparative economic analysis of traditional vs. LED lighting, we show that the introduction of LEDs allows reduction of the production cost of vegetables in the long-run of several years, due to the high energy efficiency, low maintenance cost and lon...

Singh, Devesh; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

COMMERCIALIZING  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Server Lifting Device Data Center Transitions manufactures the MASS Lift, a novel lifting device that moves large computer server cabinets. The product's power system was...

491

COMMERCIALIZING  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science,PrinciplesPlasma Physics

492

Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and UserofProtein structureAnalysis of Partondefault Sign In

493

Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean CommunitiesEFRC seekschief-science-officer/ Joint Center

494

Metallic halide lights and lighting systems. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the design and operation of metallic halide lights and lighting systems. High pressure, high intensity, and low wattage discharge lamps are described. Citations discuss power sources, lamp life, lamp control circuits, thermal switches, and heat reflective coatings. Applications in sport stadium lighting, vehicle headlights, and crop-lighting are included. (Contains a minimum of 170 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Development of a commercial photovoltaic concentrator module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ojective of this work was to develop the design and prototype of a commercial high-concentration photovoltaic (PV) module. The design is for a 282-sun point-focus concentrating module. Most of the components, subassemblies, and design features incorporate simplifications and ease of manufacturing. The Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) module is designed to incorporate high-efficiency, single-crystal silicon PV cells. The housing is made with aluminum laminated for voltage stand-off and simultaneously providing high thermal conductivity. The Fresnel lens injection molded by American Optical (AO) as singles. The cell assembly consists of a copper heat spreader, a photovoltaic cell soldered, a top and bottom contact, and a reflective secondary optical element (SOE). The cell assemblies passed all of the initial electrical characterization and high-potential tests. Under environmental cycling, the only bond that failed was the PV cell-to-heat spreader interface. The other components (top contact, bottom contact, SOE) passed all the environmental cycling tests. The cell assemblies were designed to be mounted onto the receiver section with a thermally conductive RTV. This geometry was subjected to environmental testing. There was no delamination of this bond nor was there electrical breakdown when the assemblies were subjected to the hi-pot test. A mock module was fabricated for environmental evaluation. This module was subjected to the humidity/freeze cycling to assess the performance of the lens mounting design. This module was also subjected to the rain test after the humidity/freeze cycling and checked for water leaks. The lens showed small displacement from its original position after the environmental cycling. One tablespoon of water did collect inside the module.

Saifee, S.T.; Hutchison, G. [Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Sustainable Office Lighting Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

497

Web-based energy information systems for energy management and demand response in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Information Systems (EIS) for buildings are becoming widespread in the U.S., with more companies offering EIS products every year. As a result, customers are often overwhelmed by the quickly expanding portfolio of EIS feature and application options, which have not been clearly identified for consumers. The object of this report is to provide a technical overview of currently available EIS products. In particular, this report focuses on web-based EIS products for large commercial buildings, which allow data access and control capabilities over the Internet. EIS products combine software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to collect, analyze and display building information to aid commercial building energy managers, facility managers, financial managers and electric utilities in reducing energy use and costs in buildings. Data types commonly processed by EIS include energy consumption data; building characteristics; building system data, such as heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and lighting data; weather data; energy price signals; and energy demand-response event information. This project involved an extensive review of research and trade literature to understand the motivation for EIS technology development. This study also gathered information on currently commercialized EIS. This review is not an exhaustive analysis of all EIS products; rather, it is a technical framework and review of current products on the market. This report summarizes key features available in today's EIS, along with a categorization framework to understand the relationship between EIS, Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCSs), and similar technologies. Four EIS types are described: Basic Energy Information Systems (Basic-EIS); Demand Response Systems (DRS); Enterprise Energy Management (EEM); and Web-based Energy Management and Control Systems (Web-EMCS). Within the context of these four categories, the following characteristics of EIS are discussed: Metering and Connectivity; Visualization and Analysis Features; Demand Response Features; and Remote Control Features. This report also describes the following technologies and the potential benefits of incorporating them into future EIS products: Benchmarking; Load Shape Analysis; Fault Detection and Diagnostics; and Savings Analysis.

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Herter, Karen

2003-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

498

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

499

Commercial & Institutional Green Building Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings Voluntary Green Building Programs: • LEED www.usgbc.org • Living Building Challenge living-future.org/lbc • Green Globes www.greenglobes.com • WELL Buildings wellbuildinginstitute.com • ENERGY STAR energystar.gov ESL-KT-14...The North Central Branch Texas Public Works Association Commercial & Institutional Green Building Performance 11.19.2014 ESL-KT-14-11-26 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Q&A Your Presenters: Chris...

Harrison, S.; Mundell,C.; Meline, K.; Kraatz,J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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