National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for light comm ga

  1. Glencoe Light & Power Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliam County,GlastonburyEnergyNewGlencoe Light

  2. Journal of Crystal Growth 298 (2007) 272275 Dislocation analysis in homoepitaxial GaInN/GaN light emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    2007-01-01

    of GaInN/GaN-based light emitting diodes (LED) on quasi-bulk GaN with an atomically flat polished were much improved. The optical output power of the light emitting diode increased by more than one. Cathodoluminescence; A1. Threading dislocation density; A2. Homoepitaxial growth; B1. GaInN; B3. Light emitting diode

  3. Advantages of the Blue InGaN/GaN Light-Emitting Diodes with an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN Quantum Well Structured Electron Blocking Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    ABSTRACT: InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with p-(AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN) quantum well structured electron. The proposed QWEBL LED structure, in which a p-GaN QW layer is inserted in the p-AlGaN electron blocking layer the radiative recombination rates across the active region. Consequently, the light output power was enhanced

  4. GaN based nanorods for solid state lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Shunfeng; Waag, Andreas [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Braunschweig University of Technology, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, GaN nanorods are emerging as a very promising novel route toward devices for nano-optoelectronics and nano-photonics. In particular, core-shell light emitting devices are thought to be a breakthrough development in solid state lighting, nanorod based LEDs have many potential advantages as compared to their 2 D thin film counterparts. In this paper, we review the recent developments of GaN nanorod growth, characterization, and related device applications based on GaN nanorods. The initial work on GaN nanorod growth focused on catalyst-assisted and catalyst-free statistical growth. The growth condition and growth mechanisms were extensively investigated and discussed. Doping of GaN nanorods, especially p-doping, was found to significantly influence the morphology of GaN nanorods. The large surface of 3 D GaN nanorods induces new optical and electrical properties, which normally can be neglected in layered structures. Recently, more controlled selective area growth of GaN nanorods was realized using patterned substrates both by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Advanced structures, for example, photonic crystals and DBRs are meanwhile integrated in GaN nanorod structures. Based on the work of growth and characterization of GaN nanorods, GaN nanoLEDs were reported by several groups with different growth and processing methods. Core/shell nanoLED structures were also demonstrated, which could be potentially useful for future high efficient LED structures. In this paper, we will discuss recent developments in GaN nanorod technology, focusing on the potential advantages, but also discussing problems and open questions, which may impose obstacles during the future development of a GaN nanorod based LED technology.

  5. Green cubic GaInN/GaN light-emitting diode on microstructured silicon (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Wetzel, Christian, E-mail: wetzel@ieee.org [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Future Chips Constellation, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lee, S. C.; Brueck, S. R. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Jiang, Y.-B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes free of piezoelectric polarization were prepared on standard electronic-grade Si(100) substrates. Micro-stripes of GaN and GaInN/GaN quantum wells in the cubic crystal structure were grown on intersecting (111) planes of microscale V-grooved Si in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, covering over 50% of the wafer surface area. Crystal phases were identified in electron back-scattering diffraction. A cross-sectional analysis reveals a cubic structure virtually free of line defects. Electroluminescence over 20 to 100??A is found fixed at 487?nm (peak), 516?nm (dominant). Such structures therefore should allow higher efficiency, wavelength-stable light emitters throughout the visible spectrum.

  6. Enhanced hole transport in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light-emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    -emitting diodes (LEDs) are considered the new generation lighting sources due to their advantages in power Society of America OCIS codes: 230.3670, 230.5590, 160.6000. Nitride-based high-power light devoted to the development of high-brightness GaN-based LEDs [3­5]. Lateral hole spreading is one

  7. A hole accelerator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Zhu, Binbin; Zhang, Yiping; Lu, Shunpeng; Zhang, Xueliang; Hasanov, Namig; Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Demir, Hilmi Volkan, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-10-13

    The quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been significantly limited by the insufficient hole injection, and this is caused by the inefficient p-type doping and the low hole mobility. The low hole mobility makes the holes less energetic, which hinders the hole injection into the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) especially when a p-type AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) is adopted. In this work, we report a hole accelerator to accelerate the holes so that the holes can obtain adequate kinetic energy, travel across the p-type EBL, and then enter the MQWs more efficiently and smoothly. In addition to the numerical study, the effectiveness of the hole accelerator is experimentally shown through achieving improved optical output power and reduced efficiency droop for the proposed InGaN/GaN LED.

  8. Wavelength-resolved low-frequency noise of GaInN/GaN green light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Wavelength-resolved low-frequency noise of GaInN/GaN green light emitting diodes S. L. Rumyantseva well light emitting diodes. The light intensity noise was measured as a function of wavelength within the light emitting diode spectral emission line. The spectral noise density is found to increase

  9. Demonstration of a semipolar (10(1)over-bar(3)over-bar) InGaN/GaN green light emitting diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    InGaN / GaN green light emitting diode R. Sharma, a? P. M.green ??525 nm? light emitting diode ?LED?. The fabricated

  10. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth, E-mail: krishnamoorthy.13@osu.edu, E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 × 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5?×?10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  11. Surface plasmon enhanced InGaN light emitter Koichi Okamoto*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamoto, Koichi

    is a very promising method for developing the super bright light emitting diodes (LEDs). Moreover, we foundGaN/GaN, light emitting diode, quantum well, internal quantum efficiency, solid-state light source 1. INTRODUCTION Since 1993, InGaN quantum wells (QW)-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been continuously

  12. Light extraction in individual GaN nanowires on Si for LEDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xiang

    GaN-based nanowires hold great promise for solid state lighting applications because of their waveguiding properties and the ability to grow nonpolar GaN nanowire-based heterostructures, which could lead to increased light ...

  13. Improved hole distribution in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with graded thickness quantum barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    is 48.3%. Moreover, the light output power was enhanced from 770 mW for the ETQB LEDs to 870 m; accepted 3 June 2013; published online 19 June 2013) InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with graded , which is much smaller than that of the conventional equal-thickness quantum barriers (ETQB) LED, which

  14. Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian, E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mohney, Suzanne E., E-mail: mohney@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Highly efficient GaAs solar cells by limiting light emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    a non-concentrating system with limited emission angle in a thin, light trapping GaAs solar cellORIGINAL ARTICLE Highly efficient GaAs solar cells by limiting light emission angle Emily D Kosten1 of a high-quality GaAs solar cell is a feasible route to achieving power conversion efficiencies above 38

  16. Improved performance of In,,Ga...As/GaAs quantum dot solar cells via light scattering by nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    of QDs in the context of our work is attractive for achieving long wavelength absorption in solar cells enhancement at all infrared wave- lengths in the device photocurrent spectrum. Epitaxial layer structuresImproved performance of In,,Ga...As/GaAs quantum dot solar cells via light scattering

  17. High efficiency light emitting diode with anisotropically etched GaN-sapphire interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High efficiency light emitting diode with anisotropically etched GaN- sapphire interface M. H. Lo and optimization of a light-emitting diode projection micro-stereolithography three-dimensional manufacturingGaN micro-light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 231110 (2012) A bright cadmium-free, hybrid organic

  18. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  19. High efficiency InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes with asymmetric triangular multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chiao-Yun; Li, Hen; Lu, Tien-Chang, E-mail: timtclu@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China)

    2014-03-03

    In this study, we demonstrated high efficiency InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) with asymmetric triangular multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Asymmetric triangular MQWs not only contribute to uniform carrier distribution in InGaN/GaN MQWs but also yield a low Auger recombination rate. In addition, asymmetric triangular MQWs with gallium face-oriented inclination band profiles can be immune from the polarization charge originating from typical c-plane InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. In the experiment, LEDs incorporated with asymmetric triangular MQWs with gallium face-oriented inclination band profiles exhibited a 60.0% external quantum efficiency at 20?mA and a 27.0% efficiency droop at 100?mA (corresponding to a current density of 69?A/cm{sup 2}), which accounted for an 11.7% efficiency improvement and a 31.1% droop reduction compared with symmetric square quantum well structure LEDs.

  20. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    ) In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells

  1. Electrical spin injection using GaCrN in a GaN based spin light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, D.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D.; Adari, R.; Sankaranarayan, S.; Kumar, A.; Aldhaheri, R. W.; Hussain, M. A.; Balamesh, A. S.

    2013-12-09

    We have demonstrated electrical spin-injection from GaCrN dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in a GaN-based spin light emitting diode (spin-LED). The remanent in-plane magnetization of the thin-film semiconducting ferromagnet has been used for introducing the spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic InGaN quantum well. The output circular polarization obtained from the spin-LED closely follows the normalized in-plane magnetization curve of the DMS. A saturation circular polarization of ?2.5% is obtained at 200?K.

  2. Junction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Keywords: GaInN/GaN Light emitting diode temperature Micro-Raman Photoluminescence Electroluminescence well light emitting diode (LED) dies is analyzed by micro-Raman, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescenceJunction temperature, spectral shift, and efficiency in GaInN-based blue and green light emitting

  3. Comparison of electrostatic and localized plasmon induced light enhancement in hybrid InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jie; Llopis, Antonio; Krokhin, Arkadii; Neogi, Arup, E-mail: arup@unt.edu [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Pereira, Sergio [CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Watson, Ian M. [SUPA, Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-16

    The light enhancement phenomena in InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) infiltrated with metal nanoparticles (NPs) are studied using resonant and off-resonant localized plasmon interactions. The emission and recombination characteristics of carriers in InGaN/GaN MQW structures with inverted hexagonal pits (IHPs) are modified distinctly depending on the nature of their interaction with the metal NPs and with the pumping and emitted photons. It is observed that the emission intensity of light is significantly enhanced when the emission energy is off-resonant to the localized plasmon frequency of the metal nanoparticles. This results in enhanced emission from MQW due to Au nanoparticles and from IHPs due to Ag nanoparticles. At resonant-plasmon frequency of the Ag NPs, the emission from MQWs is quenched due to the re-absorption of the emitted photons, or due to the drift carriers from c-plane MQWs towards the NPs because of the Coulomb forces induced by the image charge effect.

  4. Graded InxGa1 xAs/GaAs 1.3 m wavelength light emitting diode structures grown with molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graded InxGa1 xAs/GaAs 1.3 m wavelength light emitting diode structures grown with molecular beam 11 June 1997; accepted for publication 29 September 1997 In this study 1.1­1.3 m wavelength light at a lower cost. Such a technology could have an impact on the economic feasibility of fiber to the home

  5. p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode driven by three-dimensional hole gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Tiam Tan, Swee; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Ju, Zhengang; Zhang, Xueliang [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore) [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey); Department of Physics, UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara TR-06800 (Turkey)

    2013-12-23

    Here, GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N heterostructures with a graded AlN composition, completely lacking external p-doping, are designed and grown using metal-organic-chemical-vapour deposition (MOCVD) system to realize three-dimensional hole gas (3DHG). The existence of the 3DHG is confirmed by capacitance-voltage measurements. Based on this design, a p-doping-free InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) driven by the 3DHG is proposed and grown using MOCVD. The electroluminescence, which is attributed to the radiative recombination of injected electrons and holes in InGaN/GaN quantum wells, is observed from the fabricated p-doping-free devices. These results suggest that the 3DHG can be an alternative hole source for InGaN/GaN LEDs besides common Mg dopants.

  6. Active region based on graded-gap InGaN/GaN superlattices for high-power 440- to 470-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsulnikov, A. F., E-mail: Andrew@beam.ioffe.ru; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mizerov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Center for Microelectronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Park, Hee Seok [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Hytch, M.; Hue, F. [National Center for Scientific Research, Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)

    2010-01-15

    The structural and optical properties of light-emitting diode structures with an active region based on ultrathin InGaN quantum wells limited by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices from both sides have been investigated. The dependences of the external quantum efficiency on the active region design are analyzed. It is shown that the use of InGaN/GaN structures as limiting graded-gap short-period superlattices may significantly increase the quantum efficiency.

  7. Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Current injection efficiency induced efficiency-droop in InGaN quantum well light-emitting diodes Keywords: III-Nitride InGaN QWs Light-emitting diodes Efficiency-droop a b s t r a c t Current injection efficiency and its impact on efficiency-droop in InGaN single quantum well (QW) based light-emitting diodes

  8. Green (In,Ga,Al)P-GaP light-emitting diodes grown on high-index GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledentsov, N. N., E-mail: nikolay.ledentsov@v-i-systems.com; Shchukin, V. A. [VI Systems GmbH, Hardenbergstr. 7, Berlin D-10623 (Germany); Lyytikäinen, J.; Okhotnikov, O. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere FI-33720 (Finland); Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Payusov, A. S.; Gordeev, N. Yu.; Maximov, M. V. [A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Schlichting, S.; Nippert, F.; Hoffmann, A. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, Berlin D-10623 (Germany)

    2014-11-03

    We report on green (550–560?nm) electroluminescence (EL) from (Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P-(Al{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P double p-i-n heterostructures with monolayer-scale GaP insertions in the cladding layers and light-emitting diodes based thereupon. The structures are grown side-by-side on high-index and (100) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. At moderate current densities (?500?A/cm{sup 2}), the EL intensity of the structures is comparable for all substrate orientations. Opposite to the (100)-grown strictures, the EL spectra of (211) and (311)-grown devices are shifted towards shorter wavelengths (?550?nm at room temperature). At high current densities (>1?kA/cm{sup 2}), a much higher EL intensity is achieved for the devices grown on high-index substrates. The integrated intensity of (311)-grown structures gradually saturates at current densities above 4?kA/cm{sup 2}, whereas no saturation is revealed for (211)-grown structures up to the current densities above 14?kA/cm{sup 2}. We attribute the effect to the surface orientation-dependent engineering of the GaP band structure, which prevents the escape of the nonequilibrium electrons into the indirect conduction band minima of the p-doped (Al{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P cladding layers.

  9. Red light-emitting diodes based on InP/GaP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatami, F.; Lordi, V.; Harris, J.S.; Kostial, H.; Masselink, W.T.

    2005-05-01

    The growth, fabrication, and device characterization of InP quantum-dot light-emitting diodes based on GaP are described and discussed. The diode structures are grown on gallium phosphide substrates using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy and the active region of the diode consists of self-assembled InP quantum dots embedded in a GaP matrix. Red electroluminescence originating from direct band-gap emission from the InP quantum dots is observed at low temperatures.With increasing temperature, however, the emission line shifts to the longer wavelength. The emission light is measured to above room temperature.

  10. Enhancement of light extraction efficiency of InGaN quantum wells light emitting diodes using SiO2/polystyrene microlens arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    in the Fresnel reflection. Improvement of output power by 219% for InGaN quantum wells LEDs emitting at peakGaN quantum wells light emitting diodes LEDs using SiO2/polystyrene microspheres was demonstrated experimentally. The utilization of SiO2/polystyrene microlens arrays on InGaN quantum wells LEDs, deposited via

  11. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  12. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes Zi-Hui Zhang, Zabu Kyaw, Wei Liu, Yun Ji, Liancheng Wang, Swee Tiam Tan, Xiao Wei Sun, and Hilmi Volkan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    well on optical power of light-emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 051113 (2010); 10-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which

  13. A novel theoretical model for broadband blue InGaN/GaN superluminescent light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moslehi Milani, N.; Mohadesi, V.; Asgari, A.

    2015-02-07

    A broadband superluminescent light emitting diode with In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) active region is investigated. The investigation is based on a theoretical model which includes the calculation of electronic states of the structure, rate equations, and the spectral radiation power. Two rate equations corresponding to MQW active region and separate confinement heterostructures layer are solved self-consistently with no-k selection wavelength dependent gain and quasi-Fermi level functions. Our results show that the superluminescence started in a current of ?120?mA (?7.5?kA/Cm{sup 2}) at 300?K. The range of peak emission wavelengths for different currents is 423–426?nm and the emission bandwidth is ?5?nm in the superluminescence regime. A maximum light output power of 7.59 mW is obtained at 600?mA and the peak modal gain as a function of current indicates logarithmic behavior. Also, the comparison of our calculated results with published experimental data is shown to be in good agreement.

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Highly efficient GaAs solar cells by limiting light emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Highly efficient GaAs solar cells by limiting light emission angle Emily D Kosten1. This isotropic emission corresponds to a significant entropy increase in the solar cell, with a corresponding drop in efficiency. Here, using a detailed balance model, we show that limiting the emission angle

  15. Enhancement of light extraction efficiency of InGaN quantum wells light emitting diodes using Si O 2 /polystyrene microlens arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    November 2007 Improvement of light extraction efficiency of InGaN quantum wells light emitting diodes LEDs microlens arrays on InGaN quantum wells LEDs, deposited via rapid convective deposition, allows the increase of the effective photon escape cone and reduction in the Fresnel reflection. Improvement of output power by 219

  16. Comparative study of field-dependent carrier dynamics and emission kinetics of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes grown on (11 2 2) semipolar versus (0001) polar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Articles you may be interested in Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam light-emitting diodes prepared on ( 11 2 ¯ 2 ) -plane GaN J. Appl. Phys. 100, 113109 (2006); 10.1063/1.2382667 Demonstration of a semipolar ( 10 1 ¯ 3 ¯ ) In Ga N Ga N green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 231110

  17. The use of short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices in blue-region light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizov, V. S., E-mail: vsizov@mail.ioffe.ru; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.; Sakharov, A. V.; Lundin, W. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Cherkashin, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Hytch, M. J. [National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (CEMES) (France); Nikolaev, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Mintairov, A. M.; He Yan; Merz, J. L. [University of Notre Dame, EE Department (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Optical and light-emitting diode structures with an active InGaN region containing short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices are studied. It is shown that short-period superlattices are thin two-dimensional layers with a relatively low In content that contain inclusions with a high In content 1-3 nm thick. Inclusions manifest themselves from the point of view of optical properties as a nonuniform array of quantum dots involved in a residual quantum well. The use of short-period superlattices in light-emitting diode structures allows one to decrease the concentration of nonradiative centers, as well as to increase the injection of carriers in the active region due to an increase in the effective height of the AlGaN barrier, which in general leads to an increase in the quantum efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  18. Remarkably reduced efficiency droop by using staircase thin InGaN quantum barriers in InGaN based blue light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Kun; Ikeda, Masao, E-mail: mikeda2013@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: jpliu2010@sinano.ac.cn; Liu, Jianping, E-mail: mikeda2013@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: jpliu2010@sinano.ac.cn; Zhang, Shuming; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Cai, Jin; Wang, Hui; Wang, H. B. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou (China); Suzhou Nanojoin Photonics Co., Ltd., Suzhou (China)

    2014-10-27

    The efficiency droop of InGaN/GaN(InGaN) multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) with thin quantum barriers (QB) is studied. With thin GaN QB (3?nm–6?nm thickness), the efficiency droop is not improved, which indicates that hole transport cannot be significantly enhanced by the thin GaN QBs. On the contrary, the efficiency droop was remarkably reduced by using a InGaN staircase QB (InGaN SC-QB) MQWs structure where InGaN SC-QBs lower the transport energy barrier of holes. The efficiency droop ratio was as low as 3.3% up to 200?A/cm{sup 2} for the InGaN SC-QB LED. By using monitoring QW with longer wavelength we observe a much uniform carrier distribution in the InGaN SC-QB LEDs, which reveals the mechanism of improvement in the efficiency droop.

  19. Influence of n-type versus p-type AlGaN electron-blocking layer on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    to be further improved in order for the high- power LEDs to penetrate into the consumer market of gen- eral to higher optical output power and external quantum efficiency, compared to the devices with p-AlGaN EBLGaN/GaN based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) possess unique advantages including high energy conversion effi

  20. Angular dependence of light trapping in In0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs quantum-well solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Angular dependence of light trapping in In0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs quantum-well solar cells X. H. Li,1 P. C trapping in thin-film solar cells via engineered surface morphology or device geometry, scattering,10 In this paper, we describe and demonstrate thin-film quantum-well solar cells that are grown by molecular beam

  1. Organic Light Emitting Diodes Using a Ga:ZnO Anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.; Burrows, Paul E.

    2008-05-12

    We report the application of gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) films as anodes in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Pulsed laser deposited GZO films of differing Ga composition are examined. Bilayer OLEDs using GZO and indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes are then compared. Relative to ITO, the GZO anodes have slightly better sheet resistance and transparency in the visible spectral region. Device data suggest GZO results in more effective hole injection into an aromatic triamine hole transporting layer. Indium free anodes are expected toimprove OLED stability while lowering the cost per unit area, crucial for OLED based lighting applications.

  2. A hole accelerator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes Zi-Hui Zhang, Wei Liu, Swee Tiam Tan, Yun Ji, Liancheng Wang, Binbin Zhu, Yiping Zhang, Shunpeng Lu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    GaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has been significantly limited by the insufficient hole injection, the effectiveness of the hole ac- celerator is experimentally shown through achieving improved optical output power and reduced efficiency droop for the proposed InGaN/GaN LED. VC 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. [http://dx.doi.org/10

  3. InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode with a polarization tunnel junction Zi-Hui Zhang, Swee Tiam Tan, Zabu Kyaw, Yun Ji, Wei Liu et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    to the enhanced optical output power and external quantum efficiency. Compared to the reference InGaN/GaN LEDs; accepted 29 April 2013; published online 15 May 2013) We report InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LED have been devoted to boosting the optical output power and enhancing the external quantum efficiency

  4. Origin of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode efficiency improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piprek, Joachim, E-mail: piprek@nusod.org [NUSOD Institute LLC, P.O. Box 7204, Newark, Delaware 19714 (United States)

    2014-02-03

    This Letter investigates the efficiency enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of blue light emitting diodes (LEDs). The peak quantum efficiency of such LED exceeds 100%, but the maximum wall-plug efficiency (WPE) hardly changes. However, due to the increased bias, the WPE peaks at much higher input power, i.e., the WPE droop is significantly delayed, and the output power is strongly enhanced. The main physical reason for this improvement lies in the non-uniform vertical carrier distribution typically observed within InGaN MQWs.

  5. Polarization engineering via staggered InGaN quantum wells for radiative efficiency enhancement of light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    of light emitting diodes Ronald A. Arif, Yik-Khoon Ee, and Nelson Tansu Citation: Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 extraction in GaN-based light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061107 (2012) Electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061106 (2012) Ultraviolet electroluminescence

  6. Measurement of the absorption coefficient for light laterally propagating in light-emitting diode structures with In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelikov, Yu. S.; Bochkareva, N. I.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Martynov, I. A.; Rebane, Yu. T.; Tarkin, D. V.; Shreter, Yu. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)], E-mail: YShreter@mail.ioffe.ru

    2008-11-15

    A procedure for measuring the absorption coefficient for light propagating parallel to the surface of a GaN-based light emitting diode chip on a sapphire substrate is suggested. The procedure implies the study of emission from one end face of the chip as the opposite end face is illuminated with a light emitting diode. The absorption coefficient is calculated from the ratio between the intensities of emission emerging from the end faces of the sapphire substrate and the epitaxial layer. From the measurements for chips based on p-GaN/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/n-GaN structures, the lateral absorption coefficient is determined at a level of (23 {+-} 3)cm{sup -1} at a wavelength of 465 nm. Possible causes for the discrepancy between the absorption coefficients determined in the study and those reported previously are analyzed.

  7. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  8. Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520525 nm employing graded growth-temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520­525 nm employing current spreading and light extraction in GaN-based light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061107 (2012) Electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061106 (2012

  9. Internal efficiency of InGaN light-emitting diodes: Beyond a quasiequilibrium model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kneissl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model to better investigate InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) internal efficiency by extending beyond the usual total carrier density rate equation approach. To illustrate its capability, the model is applied to study intrinsic performance differences between violet and green LEDs. The simulations show performance differences, at different current densities and temperatures, arising from variations in spontaneous emission and heat loss rates. By tracking the momentum-resolved carrier populations, these rate changes are, in turn, traced to differences in bandstructure and plasma heating. The latter leads to carrier distributions that deviate from the quasiequilibrium ones at lattice temperature.

  10. Polarization self-screening in [0001] oriented InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes for improving the electron injection efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Kyaw, Zabu; Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-23

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the [0001] orientation inherit very strong polarization induced electric fields. This results in a reduced effective conduction band barrier height for the p-type AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) and makes the electron blocking effect relatively ineffective and the electron injection efficiency drops. Here, we show the concept of polarization self-screening for improving the electron injection efficiency. In this work, the proposed polarization self-screening effect was studied and proven through growing a p-type EBL with AlN composition partially graded along the [0001] orientation, which induces the bulk polarization charges. These bulk polarization charges are utilized to effectively self-screen the positive polarization induced interface charges located at the interface between the EBL and the last quantum barrier when designed properly. Using this approach, the electron leakage is suppressed and the LED performance is enhanced significantly.

  11. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Demir, Hilmi Volkan, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-07-21

    In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), caused due to strong polarization induced electric field, through spatially confining electrons and holes in small recombination volumes. However, this inevitably increases the carrier density in quantum wells, which in turn aggravates the Auger recombination, since the Auger recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells with the InN composition linearly grading along the growth orientation in LED structures suppressing the Auger recombination and the QCSE simultaneously. Theoretically, the physical mechanisms behind the Auger recombination suppression are also revealed. The proposed LED structure has experimentally demonstrated significant improvement in optical output power and efficiency droop, proving to be an effective solution to this important problem of Auger recombination.

  12. High-temperature luminescence in an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb light-emitting heterostructure with a high potential barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petukhov, A. A., E-mail: andrey-rus29@rambler.ru; Zhurtanov, B. E.; Kalinina, K. V.; Stoyanov, N. D.; Salikhov, H. M.; Mikhailova, M. P.; Yakovlev, Yu. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The electroluminescent properties of an n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb/p-AlGaAsSb heterostructure with a high potential barrier in the conduction band (large conduction-band offset) at the n-GaSb/n-InGaAsSb type-II heterointerface ({Delta}E{sub c} = 0.79 eV) are studied. Two bands with peaks at 0.28 and 0.64 eV at 300 K, associated with radiative recombination in n-InGaAsSb and n-GaSb, respectively, are observed in the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum. In the entire temperature range under study, T = 290-480 K, additional electron-hole pairs are formed in the n-InGaAsSb active region by impact ionization with hot electrons heated as a result of the conduction-band offset. These pairs contribute to radiative recombination, which leads to a nonlinear increase in the EL intensity and output optical power with increasing pump current. A superlinear increase in the emission power of the long-wavelength band is observed upon heating in the temperature range T = 290-345 K, and a linear increase is observed at T > 345 K. This work for the first time reports an increase in the emission power of a light-emitting diode structure with increasing temperature. It is shown that this rise is caused by a decrease in the threshold energy of the impact ionization due to narrowing of the band gap of the active region.

  13. Characterization of the deep levels responsible for non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meneghini, M. La Grassa, M.; Vaccari, S.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-03-17

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of the deep levels related to non-radiative recombination in InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The study is based on combined optical and deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements, carried out on LEDs with identical structure and with different values of the non-radiative recombination coefficient. Experimental data lead to the following, relevant, results: (i) LEDs with a high non-radiative recombination coefficient have a higher concentration of a trap (labeled as “e{sub 2}”) with an activation energy of 0.7 eV, which is supposed to be located close to/within the active region; (ii) measurements carried out with varying filling pulse duration suggest that this deep level behaves as a point-defect/dislocation complex. The Arrhenius plot of this deep level is critically compared with the previous literature reports, to identify its physical origin.

  14. Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun, E-mail: tongjun@pku.edu.cn; Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-03-07

    Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on k·p approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  15. Angular dependence of light trapping in In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs quantum-well solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X. H.; Li, P. C.; Yu, E. T.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2014-01-28

    The dependence of light trapping effects in In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs quantum-well solar cells on wavelength and incident angle is experimentally characterized and analyzed. Separation of active device layers from their epitaxial growth substrate enables integration of thin-film semiconductor device layers with nanostructured metal/dielectric rear contacts to increase optical absorption via coupling to both Fabry-Perot resonances and guided lateral propagation modes in the semiconductor. The roles of Fabry-Perot resonances and coupling to guided modes are analyzed via photocurrent response measurements and numerical modeling for light incident at angles of 0° (normal incidence) to 30° off normal. Light trapping enables external quantum efficiency at long wavelengths as high as 2.9% per quantum well to be achieved experimentally, substantially exceeding the ?1% per quantum well level typically observed. Increased long wavelength quantum efficiency is shown in experimental measurements to persist with increasing angle of incidence and is explained as a consequence of the large number of guided modes available in the device structure.

  16. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Liu, Jianping; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kwon, Min-Ki; Dupuis, Russell D.; Das, Suman; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2014-04-07

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500?nm, depth of 50?nm, and a periodicity of 1??m were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  17. The impact of trench defects in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes and implications for the “green gap” problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massabuau, F. C.-P., E-mail: fm350@cam.ac.uk; Oehler, F.; Pamenter, S. K.; Thrush, E. J.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 22 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P. [Photon Science Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kovács, A.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt- Straße, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Williams, T.; Etheridge, J. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Clayton Campus, VIC 3800 (Australia); Hopkins, M. A.; Allsopp, D. W. E. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    The impact of trench defects in blue InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) has been investigated. Two mechanisms responsible for the structural degradation of the multiple quantum well (MQW) active region were identified. It was found that during the growth of the p-type GaN capping layer, loss of part of the active region enclosed within a trench defect occurred, affecting the top-most QWs in the MQW stack. Indium platelets and voids were also found to form preferentially at the bottom of the MQW stack. The presence of high densities of trench defects in the LEDs was found to relate to a significant reduction in photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission efficiency, for a range of excitation power densities and drive currents. This reduction in emission efficiency was attributed to an increase in the density of non-radiative recombination centres within the MQW stack, believed to be associated with the stacking mismatch boundaries which form part of the sub-surface structure of the trench defects. Investigation of the surface of green-emitting QW structures found a two decade increase in the density of trench defects, compared to its blue-emitting counterpart, suggesting that the efficiency of green-emitting LEDs may be strongly affected by the presence of these defects. Our results are therefore consistent with a model that the “green gap” problem might relate to localized strain relaxation occurring through defects.

  18. Light-extraction enhancement in GaN-based light-emitting diodes using grade-refractive-index amorphous titanium oxide films with porous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, D.-S.; Lin, T.-W.; Huang, B.-W.; Juang, F.-S.; Lei, P.-H. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-Z. [Chilin Technology Co. Ltd., Tainan County 71758, Taiwan (China)

    2009-04-06

    Amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO{sub x}:OH) films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition at 200 and 25 deg. C are in turn deposited onto the GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) to enhance the associated light extraction efficiency. The refractive index, porosity, and photocatalytic effect of the deposited films are correlated strongly with the deposition temperatures. The efficiency is enhanced by a factor of {approx}1.31 over that of the uncoated LEDs and exhibited an excellent photocatalytic property after an external UV light irradiation. The increase in the light extraction is related to the reduction in the Fresnel transmission loss and the enhancement of the light scattering into the escape cone by using the graded-refractive-index a-TiO{sub x}:OH film with porous structures.

  19. Modulating emission intensity of GaN-based green light emitting diodes on c-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Chunhua; Ma, Ziguang; Zhou, Junming; Lu, Taiping; Jiang, Yang; Jia, Haiqiang; Liu, Wuming; Chen, Hong

    2014-04-14

    The asymmetric dual-wavelength (green/blue) coupled InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells were proposed to modulate the green emission intensity. Electroluminescent measurements demonstrate the conspicuous increment of the green light intensity by decreasing the coupled barrier thickness. This was partly attributed to capture of more carriers when holes tunnel across the thinner barrier from the blue quantum wells, as a hole reservoir, to the green quantum wells. While lower effective barrier height of the blue quantum wells benefits improved hole transportation from p-GaN to the active region. Efficiency droop of the green quantum wells was partially alleviated due to the enhanced injection efficiency of holes.

  20. White light generation by resonant nonradiative energy transfer from epitaxial InGaN/GaN quantum wells to colloidal CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    White light generation by resonant nonradiative energy transfer from epitaxial InGaN/GaN quantum is available HOME | SEARCH | PACS & MSC | JOURNALS | ABOUT | CONTACT US #12;T h e o p e n ­ a c c e s s j o u r n a l f o r p h y s i c s New Journal of Physics White light generation by resonant nonradiative

  1. ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng Chu, Winnie V. Chen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zheng

    ZnO:Sb/ZnO:Ga Light Emitting Diode on c-Plane Sapphire by Molecular Beam Epitaxy Zheng Yang, Sheng substrates using plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Mesa geometry light emitting diodes (LEDs) were demonstrated in recent years, such as photodetectors,8,9) light-emitting diodes (LEDs),10­13) and random lasing

  2. Analysis of different tunneling mechanisms of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/AlGaAs tunnel junction light-emitting transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Wu, Chao-Hsin

    2014-10-27

    The electrical and optical characteristics of tunnel junction light-emitting transistors (TJLETs) with different indium mole fractions (x?=?5% and 2.5%) of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As base-collector tunnel junctions have been investigated. Two electron tunneling mechanisms (photon-assisted or direct tunneling) provide additional currents to electrical output and resupply holes back to the base region, resulting in the upward slope of I-V curves and enhanced optical output under forward-active operation. The larger direct tunneling probability and stronger Franz-Keldysh absorption for 5% TJLET lead to higher collector current slope and less optical intensity enhancement when base-collector junction is under reverse-biased.

  3. Enhancing the quantum efficiency of InGaN yellow-green light-emitting diodes by growth interruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Chunhua; Ma, Ziguang; Zhou, Junming; Lu, Taiping; Jiang, Yang; Zuo, Peng; Jia, Haiqiang; Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen@iphy.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Renewable Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory for New Energy Materials and Devices, Beijing National Laboratory for Condense Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-08-18

    We studied the effect of multiple interruptions during the quantum well growth on emission-efficiency enhancement of InGaN-based yellow-green light emitting diodes on c-plane sapphire substrate. The output power and dominant wavelength at 20?mA are 0.24 mW and 556.3?nm. High resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and electroluminescence measurements demonstrate that efficiency enhancement could be partially attributed to crystal quality improvement of the active region resulted from reduced In clusters and relevant defects on the surface of InGaN layer by introducing interruptions. The less tilted energy band in the quantum well is also caused by the decrease of In-content gradient along c-axis resulted from In segregation during the interruptions, which increases spatial overlap of electron-hole wavefunction and thus the internal quantum efficiency. The latter also leads to smaller blueshift of dominant wavelength with current increasing.

  4. BioComms Training: Strategic Communications and Message Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Strategic Communications and Message Development: Presentation to EERE BioComms Group by Kearns & West.

  5. Inversion by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from N- to Ga-polar gallium nitride and its application to multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosalli, A. M.; Van Den Broeck, D. M.; Bedair, S. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Bharrat, D.; El-Masry, N. A. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)] [Department of Material Science and Engineering, NCSU, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth approach for inverting N-polar to Ga-polar GaN by using a thin inversion layer grown with high Mg flux. The introduction of this inversion layer allowed us to grow p-GaN films on N-polar GaN thin film. We have studied the dependence of hole concentration, surface morphology, and degree of polarity inversion for the inverted Ga-polar surface on the thickness of the inversion layer. We then use this approach to grow a light emitting diode structure which has the MQW active region grown on the advantageous N-polar surface and the p-layer grown on the inverted Ga-polar surface.

  6. An intentionally positioned (In,Ga)As quantum dot in a micron sized light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, M.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, S.; Zrenner, A.; Meier, C. [Department of Physics and Center for Optoelectronics and Photonics Paderborn (CeOPP), University of Paderborn, Warburger Street 100, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D. [Applied Solid State Physics, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-10-04

    We have integrated individual (In,Ga)As quantum dots (QDs) using site-controlled molecular beam epitaxial growth into the intrinsic region of a p-i-n junction diode. This is achieved using an in situ combination of focused ion beam prepatterning, annealing, and overgrowth, resulting in arrays of individually electrically addressable (In,Ga)As QDs with full control on the lateral position. Using microelectroluminescence spectroscopy we demonstrate that these QDs have the same optical quality as optically pumped Stranski-Krastanov QDs with random nucleation located in proximity to a doped interface. The results suggest that this technique is scalable and highly interesting for different applications in quantum devices.

  7. Enhancement of Radiative Efficiency with Staggered InGaN Quantum Well Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tansu, Nelson; Dierolf, Volkmar; Huang, Gensheng; Penn, Samson; Zhao, Hongping; Liu, Guangyu; Li, Xiaohang; Poplawsky, Jonathan

    2011-07-14

    The technology on the large overlap InGaN QWs developed in this program is currently implemented in commercial technology in enhancing the internal quantum efficiency in major LED industry in US and Asia. The scientific finding from this work supported by the DOE enabled the implementation of this step-like staggered quantum well in the commercial LEDs.

  8. Light induced instability mechanism in amorphous InGaZn oxide semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, John; Guo, Yuzheng

    2014-04-21

    A model of the negative bias illumination stress instability in InGaZn oxide is presented, based on the photo-excitation of electrons from oxygen interstitials. The O interstitials are present to compensate hydrogen donors. The O interstitials are found to spontaneously form in O-rich conditions for Fermi energies at the conduction band edge, much more easily that in related oxides. The excited electrons give rise to a persistent photoconductivity due to an energy barrier to recombination. The formation energy of the O interstitials varies with their separation from the H donors, which leads to a voltage stress dependence on the compensation.

  9. Temperature-dependent light-output characteristics of GaInN light-emitting diodes with different dislocation densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chhajed, Sameer; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E. Fred; Kim, Jong Kyu; Koleske, Daniel D.; Crawford, Mary H.

    2011-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the temperature dependence of optical-output power of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with different threading dislocation densities (TDDs) to assess the influence of the TDD on the temperature stability of LEDs. Whereas the LED with high TDD shows a 64% decrease in optical-output power when the ambient temperature increases from 20 to 150?°C, the LED with low TDD shows only a 54% decrease. The temperature dependence of the optical-output power and current dependence of the characteristic temperature T{sub ch} of LEDs shows that short radiative recombination lifetime and low TDDs are essential to obtain LED characteristics that are tolerant of high temperatures.

  10. Recoverable degradation of blue InGaN-based light emitting diodes submitted to 3?MeV proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Santi, C.; Meneghini, M. Trivellin, N.; Gerardin, S.; Bagatin, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-11-24

    This paper reports on the degradation and recovery of two different series of commercially available InGaN-based blue light emitting diodes submitted to proton irradiation at 3?MeV and various fluences (10{sup 11}, 10{sup 13}, and 10{sup 14}?p{sup +}/cm{sup 2}). After irradiation, we detected (i) an increase in the series resistance, in the sub-turn-on current and in the ideality factor, (ii) a spatially uniform drop of the output optical power, proportional to fluence, and (iii) a reduction of the capacitance of the devices. These results suggest that irradiation induced the generation of non-radiative recombination centers near the active region. This hypothesis is further confirmed by the results of the recovery tests carried out at low temperature (150?°C)

  11. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Lisenkov, Sergey; Pendyala, Chandrashekhar; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Menon, Madhu

    2011-08-01

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  12. Bias dependence and correlation of the cathodoluminescence and electron beam induced current from an InGaN/GaN light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, M. J.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Oehler, F.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Hopkins, M. A.; Sivaraya, S.; Allsopp, D. W. E. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-21

    Micron-scale mapping has been employed to study a contacted InGaN/GaN LED using combined electroluminescence (EL), cathodoluminescence (CL), and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Correlations between parameters, such as the EBIC and CL intensity, were studied as a function of applied bias. The CL and EBIC maps reveal small areas, 2–10??m in size, which have increased nonradiative recombination rate and/or a lower conductivity. The CL emission from these spots is blue shifted, by 30–40?meV. Increasing the reverse bias causes the size of the spots to decrease, due to competition between in-plane diffusion and drift in the growth direction. EL mapping shows large bright areas (?100??m) which also have increased EBIC, indicating domains of increased conductivity in the p and/or n-GaN.

  13. Strong carrier localization and diminished quantum-confined Stark effect in ultra-thin high-indium-content InGaN quantum wells with violet light emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Suk-Min; Kwack, Ho-Sang; Park, Chunghyun; Yoo, Yang-Seok; Cho, Yong-Hoon, E-mail: yhc@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and KI for the NanoCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and KI for the NanoCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Yong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jin Kim, Hee; Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Si Dang, Le [Nanophysics and Semiconductors, CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Institut Néel, CNRS Grenoble, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Nanophysics and Semiconductors, CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Institut Néel, CNRS Grenoble, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-11-25

    Here, we report on the optical and structural characteristics of violet-light-emitting, ultra-thin, high-Indium-content (UTHI) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), and of conventional low-In-content MQWs, which both emit at similar emission energies though having different well thicknesses and In compositions. The spatial inhomogeneity of In content, and the potential fluctuation in high-efficiency UTHI MQWs were compared to those in the conventional low-In-content MQWs. We conclude that the UTHI InGaN MQWs are a promising structure for achieving better quantum efficiency in the visible and near-ultraviolet spectral range, owing to their strong carrier localization and reduced quantum-confined Stark effect.

  14. Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard PowerWyandanch, New York: Energy ResourcesServ Comm

  15. Fairmont Public Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. Easton Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information

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  17. Florence Utility Comm | Open Energy Information

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  18. Fort Valley Utility Comm | Open Energy Information

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  19. Greenwood Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information

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  20. Hutchinson Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information

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  1. Tuntutuliak Comm Services Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power CoCleanTuntutuliak Comm

  2. High efficiency single Ag nanowire/p-GaN substrate Schottky junction-based ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.; Hasan, T.; Li, X.; Xu, P.; Wang, Y.; Shen, X.; Liu, X.; Yang, Q.

    2015-02-05

    for the removal of the native oxide layer on the GaN substrate to form the Schottky junction. First, the GaN substrate is ultrasonically degreased using acetone, ethanol, and deionized (DI) water for 5 min each. The substrate is then treated with a buffered...

  3. Department: Communication Sciences Course No.: COMM 261W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Communication Sciences Course No.: COMM 261W Credits: 3 Title: Computer Mediated Communication Contact: Ross Buck WQ: W only Catalog Copy: COMM XXXXW. Computer Mediated Communication Either for credit. How computer media increasingly influence communication processes and how computer media

  4. Enhanced optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diode with compound photonic crystals by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo, E-mail: tbwei@semi.ac.cn; Xiong, Zhuo; Shang, Liang; Tian, Yingdong; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Pengyu; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin [Semiconductor Lighting Technology Research and Development Center, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-07-07

    The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with single, twin, triple, and quadruple photonic crystals (PCs) on p-GaN are fabricated by multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography (MENLL) process utilizing the focusing behavior of polystyrene spheres. Such a technique is easy and economical for use in fabricating compound nano-patterns. The optimized tilted angle is decided to be 26.6° through mathematic calculation to try to avoid the overlay of patterns. The results of scanning electron microscopy and simulations reveal that the pattern produced by MENLL is a combination of multiple ovals. Compared to planar-LED, the light output power of LEDs with single, twin, triple, and quadruple PCs is increased by 14.78%, 36.03%, 53.68%, and 44.85% under a drive current 350?mA, respectively. Furthermore, all PC-structures result in no degradation of the electrical properties. The stimulated results indicate that the highest light extraction efficiency of LED with the clover-shape triple PC is due to the largest scattering effect on propagation of light from GaN into air.

  5. Nanospherical-lens lithographical Ag nanodisk arrays embedded in p-GaN for localized surface plasmon-enhanced blue light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Tongbo, E-mail: tbwei@semi.ac.cn; Wu, Kui; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Yonghui; Chen, Yu; Huo, Ziqiang; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Junxi; Zeng, Yiping; Li, Jinmin [State Key Laboratory of Solid-State Lighting, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083 (China); Lan, Ding [National Microgravity Laboratory, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100080 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Large-scale Ag nanodisks (NDs) arrays fabricated using nanospherical-lens lithography (NLL) are embedded in p-GaN layer of an InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) for generating localized surface plasmon (LSP) coupling with the radiating dipoles in the quantum-well (QWs). Based on the Ag NDs with the controlled surface coverage, LSP leads to the improved crystalline quality of regrowth p-GaN, increased photoluminescence (PL) intensity, reduced PL decay time, and enhanced output power of LED. Compared with the LED without Ag NDs, the optical output power at a current of 350 mA of the LSP-enhanced LEDs with Ag NDs having a distance of 20 and 35 nm to QWs is increased by 26.7% and 31.1%, respectively. The electrical characteristics and optical properties of LEDs with embedded Ag NPs are dependent on the distance of between Ag NPs and QWs region. The LED with Ag NDs array structure is also found to exhibit reduced emission divergence, compared to that without Ag NDs.

  6. Albany Water Gas & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

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  7. Newnan Wtr, Sewer & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

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  8. Paragould Light & Water Comm | Open Energy Information

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  9. Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

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  10. Cedarburg Light & Water Comm | Open Energy Information

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  11. Moose Lake Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

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  12. Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm | Open Energy Information

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  13. Waterloo Light & Water Comm | Open Energy Information

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  14. North Branch Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

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  15. Oconto Falls Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

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  16. Analysis of the causes of the decrease in the electroluminescence efficiency of AlGaInN light-emitting-diode heterostructures at high pumping density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhansky, I. V., E-mail: igor@quantum.ioffe.ru; Zakheim, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The study is devoted to theoretical explanation of a decrease in the electroluminescence efficiency as the pump current increases, which is characteristic of light-emitting-diode (LED) heterostructures based on AlInGaN. Numerical simulation shows that the increase in the external quantum efficiency at low current densities J {approx} 1 A/cm{sup 2} is caused by the competition between radiative and nonradiative recombination. The decrease in the quantum efficiency at current densities J > 1 A/cm{sup 2} is caused by a decrease in the efficiency of hole injection into the active region. It is shown that the depth of the acceptor energy level in the AlGaN emitter, as well as low electron and hole mobilities in the p-type region, plays an important role in this effect. A modified LED heterostructure is suggested in which the efficiency decrease with the pump current should not occur.

  17. Optimizing white light luminescence in Dy{sup 3+}-doped Lu{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} nano-garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haritha, P.; Linganna, K.; Venkatramu, V.; Martín, I. R.; Monteseguro, V.; Rodríguez-Mendoza, U. R.; Babu, P.; León-Luis, S. F.; Jayasankar, C. K.; Lavín, V.

    2014-11-07

    Trivalent dysprosium-doped Lu{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} nano-garnets have been prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and laser excited spectroscopy. Under a cw 457?nm laser excitation, the white luminescence properties of Lu{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} nano-garnets have been studied as a function of the optically active Dy{sup 3+} ion concentration and at low temperature. Decay curves for the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level of Dy{sup 3+} ion exhibit non-exponential nature for all the Dy{sup 3+} concentrations, which have been well-fitted to a generalized energy transfer model for a quadrupole-quadrupole interaction between Dy{sup 3+} ions without diffusion. From these data, a simple rate-equations model can be applied to predict that intense white luminescence could be obtained from 1.8?mol% Dy{sup 3+} ions-doped nano-garnets, which is in good agreement with experimental results. Chromaticity color coordinates and correlated color temperatures have been determined as a function of temperature and are found to be within the white light region for all Dy{sup 3+} concentrations. These results indicate that 2.0?mol% Dy{sup 3+} ions doped nano-garnet could be useful for white light emitting device applications.

  18. Electrical current leakage and open-core threading dislocations in AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moseley, Michael Allerman, Andrew; Crawford, Mary; Wierer, Jonathan J.; Smith, Michael; Biedermann, Laura

    2014-08-07

    Electrical current transport through leakage paths in AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and their effect on LED performance are investigated. Open-core threading dislocations, or nanopipes, are found to conduct current through nominally insulating Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N layers and limit the performance of DUV-LEDs. A defect-sensitive phosphoric acid etch reveals these open-core threading dislocations in the form of large, micron-scale hexagonal etch pits visible with optical microscopy, while closed-core screw-, edge-, and mixed-type threading dislocations are represented by smaller and more numerous nanometer-scale pits visible by atomic-force microscopy. The electrical and optical performances of DUV-LEDs fabricated on similar Si-doped Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N templates are found to have a strong correlation to the density of these nanopipes, despite their small fraction (<0.1% in this study) of the total density of threading dislocations.

  19. Comparative study of field-dependent carrier dynamics and emission kinetics of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes grown on (112{sup ¯}2) semipolar versus (0001) polar planes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Yun; Liu, Wei; Chen, Rui; Tiam Tan, Swee; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Ju, Zhengang; Zhang, Xueliang; Sun, Handong; Wei Sun, Xiao; Erdem, Talha; Zhao, Yuji; DenBaars, Steven P. E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org; Nakamura, Shuji; Volkan Demir, Hilmi E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-04-07

    The characteristics of electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) emission from GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on (112{sup ¯}2) semipolar plane and (0001) polar plane have been comparatively investigated. Through different bias-dependent shifting trends observed from the PL and time-resolved PL spectra (TRPL) for the two types of LEDs, the carrier dynamics within the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) region is systematically analyzed and the distinct field-dependent emission kinetics are revealed. Moreover, the polarization induced internal electric field has been deduced for each of the LEDs. The relatively stable emission behavior observed in the semipolar LED is attributed to the smaller polarization induced internal electric field. The study provides meaningful insight for the design of quantum well (QW) structures with high radiative recombination rates.

  20. Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

  1. Deep Ultraviolet AlGaInN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes on Si(111) and Sapphire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    molecular beam epitaxy with ammonia, are described. The typical multi-quantum well (MQW) structure LED to data storage. Despite recent progress, the prepara- tion of light sources operating below 300 nm

  2. Spontaneous emission in GaN/InGaN photonic crystal nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Sigalas, "InGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure light-emitting diodes employing photonic crystal, "III-nitride blue and ultraviolet photonic crystal light emitting diodes," Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 466, and H. Benisty, "Photonic-crystal GaN light-emitting diodes with tailored guided modes distribution

  3. Department: Communication Sciences Course No: COMM 200Q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Communication Sciences Course No: COMM 200Q Title: Research Methods in Communication Credits: 3 Contact: Ross Buck Catalog Copy: -200Q. Research Methods in Communication (Formerly offered to communication. Q Criteria: This course focuses on the application of quantitative research methods

  4. Comparison of the properties of AlGaInN light-emitting diode chips of vertical and flip-chip design using silicon as the a submount

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markov, L. K., E-mail: l.markov@mail.ioffe.ru; Smirnova, I. P.; Pavlyuchenko, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kukushkin, M. V.; Vasil'eva, E. D. [ZAO Innovation 'Tetis' (Russian Federation); Chernyakov, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Science-and-Technology Microelectronics Center (Russian Federation); Usikov, A. S. [De Core Nanosemiconductors Ltd. (India)

    2013-03-15

    Vertical and flip-chip light-emitting diode (LED) chips are compared from the viewpoint of the behavior of current spreading in the active region and the distribution of local temperatures and thermal resistances of chips. AlGaInN LED chips of vertical design are fabricated using Si as a submount and LED flipchips were fabricated with the removal of a sapphire substrate. The latter are also mounted on a Si submount. The active regions of both chips are identical and are about 1 mm{sup 2} in size. It is shown that both the emittance of the crystal surface in the visible range and the distribution of local temperatures estimated from radiation in the infrared region are more uniform in crystals of vertical design. Heat removal from flip-chips is insufficient in regions of the n contact, which do not possess good thermal contact with the submount. As a result, the total thermal resistances between the p-n junction and the submount both for the vertical chips and for flip-chips are approximately 1 K/W. The total area of the flip-chips exceeds that of the vertical design chips by a factor of 1.4.

  5. Computational analysis of thin film InGaAs/GaAs quantum well solar cells with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    Computational analysis of thin film InGaAs/GaAs quantum well solar cells with back side light, Austin, TX 78758, USA * ety@ece.utexas.edu Abstract: Simulations of thin film (~2.5 µm thick) InGaAs/GaAs. Roberts, G. Hill, and C. Calder, "Progress in quantum well solar cells," Thin Solid Films 511­512, 76

  6. GaInN light-emitting diodes using separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region to attain polarization-inverted electron-blocking layer, reduced electron leakage, and improved hole injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyaard, David S., E-mail: meyaad@rpi.edu; Lin, Guan-Bo; Ma, Ming; Fred Schubert, E. [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Cho, Jaehee [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States) [Future Chips Constellation, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Semiconductor Physics Research Center, School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Heon; Kim, Min-Ho; Shim, HyunWook; Sun Kim, Young [LED Business, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-920 (Korea, Republic of)] [LED Business, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-920 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-11

    A GaInN light-emitting diode (LED) structure is analyzed that employs a separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region, i.e., the AlGaN electron-blocking layer (EBL) and p-type GaN cladding layer, followed by wafer or chip bonding. Such LED structure has a polarization-inverted EBL and allows for uncompromised epitaxial-growth optimization of the p-type region, i.e., without the need to consider degradation of the quantum-well active region during p-type region growth. Simulations show that such an LED structure reduces electron leakage, reduces the efficiency droop, improves hole injection, and has the potential to extend high efficiencies into the green spectral region.

  7. Luminescence characterization of (Ca{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors for a white light-emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yong-Kyu; Cho, Dong-Hee; Jeong, Yong-Kwang; Nah, Min-Kook [Department of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Bok [Kumho Electric Inc., 64-1 Bongmyung-Ri, Namsa-Myun, Youngin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-883 (Korea, Republic of)] [Kumho Electric Inc., 64-1 Bongmyung-Ri, Namsa-Myun, Youngin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-883 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun-Gill, E-mail: jgkang@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We investigated the luminescence properties of (Ca{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x})Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor as a function of Zn{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 2+} concentrations. The luminescence intensity was markedly enhanced by increasing the mole fraction of Zn{sup 2+} at Ca{sup 2+} sites. Lacking any Zn{sup 2+} ions, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:0.01Eu{sup 2+} converted only 18.1% of the absorbed blue light into luminescence. As the Zn{sup 2+} concentration increased, the quantum yield increased and reached a maximum of 24.4% at x = 0.1. Furthermore, to fabricate the device, the optimized green-yellow (Ca{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1})Ga{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor was coated with MgO. White light was generated by combining the MgO-coated phosphor and the blue emission from a GaN chip.

  8. Colorado River Comm of Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal TechnologiesClio Power LtdCountyNations CompanyRiver Comm

  9. Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N13,CenterCenterLighting Sign In

  10. Fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled-plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the ZnO/GaN heterojunction light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shr-Jia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Kao, Jiann-Shiun; Chen, Fu-Rong; Tsai, Chuen-Horng [Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China); Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, 300 Taiwan (China); Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    This article reports fabrication of n-ZnO photonic crystal/p-GaN light emitting diode (LED) by nanosphere lithography to further booster the light efficiency. In this article, the fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals is carried out by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gas gives high etching rate of n-ZnO film, which yields a better surface morphology and results less plasma-induced damages of the n-ZnO film. Optimal ZnO lattice parameters of 200 nm and air fill factor from 0.35 to 0.65 were obtained from fitting the spectrum of n-ZnO/p-GaN LED using a MATLAB code. In this article, we will show our recent result that a ZnO photonic crystal cylinder has been fabricated using polystyrene nanosphere mask with lattice parameter of 200 nm and radius of hole around 70 nm. Surface morphology of ZnO photonic crystal was examined by scanning electron microscope.

  11. AlNAlGaInN superlattice light-emitting diodes at 280 nm G. Kipshidze, V. Kuryatkov, K. Zhu, and B. Borisov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    -emitting diodes operating at 280 nm, grown by gas source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia, are described storage. However, despite recent progress, preparation of light sources operating below 300 nm is still molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia13 on sapphire substrates. Epitaxial growth starts with the nitridation

  12. TESLA-FEL 2007-03 Application of low cost GaAs LED as neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    neutrons in unbiased Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) Light Emitting Diodes (LED) resulted in a reduction Keywords: COTS components, Displacement damage, Electron Linear Accelerator, GaAs Light emitting diode (LED) Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) light emitting diode (LED) for the assessment of integrated neutron fluence

  13. Graphic Comm Central http://teched.vt.edu:16080/gcc/[6/29/09 8:58:26 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    , Virginia Tech #12;Graphic Comm Central http://teched.vt.edu:16080/gcc/index.html[6/29/09 8:58:59 AM Director: Mark Sanders, Virginia Tech #12;Graphic Comm Central http://teched.vt.edu:16080/gcc/HTML/AboutGCC.html Sanders, Virginia Tech #12;Graphic Comm Central http://teched.vt.edu/GCC/HTML/Search/Search.html[6/29/09 8

  14. Current crowding in GaInN / GaN LEDs grown on insulating substrates X. Guo, E. F. Schubert and J. Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Current crowding in GaInN / GaN LEDs grown on insulating substrates X. Guo, E. F. Schubert and J. Jahns Current crowding in mesa-structure GaInN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on insulating and a saturation of the optical output power at high injection currents. It is shown that the optical power

  15. Nanostructured light-absorbing crystalline CuIn{sub (1–x)}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films grown through high flux, low energy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Allen J.; Hebert, Damon; Rockett, Angus A.; Shah, Amish B.; Bettge, Martin

    2013-10-21

    A hybrid effusion/sputtering vacuum system was modified with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) coil enabling ion assisted physical vapor deposition of CuIn{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films on GaAs single crystals and stainless steel foils. With <80 W rf power to the ICP coil at 620–740 °C, film morphologies were unchanged compared to those grown without the ICP. At low temperature (600–670 °C) and high rf power (80–400 W), a light absorbing nanostructured highly anisotropic platelet morphology was produced with surface planes dominated by (112){sub T} facets. At 80–400 W rf power and 640–740 °C, both interconnected void and small platelet morphologies were observed while at >270 W and above >715 °C nanostructured pillars with large inter-pillar voids were produced. The latter appeared black and exhibited a strong (112){sub T} texture with interpillar twist angles of ±8°. Application of a negative dc bias of 0–50 V to the film during growth was not found to alter the film morphology or stoichiometry. The results are interpreted as resulting from the plasma causing strong etching favoring formation of (112){sub T} planes and preferential nucleation of new grains, balanced against conventional thermal diffusion and normal growth mechanisms at higher temperatures. The absence of effects due to applied substrate bias suggests that physical sputtering or ion bombardment effects were minimal. The nanostructured platelet and pillar films were found to exhibit less than one percent reflectivity at angles up to 75° from the surface normal.

  16. Band Structure of Strain-Balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN Super-lattices on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.; Phillips, J. D.

    2011-05-31

    GaAs alloys with dilute content of Bi and N provide a large reduction in band-gap energy with increasing alloy composition. GaAsBi/GaAsN heterojunctions have a type-II band alignment, where superlattices based on these materials offer a wide range for designing effective band-gap energy by varying superlattice period and alloy composition. The miniband structure and effective band gap for strain-balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN superlattices with effective lattice match to GaAs are calculated for alloy compositions up to 5% Bi and N using the k·p method. The effective band gap for these superlattices is found to vary between 0.89 and 1.32 eV for period thickness ranging from 10 to 100 Å. The joint density of states and optical absorption of a 40/40 Å GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs0.98N0.02 superlattice are reported demonstrating a ground-state transition at 1.005 eV and first excited transition at 1.074 eV. The joint density of states is similar in magnitude to GaAs, while the optical absorption is approximately one order of magnitude lower due to the spatially indirect optical transition in the type-II structure. The GaAsBi/GaAsN system may provide a new material system with lattice match to GaAs in a spectral range of high importance for optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitters.

  17. White emitting polyfluorene functionalized with azide hybridized on near-UV light emitting diode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    . Griffin, C. W. Jeon, and M. D. Dawson, "Spectral conversion of InGaN ultraviolet microarray light functionalization to facilitate cross-linking intentionally when cast into solid-state form. Hybridized on n-UV InGaN/Ga generation using CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals hybridized with InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes

  18. Roadmap: Communication Studies Public Communication Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-PCMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Communication Studies ­ Public Communication ­ Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-PCMM] College: 23-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major 2 #12;Roadmap: Communication Studies ­ Public Communication ­ Bachelor of Arts [CI

  19. Al.SEP Array E -Comm~nd Decoder Failure Modes, Effects 8;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    in the Control Logic Section by locking to the 1 KHz uplink clock generated at the ground station. The phase lock\\ Al.SEP Array E - Comm~nd Decoder Failure Modes, Effects 8; ATM 949 ! Criticality Analysis PAGI OF 27 DATE 6-1-71 This ATM dotuments the Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis 'on the Bendix

  20. Lug A Mug Marketing Campaign One Less Cup Page 1 of 54 COMM 468-202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lug A Mug Marketing Campaign ­ One Less Cup Page 1 of 54 COMM 468-202 Marketing Applications Lug A Mug Marketing Campaign Jasmine Teh Randy Pan Sami Dong Stephanie Gozali Steven Eng Willson Wong Yulichia Ong #12;Lug A Mug Marketing Campaign ­ One Less Cup Page 2 of 54 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 PART I : AMS

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - NatureComm_Idrobo_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnow widelySmall Iceat

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - NatureComm_Kravchenko_2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnow widelySmall IceatIt has been shown that the

  3. Stimulated emission in GaN-based laser diodes far below the threshold region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    forward current of light-emitting diodes,” J. Appl. Phys.superluminescent light-emitting diodes based on GaN,” Appl.superluminescent light emitting diode structures,” J. Appl.

  4. Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations Marjorie Palmer Spring 2008 #12;The UGA Land Use Clinic provides Road, Room 101 Athens, GA 30602-1510 (706) 583-0373 · Fax (706) 583-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;Lighting......................................................................................................................................1 II. Approaches to Lighting Regulation

  5. COMM REF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. 'explainsBurrell,C: LIRECORD4

  6. Proposed mechanism to represent the suppression of dark current density by four orders with low energy light ion (H{sup ?}) implantation in quaternary alloy-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, A.; Ghadi, H.; Mathur, K.L.; Basu, A.; Subrahmanyam, N.B.V.; Singh, P.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Here we propose a carrier transport mechanism for low energy H{sup ?} ions implanted InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors supportive of the experimental results obtained. Dark current density suppression of up to four orders was observed in the implanted quantum dot infrared photodetectors, which further demonstrates that they are effectively operational. We concentrated on determining how defect-related material and structural changes attributed to implantation helped in dark current density reduction for InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors. This is the first study to report the electrical carrier transport mechanism of H{sup ?} ion-implanted InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors.

  7. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  8. Physical Layer Characteristics and Techniques for Visible Light Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Kaiyun

    2012-01-01

    LED, especially high power lighting LEDs. It’s anticipatedpower spectrum of a typical three-chip RGB LED. . . . . .Power and modulation bandwidth of GaAs-AlGaAs high- radiance LED’

  9. Growth and characterization of liquid phase epitaxial GaP layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kao, Yung-Chung

    1982-01-01

    Z HSVHd aInbIq BO NOIIVZIHBIDVBVHD GNV KIMO'80 GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF LIQUID PHASE EPITAXIAL GaP LAYERS A Thesis by YUNG-CHUNG KAO Approved as to style and content by: 04 (Chairman of Comm' tee) (Member) ~a m. December 1982 ABSTRACT... GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF LIQUID PHASE EPITAXIAL Gap LAYERS. (December 1982) Yung-Chung Kao, B. S. , National Tsing-Hua University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ohannes Eknoyan Gallium Phosphide, a compound semiconductor with wide energy...

  10. Graphene/GaN diodes for ultraviolet and visible photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Fang; Chen, Shao-Wen; Meng, Jie; Tse, Geoffrey; Fu, Xue-Wen; Xu, Fu-Jun [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, Bo; Liao, Zhi-Min, E-mail: liaozm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.cn; Yu, Da-Peng, E-mail: liaozm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: yudp@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2014-08-18

    The Schottky diodes based on graphene/GaN interface are fabricated and demonstrated for the dual-wavelength photodetection of ultraviolet (UV) and green lights. The physical mechanisms of the photoelectric response of the diodes with different light wavelengths are different. For UV illumination, the photo-generated carriers lower the Schottky barrier and increase the photocurrent. For green light illumination, as the photon energy is smaller than the bandgap of GaN, the hot electrons excited in graphene via internal photoemission are responsible for the photoelectric response. Using graphene as a transparent electrode, the diodes show a ?mS photoresponse, providing an alternative route toward multi-wavelength photodetectors.

  11. Photoluminescence study of the 1.047 eV emission in GaN K. Pressela)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    GaN/ AlGaN blue green light emitting diode, which has a much higher quantum efficiency than the SiC blue light emitting diode, became possible.2 Presently the wide bandgap semi- conductor GaN is intensively. Especially the 1.19 eV is very intense. Thus one can think of developing a light emitting diode in the near

  12. COMM 498 -Field Investigation in Operations Management By now, you've taken plenty of courses dealing with the theory behind the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    1 COMM 498 - Field Investigation in Operations Management By now, you've taken plenty of courses analytical concepts? Welcome to Comm 498: Field Investigation in Operations Management! This course provides processes? How do actual organizations apply operations management in the study, analysis and improvement

  13. SepTeMBeR 2011 | Vol. 54 | no. 9 | CommUniCations of the aCm 69 Constraint-satisfaction problems arise in diverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    SepTeMBeR 2011 | Vol. 54 | no. 9 | CommUniCations of the aCm 69 Constraint-satisfaction problems techniques. #12;70 CommUniCations of the aCm | SepTeMBeR 2011 | Vol. 54 | no. 9 contributed articles

  14. Lateral and Vertical Transistors Using the AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S; Mishra, UK

    2013-10-01

    Power conversion losses are endemic in all areas of electricity consumption, including motion control, lighting, air conditioning, and information technology. Si, the workhorse of the industry, has reached its material limits. Increasingly, the lateral AlGaN/GaN HEMT based on gallium nitride (GaN-on-Si) is becoming the device of choice for medium power electronics as it enables high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor at attractive pricing for wide market penetration. The reduced form factor enabled by high-efficiency operation at high frequency further enables significant system price reduction because of savings in bulky extensive passive elements and heat sink costs. The high-power market, however, still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes more difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside of silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high power conversion needs. In this paper, the development, performance, and status of lateral and vertical GaN devices are discussed.

  15. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 CMPT 116CHEM 250# MATH 223 EE 201 GE 213 Grp. A elective*CHE 223 Hum/SocSci Jr. MATH 224 English 11x CHE 220CHE 210 CHE

  16. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102GE 110 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 CMPT 116CHEM 250# MATH 223 EE 201 GE 213 Grp. A elective*CHE 223 HSS@# MATH 224 English 11x CHE 220CHE 210 CHE 323 CHE

  17. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 GE 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 GE 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 ME 227 GE 213# MATH 223 EE 201ME 214 CMPT 116 ME 215 GE 226 MATH 224 Hum/SocSci@# ME 251 ME 229 ME 318 ME 335 ME 313

  18. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    2005-2006 CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 GEOL 245 MATH 223 CE 328 CE 212 CE 225 CE 295GE 213# MATH 224 GEOL 224 GEOE 218 GEOL 258 BusSci/HSS# GEOE 315 GEOE

  19. CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    2006-07 CHEM 114 GE 124 MATH 110 COMM 102 CHEM 115# GE 125 MATH 124 PHYS 155 GE 120 GEOL 245 MATH 223 CE 328 CE 212 CE 225 CE 295GE 213# MATH 224 GEOL 224 GEOE 218 GEOL 258 Hum/SocSci Jr. GEOE 315

  20. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9?eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the ?(k?=?0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407?meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  1. AlGaN/GaN-based power semiconductor switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) have great potential for their use as high efficiency and high speed power semiconductor switches, thanks to their high breakdown electric field, mobility and ...

  2. Wide band-gap nanowires for light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesin, Jordan (Jordan Paul)

    2015-01-01

    Wide band-gap nanowires composed of GaN and ZnO are promising materials for unique designs and potential efficiency improvement of light emitting diodes (LEDs) for solid state lighting. The large surface-to-volume ratio ...

  3. Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract--In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract-- In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed GaInN/GaN quantum well material suitable for 500 ­ 580 nm light emitting diodes at longer wavelengths. Index Terms-- a-plane GaN, GaInN, Green light emitting diode, m-plane GaN I

  4. Luminescence properties of light-emitting diodes based on GaAs with the up-conversion Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Er,Yb luminophor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruzintsev, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Microelectronics Technology (Russian Federation)], E-mail: gran@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Barthou, C.; Benalloul, P. [Institute des NanoSciences (France)

    2008-03-15

    Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S luminophors doped with Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions are produced by means of solid-phase synthesis and deposited onto standard AL123A infrared light-emitting diodes. When excited with 940 nm radiation from a light-emitting diode, the structures exhibit intense visible up-conversion luminescence. A maximal brightness of 2340 cd/m{sup 2} of green and red up-conversion luminescence at corresponding wavelengths around 550 and 600 nm is observed for the Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S compound doped with 2 at % Er{sup 3+} ions and 6 at % Yb{sup 3+} ions. The ratio of the intensity of green (or red) up-conversion luminescence to the intensity of infrared Stokes luminescence increases with increasing applied voltage. The efficiency of visible emission of the light-emitting diode structures is {eta} = 1.2 lm/W at an applied voltage of 1.5 V.

  5. Development of ZnO Based Light Emitting Diodes and Laser Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Jieying

    2012-01-01

    E. Fred Schubert, Light-Emitting Diodes, New York (2006) [8]ZnO homojunction light emitting diode 3. 1. Motivation ofAlGaAs red light-emitting diodes, in: G.B. Stringfellow, M.

  6. Light-Biasing Electron-Beam-Induced-Current Measurements for Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, M. J.; Olson, J. M.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Results using light-biasing EBIC are illustrated for dual-junction InGaP/InGaAs solar cells.

  7. Light-Light Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naohiro Kanda

    2011-06-03

    For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

  8. Pascal, Blaise (1623-1662).. Expriences nouvelles touchant le vuide ,faites dans des tuyaux, syringues, soufflets et siphons de plusieurs longueurs et figures, avec diverses liqueurs, comme vif-argent, eau, vin, huyle, air, etc. avec un discours sur le me

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin, David

    , syringues, soufflets et siphons de plusieurs longueurs et figures, avec diverses liqueurs, comme vif

  9. Sandia Energy - Optical performance of top-down fabricated InGaN...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance of top-down fabricated InGaNGaN nanorod light emitting diode arrays" in Optics Express. This paper details the development of a two-step top-down process for...

  10. Localized corrosion of GaAs surfaces and formation of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Vitus, C.M.; Isaacs, H.S.; Fraser, J.; Graham, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The present work deals with pitting corrosion of p- and n-type GaAs (100). Pit growth can be electrochemically initiated on both conduction types in chloride-containing solutions and leads after extended periods of time to the formation of a porous GaAs structure. In the case of p-type material, localized corrosion is only observed if a passivating film is present on the surface, otherwise -- e.g. in acidic solutions -- the material suffers from a uniform attack (electropolishing) which is independent of the anion present. In contrast, pitting corrosion of n-type material can be triggered independent of the presence of an oxide film. This is explained in terms of the different current limiting factor for the differently doped materials (oxide film in the case of the p- and a space charge layer in the case of the n-GaAs). The porous structure was characterized by SEM, EDX and AES, and consists mainly of GaAs. From scratch experiments it is clear that the pit initiation process is strongly influenced by surface defects. For n-type material, AFM investigations show that light induced roughening of the order of several hundred nm occurs under non-passivating conditions. This nm- scale roughening however does not affect the pitting process.

  11. Evaluation of the two-photon absorption characteristics of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-28

    The optical parameters describing the sub-bandgap response of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings solar cells have been obtained from photocurrent measurements using a modulated pseudo-monochromatic light source in combination with a second, continuous photo-filling source. By controlling the charge state of the quantum rings, the photoemission cross-sections describing the two-photon sub-bandgap transitions could be determined independently. Temperature dependent photo-response measurements also revealed that the barrier for thermal hole emission from the quantum rings is significantly below the quantum ring localisation energy. The temperature dependence of the sub-bandgap photo-response of the solar cell is also described in terms of the photo- and thermal-emission characteristics of the quantum rings.

  12. Electrophoretic Deposition of Highly Efficient Phosphors for White Solid State Lighting using near UV-Emitting LEDs /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jae Ik

    2014-01-01

    application in white light emitting diode,” J. Mater. Res. ,S.Y. Choi. “White light-emitting diodes of GaN-based Sr 2phosphor for white light-emitting diodes prepared by sol–gel

  13. Importance of strain for green emitters based on (In, Ga)N films of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sandip

    , adding more In to lower the energy gap of the active layer for obtaining green-light emissionImportance of strain for green emitters based on (In, Ga)N films of non-polar orientation Sandip for obtaining green-light emitting diodes (LED) and lasers in the wavelength range between 520 and 550 nm

  14. Integration of subwavelength optical nanostructures for improved antireflection performance of mechanically flexible GaAs solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    to produce mechanically flexible, low-cost, light-weight, and high-efficiency GaAs thin-film solar cells of mechanically flexible GaAs solar cells fabricated by epitaxial lift-off Xiaohan Li a,n , Ping-Chun Li a , Li Ji bilayer antireflection coatings, respectively, with epitaxial lift-off single-junction GaAs solar cells

  15. High-performance broadband optical coatings on InGaN/GaN solar cells for multijunction device integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, N. G. Farrell, R. M.; Iza, M.; Speck, J. S.; Perl, E. E.; Keller, S.; Bowers, J. E.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a bulk (0001) substrate with high-performance broadband optical coatings to improve light absorption. A front-side anti-reflective coating and a back-side dichroic mirror were designed to minimize front surface reflections across a broad spectral range and maximize rear surface reflections only in the spectral range absorbed by the InGaN, making the cells suitable for multijunction solar cell integration. Application of optical coatings increased the peak external quantum efficiency by 56% (relative) and conversion efficiency by 37.5% (relative) under 1 sun AM0 equivalent illumination.

  16. Polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Akyol, Fatih; Park, Pil Sung; Esposto, Michele; Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    We report on the design and demonstration of polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel junction diodes with high current density and low tunneling turn-on voltage. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculations were used to model and design tunnel junctions with narrow band gap InGaN-based barrier layers. N-polar p-GaN/In{sub 0.33}Ga{sub 0.67}N/n-GaN heterostructure tunnel diodes were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Efficient interband tunneling was achieved close to zero bias with a high current density of 118 A/cm{sup 2} at a reverse bias of 1 V, reaching a maximum current density up to 9.2 kA/cm{sup 2}. These results represent the highest current density reported in III-nitride tunnel junctions and demonstrate the potential of III-nitride tunnel devices for a broad range of optoelectronic and electronic applications.

  17. Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Betty Lise

    'll build the circuit! We'll use an LED to represent the room lights! #12;4! Block diagram! Battery! Rail! #12;23! LED: light-emitting diode! Diode conducts current in only one direction! When current flows1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if

  18. Germanium subcells for multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Evstropov, V. V.; Lantratov, V. M.; Mintairov, S. A.; Timoshina, N. Kh.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Andreev, V. M.

    2010-11-15

    Photovoltaic converters based on n-GaInP/n-p-Ge heterostructures grown by the OMVPE under different conditions of formation of the p-n junction are studied. The heterostructures are intended for use as narrow-gap subcells of the GaInP/GaInAs/Ge three-junction solar cells. It is shown that, in Ge p-tn junctions, along with the diffusion mechanism, the tunneling mechanism of the current flow exists; therefore, the two-diode electrical equivalent circuit of the Ge p-n junction is used. The diode parameters are determined for both mechanisms from the analysis of both dark and 'light' current-voltage dependences. It is shown that the elimination of the component of the tunneling current allows one to increase the efficiency of the Ge subcell by {approx}1% with conversion of nonconcentrated solar radiation. The influence of the tunneling current on the efficiency of the Ge-based devices can be in practice reduced to zero at photogenerated current density of {approx}1.5 A/cm{sup 2} due to the use of the concentrated solar radiation.

  19. Metal contacts on ZnSe and GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duxstad, K J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been focused on the development of blue light emitting materials and devices. The focus has been on GaN and ZnSe, direct band gap semiconductors with bands gaps of 3.4 and 2.6 eV, respectively. To have efficient, reliable devices it is necessary to have thermally and electrically stable Ohmic contacts. This requires knowledge of the metal-semiconductor reaction behavior. To date few studies have investigated this behavior. Much information has accumulated over the years on the behavior of metals on Si and GaAs. This thesis provides new knowledge for the more ionic wide band gap semiconductors. The initial reaction temperatures, first phases formed, and phase stability of Pt, Pd, and Ni on both semiconductors were investigated. The reactions of these metals on ZnSe and GaN are discussed in detail and correlated with predicted behavior. In addition, comparisons are made between these highly ionic semiconductors and Si and GaAs. The trends observed here should also be applicable to other II-VI and III-Nitride semiconductor systems, while the information on phase formation and stability should be useful in the development of contacts for ZnSe and GaN devices.

  20. InGaAs/GaAsP strain balanced multi-quantum wires grown on misoriented GaAs substrates for high efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Álvarez, D.; Thomas, T.; Führer, M.; Hylton, N. P.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Lackner, D.; Philipps, S. P.; Bett, A. W.; Sodabanlu, H.; Fujii, H.; Watanabe, K.; Sugiyama, M.; Nasi, L.; Campanini, M.

    2014-08-25

    Quantum wires (QWRs) form naturally when growing strain balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum wells (MQW) on GaAs [100] 6° misoriented substrates under the usual growth conditions. The presence of wires instead of wells could have several unexpected consequences for the performance of the MQW solar cells, both positive and negative, that need to be assessed to achieve high conversion efficiencies. In this letter, we study QWR properties from the point of view of their performance as solar cells by means of transmission electron microscopy, time resolved photoluminescence and external quantum efficiency (EQE) using polarised light. We find that these QWRs have longer lifetimes than nominally identical QWs grown on exact [100] GaAs substrates, of up to 1??s, at any level of illumination. We attribute this effect to an asymmetric carrier escape from the nanostructures leading to a strong 1D-photo-charging, keeping electrons confined along the wire and holes in the barriers. In principle, these extended lifetimes could be exploited to enhance carrier collection and reduce dark current losses. Light absorption by these QWRs is 1.6 times weaker than QWs, as revealed by EQE measurements, which emphasises the need for more layers of nanostructures or the use light trapping techniques. Contrary to what we expected, QWR show very low absorption anisotropy, only 3.5%, which was the main drawback a priori of this nanostructure. We attribute this to a reduced lateral confinement inside the wires. These results encourage further study and optimization of QWRs for high efficiency solar cells.

  1. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  2. Red emitting photonic devices using InGaP/InGaAlP material system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kangude, Yamini

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, two red emitting photonic devices are presented using the InGaP/InGaAlP material system. InGaP/InGaAlP material system provides large flexibility in the band gap energy while being lattice matched to GaAs ...

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sacci_ChemComm-2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnowReport ARM ScienceCORPS OFSWPA / SPRA

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - CNM_CNMS_NatComm-Jan2014.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms toPalladium wavyfamily of new lithium A

  5. High-efficiency GaAs/Ge monolithic tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S.P.; Vernon, S.M.; Bajgar, C.; Haven, V.E.; Geoffroy, L.M.; Lillington, D.R.

    1988-05-01

    High photovoltaic efficiency and light weight are important criteria for spacecraft power applications. Present GaAs cells are approaching their efficiency limits, but are not efficient or light enough for future needs. The authors have investigated tandem cells of GaAs grown by MOCVD on thin Ge to address both higher efficiency and reduced weight. GaAs/Ge monolithic tandem cells of 4-cm/sup 2/ area have been produced with independently verified efficiencies up to 21.7 percent (AMO, one sun, 25/sup 0/C, total area). Under AM1.5 Global conditions, efficiencies are up to 24.3 percent. These are the highest one-sun efficiencies reported for GaAs/Ge cells, and the highest efficiency for a two-terminal monolithic tandem cell.

  6. Semiconductor heterostructures and optimization of light-trapping structures for efficient thin-film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    and optimization of light-trapping structures for efficient thin-film solar cells Claiborne O McPheeters1 , Dongzhi elements are integrated for light trapping. Measurements and simulations of GaAs solar cells with less than in their performance. Keywords: quantum-well, quantum-dot, scattering, diffraction, thin-film, GaAs, InAs, photovoltaic

  7. Is it viable to improve light output efficiency by nano-light-emitting diodes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yu-Wen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shang-En [Genesis Photonics Incorporation, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)] [Genesis Photonics Incorporation, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-Pu, E-mail: cpliu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-02

    Nanopillar arrays with InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-disks (MQDs) are fabricated by focused-ion-beam milling with surface damage layer removed by KOH wet etching. Nano-light-emitting diodes (Nano-LEDs) made of the InGaN/GaN MQD nanopillars are found to have 19.49% less output power than that of a conventional LED. The reasons are analyzed in detail and considering their current-voltage and electroluminescence characteristics, internal quantum efficiency, external quantum efficiency, light extraction, and wall-plug efficiency. Our results suggest that nanopillar-LED can outperform if the density can be increased to 2.81?×?10{sup 9}?cm{sup ?2} with the size unchanged or the size can be increased to 854.4?nm with the density unchanged.

  8. High extraction efficiency ultraviolet light-emitting diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wierer, Jonathan; Montano, Ines; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-11-24

    Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with tailored AlGaN quantum wells can achieve high extraction efficiency. For efficient bottom light extraction, parallel polarized light is preferred, because it propagates predominately perpendicular to the QW plane and into the typical and more efficient light escape cones. This is favored over perpendicular polarized light that propagates along the QW plane which requires multiple, lossy bounces before extraction. The thickness and carrier density of AlGaN QW layers have a strong influence on the valence subband structure, and the resulting optical polarization and light extraction of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes. At Al>0.3, thinner QW layers (<2.5 nm are preferred) result in light preferentially polarized parallel to the QW plane. Also, active regions consisting of six or more QWs, to reduce carrier density, and with thin barriers, to efficiently inject carriers in all the QWs, are preferred.

  9. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2010-10-14

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  10. Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light is a "wave packet" A photon is a "light particle" #12;Electromagnetic Radiation and You Light is sometimes

  11. Temperature dependence of non-radiative energy transfer in hybrid structures of InGaN/GaN nanorods and F8BT films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. M.; Liu, B.; Bai, J.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-27

    Hybrid organic/inorganic white light emitting structures have been fabricated based on a combination of high efficiency InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorod arrays and a yellow emitting co-polymer F8BT, leading to a minimised separation between them in order to achieve high efficiency non-radiative energy transfer (NRET). The NRET efficiency has been found 6.7 times higher at room temperature than at 7?K. This is attributed to the existence of strong exciton localization the InGaN MQWs, which can undergo thermally activated delocalization at high temperatures. The enhanced NRET efficiency is not only due to the delocalized MQW excitons, but also enhanced by the increased exciton diffusion at higher temperatures. This behaviour highlights the potential for high efficiency NRET in down-conversion hybrid white light emitting diodes operating at room temperature.

  12. GaAs MOEMS Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPAHN, OLGA B.; GROSSETETE, GRANT D.; CICH, MICHAEL J.; TIGGES, CHRIS P.; RENO, JOHN L.; PEAKE, GREGORY M.; KLEM, JOHN F.; LEAN, JEN; FULLER, CHARLES T.; BURKHART, JEFF; BAUER, THOMAS; SULLIVAN, CHARLES T.

    2003-03-01

    Many MEMS-based components require optical monitoring techniques using optoelectronic devices for converting mechanical position information into useful electronic signals. While the constituent piece-parts of such hybrid opto-MEMS components can be separately optimized, the resulting component performance, size, ruggedness and cost are substantially compromised due to assembly and packaging limitations. GaAs MOEMS offers the possibility of monolithically integrating high-performance optoelectronics with simple mechanical structures built in very low-stress epitaxial layers with a resulting component performance determined only by GaAs microfabrication technology limitations. GaAs MOEMS implicitly integrates the capability for radiation-hardened optical communications into the MEMS sensor or actuator component, a vital step towards rugged integrated autonomous microsystems that sense, act, and communicate. This project establishes a new foundational technology that monolithically combines GaAs optoelectronics with simple mechanics. Critical process issues addressed include selectivity, electrochemical characteristics, and anisotropy of the release chemistry, and post-release drying and coating processes. Several types of devices incorporating this novel technology are demonstrated.

  13. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  14. Properties of H, O and C in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    The electrical properties of the light ion impurities H, O and C in GaN have been examined in both as-grown and implanted material. H is found to efficiently passivate acceptors such as Mg, Ca and C. Reactivation occurs at {ge} 450 C and is enhanced by minority carrier injection. The hydrogen does not leave the GaN crystal until > 800 C, and its diffusivity is relatively high ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 2}/s) even at low temperatures (< 200 C) during injection by wet etching, boiling in water or plasma exposure. Oxygen shows a low donor activation efficiency when implanted into GaN, with an ionization level of 30--40 meV. It is essentially immobile up to 1,100 C. Carbon can produce low p-type levels (3 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}) in GaN during MOMBE, although there is some evidence it may also create n-type conduction in other nitrides.

  15. C. Wetzel et al MRS Internet J. Nitride Semicond. Res. 10, 2 (2005) 1 Development of High Power Green Light Emitting Diode Chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    2005-01-01

    Power Green Light Emitting Diode Chips C. Wetzel and T. Detchprohm Future Chips Constellation Abstract The development of high emission power green light emitting diodes chips using GaInN/GaN multi production-scale implementation of this green LED die process. Keywords: nitrides, light emitting diode

  16. GaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    into existing multijunction cells either as a means to increase the current or efficiency by using low band gapGaSb/GaAs type II quantum dot solar cells for enhanced infrared spectral response R. B infrared spectral response of GaAs-based solar cells that incorporate type II GaSb quantum dots QDs formed

  17. Formation and properties of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Lockwood, D.J.; Fraser, J.W.; Graham, M.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1996-06-01

    Porous structures on n-type GaAs (100) can be grown electrochemically in chloride-containing solutions. Crystallographic etching of the sample is a precursor stage of the attack. Polarization curves reveal the existanece of a critical onset potential for por formation (PFP). PFP is strongly dependent on the doping level of the sample and presence of surface defects. Good agreement between PFP and breakdown voltage of the space charge layer is found. Surface analysis by EDX, AES, and XPS show that the porous structure consists mainly of GaAs and that anion uptake in the structure can only observed after attackhas been initiated. Photoluminescence measurements reveal (under certain conditions) visible light emission from the porous structure.

  18. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  19. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  20. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  1. Light-splitting photovoltaic system utilizing two dual-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Kanglin; Yang, Hui; Lu, Shulong; Dong, Jianrong; Zhou, Taofei; Wang, Rongxin; Jiang, Desheng

    2010-12-15

    There are many difficulties limiting the further development of monolithic multi-junction solar cells, such as the growth of lattice-mismatched material and the current matching constraint. As an alternative approach, the light-splitting photovoltaic system is investigated intensively in different aspects, including the energy loss mechanism and the choice of energy bandgaps of solar cells. Based on the investigation, a two-dual junction system has been implemented employing lattice-matched GaInP/GaAs and InGaAsP/InGaAs cells grown epitaxially on GaAs and InP substrates, respectively. (author)

  2. New GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs, Triple-Bandgap, Tandem Solar Cell for High-Efficiency Terrestrial Concentrator Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Geisz, J.; Ward, S.; Duda, A.; Moriarty, T.; Carapella, J.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Emery. K.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; McMahon, W.; Ptak, A.

    2005-11-01

    GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs three-junction cells are grown in an inverted configuration on GaAs, allowing high quality growth of the lattice matched GaInP and GaAs layers before a grade is used for the 1-eV GaInAs layer. Using this approach an efficiency of 37.9% was demonstrated.

  3. Structure and scintillation yield of Ce-doped Al–Ga substituted yttrium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidletskiy, Oleg; Kononets, Valerii; Lebbou, Kheirreddine; Neicheva, Svetlana; Voloshina, Olesya; Bondar, Valerii; Baumer, Vyacheslav; Belikov, Konstantin; Gektin, Alexander; Grinyov, Boris; Joubert, Marie-France

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Range of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. ? Light yield of mixed crystals reaches 130% of the YAG:Ce value at x ? 0.4. ? ?1% of antisite defects is formed in YGG:Ce, but no evidence of this is obtained for the rest of crystals. -- Abstract: Structure and scintillation yield of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are studied. Crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. Distribution of host cations in crystal lattice is determined. Quantity of antisite defects in crystals is evaluated using XRD and atomic emission spectroscopy data. Trend of light output at Al/Ga substitution in Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce is determined for the first time. Light output in mixed crystals reaches 130% comparative to Ce-doped yttrium–aluminum garnet. Luminescence properties at Al/Ga substitution are evaluated.

  4. Luminescence properties of defects in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshchikov, Michael A.; Morkoc, Hadis [Department of Electrical Engineering and Physics Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)

    2005-03-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN) and its allied binaries InN and AIN as well as their ternary compounds have gained an unprecedented attention due to their wide-ranging applications encompassing green, blue, violet, and ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors (in photon ranges inaccessible by other semiconductors) and high-power amplifiers. However, even the best of the three binaries, GaN, contains many structural and point defects caused to a large extent by lattice and stacking mismatch with substrates. These defects notably affect the electrical and optical properties of the host material and can seriously degrade the performance and reliability of devices made based on these nitride semiconductors. Even though GaN broke the long-standing paradigm that high density of dislocations precludes acceptable device performance, point defects have taken the center stage as they exacerbate efforts to increase the efficiency of emitters, increase laser operation lifetime, and lead to anomalies in electronic devices. The point defects include native isolated defects (vacancies, interstitial, and antisites), intentional or unintentional impurities, as well as complexes involving different combinations of the isolated defects. Further improvements in device performance and longevity hinge on an in-depth understanding of point defects and their reduction. In this review a comprehensive and critical analysis of point defects in GaN, particularly their manifestation in luminescence, is presented. In addition to a comprehensive analysis of native point defects, the signatures of intentionally and unintentionally introduced impurities are addressed. The review discusses in detail the characteristics and the origin of the major luminescence bands including the ultraviolet, blue, green, yellow, and red bands in undoped GaN. The effects of important group-II impurities, such as Zn and Mg on the photoluminescence of GaN, are treated in detail. Similarly, but to a lesser extent, the effects of other impurities, such as C, Si, H, O, Be, Mn, Cd, etc., on the luminescence properties of GaN are also reviewed. Further, atypical luminescence lines which are tentatively attributed to the surface and structural defects are discussed. The effect of surfaces and surface preparation, particularly wet and dry etching, exposure to UV light in vacuum or controlled gas ambient, annealing, and ion implantation on the characteristics of the defect-related emissions is described.

  5. Nanostructured High Performance Ultraviolet and Blue Light Emitting Diodes for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2005-09-30

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the second 12 month contract period include (i) new means of synthesizing AlGaN and InN quantum dots by droplet heteroepitaxy, (ii) synthesis of AlGaInN nanowires as building blocks for GaN-based microcavity devices, (iii) progress towards direct epitaxial alignment of the dense arrays of nanowires, (iv) observation and measurements of stimulated emission in dense InGaN nanopost arrays, (v) design and fabrication of InGaN photonic crystal emitters, and (vi) observation and measurements of enhanced fluorescence from coupled quantum dot and plasmonic nanostructures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  6. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  7. Nanoengineering for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, E. Fred; Koleske, Daniel David; Wetzel, Christian; Lee, Stephen Roger; Missert, Nancy A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes results from a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project performed in collaboration with researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Our collaborative effort was supported by Sandia's National Institute for Nanoengineering and focused on the study and application of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts to improve the efficiency of semiconductor light-emitting diodes for solid-state lighting applications. The project explored LED efficiency advances with two primary thrusts: (1) the study of nanoscale InGaN materials properties, particularly nanoscale crystalline defects, and their impact on internal quantum efficiency, and (2) nanoscale engineering of dielectric and metal materials and integration with LED heterostructures for enhanced light extraction efficiency.

  8. InGaAsN/GaAs heterojunction for multi-junction solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Eric D. (Edgewood, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An InGaAsN/GaAs semiconductor p-n heterojunction is disclosed for use in forming a 0.95-1.2 eV bandgap photodetector with application for use in high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction is formed by epitaxially growing on a gallium arsenide (GaAs) or germanium (Ge) substrate an n-type indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN) layer having a semiconductor alloy composition In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As.sub.1-y N.sub.y with 0GaAs layer, with the InGaAsN and GaAs layers being lattice-matched to the substrate. The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction can be epitaxially grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The InGaAsN/GaAs p-n heterojunction provides a high open-circuit voltage of up to 0.62 volts and an internal quantum efficiency of >70%.

  9. Light extraction efficiency enhancement of InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    . Need Project, Intermediate Energy Infobook, (US Department of Energy, pp. 51, 2008). 2. E. F. Schubert

  10. Magnetism and transport properties of epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films on GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duong Anh Tuan; Shin, Yooleemi; Cho, Sunglae; Dang Duc Dung; Vo Thanh Son

    2012-04-01

    Epitaxial Fe-Ga thin films in disordered bcc {alpha}-Fe crystal structure (A2) have been grown on GaAs(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. The saturated magnetization (M{sub S}) decreased from 1371 to 1105 kA/m with increasing Ga concentration from 10.5 to 24.3 % at room temperature. The lattice parameter increased with the increase in Ga content because of the larger atomic radius of Ga atom than that of Fe. The increase in carrier density with Ga content caused in lower resistivity.

  11. Graphene induced remote surface scattering in graphene/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiwen; Li, Dan; Wang, Bobo; Liu, Bin; Chen, Famin; Jin, Guangri; Lu, Yanwu, E-mail: ywlu@bjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2014-10-20

    The mobilities of single-layer graphene combined with AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on two-dimensional electron gases in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction are calculated. The impact of electron density in single-layer graphene is also studied. Remote surface roughness (RSR) and remote interfacial charge (RIC) scatterings are introduced into this heterostructure. The mobilities limited by RSR and RIC are an order of magnitude higher than that of interface roughness and misfit dislocation. This study contributes to designing structures for generation of higher electron mobility in graphene/AlGaN/GaN double heterojunction.

  12. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

    1998-07-14

    A broadband light-emitting diode is disclosed. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3--2 {micro}m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-divisionmultiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft. 10 figs.

  13. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Hafich, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A broadband light-emitting diode. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3-2 .mu.m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft.

  14. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activity, providing real-time images of the sun's explosive atmosphere, enabling more timely warnings manages the complex distribution of more than 16 billion bytes of environmental data from the eight.gov (continued from previous page) movement, coral reef bleaching, volcanic ash and sea surface temperature. NOAA

  15. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provide adult audiences with training on estuarine issues of concern in their local communities,Washington 26. St.Louis River,Wisconsin * 27. Old Woman Creek,Ohio 28. Kachemak Bay,Alaska 29. Jobos Bay

  16. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their young, coral reefs flourish, and shipwrecks tell stories of our maritime history. The mission of NOAA. It protects a treasure trove of thriving coral reefs and some of the world's most exotic species -- a quarter Coral reef. Many whale species, including humpbacks (above), are found in national marine sanctuaries

  17. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the management of wild fish stocks. Extension: While research is a crucial component of Sea Grant, transferring environmental sciences into the classroom--and to bring students out of the classroom and into the natural

  18. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This list includes 20 marine mammals, eight sea turtles, 33 fish species and four invertebrates or plants for the conservation of endangered and threatened fish, wildlife and plants throughout all or a significant portion. There are approximately 1,927 species listed under the ESA. Of these species, approximately 1,353 are found in part

  19. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , D.C., sponsored by the governments of Canada, Norway, Iceland, and the United States. Recognizing diseases, and Alzheimer's. Studies have linked seafood consumption with lower heart rates, lower outweigh perceived risks, and just two six-ounce seafood meals per week can cut the risk of coronary death

  20. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reosurces. · Participating in free trade negotiations · Conducting workshops on living marine resource and international fisheries management organizations and other multilateral fisheries, wildlife protection, trade support for U.S. fisheries trade, conservation and management initiatives. U.S. commitment to combat

  1. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes (physical, geochemical, ecological) · Build predictive models for use in weather, climate, solar ecosystem health. NOAA Research also develops innovative technologies and observing systems to include. The private sector uses NOAA data to make business decisions and also employs technology developed

  2. Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

  3. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  4. Impact of electrochemical process on the degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Feng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) constitute a new generation of transistors with excellent electrical characteristics and great potential to replace silicon technology in the future, especially in high ...

  5. Monolithic integration of InGaN segments emitting in the blue, green, and red spectral range in single ordered nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.

    2013-05-06

    This work reports on the selective area growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar heterostructures. The optimization of the In/Ga and total III/V ratios, as well as the growth temperature, provides control on the emission wavelength, either in the blue, green, or red spectral range. An adequate structure tailoring and monolithic integration in a single nanocolumnar heterostructure of three InGaN portions emitting in the red-green-blue colors lead to white light emission.

  6. High Efficiency m-plane LEDs on Low Defect Density Bulk GaN Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, Aurelien

    2012-10-15

    Solid-state lighting is a key technology for reduction of energy consumption in the US and worldwide. In principle, by replacing standard incandescent bulbs and other light sources with sources based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs), ultimate energy efficiency can be achieved. The efficiency of LEDs has improved tremendously over the past two decades, however further progress is required for solid- state lighting to reach its full potential. The ability of an LED at converting electricity to light is quantified by its internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The material of choice for visible LEDs is Gallium Nitride (GaN), which is at the basis of blue-emitting LEDs. A key factor limiting the performance of GaN LEDs is the so-called efficiency droop, whereby the IQE of the LED decreases significantly at high current density. Despite decades of research, efficiency droop remains a major issue. Since high-current operation is necessary for practical lighting applications, reducing droop is a major challenge for the scientific community and the LED industry. Our approach to solving the droop issue is the use of newly available low-defect-density bulk GaN non-polar substrates. In contrast to the standard foreign substrates (sapphire, silicon carbide, silicon) used in the industry, we have employed native bulk GaN substrates with very low defect density, thus ensuring exquisite material quality and high IQE. Whereas all commercial LEDs are grown along the c-plane crystal direction of GaN, we have used m-plane non-polar substrates; these drastically modify the physical properties of the LED and enable a reduction of droop. With this approach, we have demonstrated very high IQE performance and low droop. Our results focused on violet and blue LEDs. For these, we have demonstrated very high peak IQEs and current droops of 6% and 10% respectively (up to a high current density of 200A.cm-2). All these results were obtained under electrical operation. These high IQE and low droop values are in line with the program’s milestones. They demonstrate that bulk non-polar GaN substrates represent a disruptive technology for LED performance. Application of this technology to real-world products is feasible, provided that the cost of GaN substrates is compatible with the market’s requirement.

  7. Photoelectrochemical water splitting and hydrogen generation by a spontaneously formed InGaN nanowall network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvi, N. H., E-mail: nhalvi@isom.upm.es, E-mail: r.noetzel@isom.upm.es; Soto Rodriguez, P. E. D.; Kumar, Praveen; Gómez, V. J.; Aseev, P.; Nötzel, R., E-mail: nhalvi@isom.upm.es, E-mail: r.noetzel@isom.upm.es [ISOM Institute for Systems Based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology, ETSI Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvi, A. H. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Alvi, M. A. [Department of Chemistry, Government College University, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Willander, M. [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2014-06-02

    We investigate photoelectrochemical water splitting by a spontaneously formed In-rich InGaN nanowall network, combining the material of choice with the advantages of surface texturing for light harvesting by light scattering. The current density for the InGaN-nanowalls-photoelectrode at zero voltage versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode is 3.4?mA cm{sup ?2} with an incident-photon-to-current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 16% under 350?nm laser illumination with 0.075?W·cm{sup ?2} power density. In comparison, the current density for a planar InGaN-layer-photoelectrode is 2?mA cm{sup ?2} with IPCE of 9% at zero voltage versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The H{sub 2} generation rates at zero externally applied voltage versus the Pt counter electrode per illuminated area are 2.8 and 1.61??mol·h{sup ?1}·cm{sup ?2} for the InGaN nanowalls and InGaN layer, respectively, revealing ?57% enhancement for the nanowalls.

  8. GaN nanowires show more 3D piezoelectricity than bulk GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    director cds murder nudity soundtrack BBC movie releases footage worth documentary film Blu-rays Blu-ray Ga

  9. GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs Monolithic Tandem Cells for High-Performance Solar Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Albin, D. S.; Carapella, J. J.; Duda, A.; Emery, K.; Geisz, J. F.; Jones, K.; Kurtz, S.; Moriarty, T.; Romero, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    We present a new approach for ultra-high-performance tandem solar cells that involves inverted epitaxial growth and ultra-thin device processing. The additional degree of freedom afforded by the inverted design allows the monolithic integration of high-, and medium-bandgap, lattice-matched (LM) subcell materials with lower-bandgap, lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials in a tandem structure through the use of transparent compositionally graded layers. The current work concerns an inverted, series-connected, triple-bandgap, GaInP (LM, 1.87 eV)/GaAs (LM, 1.42 eV)/GaInAs (LMM, {approx}1 eV) device structure grown on a GaAs substrate. Ultra-thin tandem devices are fabricated by mounting the epiwafers to pre-metallized Si wafer handles and selectively removing the parent GaAs substrate. The resulting handle-mounted, ultra-thin tandem cells have a number of important advantages, including improved performance and potential reclamation/reuse of the parent substrate for epitaxial growth. Additionally, realistic performance modeling calculations suggest that terrestrial concentrator efficiencies in the range of 40-45% are possible with this new tandem cell approach. A laboratory-scale (0.24 cm2), prototype GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs tandem cell with a terrestrial concentrator efficiency of 37.9% at a low concentration ratio (10.1 suns) is described, which surpasses the previous world efficiency record of 37.3%.

  10. Lighting in the Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by your library lights E Kilowatt-hours consumed by your library lights F Annual cost of operating your library lights H Current lighting index for your library ...

  11. Switchable piezoelectric transduction in AlGaN/GaN MEMS resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Dana

    This work presents a new switching mechanism in piezoelectric transduction of AlGaN/GaN bulk acoustic resonators. A piezoelectric transducer is formed in the AlGaN, between a top Schottky electrode and a 2D electron gas ...

  12. Depth-resolved ultra-violet spectroscopic photo current-voltage measurements for the analysis of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor epilayer deposited on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozden, Burcu; Yang, Chungman; Tong, Fei; Khanal, Min P.; Mirkhani, Vahid; Sk, Mobbassar Hassan; Ahyi, Ayayi Claude; Park, Minseo

    2014-10-27

    We have demonstrated that the depth-dependent defect distribution of the deep level traps in the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) epi-structures can be analyzed by using the depth-resolved ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopic photo current-voltage (IV) (DR-UV-SPIV). It is of great importance to analyze deep level defects in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure, since it is recognized that deep level defects are the main source for causing current collapse phenomena leading to reduced device reliability. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT epi-layers were grown on a 6 in. Si wafer by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The DR-UV-SPIV measurement was performed using a monochromatized UV light illumination from a Xe lamp. The key strength of the DR-UV-SPIV is its ability to provide information on the depth-dependent electrically active defect distribution along the epi-layer growth direction. The DR-UV-SPIV data showed variations in the depth-dependent defect distribution across the wafer. As a result, rapid feedback on the depth-dependent electrical homogeneity of the electrically active defect distribution in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT epi-structure grown on a Si wafer with minimal sample preparation can be elucidated from the DR-UV-SPIV in combination with our previously demonstrated spectroscopic photo-IV measurement with the sub-bandgap excitation.

  13. Light's Darkness

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Padgett, Miles [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

    2010-01-08

    Optical vortices and orbital angular momentum are currently topical subjects in the optics literature. Although seemingly esoteric, they are, in fact, the generic state of light and arise whenever three or more plane waves interfere. To be observed by eye the light must be monochromatic. Laser speckle is one such example, where the optical energy circulates around each black spot, giving a local orbital angular momentum. This talk with report three on-going studies. First, when considering a volume of interfering waves, the laser specs map out threads of complete darkness embedded in the light. Do these threads form loops? Links? Or even knots? Second, when looking through a rapidly spinning window, the image of the world on the other side is rotated: true or false? Finally, the entanglement of orbital angular momentum states means measuring how the angular position of one photons sets the angular momentum of another: is this an angular version of the EPR (Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen) paradox?

  14. Influence of growth temperature and temperature ramps on deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, A. M.; Kelchner, K.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 ; Speck, J. S.

    2013-12-02

    The dependence of deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on bulk m-plane GaN substrates as a function of growth temperature (T{sub g}) and T{sub g} ramping method was investigated using deep level optical spectroscopy. Understanding the influence of T{sub g} on GaN deep level incorporation is important for InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) because GaN quantum barrier (QB) layers are grown much colder than thin film GaN to accommodate InGaN QW growth. Deep level spectra of low T{sub g} (800?°C) GaN films grown under QB conditions were compared to deep level spectra of high T{sub g} (1150?°C) GaN. Reducing T{sub g}, increased the defect density significantly (>50×) through introduction of emergent deep level defects at 2.09?eV and 2.9?eV below the conduction band minimum. However, optimizing growth conditions during the temperature ramp when transitioning from high to low T{sub g} substantially reduced the density of these emergent deep levels by approximately 40%. The results suggest that it is important to consider the potential for non-radiative recombination in QBs of LED or LD active regions, and tailoring the transition from high T{sub g} GaN growth to active layer growth can mitigate such non-radiative channels.

  15. Types of Lights Types of Lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Types of Lights Types of Lights q So far we have studied point lights ­ Radiate in all direc7ons q Other lights ­ Direc7onal lights (posi7on-independent) ­ Spotlights #12;2 Direc1onal Lights q Shine in a single, uniform direc7on q All rays

  16. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  17. Scientific Achievement Networks of highly photoresponsive crystalline GaSe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B.

    Scientific Achievement Networks of highly photoresponsive crystalline GaSe nanosheets a crystalline GaSe target was adjusted to directly grow networks of interconnected triangular GaSe crystalline nanosheets of ~ 200 nm size (inset shows atomic

  18. Thin film GaAs solar cells on glass substrates by epitaxial liftoff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, X.Y.; Goertemiller, M.; Boroditsky, M.; Ragan, R.; Yablonovitch, E.

    1997-02-01

    In this work, we describe the fabrication and operating characteristics of GaAs/AlGaAs thin film solar cells processed by the epitaxial liftoff (ELO) technique. This technique allows the transfer of these cells onto glass substrates. The performance of the lifted-off solar cell is demonstrated by means of electrical measurements under both dark and illuminated conditions. We have also optimized the light trapping conditions in this direct-gap material. The results show that good solar absorption is possible in active layers as thin as 0.32 {mu}m. In such a thin solar cell, the open circuit voltage would be enhanced. We believe that the combination of an epitaxial liftoff thin GaAs film, and nano-texturing can lead to record breaking performance. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Tensile GaAs(111) quantum dashes with tunable luminescence below the bulk bandgap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yerino, Christopher D., E-mail: christopher.yerino@yale.edu; Jung, Daehwan; Lee, Minjoo Larry [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Simmonds, Paul J.; Liang, Baolai [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Dorogan, Vitaliy G.; Ware, Morgan E.; Mazur, Yuriy I.; Salamo, Gregory J. [Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Huffaker, Diana L. [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-08-18

    Strain-based band engineering in quantum dots and dashes has been predominantly limited to compressively strained systems. However, tensile strain strongly reduces the bandgaps of nanostructures, enabling nanostructures to emit light at lower energies than they could under compressive strain. We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of dislocation-free GaAs quantum dashes on an InP(111)B substrate, using a 3.8% tensile lattice-mismatch. Due to the high tensile strain, the GaAs quantum dashes luminesce at 110–240?meV below the bandgap of bulk GaAs. The emission energy is readily tuned by adjusting the size of the quantum dashes via deposition thickness. Tensile self-assembly creates new opportunities for engineering the band alignment, band structure, and optical properties of epitaxial nanostructures.

  20. Development of metallization for GaAs and AlGaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S.P.

    1987-04-01

    A three-layer metallization system was developed for high temperature stability on GaAs and AlGaAs solar cells. The layers are a Pt ohmic contact metal that forms thermally stable compounds with GaAs, a TiN diffusion barrier, and a gold conductor. The solar cell structure was also designed for contact stability, with the key component being a heavily doped GaAs cap layer. Reactively sputtered TiN was found to act as an excellent barrier when deposited under the proper conditions. The conditions were carefully optimized for low resistivity and low stress in the films. A low but nonzero substrate bias during sputtering was found to be important. Solar cells with sputtered metallizations of Pt/TiN/Ti/Pt/Au were found to be thermally stable up to 500/sup 0/C for 15 minutes in vacuum. At 600/sup 0/C there was catastrophic degradation of the cells due to dissociation of uncapped GaAs surfaces. Below this temperature the metallization performed as designed. The Pt and GaAs layers reacted to form a stable PtGa compound layer that gave low contact resistance. There was no penetration of Au or GaAs through the barrier layer. These results are a very encouraging first step leading to stable, reliable GaAs and AlGaAs concentrator cells.

  1. Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined using optical reflectance and the nucleation density was determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Nomarski microscopy. Dislocation density was measured using X-ray diffraction and AFM after coating the surface with silicon nitride to delineate all dislocation types. The program milestone of producing GaN films with dislocation densities of 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} was met by silicon nitride treatment of annealed sapphire followed by the multiple deposition of a low density of GaN nuclei followed by high temperature GaN growth. Details of this growth process and the underlying science are presented in this final report along with problems encountered in this research and recommendations for future work.

  2. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM); Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  3. GaSb-based Type-I QW LEDs and addressable arrays operated at wavelengths up to 3.66 m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sb-based quantum wells (QW) light emitting diodes (LED) and LED arrays operating at room temperature at wavelengths. Kipshidze, D.Westerfeld, D. Snyder, M.Johnson, G. Belenky, "GaSb-Based Type I Quantum Well Light Emitting Diode Addressable Array Operated at Wavelengths up to 3.66 µm", IEEE Photonics Technol. Lett. 21, 1087

  4. NANOSTRUCTURED HIGH PERFORMANCE ULTRAVIOLET AND BLUE LIGHT EMITTING DIODES FOR SOLID STATE LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2004-10-01

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the first 12 month contract period include (1) new means of synthesizing zero- and one-dimensional GaN nanostructures, (2) establishment of the building blocks for making GaN-based microcavity devices, and (3) demonstration of top-down approach to nano-scale photonic devices for enhanced spontaneous emission and light extraction. These include a demonstration of eight-fold enhancement of the external emission efficiency in new InGaN QW photonic crystal structures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  5. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; Worschech, L.; Gru?tzmacher, D.

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaN to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  6. Conference 5739, SPIE International Symposium Integrated Optoelectronic Devices, 22-27 Jan 2005, San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    , San Jose, CA Development of high power green light emitting diode dies in piezoelectric Ga in green light emitting diodes is one of the big challenges towards all-solid- state lighting. The prime,3], and commercialization [4,5] of high brightness light emitting diodes LEDs has led to a 1.82 Billion-$/year world market

  7. Ohmic contacts to n-GaSb 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhengchong

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, the Ill-V semiconductor GaSb and its ternary alloys containing antimony have exhibited interesting electrical and optical properties for device applications which include negative resistance tunnel devices, lasers, detectors and FET...

  8. Mg doping of GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under nitrogen-rich conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Meng; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Guo Wei; Banerjee, Animesh [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Solid-State Electronics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2010-03-29

    Acceptor doping of GaN with Mg during plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, under N-rich conditions and a relatively high growth temperature of 740 deg. C, was investigated. The p-doping level steadily increases with increasing Mg flux. The highest doping level achieved, determined from Hall measurements, is 2.1x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The corresponding doping efficiency and hole mobility are approx4.9% and 3.7 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements confirm good crystalline and optical quality of the Mg-doped layers. An InGaN/GaN quantum dot light emitting diode (lambda{sub peak}=529 nm) with p-GaN contact layers grown under N-rich condition exhibits a low series resistance of 9.8 OMEGA.

  9. GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Mandal, Krishna C. (Ashland, MA)

    2009-06-23

    GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

  10. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0 Averagequestionnaires 7tniLighting Sign In

  11. LED Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light-Emitting diodes (LEDs) efficiently produce light in a fundamentally different way than any legacy or traditional source of light.

  12. GaAs micro-pyramids serving as optical micro-cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl, M.; Beck, T.; Li, S.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M.

    2010-01-04

    An efficient light-matter coupling requires high-quality (Q) micro-cavities with small mode volume. We suggest GaAs micro-pyramids placed on top of AlAs/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors to be promising candidates. The pyramids were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy, electron-beam lithography and a subsequent wet-chemical etching process using a sacrificial AlAs layer. Measured Q-factors of optical modes in single pyramids reach values up to 650. A finite-difference time-domain simulation assuming a simplified cone-shaped geometry suggests possible Q-factors up to 3600. To enhance the light confinement in the micro-pyramids we intend to overgrow the pyramidal facets with a Bragg mirror--results of preliminary tests are given.

  13. GaN-Ready Aluminum Nitride Substrates for Cost-Effective, Very Low Dislocation Density III-Nitride LED's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandra Schujman; Leo Schowalter

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this project was to develop and then demonstrate the efficacy of a costeffective approach for a low defect density substrate on which AlInGaN LEDs can be fabricated. The efficacy of this “GaN-ready” substrate would then be tested by growing high efficiency, long lifetime InxGa1-xN blue LEDs. The approach used to meet the project objectives was to start with low dislocation density AlN single-crystal substrates and grow graded AlxGa1-xN layers on top. Pseudomorphic AlxGa1-xN epitaxial layers grown on bulk AlN substrates were used to fabricate light emitting diodes and demonstrate better device performance as a result of the low defect density in these layers when benched marked against state-of-the-art LEDs fabricated on sapphire substrates. The pseudomorphic LEDs showed excellent output powers compared to similar wavelength devices grown on sapphire substrates, with lifetimes exceeding 10,000 hours (which was the longest time that could reliably be estimated). In addition, high internal quantum efficiencies were demonstrated at high driving current densities even though the external quantum efficiencies were low due to poor photon extraction. Unfortunately, these pseudomorphic LEDs require high Al content so they emit in the ultraviolet. Sapphire based LEDs typically have threading dislocation densities (TDD) > 108 cm-2 while the pseudomorphic LEDs have TDD ? 105 cm-2. The resulting TDD, when grading the AlxGa1-xN layer all the way to pure GaN to produce a “GaN-ready” substrate, has varied between the mid 108 down to the 106 cm-2. These inconsistencies are not well understood. Finally, an approach to improve the LED structures on AlN substrates for light extraction efficiency was developed by thinning and roughening the substrate.

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Shao_2014_CNMS StaffScienceHighlight_NatureComm.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnowReport ARM ScienceCORPS aChallenges ofi S t

  15. Thermoelectric effects in wurtzite GaN and AlxGa1-xN alloys and Alexander A. Balandin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoelectric effects in wurtzite GaN and AlxGa1-xN alloys Weili Liua and Alexander A. Balandin have investigated theoretically the thermoelectric effects in wurtzite GaN crystals and AlxGa1-xN-based alloys may have some potential as thermoelectric materials at high temperature. It was found

  16. Sandia Energy - (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science, Technology, Economic Perspectives Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting:...

  17. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, P. Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Martinez, J.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ?10{sup 7?}cm{sup ?2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300?cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  18. Sustainable Office Lighting Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

  19. Ultra-high frequency photoconductivity decay in GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Johnston, S. W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Umbel, R. [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-04

    GaAs/Ge/GaAs double heterostructures (DHs) were grown in-situ using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. High-resolution x-ray rocking curve demonstrates a high-quality GaAs/Ge/GaAs heterostructure by observing Pendelloesung oscillations. The kinetics of the carrier recombination in Ge/GaAs DHs were investigated using photoconductivity decay measurements by the incidence excitation from the front and back side of 15 nm GaAs/100 nm Ge/0.5 {mu}m GaAs/(100)GaAs substrate structure. High-minority carrier lifetimes of 1.06-1.17 {mu}s were measured when excited from the front or from the back of the Ge epitaxial layer, suggests equivalent interface quality of GaAs/Ge and Ge/GaAs. Wavelength-dependent minority carrier recombination properties are explained by the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient of Ge.

  20. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bietti, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.bietti@mater.unimib.it; Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, I–20125 Milano (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [L–NESS and CNR–IFN, via Anzani 42, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D?=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s?¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  1. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettinari, G., E-mail: giorgio.pettinari@cnr.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); National Research Council (CNR), Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN-CNR), Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Patanè, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M. [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)] [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-09

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30??m for a bias increment of 0.2?V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  2. Solid-State Lighting with High Brightness, High Efficiency, and Low Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    -emitting diode (LED) is the most popular technique due to its advantages of small volume, long lifetime, high reliability, low power consumption, and nonpollution. The progress in solid-state lighting has been driven to the progress in visible InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on III-nitride based semiconductor

  3. Abbreviated MOVPE nucleation of III-nitride light-emitting diodes on nano-patterned sapphire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    -patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano- emitting diodes (LEDs) in solid state lighting applications [1 À11]. In conventional metalorganic vapor

  4. Demonstration of Fluorescent RGB Electrowetting Devices for Light Wave Coupling Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    and wasted, instead of recycling the light for use at pixels in the ON state. We present the demonstration or arrays of violet InGaN LEDs. The light storage plate is chosen simply from flexible (polymer) or rigid of a traditional diffuse backlight because (as will be discussed later) it allows for the advantage of recycling

  5. Efficient and Color-Tunable Oxyfluoride Solid Solution Phosphors for Solid-State White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Won Bin; George, Nathan; Kurzman, Joshua; Brinkley, Stuart; Mikhailovsky, Alexander; Hu, Jerry; Chmelka, Bradley F.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB)

    2012-09-06

    A solid solution strategy helps increase the efficiency of Ce{sup 3+} oxyfluoride phosphors for solid-state white lighting. The use of a phosphor-capping architecture provides additional light extraction. The accompanying image displays electroluminescence spectra from a 434-nm InGaN LED phosphor that has been capped with the oxyfluoride phosphor.

  6. Solar Cells from Earth-Abundant Semiconductors with Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, Harry

    2012-04-30

    Progress is reported in these areas: Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin Film a-Si Solar Cells; Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin InGaN Quantum Well Solar Cells; and Earth Abundant Cu{sub 2}O and Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} Solar Cells.

  7. Nanoparticle-induced light scattering for improved performance of quantum-well solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Edward T.

    in the application of semiconductor nanostructures, including quantum-well structures,1 nanowires,2 and quantum dots3Nanoparticle-induced light scattering for improved performance of quantum-well solar cells D performance of InP/InGaAsP quantum-well waveguide solar cells via light scattering from deposited dielectric

  8. Spin depolarization under low electric fields at low temperatures in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Laipan; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Chongyun; Yu, Jinling; Gao, Hansong; Ma, Hui; Qin, Xudong; Li, Yuan; Wu, Qing; Chen, Yonghai

    2014-10-13

    The spin polarization under low electric fields (?300?V/cm) at low temperatures has been studied in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well. The spin polarization was created by optical spin orientation using circularly polarized light and the inverse spin-Hall effect was employed to measure the spin polarization current. We observed an obvious spin depolarization especially at lower temperatures (80–120?K). We ascribed the spin depolarization of the photoinduced electrons to the heating effect from the low electric fields (the low field regime 50–300?V/cm). This spin depolarization due to the heating effect is sensitive to temperature and electric field, suggesting a wide range of potential applications and devices.

  9. Spectroscopy of the D1-transition of cesium by dressed-state resonance fluorescence from a single (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich, S M; Oster, M; Jetter, M; Urvoy, A; Löw, R; Michler, P

    2014-01-01

    We use a laser-driven single (In,Ga)As quantum dot (QD) in the dressed state regime of resonance fluorescence ($T = 4$ K) to observe the four $D_1$-transition lines of alkali atomic cesium ($Cs$) vapor at room temperature. We tune the frequency of the dressing continuous-wave laser in the vicinity of the bare QD resonance $\\sim 335.116$ THz ($\\sim 894.592$ nm) at constant excitation power and thereby controllably tune the center and side channel frequencies of the probe light, i.e. the Mollow triplet. Resonances between individual QD Mollow triplet lines and the atomic hyperfine-split transitions are clearly identified in the $Cs$ absorption spectrum. Our results show that narrow-band (In,Ga)As QD resonance fluorescence (RF) is suitable to optically address individual transitions of the $D_1$ quadruplet without applying magnetic field or electric field tuning.

  10. Printed assemblies of ultrathin, microscale inorganic light emitting diodes for deformable and semitransparent displays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph; Kim, Hoon-sik; Brueckner, Eric; Park, Sang Il; Kim, Rak Hwan

    2014-10-21

    Described herein are printable structures and methods for making, assembling and arranging electronic devices. A number of the methods described herein are useful for assembling electronic devices where one or more device components are embedded in a polymer which is patterned during the embedding process with trenches for electrical interconnects between device components. Some methods described herein are useful for assembling electronic devices by printing methods, such as by dry transfer contact printing methods. Also described herein are GaN light emitting diodes and methods for making and arranging GaN light emitting diodes, for example for display or lighting systems.

  11. Issues associated with the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of ScGaN and YGaN alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Knapp, James Arthur; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Creighton, James Randall; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    The most energy efficient solid state white light source will likely be a combination of individually efficient red, green, and blue LED. For any multi-color approach to be successful the efficiency of deep green LEDs must be significantly improved. While traditional approaches to improve InGaN materials have yielded incremental success, we proposed a novel approach using group IIIA and IIIB nitride semiconductors to produce efficient green and high wavelength LEDs. To obtain longer wavelength LEDs in the nitrides, we attempted to combine scandium (Sc) and yttrium (Y) with gallium (Ga) to produce ScGaN and YGaN for the quantum well (QW) active regions. Based on linear extrapolation of the proposed bandgaps of ScN (2.15 eV), YN (0.8 eV) and GaN (3.4 eV), we expected that LEDs could be fabricated from the UV (410 nm) to the IR (1600 nm), and therefore cover all visible wavelengths. The growth of these novel alloys potentially provided several advantages over the more traditional InGaN QW regions including: higher growth temperatures more compatible with GaN growth, closer lattice matching to GaN, and reduced phase separation than is commonly observed in InGaN growth. One drawback to using ScGaN and YGaN films as the active regions in LEDs is that little research has been conducted on their growth, specifically, are there metalorganic precursors that are suitable for growth, are the bandgaps direct or indirect, can the materials be grown directly on GaN with a minimal defect formation, as well as other issues related to growth. The major impediment to the growth of ScGaN and YGaN alloys was the low volatility of metalorganic precursors. Despite this impediment some progress was made in incorporation of Sc and Y into GaN which is detailed in this report. Primarily, we were able to incorporate up to 5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} Y atoms into a GaN film, which are far below the alloy concentrations needed to evaluate the YGaN optical properties. After a no-cost extension was granted on this program, an additional more 'liquid-like' Sc precursor was evaluated and the nitridation of Sc metals on GaN were investigated. Using the Sc precursor, dopant level quantities of Sc were incorporated into GaN, thereby concluding the growth of ScGaN and YGaN films. Our remaining time during the no-cost extension was focused on pulsed laser deposition of Sc metal films on GaN, followed by nitridation in the MOCVD reactor to form ScN. Finally, GaN films were deposited on the ScN thin films in order to study possible GaN dislocation reduction.

  12. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Photonic Crystal Light Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) is maximizing the efficiency of a white LED by enhancing the external quantum efficiency using photonic crystals to extract light that would normally be confined in a conventional structure. Ultimate efficiency can only be achieved by looking at the internal structure of light. To do this, UCSB is focusing on maximizing the light extraction efficiency and total light output from light engines driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based LEDs. The challenge is to engineer large overlap (interaction) between modes and photonic crystals. The project is focused on achieving high extraction efficiency in LEDs, controlled directionality of emitted light, integrated design of vertical device structure, and nanoscale patterning of lateral structure.

  13. Influence of pressure on photoluminescence and electroluminescence in GaN/InGaN/AlGaN quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Benard.A.

    recently that the temperature shifts of the photo- and electroluminescence EL peak energies in Nichia greenV/GPa for the green and blue diodes, respectively. The observed pressure coefficients are much lower than those characteristic of the energy gap in GaN ( 40 meV/GPa) or the energy gap in InN ( 33 meV/GPa). This kind

  14. InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot interdiffiusion induced by cap layer overgrowth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasinski, J.; Babinski, A.; Czeczott, M.; Bozek, R.

    2000-06-28

    The effect of thermal treatment during and after growth of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures was studied. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the presence of interacting QDs, as was expected from analysis of temperature dependence of QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. The results indicate that the effect of post-growth annealing can be similar to the effect of elevated temperature of capping layer growth. Both, these thermal treatments can lead to a similar In and Ga interdiffiusion resulting in a similar blue-shift of QD PL peak.

  15. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard; Yarrison-Rice, Jan; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Etheridge, Joanne; Wong, Bryan M.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  16. Semiconductor light-emitting devices having concave microstructures providing improved light extraction efficiency and method for producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tansu, Nelson; Gilchrist, James F; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Kumnorkaew, Pisist

    2013-11-19

    A conventional semiconductor LED is modified to include a microlens layer over its light-emitting surface. The LED may have an active layer including at least one quantum well layer of InGaN and GaN. The microlens layer includes a plurality of concave microstructures that cause light rays emanating from the LED to diffuse outwardly, leading to an increase in the light extraction efficiency of the LED. The concave microstructures may be arranged in a substantially uniform array, such as a close-packed hexagonal array. The microlens layer is preferably constructed of curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and is formed by soft-lithography imprinting by contacting fluid material of the microlens layer with a template bearing a monolayer of homogeneous microsphere crystals, to cause concave impressions, and then curing the material to fix the concave microstructures in the microlens layer and provide relatively uniform surface roughness.

  17. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  18. Structural and optical properties of InGaN–GaN nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limbach, F.; Gotschke, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Sutter, E.; Ciston, J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Kremling, S.; Ho?fling, S.; et al

    2011-01-01

    InGaN/GaN nanowire (NW) heterostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied in comparison to their GaN and InGaN counterparts. The InGaN/GaN heterostructure NWs are composed of a GaN NW, a thin InGaN shell, and a multifaceted InGaN cap wrapping the top part of the GaN NW. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images taken from different parts of a InGaN/GaN NW show a wurtzite structure of the GaN core and the epitaxial InGaN shell around it, while additional crystallographic domains are observed whithin the InGaN cap region. Large changes in the lattice parameter along the wire, from pure GaNmore »to higher In concentration demonstrate the successful growth of a complex InGaN/GaN NW heterostructure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of these heterostructure NW ensembles show rather broad and intense emission peak at 2.1 eV. However, ?-PL spectra measured on single NWs reveal a reduced broadening of the visible luminescence. The analysis of the longitudinal optical phonon Raman peak position and its shape reveal a variation in the In content between 20% and 30%, in agreement with the values estimated by PL and HRTEM investigations. The reported studies are important for understanding of the growth and properties of NW heterostructures suitable for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics.« less

  19. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  20. IEEE Energy2030 Atlanta, GA USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    of an aggregation of battery vehicles for the provision of frequency regulation ­ requiring very fast response timesIEEE Energy2030 Atlanta, GA USA 17-18 November, 2008 Design of a Conceptual Framework for the V2G in common is the batteries, which provide good storage capacity that can be effectively integrated

  1. 495 Tech Way NW Atlanta, GA 30318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    495 Tech Way NW Atlanta, GA 30318 404.385.0384 comments@energy.gatech.edu Copyright 2014 · Georgia concerns, low-cost, clean, secure energy solutions will be necessary to address our global energy needs and sustain our way of life. Georgia Tech Energy Innovations The Strategic Energy Institute's scientists

  2. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V[sub Ga]. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1[mu]m. Gallium vacancies, V[sub Ga], was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As[sub Ga] in the layer. As As[sub Ga] increases, photoquenchable As[sub Ga] decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As[sub Ga] content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga[sub As], as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As[sub Ga]-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V[sub Ga] enhanced diffusion of As[sub Ga] to As precipitates. The supersaturated V[sub GA] and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As[sub Ga]-related defects gives 2.0 [plus minus] 0.3 eV and 1.5 [plus minus] 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As[sub Ga] and V[sub Ga]. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As[sub Ga]-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 [plus minus] 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As[sub Ga]-Be[sub Ga] pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  3. Electron mobility enhancement in AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures with InGaN nanogrooves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it was discovered by Davydov et al.1 and con- firmed by independent studies2,3 that its band gap is small, EG InN =0 The conduction band offset at GaN/AlN interface was estimated as EQW=0.7 EG AlN -EG GaN =1918 meV. The nanoN/GaN/AlN QW. The depth of the nanogroove is calculated as E0=0.8 EG GaN -EG InxGa1-xN . The band gap of InxGa1

  4. Development and Industrialization of InGaN/GaN LEDs on Patterned...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    epitaxial growth of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) layers capable of producing high-efficiency LEDs when combined with chip-on-board packaging techniques. The proposed...

  5. High-field quasi-ballistic transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A.; Tripachko, N. A.; Belyaev, A. E.; Vitusevich, S. A. Hardtdegen, H.; Lüth, H.

    2014-02-17

    Mechanisms of electron transport formation in 2D conducting channels of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures in extremely high electric fields at 4.2?K have been studied. Devices with a narrow constriction for the current flow demonstrate high-speed electron transport with an electron velocity of 6.8?×?10{sup 7}?cm/s. Such a velocity is more than two times higher than values reported for conventional semiconductors and about 15% smaller than the limit value predicted for GaN. Superior velocity is attained in the channel with considerable carrier reduction. The effect is related to a carrier runaway phenomenon. The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for GaN-based materials.

  6. 2DEG electrodes for piezoelectric transduction of AlGaN/GaN MEMS resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Dana

    A 2D electron gas (2DEG) interdigitated transducer (IDT) in Gallium Nitride (GaN) resonators is introduced and demonstrated. This metal-free transduction does not suffer from the loss mechanisms associated with more commonly ...

  7. Emission and Excitation Spectra of ZnO:Ga and ZnO:Ga,N Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Rodnyi; I. V. Khodyuk; E. I. Gorokhova; S. B. Mikhrin; P. Dorenbos

    2010-09-07

    The spectral characteristics of ZnO:Ga and ZnO:Ga,N ceramics prepared by uniaxial hot pressing have been investigated. At room temperature, the edge (exciton) band at 3.12 eV dominates in the luminescence spectra of ZnO:Ga, while a wide luminescence band at 2.37 eV, which is likely to be due to zinc vacancies, is observed in the spectra of ZnO:Ga,N. Upon heating, the edge band maximum shifts to lower energies and the bandwidth increases. The extrapolated position of the edge-band maximum at zero temperature, Em(0) = 3.367 +/- 0.005 eV, is in agreement with the data for thin zinc oxide films. The luminescence excitation spectra in the range from 3 to 6.5 eV are reported and the mechanism of energy transfer to excitons and luminescence centers is considered.

  8. Composition profiling of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Giddings, A. D.; Prosa, T. J.; Larson, D. J. [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Mano, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-10-13

    Droplet epitaxy (DE) is a growth method which can create III-V quantum dots (QDs) whose optoelectronic properties can be accurately controlled through the crystallisation conditions. In this work, GaAs/AlGaAs DE-QDs have been analyzed with the complimentary techniques of cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography. Structural details and a quantitative chemical analysis of QDs of different sizes are obtained. Most QDs were found to be pure GaAs, while a small proportion exhibited high intermixing caused by a local etching process. Large QDs with a high aspect ratio were observed to have an Al-rich crown above the GaAs QD. This structure is attributed to differences in mobility of the cations during the capping phase of the DE growth.

  9. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur; Akdemir, Hande Günay; ??can, ?mdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  10. Energy absorption in Ni-Mn-Ga/ polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feuchtwanger, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    In recent years Ni-Mn-Ga has attracted considerable attention as a new kind of actuator material. Off-stoichiometric single crystals of Ni2MnGa can regularly exhibit 6% strain in tetragonal martensites and orthorhombic ...

  11. Ultra-thin ohmic contacts for p-type nitride light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffetto, Mark; Bharathan, Jayesh; Haberern, Kevin; Bergmann, Michael; Emerson, David; Ibbetson, James; Li, Ting

    2014-06-24

    A flip-chip semiconductor based Light Emitting Device (LED) can include an n-type semiconductor substrate and an n-type GaN epi-layer on the substrate. A p-type GaN epi-layer can be on the n-type GaN epi-layer and a metal ohmic contact p-electrode can be on the p-type GaN epi-layer, where the metal ohmic contact p-electrode can have an average thickness less than about 25 .ANG.. A reflector can be on the metal ohmic contact p-electrode and a metal stack can be on the reflector. An n-electrode can be on the substrate opposite the n-type GaN epi-layer and a bonding pad can be on the n-electrode.

  12. InGaAs/GaAs (110) quantum dot formation via step meandering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diez-Merino, Laura; Tejedor, Paloma

    2011-07-01

    InGaAs (110) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer very promising prospects as a material base for a new generation of high-speed spintronic devices, such as single electron transistors for quantum computing. However, the spontaneous formation of InGaAs QDs is prevented by two-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth on singular GaAs (110) substrates. In this work we have studied, by using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), the growth of InGaAs/GaAs QDs on GaAs (110) stepped substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the modification of the adatom incorporation kinetics to surface steps in the presence of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen. The as-grown QDs exhibit lateral dimensions below 100 nm and emission peaks in the 1.35-1.37 eV range. It has been found that a step meandering instability derived from the preferential attachment of In adatoms to [110]-step edges relative to [11n]-type steps plays a key role in the destabilization of 2D growth that leads to 3D mound formation on both conventional and H-terminated vicinal substrates. In the latter case, the driving force for 3D growth via step meandering is enhanced by H-induced upward mass transport in addition to the lower energy cost associated with island formation on H-terminated substrates, which results in a high density array of InGaAs/GaAs dots selectively nucleated on the terrace apices with reduced lateral dimensions and improved PL efficiency relative to those of conventional MBE-grown samples.

  13. Sheet resistance under Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haj?asz, M., E-mail: m.hajlasz@m2i.nl [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Donkers, J. J. T. M.; Sque, S. J.; Heil, S. B. S. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gravesteijn, D. J. [NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 46, 5656 AE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands); Rietveld, F. J. R. [NXP Semiconductors, Gerstweg 2, 6534 AE, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schmitz, J. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-06-16

    For the determination of specific contact resistance in semiconductor devices, it is usually assumed that the sheet resistance under the contact is identical to that between the contacts. This generally does not hold for contacts to AlGaN/GaN structures, where an effective doping under the contact is thought to come from reactions between the contact metals and the AlGaN/GaN. As a consequence, conventional extraction of the specific contact resistance and transfer length leads to erroneous results. In this Letter, the sheet resistance under gold-free Ti/Al-based Ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates has been investigated by means of electrical measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and technology computer-aided design simulations. It was found to be significantly lower than that outside of the contact area; temperature-dependent electrical characterization showed that it exhibits semiconductor-like behavior. The increase in conduction is attributed to n-type activity of nitrogen vacancies in the AlGaN. They are thought to form during rapid thermal annealing of the metal stack when Ti extracts nitrogen from the underlying semiconductor. The high n-type doping in the region between the metal and the 2-dimensional electron gas pulls the conduction band towards the Fermi level and enhances horizontal electron transport in the AlGaN. Using this improved understanding of the properties of the material underneath the contact, accurate values of transfer length and specific contact resistance have been extracted.

  14. AlGaAs/GaAs photovoltaic converters for high power narrowband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostikov, Vladimir; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay; Mintairov, Sergey; Potapovich, Nataliia; Shvarts, Maxim; Sorokina, Svetlana; Andreev, Viacheslav; Luque, Antonio

    2014-09-26

    AlGaAs/GaAs-based laser power PV converters intended for operation with high-power (up to 100 W/cm{sup 2}) radiation were fabricated by LPE and MOCVD techniques. Monochromatic (? = 809 nm) conversion efficiency up to 60% was measured at cells with back surface field and low (x = 0.2) Al concentration 'window'. Modules with a voltage of 4 V and the efficiency of 56% were designed and fabricated.

  15. Guided Neuronal Growth on Arrays of Biofunctionalized GaAs/InGaAs Semiconductor Microtubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelius S. Bausch; Aune Koitmäe; Eric Stava; Amanda Price; Pedro J. Resto; Yu Huang; David Sonnenberg; Yuliya Stark; Christian Heyn; Justin C. Williams; Erik W. Dent; Robert H. Blick

    2013-05-06

    We demonstrate embedded growth of cortical mouse neurons in dense arrays of semiconductor microtubes. The microtubes, fabricated from a strained GaAs/InGaAs heterostructure, guide axon growth through them and enable electrical and optical probing of propagating action potentials. The coaxial nature of the microtubes -- similar to myelin -- is expected to enhance the signal transduction along the axon. We present a technique of suppressing arsenic toxicity and prove the success of this technique by overgrowing neuronal mouse cells.

  16. Practical image based lighting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaemin

    2003-01-01

    information is lighting. Image based lighting that is developed to recover illumination information of the real world from photographs has recently been popular in computer graphics. In this thesis we present a practical image based lighting method. Our...

  17. Light in the city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Kavita, 1976-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis focuses on enhancing the awareness of light for the pedestrian,and using light as a way of revealing the structure of the city and its relation to the cosmos. It proposes that aesthetic qualities of light inform ...

  18. Advances in Lighting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumber, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Increasing electricity costs have made a significant impact on lighting. The Illuminating Engineering society (I.E.S.) and the lighting industry are producing new standards, procedures and products to make lighting more appropriate and energy...

  19. Natural lighting and skylights 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Benjamin Hampton

    1961-01-01

    There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work...

  20. Specific light in sculpture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, John William

    1989-01-01

    Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

  1. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  2. GaNPAs Solar Cells Lattice-Matched To GaP: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We propose the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct band-gaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We demonstrate the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and discuss the prospects for the development of monolithic high-efficiency multijunction solar cells based on silicon substrates.

  3. Accurate characterization and improvement of GaAs microstrip attenuation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, James Mason

    1992-01-01

    Convergence. III. E. 6 Final Model. III. F Simulation Results for 100 um GaAs. . III. F. 1 On-GaAs Microstrip. III. I', 2 Suspended Microstrip Line . . . . 50 . . . . 51 . . . . 54 . . . . 56 . . . . 56 . . . 56 . . . . 64 64 . . . , 64 III. F. 3... Comparison Between On-GaAs and Suspcndcd Microstrip . . . 68 III. F. 4 Microstrip Inductance III. G EM Parameters in CAD Simulations . . III. H Simulation Results for 150 um GaAs. III. I Conclusions and Recommendations. IV RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS...

  4. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  5. Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jinkyu

    2013-01-01

    Luo, S. Lu. ?White light emitting diode by using a-Ca 2 P 2silicates for near-UV light emitting diode applications,? J.S.Y. Choi. ?White light-emitting diodes of GaN-based Sr 2

  6. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    are also under consideration. Outside the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency's Green Lights program promotes energy-efficient lighting as a means to reducing...

  7. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motivation and Computation of Lighting Measures Floorspace by Lighting Equipment Configuration As described in Appendix A, for each building b, the CBECS data set has the total...

  8. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    more comprehensive understanding of commercial lighting and the potential for lighting energy savings. Steps to build on this analysis can be taken in many directions. One...

  9. Leavenworth Tree Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Join HERO for our annual Leavenworth Tree Lighting Ceremony & Shopping SATURDAY DECEMBER 12, 2015 Leavenworth Christmas Lighting Festival Visitors return year after year for some...

  10. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, which causes the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce. High-Efficiency Ballast (HEB): A lighting conservation feature...

  11. Exciting White Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Windows that emit light and are more energy efficient? Universal Display’s PHOLED technology enables windows that have transparent light-emitting diodes in them.

  12. Advanced technologies for improving high frequency performance of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Jinwook W. (Jinwook Will)

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we have used a combination of physical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental work to identify and overcome some of the main challenges in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) for ...

  13. The effects of Si-doped prelayers on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN single quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, M. J. Dawson, P.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oliver, R. A.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report on the effects of including Si-doped (In)GaN prelayers on the low temperature optical properties of a blue-light emitting InGaN/GaN single quantum well. We observed a large blue shift of the photoluminescence peak emission energy and significant increases in the radiative recombination rate for the quantum well structures that incorporated Si-doped prelayers. Simulations of the variation of the conduction and valence band energies show that a strong modification of the band profile occurs for the quantum wells on Si-doped prelayers due to an increase in strength of the surface polarization field. The enhanced surface polarization field opposes the built-in field across the quantum well and thus reduces this built-in electric field. This reduction of the electric field across the quantum well reduces the Quantum Confined Stark Effect and is responsible for the observed blue shift and the change in the recombination dynamics.

  14. Improved InGaN epitaxy yield by precise temperature measurement :yearly report 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Creighton, James Randall; Russell, Michael J.; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2006-08-01

    This Report summarizes the first year progress (October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005) made under a NETL funded project entitled ''Improved InGaN Epitaxy Yield by Precise Temperature Measurement''. This Project addresses the production of efficient green LEDs, which are currently the least efficient of the primary colors. The Project Goals are to advance IR and UV-violet pyrometry to include real time corrections for surface emissivity on multiwafer MOCVD reactors. Increasing wafer yield would dramatically reduce high brightness LED costs and accelerate the commercial manufacture of inexpensive white light LEDs with very high color quality. This work draws upon and extends our previous research (funded by DOE) that developed emissivity correcting pyrometers (ECP) based on the high-temperature GaN opacity near 400 nm (the ultraviolet-violet range, or UVV), and the sapphire opacity in the mid-IR (MIR) near 7.5 microns.

  15. Four-Terminal Mechanically Stacked GaAs/Si Tandem Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan, S

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates a four-terminal mechanically stacked double junction photovoltaic device based on GaAs as a top subcell and Si as a bottom subcell. Unlike two terminal monolithically series connected double junction photovoltaics, four-terminal mechanically stacked devices benefit from the ability to choose a combination of materials that are not constrained to lattice matching condition. GaAs top subcell is the best sensitive to visible light and Si bottom subcell is chosen to be grown on Si substrate which has relatively low cost. Moreover, the carriers generated by each subcell is collected independently to the external circuit. This electrical isolation of the subcells ensures higher efficiency, where no current matching nor tunnel junctions and related losses exist. A conversion efficiency of the device with a thickness in the order of 10 microns surpassed 27%.

  16. Integrated AlGaAs source of highly indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claire Autebert; Natalia Bruno; Anthony Martin; Aristide Lemaître; Carmen Gomez Carbonell; Ivan Favero; Giuseppe Leo; Hugo Zbinden; Sara Ducci

    2015-07-20

    The generation of nonclassical states of light in miniature chips is a crucial step towards practical implementations of future quantum technologies. Semiconductor materials are ideal to achieve extremely compact and massively parallel systems and several platforms are currently under development. In this context, spontaneous parametric down conversion in AlGaAs devices combines the advantages of room temperature operation, possibility of electrical injection and emission in the telecom band. Here we report on a chip-based AlGaAs source, producing indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons with a brightness of $7.2\\times10^6$ pairs/s and a signal-to-noise ratio of $141\\pm12$. Indistinguishability between the photons is demonstrated via a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment with a visibility of $89\\pm3\\%$, while energy-time entanglement is tested via a Franson interferometer leading to a value for the Bell parameter $ S=2.70\\pm0.10$.

  17. Integrated AlGaAs source of highly indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autebert, Claire; Martin, Anthony; Lemaître, Aristide; Carbonell, Carmen Gomez; Favero, Ivan; Leo, Giuseppe; Zbinden, Hugo; Ducci, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The generation of nonclassical states of light in miniature chips is a crucial step towards practical implementations of future quantum technologies. Semiconductor materials are ideal to achieve extremely compact and massively parallel systems and several platforms are currently under development. In this context, spontaneous parametric down conversion in AlGaAs devices combines the advantages of room temperature operation, possibility of electrical injection and emission in the telecom band. Here we report on a chip-based AlGaAs source, producing indistinguishable and energy-time entangled photons with a brightness of $7.2\\times10^6$ pairs/s and a signal-to-noise ratio of $141\\pm12$. Indistinguishability between the photons is demonstrated via a Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment with a visibility of $89\\pm3\\%$, while energy-time entanglement is tested via a Franson interferometer leading to a value for the Bell parameter $ S=2.70\\pm0.10$.

  18. A New Combustion Synthesis Method for GaN:Eu3+ and Ga2O3 :Eu3+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKittrick, Joanna

    A New Combustion Synthesis Method for GaN:Eu3+ and Ga2O3 :Eu3+ Luminescent Powders G. A. Hirata1 between the precursors. The preparation of Eu-doped Ga2O3 powders was achieved using a new combustion)3 and Ga(NO3)3 as the precursors and hydrazine as (non-carbonaceous) fuel. A spontaneous combustion

  19. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controls Lighting Controls Use lighting controls to automatically turn lights on and off as needed, and save energy. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.comMaliketh. Use lighting...

  20. Transformations in Lighting: The Fifth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 300 SSL technology leaders from industry, research organizations, universities, and national laboratories gathered in Atlanta, GA, along with representatives from efficiency programs, utilities, and the lighting design community to participate in the DOE SSL R&D Workshop on January 29-31, 2008. DOE SSL Program Manager James Brodrick kicked off the workshop by highlighting recent signs of the progress and pace of SSL advances: the New Year's Eve debut of the new Times Square Ball, lit with Philips Luxeon LEDs; the first DOE Gateway demonstration of Beta LED streetlights in Oakland, CA; and the LR6 downlight from LED Lighting Fixtures, Inc., Grand Prize Winner in the 2007 Lighting for Tomorrow competition.

  1. Improved device performance of InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells with GaP strain compensation layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    Improved device performance of InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells with GaP strain compensation Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico optical, electrical, and spectral response characteristics of three-stack InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar

  2. Lattice-Mismatched GaAs/InGaAs Two-Junction Solar Cells by Direct Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, K.; Aiken, D. J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Morral, A. F.; Atwater, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    Direct bonded interconnect between subcells of a lattice-mismatched III-V compound multijunction cell would enable dislocation-free active regions by confining the defect network needed for lattice mismatch accommodation to tunnel junction interfaces, while metamorphic growth inevitably results in less design flexibility and lower material quality than is desirable. The first direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs two-junction solar cell, is reported and demonstrates viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The tandem cell open-circuit voltage was approximately the sum of the subcell open-circuit voltages. This achievement shows direct bonding enables us to construct lattice-mismatched III-V multijunction solar cells and is extensible to an ultrahigh efficiency InGaP/GaAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs four-junction cell by bonding a GaAs-based lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs subcell and an InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsP/InGaAs subcell. The interfacial resistance experimentally obtained for bonded GaAs/InP smaller than 0.10 Ohm-cm{sup 2} would result in a negligible decrease in overall cell efficiency of {approx}0.02%, under 1-sun illumination.

  3. Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O'Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

  4. GaInNAs Structures Grown by MBE for High-Efficiency Solar Cells: Final Report; 25 June 1999--24 August 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, C. W.

    2003-08-01

    The focus of this work is to improve the quality of GaInNAs by advanced thin-film growth techniques, such as digital-alloy growth techniques and migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE). The other focus is to further investigate the properties of such materials, which are potentially beneficial for high-efficiency, multijunction solar cells. 400-nm-thick strain-compensated Ga0.92In0.08As/GaN0.03As0.97 short-period superlattices (SPSLs) are grown lattice-matched to GaAs substrates. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of digital alloys is 3 times higher than that of random alloys at room temperature, and the improvement is even greater at low temperature, by a factor of about 12. The room-temperature PL intensity of the GaInNAs quantum well grown by the strained InAs/GaN0.023As SPSL growth mode is higher by a factor 5 as compare to the continuous growth mode. The SPSL growth method allows for independent adjustment of the In-to-Ga ratio without group III competition. MEE reduces the low-energy tail of PL, and PL peaks become more intense and sharper. The twin peaks photoluminescence of GaNAs grown on GaAs was observed at room temperature. The peaks splitting increase with increase in nitrogen alloy content. The strain-induced splitting of light-hole and heavy-hole bands of tensile-strained GaNAs is proposed as an explanation of such behavior.

  5. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-06-02

    We grow Li codoped (Ga,Mn)As layers with nominal Mn composition up to 0.15 by molecular beam epitaxy. The layers before and after annealing are characterized by x-ray diffraction, transport, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The codoping with Li reduces the lattice constant and electrical resistivity of (Ga,Mn)As after annealing. We find that (Ga,Mn)As:Li takes similar Curie temperature to that of (Ga,Mn)As, but with pronounced magnetic moments and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, indicating that the Li codoping has nontrivial effects on the magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As.

  6. 56 IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 1, JANUARY 2012 Metamorphic GaAsP and InGaP Solar Cells on GaAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    solar cells are triple-junction concentrator devices, with each junction efficiently col- lecting subcell in a multijunction de- vice. GaAs0.66 P0.34 single-junction solar cells with Eg = 1.83 eV were56 IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 2, NO. 1, JANUARY 2012 Metamorphic GaAsP and InGaP Solar

  7. High-Efficiency Non-Polar GaN-Based LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Fini

    2010-11-30

    Inlustra Technologies with subcontractor U.C. Santa Barbara conducted a project with the principle goal of demonstrating high internal quantum efficiency blue (430 nm) and green (540nm) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on low-defect density non-polar GaN wafers. Inlustra pursued the fabrication of smooth thick a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as defect reduction techniques such as lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) to uniformly lower dislocation density in these films. Limited free-standing wafers were produced as well. By the end of the reporting period, Inlustra had met its milestone of dislocation reduction to < 5 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. Stacking faults were still present in appreciable density ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -1}), but were not the primary focus of defect reduction since there have been no published studies establishing their detrimental effects on LED performance. Inlustra's LEO progress built a solid foundation upon which further commercial development of GaN substrates will occur. UCSB encountered multiple delays in its LED growth and fabrication efforts due to unavoidable facilities outages imposed by ongoing construction in an area adjacent to the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) laboratory. This, combined with the large amount of ab initio optimization required for the MOCVD system used during the project, resulted in unsatisfactory LED progress. Although numerous blue-green photoluminescence results were obtained, only a few LED structures exhibited electroluminescence at appreciable levels. UCSB also conducting extensive modeling (led by Prof. Van de Walle) on the problem of non-radiative Auger recombination in GaN-based LED structures, which has been posited to contribute to LED efficiency 'droop' at elevated current density. Unlike previous modeling efforts, UCSB's approach was truly a first-principles ab initio methodology. Building on solid numerical foundations, the Auger recombination rates of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N alloys were calculated from first-principles density-functional and many-body-perturbation theory. The differing mechanisms of inter- and intra-band recombination were found to affect different parts of the emission spectrum. In the blue to green spectral region and at room temperature the Auger coefficient was calculated to be as large as 2 x 10{sup -30} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}; in the infrared it is even larger. These results indicated that Auger recombination may be responsible for the loss of quantum efficiency that affects InGaN-based light emitters, whether on non-polar or polar crystal planes.

  8. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N. J.; Koltai, R. N.; McGowan, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    The GATEWAY program followed two pedestrian-scale lighting projects that required multiple mockups – one at Stanford University in California and the other at Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. The report provides insight into pedestrian lighting criteria, how they differ from street and area lighting criteria, and how solid-state lighting can be better applied in pedestrian applications.

  9. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

    2008-02-12

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  10. Three-junction solar cells comprised of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs tandem cell mechanically stacked on a Si cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazawa, Y.; Tamura, K.; Watahiki, S.; Kitatani, T.; Ohtsuka, H.; Warabisako, T.

    1997-12-31

    Three-junction tandem solar cells were fabricated by mechanical stacking of a thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell and a Si cell. The epitaxial lift-off (ELO) technique was used for the thinning of GaInP/GaAs tandem cells. Both spectral responses of the GaInP top cell and the GaAs middle cell in the thin-film GaInP/GaAs monolithic tandem cell were conserved. The Si cell performance has been improved by reducing the absorption loss in the GaAs substrate.

  11. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions using trimethyl aluminium for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, B.; DeVita, M.; Turala, A.; Kolhatkar, G.; Boucherif, A.; Jaouad, A.; Aimez, V.; Arès, R.; Wilkins, M.; Wheeldon, J. F.; Walker, A. W.; Hinzer, K.; Fafard, S.

    2013-09-27

    AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions for use in high concentration multijunction solar cells were designed and grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) using trimethyl aluminium (TMA) as the p-dopant source for the AlGaAs active layer. Controlled hole concentration up to 4?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} was achieved through variation in growth parameters. Fabricated tunnel junctions have a peak tunneling current up to 6140 A/cm{sup 2}. These are suitable for high concentration use and outperform GaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions.

  12. 0.7-eV GaInAs Junction for a GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs(1eV)/GaInAs(0.7eV) Four-Junction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Geisz, J. F.; Norman, A. G.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction solar cells, focusing on adding a fourth junction to the Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5} P/GaAs/Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As inverted three-junction cell. This cell, grown inverted on GaAs so that the lattice-mismatched Ga{sub 0.75}In{sub 0.25}As third junction is the last one grown, has demonstrated 38% efficiency, and 40% is likely in the near future. To achieve still further gains, a lower-bandgap Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction could be added to the three-junction structure for a four-junction cell whose efficiency could exceed 45% under concentration. Here, we present the initial development of the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}As fourth junction. Junctions of various bandgaps ranging from 0.88 to 0.73 eV were grown, in order to study the effect of the different amounts of lattice mismatch. At a bandgap of 0.88 eV, junctions were obtained with very encouraging {approx}80% quantum efficiency, 57% fill factor, and 0.36 eV open-circuit voltage. The device performance degrades with decreasing bandgap (i.e., increasing lattice mismatch). We model the four-junction device efficiency vs. fourth junction bandgap to show that an 0.7-eV fourth-junction bandgap, while optimal if it could be achieved in practice, is not necessary; an 0.9-eV bandgap would still permit significant gains in multijunction cell efficiency while being easier to achieve than the lower-bandgap junction.

  13. Design for enhanced thermo-electric pumping in light emitting diodes Dodd J. Gray Jr., Parthiban Santhanam, and Rajeev J. Ram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Rajeev J.

    of EL cooling in an LED, the low light power ($70 pW or $1.1 Â 10À9 W mmÀ2 ) and elevated LED tem for optimization of thermo-electric pumping in light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use a finite element model for charge transport in a GaInAsSb/GaSb double hetero-junction LED that is verified experimentally

  14. Near-infrared electroluminescence and photo detection in InGaAs p-i-n microdisks grown by selective area growth on silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjellman, Jon Øyvind; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2014-06-16

    Microselective-area growth of p-i-n InGaAs disks on (111) silicon by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition is a promising technology for III/V-on-Si integration. As a proof-of-concept, room-temperature electroluminescence is reported from ensembles of p-i-n InGaAs-on-Si micro-disks. The observed spectrum shows peak luminescence at 1.78??m with a local maxima at 1.65??m. The disks are also shown to generate a measurable photo current when illuminated by infrared light with less energy than the silicon bandgap energy. This makes these InGaAs-on-Si disks a promising technology for monolithic integration of light sources and detectors with silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor electronics for optical communication, sensing, and imaging.

  15. Electron tunneling spectroscopy study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jie Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-11-25

    We investigate the energy levels of electron traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by the use of electron tunneling spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of a typical spectrum, obtained in a wide gate bias range and with both bias polarities, suggests the existence of electron traps both in the bulk of AlGaN and at the AlGaN/GaN interface. The energy levels of the electron traps have been determined to lie within a 0.5?eV band below the conduction band minimum of AlGaN, and there is strong evidence suggesting that these traps contribute to Frenkel-Poole conduction through the AlGaN barrier.

  16. A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green ({lambda}=524 nm) laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-05-30

    The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching with gallium. Emission above threshold is characterized by a peak at 524 nm (green) and linewidth of 0.7 nm. The lowest measured threshold current density is 1.2 kA/cm{sup 2} at 278 K. The slope and wall plug efficiencies are 0.74 W/A and {approx}1.1%, respectively, at 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2}. The value of T{sub 0}=233 K in the temperature range of 260-300 K.

  17. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN solar cells with nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, J.; Yang, C. C.; Athanasiou, M.; Wang, T.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well solar cells with nanostructures operating at a wavelength of 520?nm. Nanostructures with a periodic nanorod or nanohole array are fabricated by means of modified nanosphere lithography. Under 1 sun air-mass 1.5 global spectrum illumination, a fill factor of 50 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9?V are achieved in spite of very high indium content in InGaN alloys usually causing degradation of crystal quality. Both the nanorod array and the nanohole array significantly improve the performance of solar cells, while a larger enhancement is observed for the nanohole array, where the conversion efficiency is enhanced by 51%.

  18. Graphene in ohmic contact for both n-GaN and p-GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Shi, Lin; Xu, Gengzhao; Fan, Yingmin; Huang, Zengli [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Xu, Ke, E-mail: kxu2006@sinano.ac.cn [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Suzhou Nanowin Science and Technology Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-05-26

    The wrinkles of single layer graphene contacted with either n-GaN or p-GaN were found both forming ohmic contacts investigated by conductive atomic force microscopy. The local I–V results show that some of the graphene wrinkles act as high-conductive channels and exhibiting ohmic behaviors compared with the flat regions with Schottky characteristics. We have studied the effects of the graphene wrinkles using density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the standing and folded wrinkles with zigzag or armchair directions have a tendency to decrease or increase the local work function, respectively, pushing the local Fermi level towards n- or p-type GaN and thus improving the transport properties. These results can benefit recent topical researches and applications for graphene as electrode material integrated in various semiconductor devices.

  19. Evaluation of GaN substrates grown in supercritical basic ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Makoto; Yamada, Hisashi; Iso, Kenji; Sato, Hitoshi; Hirasawa, Hirohiko; Kamber, Derrick S.; Hashimoto, Tadao; Baars, Steven P. den; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2009-02-02

    GaN crystals grown by the basic ammonothermal method were investigated for their use as substrates for device regrowth. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the substrates contained multiple grains while secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) revealed a high concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, and sodium. Despite these drawbacks, the emission from the light emitting diode structures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on both the c-plane and m-plane epitaxial wafers was demonstrated. The SIMS depth profiles showed that the diffusion of the alkali metal from the substrate into the epitaxial film was small, especially in the m-direction.

  20. Order from Chaos: (alpha)-Fe(001) Growth on GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Morton, S A; Waddill, G D; Thompson, J D; Neal, J R; Shen, T H

    2008-02-08

    The growth of Fe upon GaAs(001) has been studied with Spin-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (SRPES), Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD) in PES. Despite evidence of atomic level disorder such as intermixing, an over-layer with the spectroscopic signature of {alpha}-Fe(001), with a bcc real space ordering, is obtained. The results will be discussed in light of the possibility of using such films as a spin polarized source in device applications.

  1. Movement of the boundary of a p-n junction in GaAs:Si under gyrotronic irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukach, G. A.; Kidalov, V. V.

    2011-12-15

    It is shown that, by using a gyratron, it is possible to control the position of a p-n junction in an already fabricated light-emitting structure. A shift of the compensated region in the emitting structure based on GaAs:Si is caused by the motion of impurities in the field of thermoelastic stresses appearing in the course of sample cooling after gyrotronic irradiation.

  2. Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell D. Dupuis

    2004-09-30

    We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers the first year of the three-year program ''Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications''. The first year activities were focused on the installation, set-up, and use of advanced equipment for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of III-nitride films and the characterization of these materials (Task 1) and the design, fabrication, testing of nitride LEDs (Task 4). As a progress highlight, we obtained improved quality of {approx} 2 {micro}m-thick GaN layers (as measured by the full width at half maximum of the asymmetric (102) X-ray diffraction peak of less than 350 arc-s) and higher p-GaN:Mg doping level (free hole carrier higher than 1E18 cm{sup -3}). Also in this year, we have developed the growth of InGaN/GaN active layers for long-wavelength green light emitting diodes, specifically, for emission at {lambda} {approx} 540nm. The effect of the Column III precursor (for Ga) and the post-growth thermal annealing effect were also studied. Our LED device fabrication process was developed and initially optimized, especially for low-resistance ohmic contacts for p-GaN:Mg layers, and blue-green light emitting diode structures were processed and characterized.

  3. Temperature dependency of the emission properties from positioned In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, T.; Schneider, C.; Maier, S.; Forchel, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Igusa, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-15

    In this letter we study the influence of temperature and excitation power on the emission linewidth from site-controlled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on nanoholes defined by electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching. We identify thermal electron activation as well as direct exciton loss as the dominant intensity quenching channels. Additionally, we carefully analyze the effects of optical and acoustic phonons as well as close-by defects on the emission linewidth by means of temperature and power dependent micro-photoluminescence on single quantum dots with large pitches.

  4. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Sofferman, D. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York 11530-0701 (United States); Beskin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-08-12

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport.

  5. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tips: Lighting Tips: Lighting Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Lighting choices save you money....

  6. Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal, Emily

    2012-05-31

    The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of lighting ordinances in preventing light pollution. Using an industry-accepted lighting...

  7. GaInP/GaAs dual junction solar cells on Ge/Si epitaxial templates Melissa J. Archer,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    GaInP/GaAs dual junction solar cells on Ge/Si epitaxial templates Melissa J. Archer,1,a Daniel C, crack-free GaInP/GaAs double junction solar cells were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition with the world record efficiency is a metamorphic triple junction GaInP/GaAs/Ge cell.6 Alternatively, wafer

  8. OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Perry

    OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting · Overview of Lighting in OpenGL In order for lighting to have an effect in OpenGL, two things are required: A light An object to be lit Lights can be set to any color determine how they reflect the light which hits them. The color(s) of an object is determined

  9. High-Efficiency GaInP/GaAs Tandem Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K. A.; Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Cramer, C.; Olson, J. M.

    1996-09-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved efficiencies between 25.7-30.2%, depending on illumination conditions. The efficiencies are the highest confirmed two-terminal values measured for any solar cell within each standard illumination category. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance.

  10. High-efficiency GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertness, K.A.; Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Kramer, C.; Olson, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells have achieved new record efficiencies, specifically 25.7% under air-mass 0 (AM0) illumination, 29.5% under AM 1.5 global (AM1.5G) illumination, and 30.2% at 140-180x concentration under AM 1.5 direct (AM1.5D) illumination. These values are the highest two-terminal efficiencies achieved by any solar cell under these illumination conditions. The monolithic, series-connected design of the tandem cells allows them to be substituted for silicon or gallium arsenide cells in photovoltaic panel systems with minimal design changes. The advantages of using GaInP/GaAs tandem solar cells in space and terrestrial applications are discussed primarily in terms of the reduction in balance-of-system costs that accrues when using a higher efficiency cell. The new efficiency values represent a significant improvement over previous efficiencies for this materials system, and we identify grid design, back interface passivation, and top interface passivation as the three key factors leading to this improvement. In producing the high-efficiency cells, we have addressed nondestructive diagnostics and materials growth reproducibility as well as peak cell performance. 31 refs.

  11. TJ Solar Cell (GaInP/GaAs/Ge Ultrahigh-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Daniel

    2002-04-17

    This talk will discuss recent developments in III-V multijunction photovoltaic technology which have led to the highest-efficiency solar cells ever demonstrated. The relationship between the materials science of III-V semiconductors and the achievement of record solar cell efficiencies will be emphasized. For instance, epitaxially-grown GAInP has been found to form a spontaneously-ordered GaP/InP (111) superlattice. This ordering affects the band gap of the material, which in turn affects the design of solar cells which incorporate GaInP. For the next generation of ultrahigh-efficiency III-V solar cells, we need a new semiconductor which is lattice-matched to GaAs, has a band gap of 1 eV, and has long minority-carrier diffusion lengths. Out of a number of candidate materials, the recently-discovered alloy GaInNAs appears to have the greatest promise. This material satisfies the first two criteria, but has to date shown very low diffusion lengths, a problem which is our current focus in the development of these next-generation cells.

  12. Multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells with Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelyanov, V. M. Kalyuzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Lantratov, V. M.

    2010-12-15

    Effect of subcell parameters on the efficiency of GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge tandem solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons at fluences of up to 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} has been theoretically studied. The optimal thicknesses of GaInP and GaInAs subcells, which provide the best photocurrent matching at various irradiation doses in solar cells with and without built-in Bragg reflectors, were determined. The dependences of the photoconverter efficiency on the fluence of 1-MeV electrons and on the time of residence in the geostationary orbit were calculated for structures optimized to the beginning and end of their service lives. It is shown that the optimization of the subcell heterostructures for a rated irradiation dose and the introduction of Bragg reflectors into the structure provide a 5% overall increase in efficiency for solar cells operating in the orbit compared with unoptimized cells having no Bragg reflector.

  13. Photon-enhanced thermionic emission from p-GaAs with nonequilibrium Cs overlayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuravlev, A. G.; Romanov, A. S.; Alperovich, V. L.

    2014-12-22

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE), which is promising for increasing the efficiency of solar energy conversion, is studied during cesium deposition on the As- and Ga-rich p-GaAs(001) surfaces and subsequent relaxation in the nonequilibrium Cs overlayer by means of photoemission quantum yield spectroscopy adapted for systems with time-variable parameters. Along with direct photoemission of “hot” electrons excited by light above the vacuum level, the spectra contain PETE contribution of “thermalized” electrons, which are excited below the vacuum level and emit in vacuum due to thermalization up in energy by phonon absorption. Comparing the measured and calculated spectra, the effective electron affinity and escape probabilities of hot and thermalized electrons are obtained as functions of submonolayer Cs coverage. The minima in the affinity and pronounced peaks in the escape probabilities are observed for Cs deposition on both the As- and Ga-rich surfaces. Possible reasons for the low mean values of the electron escape probabilities and for the observed enhancement of the probabilities at certain Cs coverages are discussed, along with the implications for the PETE device realization.

  14. CONNECTED LIGHTING SYSTEMS MEETING

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    There is a lot of buzz today about the Internet of Things and the convergence of intelligent controllable light sources, communication networks, sensors, and data exchange in future lighting...

  15. Fast Light, Fast Neutrinos?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Cahill

    2011-10-10

    In certain media, light has been observed with group velocities faster than the speed of light. The recent OPERA report of superluminal 17 GeV neutrinos may describe a similar phenomenon.

  16. Kyler Nelson Light Timer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    designated by the user, the Arduino board will dim the light to save energy. The user designates the time instance, the light is dimmed using pulse width modulation (PWM) in the Arduino's pin number 11

  17. Automatic lighting controls demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Lighting and Daylight Harvesting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bos, J.

    2011-01-01

    in 1992 to serve the lighting design needs of the architectural and interior design communities. With over fifty years of combined experience, our areas of expertise range from architectural and theatrical lighting to custom fixture design. Bos... Lighting Design We are active members of the International Association of Lighting Designers, the American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society, International Dark Skies Association and the United States Green Building Council...

  19. LED Lighting Retrofit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw-Meadow, N.

    2011-01-01

    kWh is the one that never gets used? ?Dedicated to making environmentally responsible products? Ringdale Introduction LED Roadway Lighting Better Light, Fewer Watts. Period. Nathan Shaw-Meadow LED Lighting Specialist Ringdale ActiveLED ESL.../exponential efficiency growth often deters investment today 7 Challenges to Implementation ESL-KT-11-11-57 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 ? Municipal Street Light Case Study 8 ? Replaced 400W High Pressure Sodium fixtures with 52W Active...

  20. Fano Resonance in GaAs 2D Photonic Crystal Nanocavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, P. T.; Guimaraes, P.S. S.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Szymanski, D.; Whittaker, D. M.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Vasco, J. P.; Vinck-Posada, H.

    2011-12-23

    We report the results of polarization resolved reflectivity experiments in GaAs air-bridge photonic crystals with L3 cavities. We show that the fundamental L3 cavity mode changes, in a controlled way, from a Lorentzian symmetrical lineshape to an asymmetrical form when the linear polarization of the incident light is rotated in the plane of the crystal. The different lineshapes are well fitted by the Fano asymmetric equation, implying that a Fano resonance is present in the reflectivity. We use the scattering matrix method to model the Fano interference between a localized discrete state (the cavity fundamental mode) and a background of continuum states (the light reflected from the crystal slab in the vicinity of the cavity) with very good agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Light emitting device comprising phosphorescent materials for white light generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2014-07-22

    The present invention relates to phosphors for energy downconversion of high energy light to generate a broadband light spectrum, which emit light of different emission wavelengths.

  2. And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.... Lighting Up Operations with Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology And the Oscar for Sustainable Mobile Lighting Goes to.......

  3. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19?}m{sup ?2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  4. Deep level defects in n-type GaAsBi and GaAs grown at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mooney, P. M.; Watkins, K. P.; Jiang, Zenan; Basile, A. F.; Lewis, R. B.; Bahrami-Yekta, V.; Masnadi-Shirazi, M.; Beaton, D. A.; Tiedje, T.

    2013-04-07

    Deep level defects in n-type GaAs{sub 1-x}Bi{sub x} having 0 < x < 0.012 and GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at substrate temperatures between 300 and 400 Degree-Sign C have been investigated by Deep Level Capacitance Spectroscopy. Incorporating Bi suppresses the formation of an electron trap with activation energy 0.40 eV, thus reducing the total trap concentration in dilute GaAsBi layers by more than a factor of 20 compared to GaAs grown under the same conditions. We find that the dominant traps in dilute GaAsBi layers are defect complexes involving As{sub Ga}, as expected for MBE growth at these temperatures.

  5. Deep level centers and their role in photoconductivity transients of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratenko, S. V. Vakulenko, O. V.; Mazur, Yu. I. Dorogan, V. G.; Marega, E.; Benamara, M.; Ware, M. E.; Salamo, G. J.

    2014-11-21

    The in-plane photoconductivity and photoluminescence are investigated in quantum dot-chain InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures. Different photoconductivity transients resulting from spectrally selecting photoexcitation of InGaAs QDs, GaAs spacers, or EL2 centers were observed. Persistent photoconductivity was observed at 80?K after excitation of electron-hole pairs due to interband transitions in both the InGaAs QDs and the GaAs matrix. Giant optically induced quenching of in-plane conductivity driven by recharging of EL2 centers is observed in the spectral range from 0.83?eV to 1.0?eV. Conductivity loss under photoexcitation is discussed in terms of carrier localization by analogy with carrier distribution in disordered media.

  6. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  7. Enhancement of current collection in epitaxial lift-off InAs/GaAs quantum dot thin film solar cell and concentrated photovoltaic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sogabe, Tomah Shoji, Yasushi; Tamayo, Efrain; Okada, Yoshitaka; Mulder, Peter; Schermer, John

    2014-09-15

    We report the fabrication of a thin film InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cell (QD cell) by applying epitaxial lift-off (ELO) approach to the GaAs substrate. We confirmed significant current collection enhancement (?0.91?mA/cm{sup 2}) in the ELO-InAs QD cell within the wavelength range of 700?nm–900?nm when compared to the ELO-GaAs control cell. This is almost six times of the sub-GaAs bandgap current collection (?0.16?mA/cm{sup 2}) from the wavelength range of 900?nm and beyond, we also confirmed the ELO induced resonance cavity effect was able to increase the solar cell efficiency by increasing both the short circuit current and open voltage. The electric field intensity of the resonance cavity formed in the ELO film between the Au back reflector and the GaAs front contact layer was analyzed in detail by finite-differential time-domain (FDTD) simulation. We found that the calculated current collection enhancement within the wavelength range of 700?nm–900?nm was strongly influenced by the size and shape of InAs QD. In addition, we performed concentrated light photovoltaic study and analyzed the effect of intermediate states on the open voltage under varied concentrated light intensity for the ELO-InAs QD cell.

  8. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The cycled'' organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  9. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Lighting Design Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of...

  10. Ultra-thin GaAs single-junction solar cells integrated with a reflective back scattering layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Weiquan; Becker, Jacob; Liu, Shi; Kuo, Ying-Shen; Li, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Yong-Hang; Landini, Barbara; Campman, Ken

    2014-05-28

    This paper reports the proposal, design, and demonstration of ultra-thin GaAs single-junction solar cells integrated with a reflective back scattering layer to optimize light management and minimize non-radiative recombination. According to our recently developed semi-analytical model, this design offers one of the highest potential achievable efficiencies for GaAs solar cells possessing typical non-radiative recombination rates found among commercially available III-V arsenide and phosphide materials. The structure of the demonstrated solar cells consists of an In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P/GaAs/In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P double-heterostructure PN junction with an ultra-thin 300?nm thick GaAs absorber, combined with a 5??m thick Al{sub 0.52}In{sub 0.48}P layer with a textured as-grown surface coated with Au used as a reflective back scattering layer. The final devices were fabricated using a substrate-removal and flip-chip bonding process. Solar cells with a top metal contact coverage of 9.7%, and a MgF{sub 2}/ZnS anti-reflective coating demonstrated open-circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) up to 1.00?V, short-circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) up to 24.5?mA/cm{sup 2}, and power conversion efficiencies up to 19.1%; demonstrating the feasibility of this design approach. If a commonly used 2% metal grid coverage is assumed, the anticipated J{sub sc} and conversion efficiency of these devices are expected to reach 26.6?mA/cm{sup 2} and 20.7%, respectively.

  11. DC characteristics of OMVPE-grown N-p-n InGaP/InGaAsN DHBTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, N.Y.; Chang, P.C.; Baca, A.G.; Xie, X.M.; Sharps, P.R.; Hou, H.Q.

    2000-01-04

    The authors demonstrate, for the first time, a functional N-p-n heterojunction bipolar transistor using a novel material, InGaAsN, with a bandgap energy of 1.2eV as the p-type base layer. A 300{angstrom}-thick In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As graded layer was introduced to reduce the conduction band offset at the p-type InGaAsN base and n-type GaAs collector junction. For an emitter size of 500 {mu}m{sup 2}, a peak current gain of 5.3 has been achieved.

  12. The Effect of the Thermal Boundary Resistance on Self-Heating of AlGaN/GaN HFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sound velocity in GaN. The cut off wave vector is given by where NA is the Avogadro number, is the mass

  13. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killat, N., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paskova, T. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States) [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Evans, K. R. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States)] [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Leach, J. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States) [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  14. Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand-blasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand@ust.hk Abstract: Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by scattering the light is one of the effective methods for large-area lighting applications. In this paper, we present a very simple and cost

  15. Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Induction lighting is one of the best kept secrets in energy-efficient lighting. Simply stated, induction lighting is essentially a fluorescent light without electrodes or filaments, the items that...

  16. Light and heavy ion effects on damage clustering in GaAs quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    of Technology, P.O. Box 692, 33101 Tampere, Finland c Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University-00014, University of Helsinki, Finland b Institute of Materials Chemistry, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, 33101 Tampere, Finland Available online 10 January 2007 Abstract Recent experiments

  17. Lighting the Night: Technology, Urban Life and the Evolution of Street Lighting [Light in Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Alfred

    1992-01-01

    Electrical 16. "Highway Lighting by So­ dium Vapor Lamps,"Possibilities of Street: Lighting Improve­ ments," TheLaunches Broad Street Lighting Promotion Campaign," The

  18. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi

    2012-06-15

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  19. ECE 466: LED Lighting Systems -Incandescent lightings rise and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    ECE 466: LED Lighting Systems - Incandescent lightings rise and demise via government policy - Alternative Fluorescent light sources and compact fluorescent lights (CFL) to incandescents - Alternative LED light sources - Color index as well as Watts to Lumens efficiency available from all three light sources

  20. Lighting and Surfaces 11.1 Introduction to Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, John P.

    Chapter 11 Lighting and Surfaces 11.1 Introduction to Lighting Three-dimensional surfaces can react to light, and how computer graphics simulates this. There are three species of light (or "illumination models"): 1. Intrinsic (self-emitting) 2. Ambient light (sometimes called "diffuse light") 3

  1. Istanbul,Turkey & Atlanta, GA Istanbul,Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    Istanbul,Turkey & Atlanta, GA Istanbul,Turkey & Atlanta, GA 2012 Media, Journalism and Business for departure to Istanbul,Turkey Day 9 Depart for Istanbul; guided cultural visit upon arrival; group dinner Day business leaders; site visits to local universities Day 18 UPS and the value of logistics inTurkey Day 19

  2. Photoeffects in WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Cho, Y.S.; Kang, D.H.

    1996-12-01

    Photoeffects of a {ital p}-type GaAs coated with WO{sub 3} thin film have been investigated as a function of film thickness and photoresponse transients of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were studied. Also, these results were compared to those for a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. The photocurrent of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode depended on the film thickness of the WO{sub 3}, showing an optimum photon efficiency for specimens of 800 A thickness. This is due to the existence of an effective interface state within the band gap which reduces trapping of carriers and facilitates carrier movement. For an 800-A-thick WO{sub 3} thin film deposited {ital p}-GaAs photoelectrode, the photogenerated electrons were found to move to an electrolyte at a higher positive onset potential compared with that of single {ital p}-type GaAs, which was confirmed as a result of transient behavior. {ital I}{endash}{ital V} and {ital C}{endash}{ital V} characteristics of the WO{sub 3}/GaAs electrode were also compared with those of a single {ital p}-type GaAs electrode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Localization-delocalization transition of electrons at the percolation threshold of semiconductor GaAs1–xNx alloys: The appearance of a mobility edge

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Beaton, D. A.; Ptak, A. J.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2012-07-09

    Electrons in semiconductor alloys have generally been described in terms of Bloch states that evolve from constructive interference of electron waves scattering from perfectly periodic potentials, despite the loss of structural periodicity that occurs on alloying. Using the semiconductor alloy GaAs??xNx as a prototype, we demonstrate a localized to delocalized transition of the electronic states at a percolation threshold, the emergence of a mobility edge, and the onset of an abrupt perturbation to the host GaAs electronic structure, shedding light on the evolution of electronic structure in these abnormal alloys.

  4. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-?m transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2?ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75?kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  5. Large linear magnetoresistance in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamir, Mohammed Ali, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Goswami, Srijit, E-mail: aamir@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Ghosh, Arindam [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Baenninger, Matthias; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Tripathi, Vikram [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Pepper, Michael [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University College, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04

    We report non-saturating linear magnetoresistance (MR) in a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterointerface in the strongly insulating regime. We achieve this by driving the gate voltage below the pinch-off point of the device and operating it in the non-equilibrium regime with high source-drain bias. Remarkably, the magnitude of MR is as large as 500% per Tesla with respect to resistance at zero magnetic field, thus dwarfing most non-magnetic materials which exhibit this linearity. Its primary advantage over most other materials is that both linearity and the enormous magnitude are retained over a broad temperature range (0.3 K to 10 K), thus making it an attractive candidate for cryogenic sensor applications.

  6. Growth of GaN@InGaN Core-Shell and Au-GaN Hybrid Nanostructures for Energy Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuykendall, Tevye; Aloni, Shaul; Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Mokari, Taleb

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated a method to control the bandgap energy of GaN nanowires by forming GaN@InGaN core-shell hybrid structures using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Furthermore, we show the growth of Au nanoparticles on the surface of GaN nanowires in solution at room temperature. The work shown here is a first step toward engineering properties that are crucial for the rational design and synthesis of a new class of photocatalytic materials. The hybrid structures were characterized by various techniques, including photoluminescence (PL), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD).

  7. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shyh-Jer, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Su, Yan-Kuin, E-mail: yksu@mail.ncku.edu.tw, E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Institute of Microelectronics and Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, Kun-Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kang L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL.

  8. Sandia Energy - Light Creation Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Creation Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Light Creation Materials Light Creation MaterialsAlyssa Christy2015-03-26T16:28:52+00...

  9. Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Summaries ELEMENT 2: ADVANCE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT 2.1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED light emitting diodes (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp

  10. Electrical spin injection into InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells: A comparison between MgO tunnel barriers grown by sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barate, P.; Zhang, T. T.; Vidal, M.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Amand, T. [Université de Toulouse, INSA-CNRS-UPS, LPCNO, 135 avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); Liang, S.; Devaux, X.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Lu, Y., E-mail: yuan.lu@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Frougier, J.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J. M. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 1 avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Xu, B.; Wang, Z. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Y. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, UPMC, CNRS UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Tao, B. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, X. F. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-07

    An efficient electrical spin injection into an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode is demonstrated thanks to a CoFeB/MgO spin injector. The textured MgO tunnel barrier is fabricated by two different techniques: sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy. The maximal spin injection efficiency is comparable for both methods. Additionally, the effect of annealing is also investigated for the two types of samples. Both samples show the same trend: an increase of the electroluminescence circular polarization (P{sub c}) with the increase of annealing temperature, followed by a saturation of P{sub c} beyond 350?°C annealing. Since the increase of P{sub c} starts well below the crystallization temperature of the full CoFeB bulk layer, this trend could be mainly due to an improvement of chemical structure at the top CoFeB/MgO interface. This study reveals that the control of CoFeB/MgO interface is essential for an optimal spin injection into semiconductor.

  11. Elastic properties of Pu metal and Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E; Suzuki, Y; Migliori, A

    2010-01-05

    We present elastic properties, theoretical and experimental, of Pu metal and Pu-Ga ({delta}) alloys together with ab initio equilibrium equation-of-state for these systems. For the theoretical treatment we employ density-functional theory in conjunction with spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization for the metal and coherent-potential approximation for the alloys. Pu and Pu-Ga alloys are also investigated experimentally using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. We show that orbital correlations become more important proceeding from {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} plutonium, thus suggesting increasing f-electron correlation (localization). For the {delta}-Pu-Ga alloys we find a softening with larger Ga content, i.e., atomic volume, bulk modulus, and elastic constants, suggest a weakened chemical bonding with addition of Ga. Our measurements confirm qualitatively the theory but uncertainties remain when comparing the model with experiments.

  12. Transport properties of InGaAs/GaAs Heterostructures with {delta}-doped quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baidus, N. V.; Vainberg, V. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Pylypchuk, A. S. Poroshin, V. N.; Sarbey, O. G.

    2012-05-15

    The lateral transport of electrons in single- and double-well pseudomorphic GaAs/n-InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with quantum wells 50-100 meV deep and impurity {delta}-layers in the wells, with concentrations in the range 10{sup 11} < N{sub s} < 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, has been investigated. Single-well structures with a doped well at the center exhibit a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient and an increase in low-temperature electron mobility with an increase in the impurity concentration. The results obtained indicate that the impurity-band electron states play an important role in the conductivity of these structures. Involvement of the impurity band also allows to explain adequately the characteristics of the conductivity of double-well structures; in contrast to single-well structures, band bending caused by asymmetric doping is of great importance. The numerical calculations of conductivity within the model under consideration confirm these suggestions.

  13. Investigation of the effect of temperature during off-state degradation of AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , creating both electron traps and increasing electron tunneling through the defect states [4Investigation of the effect of temperature during off-state degradation of AlGaN/GaN High Electron 2011 a b s t r a c t AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors were found to exhibit a negative

  14. Mesoscopic photovoltaic effect in GaAs/Ga1-xAlxAs Aharonov-Bohm rings L. Angers, A. Chepelianskii, R. Deblock, B. Reulet, and H. Bouchiat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Mesoscopic photovoltaic effect in GaAs/Ga1-xAlxAs Aharonov-Bohm rings L. Angers, A. Chepelianskii specific dc voltage. We have investigated this photovoltaic PV effect on GaAs/Ga1-xAlxAs Aharonov is generally done by measuring the dc induced signal sometimes called photovoltaic effect which has also given

  15. Determination of two-dimensional electron and hole gas carriers in AlGaN/GaN/AlN heterostructures grown by Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    between GaN and a sapphire substrate, the dislocation scattering mechanism and the electron spillover

  16. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  18. Atomistic description of the electronic structure of InxGa1xAs alloys and InAsGaAs superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Paul

    quantum-wells15,20 (InxGa1 xAs)n /InP on InP and (InxGa1 xAs)n /GaAs on GaAs, and v GaAs-embedded InAs quantum dots.21­23 We wish to provide a uniform the- oretical description of the electronic structure-period dependence of the band offsets and interband transitions of InAs/GaAs systems on InP and GaAs substrates. DOI

  19. Low-frequency noise in GaNAlGaN heterostructure field-effect transistors at cryogenic temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Nezih

    that the 1/f noise in GaN/AlGaN HFETs might be caused by electron tunneling from the channel to the traps was practically independent of the frequency of analysis. The model linking this maximum to the electron tunneling Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering and Center for Integrated Electronics

  20. Development of GaAs/Si and GaAs/Si monolithic structures for future space solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitzer, M.B.; Vernon, S.M.; Wolfson, R.G.; Tobin, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs and GaAlAs directly on Si are presented, and applications to new cell structures are suggested. The novel feature is the elimination of a Ge lattice transition region. This feature not only reduces the cost of substrate preparation, but also makes possible the fabrication of high efficiency monolithic cascade structures. All films to be discussed were grown by organometallic chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. This process yielded reproducible, large-area films of GaAs, grown directly on Si, that are tightly adherent and smooth, and are characterized by a defect density of 5 x 10(6) power/sq cm. Preliminary studies indicate that GaAlAs can also be grown in this way. A number of promising applications are suggested. Certainly these substrates are ideal for low-weight GaAs space solar ells. For very high efficiency, the absence of Ge makes the technology attractive for GaAlAs/Si monolithic cascades, in which the Si substrates would first be provided with a suitable p/n junction. An evaluation of a three bandgap cascade consisting of appropriately designed GaAlAs/GaAs/Si layers is also presented.

  1. GaAs-based self-aligned laser incorporating InGaP opto-electronic confinement layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be well suited for exploitation of long wavelength quantum dot and dilute nitride technology, resulting in single lateral mode emission from an In0.17Ga0.83As double quantum well laser. Introduction: Lasers based on the GaAs materials system offer advan- tages over their InP counterparts, such as the use

  2. Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated Antenna Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    Output Harmonic Termination Techniques for AlGaN/GaN HEMT Power Amplifiers Using Active Integrated 1200, Los Angeles, CA 90045 Abstract -- In this paper, effects of output harmonic terminations on PAE termination, we observe a substantial increase in PAE and output power. Further, we demonstrate the high

  3. SnO2 functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor for hydrogen sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    for spacecraft and other long-term sensing applications. However, hydrogen is a dangerous gas for storage for monitoring leakage of hydrogen storage equipment and fuel tanks for spacecraft and hydrogen fuel cellSnO2 functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor for hydrogen sensing applications

  4. Mn-doped Ga(As,P) and (Al,Ga)As ferromagnetic semiconductors: Electronic structure calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masek, J.; Kudrnovsky, J.; Maca, F.; Sinova, Jairo; MacDonald, A. H.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, T.

    2007-01-01

    A remarkable progress towards functional ferromagnetic semiconductor materials for spintronics has been achieved in p-type (Ga,Mn)As. Robust hole-mediated ferromagnetism has, however, been observed also in other III-V hosts such as antimonides, Ga...

  5. DESIGN, GROWTH, FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH-BAND GAP InGaN/GaN SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honsberg, Christiana

    photovoltaic efficiency of 39% at 236 suns is achieved by a triple-junction GaInP- GaInAs-Ge tandem solar cell [1]. While the achievable efficiency of triple-junction tandem solar cells is restricted to about 40% [2], modeling results show that a tandem solar cell of five junctions or greater, or an equivalent

  6. Faster Than Light?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Geroch

    2010-05-10

    It is argued that special relativity remains a viable physical theory even when there is permitted signals traveling faster than light.

  7. Comparing Light Bulbs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this exercise, students will use a light to demonstrate the difference between being energy-efficient and energy-wasteful, and learn what energy efficiency means.

  8. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illuminance Assignments for CBECS Building Activity Categories Illuminance ranges were adopted from the 1987 Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) Lighting Handbook. The IES...

  9. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from the engineering literature, based on CBECS building activity.) 4. Efficacy: an energy efficiency measure. Technically, the amount of light produced per unit of energy...

  10. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (CEC), March 1990. Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines (ALTAG), Building and Appliance Efficiency Office. 3. Dubin, F.S., Mindell, H.L., and Bloome, S., 1976....

  11. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    energy are presented in this section. Statistics are presented by subgroups based on building characteristics, and by subgroups based on lighting equipment. The three sets of...

  12. Plasmonic light trapping in thin-film Si solar cells This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    devices, semiconductors containing scarce elements such as CdTe and CuInGaSe2 have entered the marketPlasmonic light trapping in thin-film Si solar cells This article has been downloaded from Plasmonic light trapping in thin-film Si solar cells P Spinelli1 , V E Ferry2 , J van de Groep1 , M van Lare

  13. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmund G. Brown Jr. Governor LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: SMART LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE LIGHTING's Future: Smart LightEmitting Diode Lighting in Residential Fans. California Energy Commission, PIER

  14. Progress toward technology transition of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, D.N.; Marvin, D.C.; Brinker, D.J.; Curtis, H.B.; Price, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of the joint WL/PL/NASA Multijunction Solar Cell Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program is to scale up high efficiency GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge multijunction solar cells to production size, quantity, and yield while limiting the production cost/Watt ($/W) to 15% over GaAs cells. Progress made by the program contractors, Spectrolab and TECSTAR, include, respectively, best cell efficiencies of 25.76% and 24.7% and establishment of 24.2% and 23.8% lot average efficiency baseline designs. The paper also presents side-by-side testing results collected by Phillips Laboratory and NASA Lewis on Phase 1 deliverable cells, which shows compliance with program objectives. Cell performance, pre- and post-radiation, and temperature coefficient results on initial production GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge solar cells will be presented.

  15. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  16. Light intensity compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  17. Temperature-induced martensite in magnetic shape memory Fe{sub 2}MnGa observed by photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Catherine; Scholl, Andreas; Kainuma, R.; Elmers, Hans-Joachim; Omori, Toshihiro

    2012-01-18

    The magnetic domain structure in single crystals of a Heusler shape memory compound near the composition Fe{sub 2}MnGa was observed during phase transition by photoelectron emission microscopy at Beamline 11.0.1.1 of the Advanced Light Source. The behavior is comparable with recent observations of an adaptive martensite phase in prototype Ni{sub 2}MnGa, although the pinning in the recent work is an epitaxial interface and in this work the e#11;ective pinning plane is a boundary between martensitic variants that transform in a self-accommodating way from the single crystal austenite phase present at high temperatures. Temperature dependent observations of the twinning structure give information as to the coupling behavior between the magnetism and the structural evolution.

  18. Ferromagnetism in undoped One-dimensional GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeganathan, K. E-mail: jagan@physics.bdu.ac.in; Purushothaman, V.; Debnath, R.; Arumugam, S.

    2014-05-15

    We report an intrinsic ferromagnetism in vertical aligned GaN nanowires (NW) fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy without any external catalyst. The magnetization saturates at ?0.75 × emu/gm with the applied field of 3000 Oe for the NWs grown under the low-Gallium flux of 2.4 × 10{sup ?8} mbar. Despite a drop in saturation magnetization, narrow hysteresis loop remains intact regardless of Gallium flux. Magnetization in vertical standing GaN NWs is consistent with the spectral analysis of low-temperature photoluminescence pertaining to Ga-vacancies associated structural defects at the nanoscale.

  19. Characterization of Zns-GaP Naon-composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, V.

    1993-12-09

    It proved possible to produce consistent, high-quality nanocrystalline ZnS powders with grain sizes as small as 8 nm. These powders are nano-porous and are readily impregnated with GaP precursor, although inconsistently. Both crystal structure and small grain size of the ZnS can be maintained through the use of GaP. Heat treatment of the impregnated powders results in a ZnS-GaP composite structure where the grain sizes of the phases are on the order of 10--20 nm. Conventional powder processing should be able to produce optically dense ceramic compacts with improved mechanical properties and suitable IR transmission.

  20. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Reflectance Model how objects reflect light. Model light sources Algorithms for computing Shading: computing intensities within polygons Determine what light strikes what

  1. VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS Andrea Basso method to improve the lighting conditions of a real scene or video sequence. In particular we concentrate on modifying real light sources intensities and inserting virtual lights into a real scene viewed from a fixed

  2. LightBox -Exploring Interaction Modalities with Colored Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of light to very subtle animations, transitions and dimmed lighting effects. Implementation LightBox is housed in an aluminum suitcase measuring 48x38x25cm. The lid of the suitcase contains a panel of 12x12 Design. Figure 1. An animated lighting sequence visualized on the hi-power LEDs of LightBox #12

  3. Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavehrad, Mohsen

    Indoor positioning algorithm using light- emitting diode visible light communications Zhou Zhou of Use: http://spiedl.org/terms #12;Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light. This paper proposes a novel indoor positioning algorithm using visible light communications (VLC

  4. New red phosphor for near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with high color-purity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhengliang; He, Pei; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Jishou; Gong, Menglian

    2010-02-15

    New red phosphors, Na{sub 5}Eu(MoO{sub 4}){sub 4} doped with boron oxide were prepared by the solid-state reaction. Their structure and photo-luminescent properties were investigated. With the introduction of boron oxide, the red emission intensity of the phosphors under 395 nm excitation is strengthened, with high color-purity (x = 0.673, y = 0.327). The single red light-emitting diode was obtained by combining InGaN chip with the red phosphor, bright red light can be observed by naked eyes from the red light-emitting diodes under a forward bias of 20 mA.

  5. Indium distribution at the interfaces of (Ga,In)(N,As)/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luna, E.; Ishikawa, F.; Batista, P. D.; Trampert, A. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-04-07

    The indium distribution across (Ga,In)(N,As) quantum wells is determined by using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Inside the quantum well, the indium distribution is well described by Muraki's segregation model; however, it fails in reflecting the concentration at the interfaces. To describe them, we propose a sigmoidal law which defines the smooth variation of the indium concentration with the position and provides a systematic and quantitative characterization of the interfaces. The thermal stability of the interfaces and their interplay with segregation effects are discussed. A connection between the high thermal robustness of the interfaces and the inherent thermodynamic miscibility gap of the alloy is suggested.

  6. Local Structures and Interface Morphology of InGaAsN Thin Films Grown on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allerman, A.A.; Chen, J.G.; Geisz, J.F.; Huang, S.; Hulbert, S.L.; Jones, E.D.; Kao, Y.H.; Kurtz, S.; Kurtz, S.R.; Olson, J.M.; Soo, Y.L.

    1999-02-23

    The compound semiconductor system InGaAsN exhibits many intriguing properties which are particularly useful for the development of innovative high efficiency thin film solar cells and long wavelength lasers. The bandgap in these semiconductors can be varied by controlling the content of N and In and the thin films can yet be lattice-matched to GaAs. In the present work, x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) techniques have been employed to probe the local environment surrounding both N and In atoms as well as the interface morphology of InGaAsN thin films epitaxially grown on GaAs. The soft x-ray XAFS results around nitrogen K-edge reveal that N is in the sp{sup 3} hybridized bonding configuration in InGaAsN and GaAsN, suggesting that N impurities most likely substitute for As sites in these two compounds. The results of In K-edge XAFS suggest a possible trend of a slightly larger coordination number of As nearest neighbors around In atoms in InGaAsN samples with a narrower bandgap whereas the In-As interatomic distance remains practically the same as in InAs within the experimental uncertainties. These results combined suggest that N-substitution of the As sites plays an important role of bandgap-narrowing while in the meantime counteracting the compressive strain caused by In-doping. Grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS) experiments verify that InGaAsN thin films can indeed form very smooth interfaces with GaAs yielding an average interfacial roughness of 5-20{angstrom}.

  7. Structural and optical properties of GaAs-based heterostructures with Ge and Ge/InGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dubinov, A. A., E-mail: sanya@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Drozdov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Zvonkov, B. N. [Nizhni Novgorod State University, Research Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, K. E.; Tonkikh, A. A.; Yablonskiy, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Werner, P. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    GaAs-based heterostructures with Ge and Ge/InGaAs quantum wells are grown by laser-assisted sputtering. Structural and optical studies of the heterostructures are carried out. A broad photoluminescence line is observed in the wavelength range from 1300 to 1650 nm. The line corresponds to indirect transitions in the momentum space of the Ge quantum wells and to transitions between the In{sub 0.28}Ga{sub 0.72}As and Ge layers, indirect in coordinate space, but direct in momentum space.

  8. High-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well laser with enhanced broad spectrum of stimulated emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huolei; Yu, Hongyan; Zhou, Xuliang; Kan, Qiang; Yuan, Lijun; Wang, Wei; Pan, Jiaoqing, E-mail: jqpan@semi.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Weixi [State Key Lab for Mesoscopic Physics and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ding, Ying, E-mail: Ying.Ding@glasgow.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    We report the demonstration of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) broadband stimulated emission laser with a structure that integrated a GaAs tunnel junction with two QW active regions. The laser exhibits ultrabroad lasing spectral coverage of ?51?nm at a center wavelength of 1060?nm with a total emission power of 790 mW, corresponding to a high average spectral power density of 15.5 mW/nm, under pulsed current conditions. Compared to traditional lasers, this laser with an asymmetric separate-confinement heterostructure shows broader lasing bandwidth and higher spectral power density.

  9. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell spherical quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emre Kavruk, Ahmet E-mail: aekavruk@gmail.com; Koc, Fatih; Sahin, Mehmet E-mail: mehsahin@gmail.com

    2013-11-14

    In this work, the optical properties of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/GaAs/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}As multi-shell quantum dot heterostructure have been studied as a function of Al doping concentrations for cases with and without a hydrogenic donor atom. It has been observed that the absorption coefficient strength and/or resonant absorption wavelength can be adjusted by changing the Al content of inner-barrier and/or outer-barrier regions. Besides, it has been shown that the donor atom has an important effect on the control of the electronic and optical properties of the structure. The results have been presented as a function of the Al contents of the inner-barrier x and outer-barrier y regions and probable physical reasons have been discussed.

  10. Electrical degradation mechanisms of RF power GaAs PHEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villanueva, Anita A. (Anita Ariel), 1978-

    2007-01-01

    GaAs Pseudomorphic High-Electron Mobility Transistors (PHEMTs) are widely used in RF power applications. Since these devices typically operate at high power levels and under high voltage biasing, their electrical reliability ...

  11. Evaporation-based Ge/.sup.68 Ga Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, Saed (Albuquerque, NM); Whipple, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Grant, Patrick M. (Los Alamos, NM); O'Brien, Jr., Harold A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    Micro concentrations of .sup.68 Ga in secular equilibrium with .sup.68 Ge in strong aqueous HCl solution may readily be separated in ionic form from the .sup.68 Ge for biomedical use by evaporating the solution to dryness and then leaching the .sup.68 Ga from the container walls with dilute aqueous solutions of HCl or NaCl. The chloro-germanide produced during the evaporation may be quantitatively recovered to be used again as a source of .sup.68 Ga. If the solution is distilled to remove any oxidizing agents which may be present as impurities, the separation factor may easily exceed 10.sup.5. The separation is easily completed and the .sup.68 Ga made available in ionic form in 30 minutes or less.

  12. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  13. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  14. Lakeview Light and Power- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lakeview Light and Power offers a commercial lighting rebate program. Rebates apply to the installation of energy efficient lighting retrofits in non-residential buildings. The rebate program is...

  15. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-11-01

    A U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Gateway Report on a Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting in Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon.

  16. Low temperature carrier redistribution dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badcock, T. J., E-mail: Thomas.badcock@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Dawson, P.; Davies, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oehler, F.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-21

    We have studied the carrier recombination dynamics in an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure as a function of emission energy and excitation density between temperatures of 10?K and 100?K. Under relatively low levels of excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and decay time of emission on the high energy side of the luminescence spectrum decrease strongly between 10?K and 50?K. In contrast, for emission detected on the low energy side of the spectrum, the PL intensity and decay time increase over the same temperature range. These results are consistent with a thermally activated carrier redistribution process in which the (temperature dependent) average timescale for carrier transfer into or out of a localised state depends on the energy of the given state. Thus, the transfer time out of shallow, weakly localised states is considerably shorter than the arrival time into more deeply localised states. This picture is consistent with carriers hopping between localisation sites in an uncorrelated disorder potential where the density of localised states decreases with increasing localisation depth, e.g., a exponential or Gaussian distribution resulting from random alloy disorder. Under significantly higher levels of excitation, the increased occupation fraction of the localised states results in a greater average separation distance between unoccupied localised states, causing a suppression of the spectral and dynamic signatures of the hopping transfer of carriers.

  17. Structural and optical properties of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}:In films deposited on MgO (1 0 0) substrates by MOCVD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Lingyi; Ma Jin; Luan Caina; Zhu Zhen

    2011-08-15

    Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}:In films with different indium (In) content x [x=In/(Ga+In) atomic ratio] have been deposited on MgO (1 0 0) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Structural analyses revealed that the film deposited with actual In content (x') of 0.09 was an epitaxial film and the films with x'=0.18 and 0.37 had mixed-phase structures of monoclinic Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and bixbyite In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The absolute average transmittance of the obtained films in the visible region exceeded 95%, and the band gap was in the range of 4.74-4.87 eV. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed at room temperature, in which the visible luminescences were strong and could be seen by the naked eye. The strong emissions in the visible light region were proposed to originate from the gallium vacancies, oxygen deficiencies and other defects in these films. - Graphical abstract: Low magnification XTEM (a), HRTEM (b) and SAED (c) micrographs of the interface area between Ga{sub 1.82}In{sub 0.18}O{sub 3} film and MgO substrate have showed the Ga{sub 1.82}In{sub 0.18}O{sub 3} is an epitaxial film. Highlights: > Ga{sub 1.82}In{sub 0.18}O{sub 3} epitaxial film was deposited on MgO(1 0 0) substrate. > The transmittance of the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}:In films in the visible region exceeded 95%. > Strong emissions were observed in the photoluminescence measurements of the films.

  18. Influence of stress on optical transitions in GaN nanorods containing a single InGaN/GaN quantum disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Y. D.; Shields, P. A.; Allsopp, D. W. E., E-mail: d.allsopp@bath.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Bruckbauer, J.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-07

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging has been performed on GaN nanorods containing a single InGaN quantum disk (SQD) with controlled variations in excitation conditions. Two different nanorod diameters (200 and 280?nm) have been considered. Systematic changes in the CL spectra from the SQD were observed as the accelerating voltage of the electron beam and its position of incidence are varied. It is shown that the dominant optical transition in the SQD varies across the nanorod as a result of interplay between the contributions of the deformation potential and the quantum-confined Stark effect to the transition energy as consequence of radial variation in the pseudomorphic strain.

  19. Columbia Water & Light- HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain...

  20. Peninsula Light Company- Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peninsula Light Company (PLC) offers a rebate program for commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient lighting. Participating customers must be served by PLC commercial service....

  1. Light Vector Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Milov

    2008-12-21

    This article reviews the current status of experimental results obtained in the measurement of light vector mesons produced in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at different energies. The review is focused on two phenomena related to the light vector mesons; the modification of the spectral shape in search of Chiral symmetry restoration and suppression of the meson production in heavy ion collisions. The experimental results show that the spectral shape of light vector mesons are modified compared to the parameters measured in vacuum. The nature and the magnitude of the modification depends on the energy density of the media in which they are produced. The suppression patterns of light vector mesons are different from the measurements of other mesons and baryons. The mechanisms responsible for the suppression of the mesons are not yet understood. Systematic comparison of existing experimental results points to the missing data which may help to resolve the problem.

  2. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lamp produces about 1750 lumens. Footcandle: a lumen of light distributed over a 1-square-foot (0.09-square-meter) area. Ideal Illumination: the minimum number of footcandles...

  3. Solid State Lighting Reliability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solid State Lighting Reliability 2015Building Technologies Office Peer Review Lynn Davis, PhD RTI International ldavis@rti.org --- 919-316-3325 Project Summary Timeline: Start...

  4. The Facts of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Berthold K.P.

    This is a random collection of facts about radiant and luminous energy. Some of this information may be useful in the design of photo-diode image sensors, in the set-up of lighting for television microscopes and the ...

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  6. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.2 152.6 160.5 54.6 Assembly Health Care Lodging Office 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Energy Information Administration Energy Consumption Series: Lighting in Commercial...

  7. Impact of proton irradiation on deep level states in n-GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Cinkilic, E.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Speck, J. S.

    2013-07-22

    Deep levels in 1.8 MeV proton irradiated n-type GaN were systematically characterized using deep level transient spectroscopies and deep level optical spectroscopies. The impacts of proton irradiation on the introduction and evolution of those deep states were revealed as a function of proton fluences up to 1.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2}. The proton irradiation introduced two traps with activation energies of E{sub C} - 0.13 eV and 0.16 eV, and a monotonic increase in the concentration for most of the pre-existing traps, though the increase rates were different for each trap, suggesting different physical sources and/or configurations for these states. Through lighted capacitance voltage measurements, the deep levels at E{sub C} - 1.25 eV, 2.50 eV, and 3.25 eV were identified as being the source of systematic carrier removal in proton-damaged n-GaN as a function of proton fluence.

  8. High intensity low temperature (HILT) performance of space concentrator GaInP/GaInAs/Ge MJ SCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shvarts, Maxim Z., E-mail: shvarts@scell.ioffe.ru; Kalyuzhnyy, Nikolay A.; Mintairov, Sergey A.; Soluyanov, Andrei A.; Timoshina, Nailya Kh. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya str., St.-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Gudovskikh, Alexander S. [Saint-Petersburg Academic University - Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Luque, Antonio [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya str., St.-Petersburg, 194021, Russia and Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26

    In the work, the results of an investigation of GaInP/GaInAs/Ge MJ SCs intended for converting concentrated solar radiation, when operating at low temperatures (down to ?190 °C) are presented. A kink of the cell I-V characteristic has been observed in the region close to V{sub oc} starting from ?20°C at operation under concentrated sunlight. The causes for its occurrence have been analyzed and the reasons for formation of a built-in potential barrier for majority charge carriers at the n-GaInP/n-Ge isotype hetero-interface are discussed. The effect of charge carrier transport in n-GaInP/n-pGe heterostructures on MJ SC output characteristics at low temperatures has been studied including EL technique.

  9. The origin and reduction of switching noise in GaAs/AlGaAs lateral gated devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, John H.

    to cryogenic temperature with all gates grounded to the substrate to protect against electrostatic effects in AlGaAs: electrons `freeze' into deep traps ­ DX centres ­ below about 150 K. The occupation of donors

  10. Design and fabrication of InGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistors for microwave power amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keogh, David Martin

    2006-01-01

    assuming the material growth technology allows for all ofand a relatively immature growth technology, as well as theof the art for InGaN growth technology. Epitaxial growth of

  11. Polarization field engineering of GaN/AlN/AlGaN superlattices for enhanced thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sztein, Alexander, E-mail: asztein@umail.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bowers, John E.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Nakamura, Shuji [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    A novel polarization field engineering based strategy to simultaneously achieve high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials is demonstrated. Polarization based electric fields are used to confine electrons into two-dimensional electron gases in GaN/AlN/Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N superlattices, resulting in improved electron mobilities as high as 1176 cm{sup 2}/Vs and in-plane thermal conductivity as low as 8.9?W/mK. The resulting room temperature ZT values reach 0.08, a factor of four higher than InGaN and twelve higher than GaN, demonstrating the potential benefits of this polarization based engineering strategy for improving the ZT and efficiencies of thermoelectric materials.

  12. Si-CMOS-Like Integration of AlGaN/GaN Dielectric-Gated High-Electron-Mobility Transistors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derek Wade

    2014-07-31

    production is projected to consume ~100,000 wafers per year by 2015 (Yole Development, “Power GaN – 2012 Edition”), this manufacturing breakthrough represents potential savings of ~$17 million per year....

  13. Characterization of the gate oxide of an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    2011; published online 21 March 2011 A subnanometer thick interfacial oxide layer present between used to characterize a Ni/AlGaN interfacial oxide layer with subnanometer thickness. The semiconducting

  14. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  15. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  16. Light and Plants Plants use light to photosynthesize. Name two places that light can come from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Light and Plants Plants use light to photosynthesize. Name two places that light can come from: 1 (CO2, a gas) from the air and turn it into SUGARS (food). This process is powered by energy from light plants) for energy. Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) is a combination of red light and blue

  17. LED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    focusing light in ways that are useful in homes and commercial settings. The light-emitting diode (LED) is one of today's most energy-efficient and rapidly-developing lighting...

  18. Energy Conservation in Industrial Lighting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meharg, E.

    1979-01-01

    were identified. Savings in power and cost were quantified for typical examples as follows: Task lighting, high light source efficacy, high luminaire mounting height, efficient luminaires, surroundings painted a light color, regular luminaire cleaning...

  19. Higher order light propagation volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy Ly; Martin, Timothy Ly

    2012-01-01

    1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . 1.2 Light Propagation4.1.1 Injection of Virtual Point Lights and Geometryof the Stanford bunny, lit by an area light, rendered using

  20. Light as a Healing Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    S. (1991). Meridians conduct light. Moskow: Raum and Zeit.the bod’ys absorption of light. Explore, 9(2), doi: https://01). The healing use of light and color. Health Care Design

  1. Lighting and the Bottom Line 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, M.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion of the cost of light and how it relates to the cost of people. The new Illuminating Engineering Society recommended method of determining lighting levels will be explained. Also several ways of providing good lighting to increase...

  2. The first principle study of Ni{sub 2}ScGa and Ni{sub 2}TiGa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Özduran, Mustafa; Turgut, Kemal; Arikan, Nihat; ?yigör, Ahmet; Candan, Abdullah

    2014-10-06

    We computed the electronic structure, elastic moduli, vibrational properties, and Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa alloys in the cubic L2{sub 1} structure. The obtained equilibrium lattice constants of these alloys are in good agreement with available data. In cubic systems, there are three independent elastic constants, namely C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44}. We calculated elastic constants in L2{sub 1} structure for Ni{sub 2}TiGa and Ni{sub 2}ScGa using the energy-strain method. The electronic band structure, total and partial density of states for these alloys were investigated within density functional theory using the plane-wave pseudopotential method implemented in Quantum-Espresso program package. From band structure, total and projected density of states, we observed metallic characters of these compounds. The electronic calculation indicate that the predominant contributions of the density of states at Fermi level come from the Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, Ni 3d states and Sc 3d states for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The computed density of states at Fermi energy are 2.22 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}TiGa, 0.76 states/eV Cell for Ni{sub 2}ScGa. The vibrational properties were obtained using a linear response in the framework at the density functional perturbation theory. For the alloys, the results show that the L2{sub 1} phase is unstable since the phonon calculations have imagine modes.

  3. Birefringence in the transparency region of GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirenko, A.A.; Etchegoin, P.; Fainstein, A.; Eberl, K.; Cardona, M.

    1999-09-01

    Birefringence measurements for in-plane propagation of light below the absorption edge in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells (MQW{close_quote}s) are reported for different well/barrier widths. A remarkable drop in the low-frequency limit of the birefringence has been observed for MQW structures with small periods and ascribed to the presence of local fields. The temperature dependence of the birefringence is also studied and complementary results in InP quantum dot structures are also presented. The latter exhibit a strong resonant birefringence, which can be explained by the reduced dimensionality in the joint density of states for optical transitions in the dots. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Recent progress of GaAsP HPD development for the MAGIC telescope project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Y. Saito; M. Shayduk; M. V. Fonseca; M. Hayashida; E. Lorenz; K. Mannheim; R. Mirzoyan; T. Schweizer; M. Teshima

    2007-09-13

    Today the Hybrid Photon Detector (HPD) is one of the few low light level (LLL) sensors that can provide an excellent single and multiple photoelectron (ph.e.) amplitude resolution. The recently developed HPDs for the MAGIC telescope project with a GaAsP photocathode, namely the R9792U-40, provide a peak quantum efficiency (QE) of more than 50% and a pulse width of ~2 nsec. In addition, the afterpulsing rate of these tubes is very low compared to that of conventional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), i.e. the value is ~300 times lower. Photocathode aging measurements showed life time of more than 10 years under standard operating conditions of the Cherenkov Telescopes. Here we want to report on the recent progress with the above mentioned HPDs.

  5. Advances in InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems for quantum communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun; Zbinden, Hugo; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the most sensitive instruments for light detection. In the near-infrared range, SPDs based on III-V compound semiconductor avalanche photodiodes have been extensively used during the past two decades for diverse applications due to their advantages in practicality including small size, low cost and easy operation. In the past decade, the rapid developments and increasing demands in quantum information science have served as key drivers to improve the device performance of single-photon avalanche diodes and to invent new avalanche quenching techniques. This Review aims to introduce the technology advances of InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems in the telecom wavelengths and the relevant quantum communication applications, and particularly to highlight recent emerging techniques such as high-frequency gating at GHz rates and free-running operation using negative-feedback avalanche diodes. Future perspectives of both the devices and quenching techniques are summarized.

  6. Advances in InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems for quantum communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Zhang; Mark A. Itzler; Hugo Zbinden; Jian-Wei Pan

    2015-05-09

    Single-photon detectors (SPDs) are the most sensitive instruments for light detection. In the near-infrared range, SPDs based on III-V compound semiconductor avalanche photodiodes have been extensively used during the past two decades for diverse applications due to their advantages in practicality including small size, low cost and easy operation. In the past decade, the rapid developments and increasing demands in quantum information science have served as key drivers to improve the device performance of single-photon avalanche diodes and to invent new avalanche quenching techniques. This Review aims to introduce the technology advances of InGaAs/InP single-photon detector systems in the telecom wavelengths and the relevant quantum communication applications, and particularly to highlight recent emerging techniques such as high-frequency gating at GHz rates and free-running operation using negative-feedback avalanche diodes. Future perspectives of both the devices and quenching techniques are summarized.

  7. Below gap optical absorption in GaAs driven by intense, single-cycle coherent transition radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Goodfellow, J.; Fuchs, M.; Daranciang, D.; Ghimire, S.; Chen, F.; Loos, H.; Reis, D. A.; Fisher, A. S.; Lindenberg, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Single-cycle terahertz fields generated by coherent transition radiation from a relativistic electron beam are used to study the high field optical response of single crystal GaAs. Large amplitude changes in the sub-band-gap optical absorption are induced and probed dynamically by measuring the absorption of a broad-band optical beam generated by transition radiation from the same electron bunch, providing an absolutely synchronized pump and probe geometry. This modification of the optical properties is consistent with strong-field-induced electroabsorption. These processes are pertinent to a wide range of nonlinear terahertz-driven light-matter interactions anticipated at accelerator-based sources.

  8. Enhanced excitonic photoconductivity due to built-in internal electric field in TlGaSe{sub 2} layered semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu. Suleymanov, Rauf A.; ?ale, Yasin; Balaban, Ertan

    2014-12-07

    The strong enhancement, by several orders of magnitude, of the excitonic peak within the photoconductivity spectrum of TlGaSe{sub 2} semiconductor was observed. The samples were polarized in external dc electric field, which was applied prior to the measurements. Due to the accumulation of charges near the surface, an internal electric field was formed. Electron-hole pairs that were created after the absorption of light are fallen in and then separated by the built-in electric field, which prevents radiative recombination process.

  9. Highly polarized emission in spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of alpha-Fe(001)/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, James; Yu, Sung Woo; Morton, Simon; Waddill, George; Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Spangenberg, Matthais; Shen, T.H.

    2009-05-19

    Highly spin-polarized sources of electrons, Integrated into device design, remain of great interest to the spintronic and magneto-electronic device community Here, the growth of Fe upon GaAs(001) has been studied with photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), including Spin Resolved PES. Despite evidence of atomic level disorder such as intermixing, an over-layer with the spectroscopic signature of alpha-Fe(001), with a bcc real space ordering, Is obtained The results will be discussed in light of the possibility of using such films as a spin-polarized source in device applications.

  10. Pulsed Electrical Spin Injection into InGaAs Quantum Dots: Studies of the Electroluminescence Polarization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asshoff, P.; Loeffler, W.; Fluegge, H.; Zimmer, J.; Mueller, J.; Westenfelder, B.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.; Kalt, H.; Hetterich, M. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik and DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-01-04

    We present time-resolved studies of the spin polarization dynamics during and after initialization through pulsed electrical spin injection into InGaAs quantum dots embedded in a p-i-n-type spin-injection light-emitting diode. Experiments are performed with pulse widths in the nanosecond range and a time-resolved single photon counting setup is used to detect the subsequent electroluminescence. We find evidence that the achieved spin polarization shows an unexpected temporal behavior, attributed mainly to many-carrier and non-equilibrium effects in the device.

  11. High-power, very low threshold, GaImnP/AIGaInP visble-diode lasers l-l. B. Serreze, v. C. Chen, and R. 6. Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lasers,and this cw threshold current density is believedto be, by far, the lowest. Low-power visibleHigh-power, very low threshold, GaImnP/AIGaInP visble-diode lasers l-l. B. Serreze, v. C. Chen light (665 nm) laser diodesemploying a strained-layer,single quantum well, graded index

  12. New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krailo, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    and lighting systems. Table 2 shows the development of four-foot energy-saving retrofit lamps. By utilizing new cathode designed and different gas fills, 34-watt energy-saving lamps were developed that operate on existing rapid start ballasts and afford... of fluorescent lamps, two watts of system power are consumed in heating the lamp cath odes. The shedding of cathode heating wattage was the next lamp efficiency improvement to be introduced. One available sy tern dis connects the lamp cathodes from...

  13. Optical investigation of InAs quantum dots inserted in AlGaAs/GaAs modulation doped heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khmissi, H.; Baira, M.; Bouzaieene, L.; Saidi, F.; Maaref, H. [Laboratoire de Micro-optoelectronique et Nanostructures, Universite de Monastir (Tunisia); Sfaxi, L. [Laboratoire de Micro-optoelectronique et Nanostructures, Universite de Monastir (Tunisia); Universite de Sousse Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l'Environnement 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Bru-Chevallier, C. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL), CNRS UMR-5270, INSA-LYON, 7, Avenue Jean Capelle, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2011-03-01

    Optical properties of InAs quantum dots (QDs) inserted in AlGaAs/GaAs modulation doped heterostructure are investigated. To study the effect of carrier transfer behavior on the luminescence of self-assembled quantum dots, a series of sample has been prepared using molecular beam epitaxy (Riber 32 system) in which we have varied the thickness separating the delta dopage and the InAs quantum dots layer. Photoluminescence spectra show the existence of two peaks that can be attributed to transition energies from the ground state (E{sub 1}-HH{sub 1}) and the first excited state (E{sub 2}-HH{sub 2}). Two antagonist effects have been observed, a blue shift of the emission energies result from electron transferred from the AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction to the InAs quantum dots and a red shift caused by the quantum confined Stark effect due to the internal electric field existing In the AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction.

  14. Effects of high-temperature AIN buffer on the microstructure of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coerekci, S.; Oeztuerk, M. K.; Yu, Hongbo; Cakmak, M.; Oezcelik, S.; Oezbay, E.

    2013-06-15

    Effects on AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor structure of a high-temperature AlN buffer on sapphire substrate have been studied by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy techniques. The buffer improves the microstructural quality of GaN epilayer and reduces approximately one order of magnitude the edge-type threading dislocation density. As expected, the buffer also leads an atomically flat surface with a low root-mean-square of 0.25 nm and a step termination density in the range of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Due to the high-temperature buffer layer, no change on the strain character of the GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers has been observed. Both epilayers exhibit compressive strain in parallel to the growth direction and tensile strain in perpendicular to the growth direction. However, an high-temperature AlN buffer layer on sapphire substrate in the HEMT structure reduces the tensile stress in the AlGaN layer.

  15. Light emission patterns from stadium-shaped semiconductor microcavity lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susumu Shinohara; Takehiro Fukushima; Takahisa Harayama

    2008-03-10

    We study light emission patterns from stadium-shaped semiconductor (GaAs) microcavity lasers theoretically and experimentally. Performing systematic wave calculations for passive cavity modes, we demonstrate that the averaging by low-loss modes, such as those realized in multi-mode lasing, generates an emission pattern in good agreement with the ray model's prediction. In addition, we show that the dependence of experimental far-field emission patterns on the aspect ratio of the stadium cavity is well reproduced by the ray model.

  16. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as part of your whole-house design -- an approach for building an energy-efficient home. Indoor Lighting Design When designing indoor lighting for energy efficiency,...

  17. GATEWAY Demonstrations: LED Street Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Tyson; Shackelford, Jordan; Pang, Terrance Pang

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes an assessment project conducted to study the performance of light emitting diode (LED) luminaires in a street lighting application in San Francisco, CA.

  18. Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered a basic understanding of lighting, different types of lamps and luminaries, importance of energy efficiency in lighting, and knowledge of where to find financial resources.

  19. 2010 US Lighting Market Characterization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 U.S. Lighting Market Characterization January 2012 Prepared for: Solid-State Lighting Program Building Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  20. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fluorescent lighting fixtures rather than replace them. Dimmers and LEDs Some light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs can be used with dimmers. LED bulbs and fixtures must be...

  1. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2005-07-30

    In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 {micro}m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of {approx} 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light emitting diodes, and packaging them to produce a white light fixture. During the third and final year of the project, the LRC team investigated alternate packaging methods for the white LED device to achieve at least 25 percent more luminous efficacy than traditional white LEDs; conducted optical ray-tracing analyses and human factors studies to determine the best form factor for the white light source under development, in terms of high luminous efficacy and greater acceptance by subjects; and developed a new die encapsulant using silicone-epoxy resins that showed less yellowing and slower degradation. At the conclusion of this project, the LRC demonstrated a new packaging method, called scattered photon extraction (SPE), that produced an average luminous flux and corresponding average efficacy of 90.7 lm and 36.3 lm/W, respectively, compared with 56.5 lm and 22.6 lm/W for a similar commercial white LED package. At low currents, the SPE package emitted white light with an efficacy of over 80 lm/W and had chromaticity values very close to the blackbody locus. The SPE package showed an overall improvement of 61% for this particular comparison, exceeding the LRC's third-year goal of 25% improvement.

  2. Lasing characteristics of GaSb/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots embedded in an InGaAs quantum well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico, New Mexico 87545 Received 26 February 2007; accepted 1 June 2007; published online 28 June 2007 intriguing optoelectronic device possibilities on GaAs substrates including lasers, detectors, or solar cells

  3. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Basic fact: Light is linear Double intensity of sources, double photons reaching eye. Turn on two lights, and photons reaching eye are same as sum of number when each

  4. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  5. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  6. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LED Roadway Lighting: Philadelphia, PA Royer, Michael P.; Tuenge, Jason R.; Poplawski, Michael E. Roadway Lighting; Solid-state lighting; LED lighting; SSL; LED; GATEWAY Roadway...

  7. Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of

  8. Testimonials - Partnerships in LED Lighting - Philips Lumileds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LED Lighting - Philips Lumileds Lighting, LLC Testimonials - Partnerships in LED Lighting - Philips Lumileds Lighting, LLC Addthis An error occurred. Try watching this video on...

  9. Light-induced charge separation in thin tetraphenyl-porphyrin layers deposited on Au Y. Zidon and Yoram Shapira*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoram

    for applications in opto- electronics, such as organic light-emitting diodes or organic solar cells. Interfaces-phenylene vinylene coated Au or GaAs surfaces.11 However, none of the past SPS studies recognized internal processes, taking place in thin organic films deposited on Au. In t

  10. A 3-10 GHZLCR-matched Power Amplifier using Flip-Chip Mounted AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    amplifier using GaN- HEMTs-on-Sapphire. I INTRODUCTION GaN HEMTs have enormous potential for realizing high-power Traveling Wave Power Amplifier circuit (TWPA)[1][2] for realization of wideband power amplifiersWE4A-5 A 3-10 GHZLCR-matched Power Amplifier using Flip-Chip Mounted AlGaN/GaN HEMTs Jane J

  11. Intermixing of InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Well Using Multiple Cycles Annealing Cu-doped SiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongpinyo, V; Ding, Y H; Dimas, C E; Wang, Y; Ooi, B S; Qiu, W; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E M; Cole, G D; Bond, T C

    2008-06-11

    The authors investigate the effect of intermixing in InGaAs/GaAs quantum well structure using Cu-doped SiO{sub 2}. The incorporation of Cu into the silica film yields larger bandgap shift than typical impurity-free vacancy diffusion (IFVD) method at a lower activation temperature. We also observe enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) signal from the intermixed InGaAs/GaAs quantum well structure after being cycle-annealed at 850 C.

  12. Metamorphic GaAsP buffers for growth of wide-bandgap InGaP solar cells J. Simon,1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    . INTRODUCTION Triple-junction metamorphic solar cells have reached ef- ficiencies as high as 41.1% by combiningMetamorphic GaAsP buffers for growth of wide-bandgap InGaP solar cells J. Simon,1,a S. Tomasulo,1 P-yP solar cells. Tensile-strained GaAsxP1-x buffers grown on GaAs using unoptimized conditions

  13. FIRST DEMONSTRATION OF MONOLITHIC InP-BASED InAlAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs TRIPLE JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    FIRST DEMONSTRATION OF MONOLITHIC InP-BASED InAlAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs TRIPLE JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS RobynAlAs/InGaAsP/InGaAs triple junction solar cell grown on InP substrate. X-ray diffraction characterization shows high quality solar cell materials. Preliminary 1-sun AM1.5D testing of the triple junction solar cell shows promising

  14. Light Quark Mass Reweighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Liu; Norman H. Christ; Chulwoo Jung

    2012-06-01

    We present a systematic study of the effectiveness of light quark mass reweighting. This method allows a single lattice QCD ensemble, generated with a specific value of the dynamical light quark mass, to be used to determine results for other, nearby light dynamical quark masses. We study two gauge field ensembles generated with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions with light quark masses m_l=0.02 (m_\\pi=620 MeV) and m_l=0.01 (m_\\pi=420 MeV). We reweight each ensemble to determine results which could be computed directly from the other and check the consistency of the reweighted results with the direct results. The large difference between the 0.02 and 0.01 light quark masses suggests that this is an aggressive application of reweighting as can be seen from fluctuations in the magnitude of the reweighting factor by four orders of magnitude. Never-the-less, a comparison of the reweighed topological charge, average plaquette, residual mass, pion mass, pion decay constant, and scalar correlator between these two ensembles shows agreement well described by the statistical errors. The issues of the effective number of configurations and finite sample size bias are discussed. An examination of the topological charge distribution implies that it is more favorable to reweight from heavier mass to lighter quark mass.

  15. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer hasmore »the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.« less

  16. Radiation damage of GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nishioka, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    1987-01-15

    1-MeV electron irradiation damages in GaAs thin-film solar cells on Si substrates are examined for the first time. Damage constant for minority-carrier diffusion length in GaAs heteroepitaxial films on Si substrates is found to be the same as that in GaAs homoepitaxial films on GaAs substrates. This agreement suggests that GaAs/Si has the same defect introduction rate with radiation as GaAs/GaAs. The degradation of GaAs solar cells on Si with electron irradiation is less than that of GaAs solar cells on GaAs, because in the present, GaAs films on Si substrates have lower minority-carrier diffusion length compared to GaAs films on GaAs and these films are insensitive to radiation. The p/sup +/-p/sup +/-n AlGaAs-GaAs heteroface solar cell with junction depth of about 0.3 ..mu..m is concluded to be useful for a high-efficiency and radiation-resistant solar cell fabricated on a Si substrate.

  17. Laser Gain and Threshold Properties in Compressive-Strained and Lattice-Matched GaInNAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Modine, N.A.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1999-08-04

    The optical gain spectra for compressive-strained and lattice-matched GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of lasing threshold current density for different GAInNAs/GaAs laser structures.

  18. Are Light Gluinos Dead?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    1997-07-25

    Not yet. ALEPH's recent exclusion limit employs an aggressive determination of theoretical uncertainties using a simplified application of the Bayesian method. The validity of their analysis can be evaluated by its further implications, such as contradicting the existence a b quark and requiring relations between hadronic event-shape observables which are not observed. Traditional error estimation methods result in a much larger estimate for the theoretical uncertainties. This puts the ALEPH and also Csikor-Fodor limits at the $\\sim 1~ \\sigma$ level for the very light gluino scenario. A recent astrophysical result implies direct searches will be more difficult than previously anticipated, adding to the importance of reducing the QCD uncertainty in predictions sensitive to indirect effects of light gluinos. Some possible indications in favor of a light gluino are noted.

  19. Light harvesting arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2002-01-01

    A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  20. Pupillary efficient lighting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Jewett, Don L. (Mill Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination.

  1. Sneaky light stop

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemore »to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.« less

  2. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  3. Contribution of alloy clustering to limiting the two-dimensional electron gas mobility in AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Mishra, Umesh K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Chalabi, Hamidreza [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kaun, Stephen W.; Shivaraman, Ravi; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    The influence of alloy clustering on fluctuations in the ground state energy of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures is studied. We show that because of these fluctuations, alloy clustering degrades the mobility even when the 2DEG wavefunction does not penetrate the alloy barrier unlike alloy disorder scattering. A comparison between the results obtained for AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures shows that alloy clustering limits the 2DEG mobility to a greater degree in InAlN/GaN heterostructures. Our study also reveals that the inclusion of an AlN interlayer increases the limiting mobility from alloy clustering. Moreover, Atom probe tomography is used to demonstrate the random nature of the fluctuations in the alloy composition.

  4. Radioluminescent lighting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The glow-in-the-dark stereotype that characterizes the popular image of nuclear materials is not accidental. When the French scientist, Henri Becquerel, first discovered radioactivity in 1896, he was interested in luminescence. Radioluminescence, the production of light from a mixture of energetic and passive materials, is probably the oldest practical application of the unstable nucleus. Tritium-based radioluminescent lighting, in spite of the biologically favorable character of the gaseous tritium isotope, was included in the general tightening of environmental and safety regulations. Tritium light manufacturers would have to meet two fundamental conditions: (1) The benefit clearly outweighed the risk, to the extent that even the perceived risk of a skeptical public would be overcome. (2) The need was significant enough that the customer/user would be willing and able to afford the cost of regulation that was imposed both in the manufacture, use and eventual disposal of nuclear materials. In 1981, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were investigating larger radioluminescent applications using byproduct nuclear material such as krypton-85, as well as tritium. By 1982, it appeared that large source, (100 Curies or more) tritium gas tube, lights might be useful for marking runways and drop zones for military operations and perhaps even special civilian aviation applications. The successful development of this idea depended on making the light bright enough and demonstrating that large gas tube sources could be used and maintained safely in the environment. This successful DOE program is now in the process of being completed and closed-out. Working closely with the tritium light industry, State governments and other Federal agencies, the basic program goals have been achieved. This is a detailed report of what they have learned, proven, and discovered. 91 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (JF)

  5. Optical reflection from the Bragg lattice of AsSb metal nanoinclusions in an AlGaAs matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushanov, V. I.; Chaldyshev, V. V., E-mail: chald.gvg@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhenskii, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The optical properties of metal-semiconductor metamaterials based on an AlGaAs matrix are studied. The specific feature of these materials is that there are As and AsSb nanoinclusion arrays which modify the dielectric properties of the material. These nanoinclusions are randomly arranged in the medium or form a Bragg structure with a reflectance peak at a wavelength close to 750 nm, corresponding to the transparency region of the matrix. The reflectance spectra are studied for s- and p-polarized light at different angles of incidence. It is shown that (i) As nanoinclusion arrays only slightly influence the optical properties of the medium in the wavelength range 700-900 nm, (ii) chaotic AsSb nanoinclusion arrays cause strong scattering of light, and (iii) the spatial periodicity in the arrangement of AsSb nanoinclusions is responsible for Bragg resonance in the optical reflection.

  6. Light is Heavy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mark, M B

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's relativity theory appears to be very accurate, but at times equally puzzling. On the one hand, electromagnetic radiation must have zero rest mass in order to propagate at the speed of light, but on the other hand, since it definitely carries momentum and energy, it has non-zero inertial mass. Hence, by the principle of equivalence, it must have non-zero gravitational mass, and so, light must be heavy. In this paper, no new results will be derived, but a possibly surprising perspective on the above paradox is given.

  7. Damage production in GaAs and GaAsN induced by light and heavy ions C. Bjrkas,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    , Finland V. D. S. Dhaka Institute of Materials Chemistry, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, 33101 Tampere, Finland M. Pessa Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P

  8. The impact of trench defects in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes and implications for the “green gap” problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Davies, M. J.; Oehler, F.; Pamenter, S. K.; Thrush, E. J.; Kappers, M. J.; Kovács, A.; Williams, T.; Hopkins, M. A.; Humphreys, C. J.; Dawson, P.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Etheridge, J.; Allsopp, D. W. E.; Oliver, R. A.

    2014-09-19

    of Physics and Astronomy, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK 3 Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt- Straße, D-52425 Jülich, Germany 4 Monash...

  9. Linear photon upconversion of 400 meV in an AlGaInP/GaInP quantum well heterostructure to visible light at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kasey

    and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 J. M. Olson National Renewable Energy-photon and electron-phonon interactions to conserve energy. Several types of upconversion methods have been explored devices have a theoretical maximum upconversion luminescence energy, limited to twice the type

  10. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry-leading uptime enabled in part by a novel in-situ cleaning process developed in this program.

  11. Thermoelectric properties of chalcopyrite type CuGaTe{sub 2} and chalcostibite CuSbS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Gudelli, Vijay; Kanchana, V., E-mail: kanchana@iith.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailaram 502 205, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vaitheeswaran, G. [Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 046, Andhra Pradesh (India); Svane, A.; Christensen, N. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2013-12-14

    Electronic and transport properties of CuGaTe{sub 2}, a hole-doped ternary copper based chalcopyrite type semiconductor, are studied using calculations within the Density Functional Theory and solving the Boltzmann transport equation within the constant relaxation time approximation. The electronic band structures are calculated by means of the full-potential linear augmented plane wave method, using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential. The calculated band gap of 1.23?eV is in agreement with the experimental value of 1.2?eV. The carrier concentration- and temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of CuGaTe{sub 2} are derived, and a figure of merit of zT?=?1.69 is obtained at 950?K for a hole concentration of 3.7·10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}, in agreement with a recent experimental finding of zT?=?1.4, confirming that CuGaTe{sub 2} is a promising material for high temperature thermoelectric applications. The good thermoelectric performance of p-type CuGaTe{sub 2} is associated with anisotropic transport from a combination of heavy and light bands. Also for CuSbS{sub 2} (chalcostibite), a better performance is obtained for p-type than for n-type doping. The variation of the thermopower as a function of temperature and concentration suggests that CuSbS{sub 2} will be a good thermoelectric material at low temperatures, similarly to the isostructural CuBiS{sub 2} compound.

  12. Nano-scale luminescence characterization of individual InGaN/GaN quantum wells stacked in a microcavity using scanning transmission electron microscope cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Gordon Müller, Marcus; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Glauser, Marlene; Carlin, Jean-François; Cosendey, Gatien; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    Using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy directly performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope at liquid helium temperatures, the optical and structural properties of a 62 InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well embedded in an AlInN/GaN based microcavity are investigated at the nanometer scale. We are able to spatially resolve a spectral redshift between the individual quantum wells towards the surface. Cathodoluminescence spectral linescans allow directly visualizing the critical layer thickness in the quantum well stack resulting in the onset of plastic relaxation of the strained InGaN/GaN system.

  13. Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-03-30

    The article discusses solid state lighting technologies. This topic was covered in two previous ASHRAE Journal columns (2010). This article covers advancements in technologies and the associated efficacies. The life-cycle, energy savings and market potential of these technologies are addressed as well.

  14. Polycrystalline MBE-grown GaAs for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D.J.; Kurtz, S.R.; Kibbler, A.E.; Al-Jassim, M.; Jones, K.; Keyes, B.; Matson, R.

    1997-02-01

    This paper will discuss initial studies of thin-film GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy for use in developing a thin-film GaAs solar cell. Photocurrent and photoluminescence intensity are related to the material morphology as a function of growth conditions. Growth temperature and V/III ratio have a dramatic effect on the photocurrent. However, it seems likely that even after optimizing such growth parameters, it will be necessary to provide substrates that can provide templates to enhance grain size from the start of thin-film growth. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Polycrystalline MBE-grown GaAs for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, D. J.; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Kibbler, A. E.; Al-Jassim, M.; Jones, K.; Keyes, B.; Matson, R.

    1997-02-15

    This paper will discuss initial studies of thin-film GaAs grown by molecular-beam epitaxy for use in developing a thin-film GaAs solar cell. Photocurrent and photoluminescence intensity are related to the material morphology as a function of growth conditions. Growth temperature and V/III ratio have a dramatic effect on the photocurrent. However, it seems likely that even after optimizing such growth parameters, it will be necessary to provide substrates that can provide templates to enhance grain size from the start of thin-film growth.

  16. Highly transparent ammonothermal bulk GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, WK; Ehrentraut, D; Downey, BC; Kamber, DS; Pakalapati, RT; Do Yoo, H; D'Evelyn, MP

    2014-10-01

    A novel apparatus has been employed to grow ammonothermal (0001) gallium nitride (GaN) with diameters up to 2 in The crystals have been characterized by x-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and optical spectroscopy. High crystallinity GaN with FWHM values about 20-50 arcsec and dislocation densities below 1 x 10(5) cm(-2) have been obtained. High optical transmission was achieved with an optical absorption coefficient below 1 cm(-1) at a wavelength of 450 nm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. HIGH-EFFICIENCY NITRIDE-BASED SOLID-STATE LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2003-10-30

    In this second annual report we summarize the progress in the second-year period of Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High- Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. The two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), are pursuing the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging standpoints. The UCSB team has recently made significant progress in the development of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN active regions emitting in the ultraviolet (UV), resonant-cavity LEDs (RCLEDs), as well as lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) techniques to obtain large-area non-polar GaN films with low average dislocation density. The Rensselaer team has benchmarked the performance of commercially available LED systems and has also conducted efforts to develop an optimized RCLED packaging scheme, including development of advanced epoxy encapsulant chemistries.

  18. Strong enhancement of terahertz emission from GaAs in InAs/GaAs quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estacio, Elmer; Pham, Minh Hong; Takatori, Satoru; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Nakazato, Tomoharu; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Somintac, Armando; Defensor, Michael; Awitan, Fritz Christian B.; Jaculbia, Rafael B.; Salvador, Arnel; Garcia, Alipio

    2009-06-08

    We report on the intense terahertz emission from InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Results reveal that the QD sample emission was as high as 70% of that of a p-type InAs wafer, the most intense semiconductor emitter to date. Excitation wavelength studies showed that the emission was due to absorption in strained undoped GaAs, and corresponds to a two order-of-magnitude enhancement. Moreover, it was found that multilayer QDs emit more strongly compared with a single layer QD sample. At present, we ascribe the intense radiation to huge strain fields at the InAs/GaAs interface.

  19. Characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors with triple delta-doped sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Kuei-Yi; Chiang, Meng-Hsueh Cheng, Shiou-Ying; Liu, Wen-Chau

    2012-02-15

    Fundamental and insightful characteristics of InGaP/InGaAs double channel pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (DCPHEMTs) with graded and uniform triple {delta}-doped sheets are coomprehensively studied and demonstrated. To gain physical insight, band diagrams, carrier densities, and direct current characteristics of devices are compared and investigated based on the 2D semiconductor simulator, Atlas. Due to uniform carrier distribution and high electron density in the double InGaAs channel, the DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped sheets exhibits better transport properties, higher and linear transconductance, and better drain current capability as compared with the uniformly triple {delta}-doped counterpart. The DCPHEMT with graded triple {delta}-doped structure is fabricated and tested, and the experimental data are found to be in good agreement with simulated results.

  20. Terahertz intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunds, C.; Malis, O.; Shao, J.; Shirazi-HD, M.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate THz intersubband absorption (15.6–26.1?meV) in m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells. We find a trend of decreasing peak energy with increasing quantum well width, in agreement with theoretical expectations. However, a blue-shift of the transition energy of up to 14?meV was observed relative to the calculated values. This blue-shift is shown to decrease with decreasing charge density and is, therefore, attributed to many-body effects. Furthermore, a??40% reduction in the linewidth (from roughly 8 to 5?meV) was obtained by reducing the total sheet density and inserting undoped AlGaN layers that separate the wavefunctions from the ionized impurities in the barriers.