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1

RadRAT: a radiation risk assessment tool for lifetime cancer risk projection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Risk projection methods allow for timely assessment of the potential magnitude of radiation-related cancer risks following low-dose radiation exposures. The estimation of such risks directly through observational studies would generally require infeasibly large studies and long-term follow-up to achieve reasonable statistical power. We developed an online radiation risk assessment tool (RadRAT) which can be used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-related cancer with uncertainty intervals following a user-specified exposure history (https://irep.nci.nih.gov/radrat). The uncertainty intervals constitute a key component of the program because of the various assumptions that are involved in such calculations. The risk models used in RadRAT are broadly based on those developed by the BEIR VII committee for estimating lifetime risk following low-dose radiation exposure of the US population for eleven site-specific cancers. We developed new risk models for seven additional cancer sites, oral, oesophagus, gallbladder, pancreas, rectum, kidney and brain/central nervous system (CNS) cancers, using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The lifetime risk estimates are slightly higher for RadRAT than for BEIR VII across all exposure ages mostly because the weighting of the excess relative risk and excess absolute risk models was conducted on an arithmetic rather than a logarithmic scale. The calculator can be used to estimate lifetime cancer risk from both uniform and non-uniform doses that are acute or chronic. It is most appropriate for low-LET radiation doses  

Amy Berrington de Gonzalez; A Iulian Apostoaei; Lene H S Veiga; Preetha Rajaraman; Brian A Thomas; F Owen Hoffman; Ethel Gilbert; Charles Land

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

Hardy, Christopher R.

3

Phase I Study of Weekly Mitoxantrone and Docetaxel before Prostatectomy in Patients with High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...factors, estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer and screening...screening had a documented lifetime risk of breast cancer of 20 or greater...value and cancer yield with an acceptable biopsy rate in a diverse group of high risk women undergoing breast MRI...

Tomasz M. Beer; Mark Garzotto; Bruce A. Lowe; William J. Ellis; Michelle A. Montalto; Paul H. Lange; and Celestia S. Higano

2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Diesel exhaust exposure and bladder cancer risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A total of 136 cases of men with urinary bladder cancer and 272 matched hospital controls were examined for potential exposure to diesel exhaust. A lifetime occupational history was obtained for ... in the study ...

V. Iyer; R. E. Harris; E. L. Wynder

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer Jie Chen1 , Hongxing He1 , Huidong Jin1 of identifying and describing risk groups for colorectal cancer (CRC) from population based administrative health are applied to the colorectal cancer patients' profiles in contrast to background pa- tients' profiles

Jin, Huidong "Warren"

6

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice K Taylor, N Phan, ME Cybulski, L Laframboise, DR Boreham Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high dose rates using a linear no threshold model. Based on this approach, it has been postulated that human exposure to medical imaging involving low doses of x-rays and gamma rays increase an individual's risk of developing cancer throughout their lifetime. Conversely, there is evidence that low doses of gamma radiation increase the latency period of cancer depending upon genotype, cancer type, and the magnitude of

7

Vitamin D-Related Genetic Variants, Interactions with Vitamin D Exposure, and Breast Cancer Risk among Caucasian Women in Ontario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0.63 (0.49-0.82) Solar vitamin D score (lifetime...and Health Study, Ontario, Canada, and age-adjusted odds ratio...isoflavones-and breast cancer risk (Canada).Cancer Causes Control 2008...Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada. LN.Anderson@utoronto...

Laura N. Anderson; Michelle Cotterchio; David E. C. Cole; and Julia A. Knight

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and UNSCEAR 1988 in Radiation Risk Assessment - Lifetime Total Cancer Mortality Risk Estimates at Low Doses and Low Dose Rates for Low-LET Radiation, Committee on Interagency...

9

Genetic susceptibility of cervical cancer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. Lifetime risks for cervical cancer range from 0.4% in Israel to 5,3% in Colombia,… (more)

Zoodsma, Margreet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Measuring Perceptions of Breast Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...27 Lipkus I, Biradavolu M, Fenn K, Keller P, Rimer B. Informing women about their breast cancer risks: truth and consequences. Health Commun 2001;13:205-26. 28 Alexander N, Ross J, Sumner W, Nease R, Littenberg B. The effect...

Andrea Gurmankin Levy; Judy Shea; Sankey V. Williams; Alex Quistberg; Katrina Armstrong

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Estimating cancer risk from dental cone-beam CT exposures based on skin dosimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to measure entrance skin doses on patients undergoing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations, to establish conversion factors between skin and organ doses, and to estimate cancer risk from CBCT exposures. 266 patients (age 8–83) were included, involving three imaging centres. CBCT scans were acquired using the SCANORA 3D (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland) and NewTom 9000 (QR, Verona, Italy). Eight thermoluminescent dosimeters were attached to the patient's skin at standardized locations. Using previously published organ dose estimations on various CBCTs with an anthropomorphic phantom, correlation factors to convert skin dose to organ doses were calculated and applied to estimate patient organ doses. The BEIR VII age- and gender-dependent dose-risk model was applied to estimate the lifetime attributable cancer risk. For the SCANORA 3D, average skin doses over the eight locations varied between 484 and 1788 µGy. For the NewTom 9000 the range was between 821 and 1686 µGy for Centre 1 and between 292 and 2325 µGy for Centre 2. Entrance skin dose measurements demonstrated the combined effect of exposure and patient factors on the dose. The lifetime attributable cancer risk, expressed as the probability to develop a radiation-induced cancer, varied between 2.7 per million (age >60) and 9.8 per million (age 8–11) with an average of 6.0 per million. On average, the risk for female patients was 40% higher. The estimated radiation risk was primarily influenced by the age at exposure and the gender, pointing out the continuing need for justification and optimization of CBCT exposures, with a specific focus on children.

Ruben Pauwels; Lesley Cockmartin; Deimante Ivanauskaité; Ausra Urbonien?; Sophia Gavala; Catherine Donta; Kostas Tsiklakis; Reinhilde Jacobs; Hilde Bosmans; Ria Bogaerts; Keith Horner; The SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Communicating Breast Cancer Risks to Women Using Different Formats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...B. K. Informing women about their breast cancer risks: truth and consequences. Health Comm., 13: 205-206, 2001. 5 Kahneman D...Humans Middle Aged Patient Education as Topic Risk Factors Truth Disclosure Women's Health

Isaac M. Lipkus; William M. P. Klein; Barbara K. Rimer

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

EPA 402-R-93-076 ESTIMATING RADIOGENIC CANCER RISKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparing health risk estimates due to low level exposures of low-LET radiation based on models recently This document presents a revised methodology for EPA's estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population

14

Radiotherapy-induced secondary cancer risk for breast cancer: 3D conformal therapy versus IMRT versus VMAT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluated the secondary cancer risk to various organs due to radiation treatment for breast cancer. Organ doses to an anthropomorphic phantom were measured using a photoluminescent dosimeter (PLD) for breast cancer treatment with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Cancer risk based on the measured dose was calculated using the BEIR (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) VII models. The secondary dose per treatment dose (50.4 Gy) to various organs ranged from 0.02 to 0.36 Gy for 3D-CRT, but from 0.07 to 8.48 Gy for IMRT and VMAT, indicating that the latter methods are associated with higher secondary radiation doses than 3D-CRT. The result of the homogeneity index in the breast target shows that the dose homogeneity of 3D-CRT was worse than those of IMRT and VMAT. The organ specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) to the thyroid, contralateral breast and ipsilateral lung per 100?000 population were 0.02, 19.71, and 0.76 respectively for 3D-CRT, much lower than the 0.11, 463.56, and 10.59 respectively for IMRT and the 0.12, 290.32, and 12.28 respectively for VMAT. The overall estimation of LAR indicated that the radiation-induced cancer risk due to breast radiation therapy was lower with 3D-CRT than with IMRT or VMAT.

Boram Lee; Sunyoung Lee; Jiwon Sung; Myonggeun Yoon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Cancer Risk among Children Born after Assisted Conception  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of 26,692 children born after assisted conception in Sweden between 1982 and 2005. A total of 47 cancers (excluding histiocytosis) were observed in this cohort, which had a higher risk of childhood cancer than did children conceived without assisted conception during the same period (odds ratio after... In a large study using registry data from Britain, overall cancer incidence was not increased among children born after assisted conception. Assisted conception was associated with an increased risk of hepatoblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma, but the absolute risks were small.

Williams C.L.; Bunch K.J.; Stiller C.A.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Raw versus Cooked Vegetables and Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...study center, education, parity, energy, and alcohol intake but not for known...hypopharyngeal and esophageal cancer (Japan). Cancer Causes Control 2000;11...Hsu JP, Fry WG, Parker RP. Effect of household preparation on levels of pesticide residues...

Lilli B. Link and John D. Potter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy Balance and Breast Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Zhu Z, Jiang W. Dietary energy restriction in breast cancer...induced in mammary carcinomas by energy restriction. Cancer Res 2004...the effect of World War II in Norway. Cancer Causes Control 1996...Determinants of 24-hour energy expenditure in man. Methods...

Alecia Malin; Charles E. Matthews; Xiao-Ou Shu; Hui Cai; Qi Dai; Fan Jin; Yu-Tang Gao; and Wei Zheng

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

New perspectives on the cancer risks of trichloroethylene, its metabolites, and chlorination by-products  

SciTech Connect

Scientific developments in the 1990`s have important implications for the assessment of cancer risks posed by exposures to trichloroethylene (TCE). These new developments include: epidemiological studies; experimental studies of TCE carcinogenicity, metabolism and metabolite carcinogenicity; applications of new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for TCE; and new pharmacodynamic data obtained for TCE and its rhetabolites. Following a review of previous assessments of TCE carcinogenicity, each of these new sets of developments is summarized. The new epidemiological data do not provide evidence of TCE carcinogenicity in humans, and the new pharmacodynamic data support the hypothesis that TCE carcinogenicity is caused by TCE-induced cytotoxicity. Based on this information, PBPK-based estimates for likely no-adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for human exposures to TCE are calculated to be 16 ppb for TCE in air respired 24 hr/day, and 210 ppb for TCE in drinking water. Cancer risks of zero are predicted for TCE exposures below these calculated NOAELs. For comparison, hypothetical cancer risks posed by lifetime ingestive and multiroute household exposures to TCE in drinking water, at the currently enforced Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) concentration of 5 ppb are extrapolated from animal bioassay data using a conservative, linear dose-response model. These TCE-related risks are compared to corresponding ones associated with concentrations of chlorination by-products (CBP) in household water. It is shown that, from the standpoint of comparative hypothetical cancer risks, based on conservative linear dose-response extrapolations, there would likely be no health benefit, and more likely a possible health detriment, associated with any switch from a household water supply containing <375 ppb TCE to one containing CBP at levels corresponding to the currently proposed 80-ppb MCL for total trihalomethanes.

Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Slone, T.; Gold, L.S.; Manley, N.; Revzan, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that contralateral breast doses and LAR were comparable to WBRT, despite their added complexity. The smaller irradiated volume of the ABPI plan contributed to a halving of LAR for contralateral breast compared with the other plan types. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for a left breast protocol using kilovoltage CBCT contributed <10% to LAR for the majority of organs, and did not exceed 22% of total organ dose. Conclusions: Phantom measurements and calculations of LAR from the BEIR VII models predict that complex breast radiotherapy techniques do not increase the theoretical risk of second cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Comparison of radiation exposure and associated radiation-induced cancer risks from mammography and molecular imaging of the breast  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Recent studies have raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. Little has been published regarding the relative exposure and risks associated with breast imaging techniques such as breast specific gamma imaging (BSGI), molecular breast imaging (MBI), or positron emission mammography (PEM). The purpose of this article was to estimate and compare the risks of radiation-induced cancer from mammography and techniques such as PEM, BSGI, and MBI in a screening environment. Methods: The authors used a common scheme for all estimates of cancer incidence and mortality based on the excess absolute risk model from the BEIR VII report. The lifetime attributable risk model was used to estimate the lifetime risk of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality. All estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were based on a population of 100 000 females followed from birth to age 80 and adjusted for the fraction that survives to various ages between 0 and 80. Assuming annual screening from ages 40 to 80 and from ages 50 to 80, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality attributed to digital mammography, screen-film mammography, MBI, BSGI, and PEM was calculated. The corresponding cancer incidence and mortality from natural background radiation was calculated as a useful reference. Assuming a 15%-32% reduction in mortality from screening, the benefit/risk ratio for the different imaging modalities was evaluated. Results: Using conventional doses of 925 MBq Tc-99m sestamibi for MBI and BSGI and 370 MBq F-18 FDG for PEM, the cumulative cancer incidence and mortality were found to be 15-30 times higher than digital mammography. The benefit/risk ratio for annual digital mammography was >50:1 for both the 40-80 and 50-80 screening groups, but dropped to 3:1 for the 40-49 age group. If the primary use of MBI, BSGI, and PEM is in women with dense breast tissue, then the administered doses need to be in the range 75-150 MBq for Tc-99m sestamibi and 35 MBq-70 MBq for F-18 FDG in order to obtain benefit/risk ratios comparable to those of mammography in these age groups. These dose ranges should be achievable with enhancements to current technology while maintaining a reasonable examination time. Conclusions: The results of the dose estimates in this study clearly indicate that if molecular imaging techniques are to be of value in screening for breast cancer, then the administered doses need to be substantially reduced to better match the effective doses of mammography.

O'Connor, Michael K.; Li Hua; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Clancy, Conor B.; Vetter, Richard J. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, St. James's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Radiation Safety, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radon and the risks of cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of April, Denis Henshaw and colleagues1 published their finding of significant correlations between average indoor radon levels in different countries and the incidence of leukaemia and other cancers in children, ... a similar correlation for prostatic cancer2. Significant regional correlations have also been reported between indoor radon and acute myeloid leukaemia in Britain3 and Canada1.

Julian Peto

1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Perceived Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Sources of Risk Judgments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...were either semi-retired (n = 3) or retired (n = 4); and three described themselves...Psychol 1984;3:431-57. 20 Lipkus IM, Crawford Y, Fenn K, et al. Testing different...Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public...

Kathryn A. Robb; Anne Miles; and Jane Wardle

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Risk of radon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 98) considered the individual lung cancer risk to the general population from indoor exposure to radon-222 and concluded that a current upper estimate is 10"4 per lifetime per working ... estimate, a further potentially major consideration was not included. The general background effect of radon was assessed by identifying lung cancer rates before cigarette smoking became popular. Those rates ...

ROBERT L. FLEISCHER

1981-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer from select US states , Michelle Chino3 , Karl Kingsley1* Abstract Objectives: To examine the primary risk factor for oral cancer in oral cancer incidence and mortality. Methods: Population-based data on oral cancer morbidity

Ahmad, Sajjad

25

EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Brenner* Abstract--There is strong evidence that ionizing radiation increases cancer risks at high doses. There exists a range of high radiation doses which demonstra- bly increase cancer risks, and a lower dose rangePaper EXTRAPOLATING RADIATION-INDUCED CANCER RISKS FROM LOW DOSES TO VERY LOW DOSES David J

Brenner, David Jonathan

26

Improved Cancer Risk Assessment Using Text Mining Name Mode of Action Precision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved Cancer Risk Assessment Using Text Mining Name Mode of Action Precision Aflatoxin B1 for risk assessment purposes Cancer Risk Assessment examines existing scientific evidence to determine the relationship between exposure to a chemical and the likelihood of developing cancer from that exposure. Text

Korhonen, Anna

27

A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating short- and long-term processes. Part II: second cancer risk estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation dose calculations. An important goal of our model development is second cancer risk estimation

Shuryak, Igor; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Identifying Latent Classes of Adults at Risk for Skin Cancer Based on Constitutional Risk and Sun Protection Behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these habits were greater for those with higher...skin cancer. The classes seemed to represent...numbers indicating greater risk in the class (Tables 1 and 2...higher risk reported greater sun protection practices. Latent Class Validation The LCA...

Alana D. Steffen; Karen Glanz; and Lynne R. Wilkens

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

B Lifetime  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lifetime Lifetime Lifetime is similar to half-life, which you may have studied in radioactivity. More details on lifetime. Lifetime is the average time between creation and decay of a particle, which cannot be predicted for an individual particle, so we use the average time. The lifetime is the time when e-1 (or 37%) of them have survived. Derivation of equation To simplify calculations, we will use only the information in a plane perpendicular (transverse) to the beams, that is, in the x-y plane. The lifetime of B mesons is t = d/v (since velocity = distance/time) The velocity can be determined from the momentum. However, we cannot use the usual equation p = mv These particles are moving at velocities close to the speed of light, c. Here the correct formula is (Do you find the usual formula for p if v is much smaller than c?)

30

EPA 402-R-99-003 ESTIMATING RADIOGENIC CANCER RISKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ionizing radiation. Using this methodology, numerical estimates of the risk per unit dose were derived the Agency's methodology for deriving estimates of excess cancer morbidity and mortality due to low doses-body radiation: the low-LET nominal estimate increased from 5.1Ă?10-2 Gy-1 to 5.75Ă?10-2 Gy-1 . In this document

31

Particle Lifetimes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reviewing Particle Lifetimes Reviewing Particle Lifetimes The lifetimes of elementary particles are statistical in nature. In a given sample, one particle might decay immediately, another in 1 nanosecond, yet another after 10 milliseconds, and still another in 50 years. What we call the lifetime is the time it takes for a sample to decay so 1/e (~30%) of the sample is left; after 2 lifetimes, 1/e2 of the sample is left, and so on. Take, for example, a sample of cosmic ray muons produced in the upper atmosphere. These muons, when observed at (relative) rest in the laboratory, have a mean lifetime T. Now, since particle decay is statistical in nature, the number of undecayed particles after a given time is a negative exponential function: N(t) = No e-t/T where N(t) is the number of muons at time t, No is the initial number of

32

Portable stove intervention reduces lung cancer mortality risk in lifetime smoky coal users  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pattern that may be associated with household coal burning Howard D. Hosgood 1 William Pao...combustion, particularly from bituminous coal. To further explore the clinical and histological...all subjects with KRAS mutations burned coal indoors for heating and cooking, our findings...

H. Dean Hosgood; Min Shen; Robert Champan; Eric Chen; Tongzhang Zheng; Kyoung-mu Lee; Xingzhou He; Qing Lan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Screening for Pancreatic Cancer in High-Risk Individuals: A Call for Endoscopic Ultrasound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biomarkers of breast cancer risk. Thirty-first San Antonio...sedentary lifestyle), is a risk factor for breast cancer. Observational...CER) and exercise reduce risk, particularly of postmenopausal...tumours. IER may also be more acceptable than CER which has been difficult...

Alberto Larghi; Elizabeth C. Verna; Piera Giuseppina Lecca; and Guido Costamagna

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Identifying Men Diagnosed With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Who are at High Risk for Death From Prostate Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Men Diagnosed With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Who are at High Risk for Death From Prostate Cancer Anthony V. D'Amico,* Ming Hui-Chen, Andrew A. Renshaw, Brenda Sussman, Kimberly A), Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, Department

Chen, Ming-Hui

35

Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and risk of breast cancer: The Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer Study (WEB Study)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...risk of breast cancer: The Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer Study...study in two counties of western New York. Cases were women with primary incident...adjusted for age, education, total energy and other nutrient and breast cancer...

Mary E. Platek; Jo L. Freudenheim; Sylvia Quick; Jing Nie; Paola Muti; Susan E. McCann; Maurizio Trevisan; Peter Shields; and Stephen B. Edge

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Associations between Beer, Wine, and Liquor Consumption and Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...particularly risk at high consumption levels. (Cancer...cancer deaths in the world. Although tobacco...Alcoholic beverage consumption has been established...adjusted for total energy intake and consumption of fruits and vegetables...

Chun Chao

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - anal cancer risk Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anal cancer risk Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Summer Internship Results Symposium Text Mining...

38

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

39

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and prevention of breast cancer: pooled analysis. AnticancerBray F, Ferlay J, Pisani P. Global cancer statistics, 2002.CA-Cancer J Clin. 2005;55(2):74-108. American Cancer

Mohr, Sharif Burgette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluating serum anti-cyclin B1 antibodies as a biomarker for prevalent, early lung cancer in a population at high-risk for lung cancer  

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...postmenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer in the NCIC...on bone loss in women at high risk for breast cancer, within a...postmenopausal women at increased risk of developing breast cancer...Eligible women had to have an acceptable quality BMD scan by DEXA taken...

Ann Marie Egloff; Joel Weissfeld; Stephanie R. Land; and Olivera J. Finn

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessing Cancer Risk in China from ?-Hexachlorocyclohexane Emitted from Chinese and Indian Sources  

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The contribution of fresh use of lindane in India to the cancer risk in China was almost 1 order of magnitude higher than that of the reemission of ?-HCH from Indian soils. ... Hence, we assumed that the cancer risk at each model grid point resulted from local contamination of ?-HCH in the atmosphere, water, soil, and food. ...

Yue Xu; Chongguo Tian; Jianmin Ma; Xiaoping Wang; Jun Li; Jianhui Tang; Yingjun Chen; Wei Qin; Gan Zhang

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

Lung Cancer in Never Smokers: Clinical Epidemiology and Environmental Risk Factors  

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...smoke, aerosolized cooking oils, and SHS. Studies evaluating...Kleinerman RA, et al. Cooking oil fumes and risk of lung cancer...Hirayama T . Non-smoking wives of heavy smokers have a higher risk of...a case-control study in Missouri (United States). Cancer Causes...

Jonathan M. Samet; Erika Avila-Tang; Paolo Boffetta; Lindsay M. Hannan; Susan Olivo-Marston; Michael J. Thun; and Charles M. Rudin

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities  

SciTech Connect

Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: • Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. • Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates • Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. • These metals were not detected in background air samples. • Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D and Risk of Incident Ovarian Cancer  

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...the U.S. due to inadequate doses of solar ultraviolet-B radiation. Cancer 2002...1867-75. 20 Grant WB. Ecologic studies of solar UV-B radiation and cancer mortality rates...cancer risk: a case-control study in Mexico. Oncology 2002;63:151-7. 24 Genkinger...

Shelley S. Tworoger; I-Min Lee; Julie E. Buring; Bernard Rosner; Bruce W. Hollis; and Susan E. Hankinson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Alcohol Consumption and the Risk for Prostate Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition  

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...Communications Alcohol Consumption and the Risk for...Welfare and Sports; World Cancer Research...association of alcohol consumption at recruitment...and nonalcohol energy intake. Overall, neither alcohol consumption at baseline nor...

Sabine Rohrmann; Jakob Linseisen; Timothy J. Key; Majken K. Jensen; Kim Overvad; Nina Fřns Johnsen; Anne Tjřnneland; Rudolf Kaaks; Manuela M. Bergmann; Cornelia Weikert; Androniki Naska; Antonia Trichopoulou; Dimitrios Trichopoulos; Valeria Pala; Carlotta Sacerdote; Domenico Palli; Rosario Tumino; H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; Alina Vrieling; Carlos A. González; Nerea Larrańaga; Carmen Navarro; Aurelio Barricarte; J. Ramon Quiros; Carmen Martínez-García; Göran Hallmans; Pär Stattin; Jonas Manjer; Elisabet Wirfält; Sheila Bingham; Key-Tee Khaw; Lars Egevad; Pietro Ferrari; Mazda Jenab; and Elio Riboli

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nonsmoking-related Arylamine Exposure and Bladder Cancer Risk  

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...bladder cancer in the general population. Introduction...emissions (28) and diesel engine exhaust (29) , and...bladder cancer in the general population. The costs...bladder cancer in the general population. | Biological...

Paul L. Skipper; Steven R. Tannenbaum; Ronald K. Ross; and Mimi C. Yu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to Routine Mammographic Screening Featured Project Description David J. Brenner, Steve Marino, and Charles Geard, Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York Summary: To obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Abstract: The aim of this work is to obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Given the increasing emphasis on clinical mammographic screening for breast cancer, it is of societal importance to provide realistic risk estimates with realistic confidence bounds for breast cancer

48

The sensitivity of the statistical procedures utilizing the Hartley-Sielken models to do low dose cancer risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(d) for a grid of t and d values. ) The distribution of T2 was taken to be exponential with p(T & t) = 1 -e 2 and either 3. 5 which implies a median time from onset to cancer caused death of . 2 (that is, 1/5 of a lifetime), or 1. 4 2 which implies... a median of . 5 (that is, 1/2 of a lifetime). These two values correspond respectively to "short" and "moderately long" median times from cancer onset to cancer caused death. (Table A. 3 indicates the percentiles of both distributions for T2...

Sabbagh, Mayna

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Urinary strontium and the risk of breast cancer: A case-control study in Guangzhou, China  

SciTech Connect

Strontium has been widely used in industries like electronic and pharmacy. It has a carcinogenic potential, however, and no study has been conducted to evaluate its effects on cancer risk. The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between strontium and breast cancer risk in a case-control study including 240 incident invasive breast cancer patients and 246 age-matched controls. We measured the urinary concentrations of strontium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and conducted face-to-face interviews to obtain information on potential breast cancer risk factors. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the association. Creatinine-adjusted levels [median (25th, 75th) {mu}g/g] of strontium were 155.59 (99.05, 230.70) in the breast cancer patients and 119.62 (81.97, 163.76) in the controls. Women in the highest tertile of strontium showed 124% increased risk of breast cancer, when compared with those in the lowest tertile after adjustment for the potential risk factors [OR (95% CI): 2.24 (1.42-3.81)]. This association was particularly strong for HER2 positive breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 10.92 (3.53-33.77)], and only occurred among premenopausal women. These results suggest a potential role of strontium in the development of breast cancer and urge further studies on the environmental contamination and the physiological and pathological mechanisms of strontium.

Chen, Li-Juan [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Tang, Lu-Ying [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China) [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China); The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510630 (China); He, Jian-Rong [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China) [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Guangzhou 510623 (China); Su, Yi; Cen, Yu-Ling; Yu, Dan-Dan [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Wu, Bang-Hua [The Guangdong Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Diseases, Guangzhou 510300 (China)] [The Guangdong Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Diseases, Guangzhou 510300 (China); Lin, Ying [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Chen, Wei-Qing [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Song, Er-Wei, E-mail: songerwei02@yahoo.com.cn [The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 107 Yanjiang West, Guangzhou 510120 (China)] [The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 107 Yanjiang West, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Ren, Ze-Fang, E-mail: renzef@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [The School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan 2nd Rd, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Reduced Repair of the Oxidative 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage and Risk of Head and Neck Cancer  

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...Oncology, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot, Israel...Oncology, Sourasky Medical Center; 5 Sackler Faculty...Research, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; and 8 Department of Industrial Engineering and Management...carcinogenesis|cancer risk assessment|8-oxoguanine DNA...

Tamar Paz-Elizur; Rami Ben-Yosef; Dalia Elinger; Akiva Vexler; Meir Krupsky; Alain Berrebi; Adi Shani; Edna Schechtman; Laurence Freedman; and Zvi Livneh

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Abstract B30: Indicators of energy balance and breast cancer risk among white and black women  

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...Lifestyle, and Genetics Physical Activity and Energy Balance Physical Activity and Energy Balance: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts...2013; Atlanta, GA Abstract B30: Indicators of energy balance and breast cancer risk among white and...

Maureen Sanderson; Sandra L. Deming-Halverson; Alecia M. Fair; Martha J. Shrubsole; Alicia Beeghly-Fadiel; Sarah Nechuta; Yong Cui; David Shen-Miller; Heather O'Hara; Nia Foderingham; Xiao-Ou Shu; Wei Zheng

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mammary Gland Development, Reproductive History, and Breast Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Development, Reproductive History, and Breast Cancer...Molecular and Cellular Engineering, Stellar-Chance...Molecular and Cellular Engineering [L. A. C., C...Development, Reproductive History, and Breast Cancer...Molecular and Cellular Engineering [L. A. C., C...

Lewis A. Chodosh; Celina M. D'Cruz; Heather Perry Gardner; Seung I. Ha; Sandra T. Marquis; Jayant V. Rajan; Douglas B. Stairs; James Y. Wang; and Man Wang

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Occupational Risks for Bladder Cancer among Men in Sweden  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MATERIALS AND METHODS The Cancer-Environment Registry and the statistical...Briefly, the Cancer-Environment Registry links current employment...P engineers (SIR = 1.39; 84 cases; P engineers (SIR = 1.19; 276 cases...

Hans S. R. Malker; Joseph K. McLaughlin; Debra T. Silverman; Jan L. E. Ericsson; B. J. Stone; Jan A. Weiner; Birgitta K. Malker; and William J. Blot

1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Red Meat, Chicken, and Fish Consumption and Risk of Colorectal Cancer  

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...unity. Conclusion: Consumption of fresh red meat and...risk of rectal cancer. Consumption of chicken and fish...Introduction In 1997, the World Cancer Research Fund...Research stated that consumption of red meat probably...or their reported energy intake was in the lowest...

Dallas R. English; Robert J. MacInnis; Allison M. Hodge; John L. Hopper; Andrew M. Haydon; and Graham G. Giles

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Variety in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and the Risk of Lung Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition  

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...Vegetable and fruit consumption has been hypothesized...cancer risk. The 2007 World Cancer Research Fund...vegetable and fruit consumption and energy intake increased with...fruit and vegetable consumption. Those reporting higher...

Frederike L. Büchner; H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; Martine M. Ros; Kim Overvad; Christina C. Dahm; Louise Hansen; Anne Tjřnneland; Françoise Clavel-Chapelon; Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault; Marina Touillaud; Rudolf Kaaks; Sabine Rohrmann; Heiner Boeing; Ute Nöthlings; Antonia Trichopoulou; Dimosthenis Zylis; Vardis Dilis; Domenico Palli; Sabina Sieri; Paolo Vineis; Rosario Tumino; Salvatore Panico; Petra H.M. Peeters; Carla H. van Gils; Eiliv Lund; Inger T. Gram; Tonje Braaten; María-José Sánchez; Antonio Agudo; Nerea Larrańaga; Eva Ardanaz; Carmen Navarro; Marcial V. Argüelles; Jonas Manjer; Elisabet Wirfält; Göran Hallmans; Torgny Rasmuson; Tim J. Key; Kay-Tee Khaw; Nick Wareham; Nadia Slimani; Anne-Claire Vergnaud; Wei W. Xun; Lambertus A.L.M. Kiemeney; and Elio Riboli

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

Kohler, Racquel E. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheets, Nathan C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Wheeler, Stephanie B. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Nutting, Chris [Royal Marsden Hospital, London, United Kindom (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Division of Clinical Studies, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Chera, Bhishamjit S., E-mail: bchera@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues  

SciTech Connect

Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

Wiltse, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy Balance, the PI3K-AKT-mTOR Pathway Genes, and the Risk of Bladder Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subgroups as defined energy balance status. Compared with...intake and smoking status. Energy balance reflects...physical activity, energy balance, and cancer...socioeconomic status, and risks of...bladder cancer in US men and women...

Jie Lin; Jianming Wang; Anthony J. Greisinger; H. Barton Grossman; Michele R. Forman; Colin P. Dinney; Ernest T. Hawk; and Xifeng Wu

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Communicating Breast Cancer Risks to Women Using Different Formats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...point estimates or range of risks as equally acceptable. Both formats lead to short-term reductions in perceived risk (i.e., greater accuracy...point estimates or range of risks as equally acceptable. Both formats lead to short-term...

Isaac M. Lipkus; William M. P. Klein; and Barbara K. Rimer

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Genetic Polymorphisms of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated and Breast Cancer Risk  

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...7 Microbiology and Genetic Engineering, College of Natural Science...of the Korean Science and Engineering Foundation. The costs of...pregnancy, parity, family history of breast cancer, alcohol...exclusion of those with previous history of cancer or previous history...

Kyoung-Mu Lee; Ji-Yeob Choi; Sue Kyung Park; Hye-Won Chung; Byungchan Ahn; Keun-Young Yoo; Wonshik Han; Dong-Young Noh; Sei-Hyun Ahn; Ho Kim; Qingyi Wei; and Daehee Kang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Physical Activity and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review  

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...diabetes, family history of pancreatic cancer...record (15, 29) or energy expenditure estimated...including family history of pancreatic cancer...8 Perseghin G, Price TB, Petersen KF...smoking status and history of diabetes: a large-scale...Massachusetts, USA. | Journal Article...

Ying Bao and Dominique S. Michaud

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Is a Personal History of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Associated with Increased or Decreased Risk of Other Cancers?  

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...nearly direct evidence that solar UVB irradiance reduces the risk...accrue (39-45 ). A study in Canada observed an SIR of 1.6, with...J. Alberg). Figure 1. Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR...cancer: additional evidence that solar ultraviolet-B irradiance reduces...

Anthony J. Alberg and Alexander H. Fischer

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Circadian clock genes and risk of fatal prostate cancer  

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Circadian genes may be involved in regulating cancer-related pathways, including cell proliferation, DNA damage response, and apoptosis. We aimed to assess the role of genetic variation in core circadian rhyth...

Sarah C. Markt; Unnur A. Valdimarsdottir; Irene M. Shui…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dietary Folate and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...also made for nonalcohol energy intake, using the residual...vitamin B6 intake were energy adjusted using the residual method. The measurement unit was set at 1 SD of the...cancer, and nonalcohol energy intake. The reference...

Claudio Pelucchi; Carlotta Galeone; Renato Talamini; Eva Negri; Maria Parpinel; Silvia Franceschi; Maurizio Montella; and Carlo La Vecchia

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Urinary Bladder Cancer Risk Factors in Egypt–Response  

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...treatment program for hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt David D. Kim 1 David W. Hutton 1 Ahmed A...Institute, Menofeia University, Menofeia, Egypt 3Gharbiah Cancer Society, Gharbiah, Egypt Egypt has one of the highest prevalence rates...

Yun-Ling Zheng; Sania Amr; Chiranjeev Dash; Christopher A. Loffredo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Anthropometry and Esophageal Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition  

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...Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 21 Cancer Epidemiology...esophageal cancer. Methods: We applied multivariable adjusted Cox proportional...spouses), and the cohorts in Utrecht (the Netherlands) and Florence...

Annika Steffen; Matthias B. Schulze; Tobias Pischon; Thomas Dietrich; Esther Molina; Maria-Dolores Chirlaque; Aurelio Barricarte; Pilar Amiano; J. Ramón Quirós; Rosario Tumino; Amalia Mattiello; Domenico Palli; Paolo Vineis; Claudia Agnoli; Gesthimani Misirli; Paolo Boffetta; Rudolf Kaaks; Sabine Rohrmann; H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; Petra H.M. Peeters; Anne M. May; Elizabeth A. Spencer; Naomi E. Allen; Sheila Bingham; Anne Tjřnneland; Jytte Halkjćr; Kim Overvad; Jakob Stegger; Jonas Manjer; Björn Lindkvist; Göran Hallmanns; Roger Stenling; Eiliv Lund; Elio Riboli; Carlos A. Gonzalez; and Heiner Boeing

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

Dibley, V. R., LLNL

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Body Size and Composition and Prostate Cancer Risk  

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...California 95616 ABSTRACT The development of stable immunoconjugates...ovarian cancer. The development of serum sickness-like...vivo use, leads to the development of immune responses...3-particles of low energy (3), and the potential...Hammersmith Hospital Ethics Committee, and written...

Robert J. MacInnis; Dallas R. English; Dorota M. Gertig; John L. Hopper; and Graham G. Giles

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Vitamin D and Cancer Risk among American Indians  

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...higher for men in New Mexico, liver cancer, is not...in both Alaska and New Mexico probably derive much of their vitamin D from solar UVB irradiance, with...New Mexican Indians, solar UVB doses are two to...white Americans in New Mexico are among the lowest...

William B. Grant

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Height, Age at Menarche, and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer  

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...88:s145-8. 16 Australian National Audit Office. Integrity of the electoral role...Canberra (Australia): Australian National Audit Office; 2002. Available from: http...313-42. 22 Kaaks R, Lukanova A. Energy balance and cancer: the role of insulin...

Susan J. Jordan; Penelope M. Webb; and Adčle C. Green

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Body Size and Composition and Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer  

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...100 g using digital electronic scales, height to 1...the Electoral Rolls, electronic phone books and the...measure at baseline. Calculation of person-time began...postmenopausal years and that it does not manifest until 15...Bianchini F, Eds. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention...

Robert J. MacInnis; Dallas R. English; Dorota M. Gertig; John L. Hopper; and Graham G. Giles

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Urinary Bladder Cancer Risk Factors in Egypt—Letter  

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...DLBCL): A comparative study between Egypt and Sweden Therese AS Jacobson 1 Abeer...Sweden 2National Cancer Institute, Cairo, Egypt 3Department of Oncology and Pathology...viruses infection in some countries including Egypt. We therefore assume that the progression...

Thomas Behrens; Beate Pesch; Thomas Brüning

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Mammographic Density Correlation with Gail Model Breast Cancer Risk Estimates and Component Risk Factors  

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...University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington Grant support: Seattle...National Cancer Institute grant CA66186) and Clinical...Genetics Fellowship grant 1R25 CA85771. The...both subjective and computer-assisted objective...

Melanie R. Palomares; Joelle R.B. Machia; Constance D. Lehman; Janet R. Daling; and Anne McTiernan

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Obesity, High Energy Intake, Lack of Physical Activity, and the Risk of Kidney Cancer  

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...activity, alcohol consumption, diet (69-item...Assessment of obesity and energy intake Participants...North Carolina). Energy intake and total...status, alcohol consumption, smoking, BMI...of cancer in the world: comparative risk...height, body mass, energy intake, and physical...

Sai Yi Pan; Marie DesMeules; Howard Morrison; and Shi Wu Wen

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Plasma Choline Metabolites and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study  

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...colorectal neoplasia: a review.J Nutr 2002;132:2350S-2355S. 8. Pufulete M , Al-Ghnaniem R, Leather AJ, Appleby P, Gout S, Terry C, et alFolate status, genomic DNA hypomethylation, and risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer: a case control study...

Sajin Bae; Cornelia M. Ulrich; Marian L. Neuhouser; Olga Malysheva; Lynn B. Bailey; Liren Xiao; Elissa C. Brown; Kara L. Cushing-Haugen; Yingye Zheng; Ting-Yuan David Cheng; Joshua W. Miller; Ralph Green; Dorothy S. Lane; Shirley A.A. Beresford; Marie A. Caudill

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Regional Distribution of Human Papillomavirus DNA and Other Risk Factors for Invasive Cervical Cancer in Panama  

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...Other Risk Factors for Invasive Cervical Cancer in Panama 1 1 This study was supported by Contract NC1-CP-EB-41026...and Instituto Oncologico Nacional [J. G.], Panama City, Republic of Panama 2 Present address: Viral Exanthems and Herpesvirus...

Judit Acs; Allan Hildesheim; William C. Reeves; Maria Brenes; Louise Brinton; Carol Lavery; Maria Elena de la Guardia; Julio Godoy; William E. Rawls

1989-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Associations of Sedentary Lifestyle, Obesity, Smoking, Alcohol Use, and Diabetes with the Risk of Colorectal Cancer  

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...random sample of state households. One control was...colorectal cancer risk. Energy intake (independent...markedly (e.g., in Japan; Ref. 5). Thus...resulting in a positive energy bal ance, weight...in Japan. Tokyo, Japan: Women's University...classificationof energy costs of human physical...

Loďc Le Marchand; Lynne R. Wilkens; Laurence N. Kolonel; Jean H. Hankin; and Li-Ching Lyu

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Associations between Beer, Wine, and Liquor Consumption and Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-analysis  

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...literature on beer, wine, and liquor intake and...alcoholic beverage (beer, wine, or liquor) and lung...per bottle, 150 mL of wine per glass, and 40 mL...beverage could potentially increase the risk of lung cancer...alcoholic beverages, and quality of smoking adjustment...

Chun Chao

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk  

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Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk Title Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goth-Goldstein, Regine, Marion L. Russell, Donghui Li, Ana P. MĂĽller, Maira Caleffi, Joao Eschiletti, Marcia Graudenz, and Michael D. Sohn Date Published 04/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This study investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) increases breast cancer risk. PAHs are products of incomplete burning of organic matter and are present in cigarette smoke, ambient air, drinking water, and diet. PAHs require metabolic transformation to bind to DNA, causing DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and are thought to be an important pre-cancer marker. In breast tissue, PAHs appear to be metabolized to their cancer-causing form primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Because the genotoxic impact of PAH depends on their metabolism, we hypothesized that high CYP1B1 enzyme levels result in increased formation of PAH-DNA adducts in breast tissue, leading to increased development of breast cancer. We have investigated molecular mechanisms of the relationship between PAH exposure, CYP1B1 expression and breast cancer risk in a clinic-based case-control study. We collected histologically normal breast tissue from 56 women (43 cases and 13 controls) undergoing breast surgery and analyzed these specimens for CYP1B1 genotype, PAH-DNA adducts and CYP1B1 gene expression. We did not detect any difference in aromatic DNA adduct levels of cases and controls, only between smokers and non-smokers. CYP1B1 transcript levels were slightly lower in controls than cases, but the difference was not statistically significant. We found no correlation between the levels of CYP1B1 expression and DNA adducts. If CYP1B1 has any role in breast cancer etiology it might be through its metabolism of estrogen rather than its metabolism of PAHs. However, due to the lack of statistical power these results should be interpreted with caution

80

Healthy Lifestyle on the Risk of Breast Cancer  

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...of activities such as household work. Physical activity...metabolic equivalents of energy expenditure (METS...prevention strategies in Japan. Tobacco smoking and...risk: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort...et alActive smoking, household passive smoking, and...

Luisa María Sánchez-Zamorano; Lourdes Flores-Luna; Angélica Ángeles-Llerenas; Isabelle Romieu; Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce; Hernando Miranda-Hernández; Fernando Mainero-Ratchelous; and Gabriela Torres-Mejía

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Meat, Fish, and Colorectal Cancer Risk: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model adjusted for age, sex, energy (nonfat and fat sources), height, weight, work-related physical. Affiliations of authors: From the Nutrition and Hormones Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark (AO, A. Tjønneland); Institut National de la Santé et

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

Abstract 1561: An evaluation of the use of genetically modified mouse models in human cancer risk assessment.  

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...and educating the public about acceptable risk profiles for given chemopreventive...presence or number of cancers and an acceptable risk-benefit ratio have been the...precancers, however, may, with an acceptable risk-benefit ratio, also lead to...

David A. Eastmond; Suryanarayana V. Vulimiri; John E. French; and Babasaheb Sonawane

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

Cancer risk estimation in Belarussian children due to thyroid irradiation as a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect

The thyroid doses received by the juvenile population of Belarus following the Chernobyl accident ranged up to about 10 Gy. The thyroid cancer risk estimate recommended in NCRP Report No. 80 was used to predict the number of thyroid cancer cases among children during 1990-1992 in selected Belarussian regions and cities. The results obtained using this risk estimate show an excess of thyroid cancer cases being registered vs. the predicted cases. Thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys under investigation is higher than among girls in the postaccident period. The excess of the observed over the expected incidence in the general juvenile population is caused by the high thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys. These results, which can be considered part of the first stage of a thorough thyroid cancer risk estimation after the Chernobyl accident, demonstrate the critical need to complete these studies in depth. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Buglova, E.; Kenigsberg, J.E.; Sergeeva, N.V. [Research Inst. of Radiation Medicine, Minsk (Belarus)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p < .05). A statistically significant difference was found in the 3-year recurrence-free survival rate among the no further treatment, RT, and CRT groups (67.5%, 90.5%, and 97.5%, respectively; p < .05). The incidence of Grade 3-4 hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicities was not significantly different statistically between the RT and CRT groups (6.1% and 13.4%, respectively; p > .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.k [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Center for Clinical Trials, National Cancer Center, Kyongi (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

Zwahlen, Daniel R. [Radiation Oncology, Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: daniel.zwahlen@gmx.ch; Ruben, Jeremy D.; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L. [Radiation Oncology, Alfred Hospital and Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Schneider, Uwe [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Triemli Hospital, Zurich and Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from consuming aquatic food resources from chemically contaminated water  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from contaminated waters must confront the problems of long latency and rarity of the end point (cancer). The latency problem makes determination of diet history more difficult, while the low frequency of cancer as an end point reduces the statistical power of the study. These factors are discussed in relation to the study designs most commonly employed in epidemiology. It is suggested that the use of biomarkers for persistent chemicals may be useful to mitigate the difficulty of determining exposure, while the use of more prevalent and timely end points, such as carcinogen-DNA adducts or oncogene proteins, may make the latency and rarity problems more tractable.

Ozonoff, D. (Boston Univ. School of Public Health, MA (United States)); Longnecker, M.P. (UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Variants in Circadian rhythm genes and risk for prostate cancer: A population-based study in China  

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...resembling the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, whose constellation of symptoms are putative risk factors for prostate cancer...processes that may be related to prostate tumorigenesis, such as energy metabolism, sex steroid secretion, and inflammation, the...

Lisa Chu; Yong Zhu; Kim Danforth; Yu-Tang Gao; Tongzhang Zheng; Anand Chokkalingam; Isabell Sesterhenn; Ming-Chang Shen; and Ann Hsing

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Green tea and black tea consumption in relation to colorectal cancer risk: the Singapore Chinese Health Study  

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...Epidemiology 4: Diet, Alcohol, Energy Balance, and Cancer Risk Proc...Cancer Res, Volume 47, 2006 Green tea and black tea consumption...Experimental studies support both green and black tea as chemo-preventive...The relationships between green tea and black tea consumption...

Can-Lan Sun; Jian-Min Yuan; Woon-Puay Koh; Hin-Peng Lee; and Mimi C Yu

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

XPD Polymorphism and Risk of Subsequent Cancer in Individuals with Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer  

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...predisposition to reduced DNA repair capacity may be an underlying susceptibility...predisposition to reduced DNA repair capacity may be an underlying susceptibility...suggest that reduced DNA repair capacity may be an underlying risk factor...Scotto JFT, Fraumeni JF. Solar radiation. In: Schottenfeld...

Abenaa M. Brewster; Anthony J. Alberg; Paul T. Strickland; Sandy C. Hoffman; and Kathy Helzlsouer

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED{sub late}) in bone was 114 Gy{sub 2} (range, 30-167 Gy{sub 2}). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy{sub 2} (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy{sub 2} or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Geol, E-mail: cglee1023@yuhs.a [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Chang [Department of Otolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, In Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

P4-10-04: Automated Breast Cancer Risk Assessment: Identifying High Risk Women in the Primary Care Setting.  

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...high risk patients than average risk patients (p0.04). Use of...Conclusions: Performing personalized risk assessment and use of the decision...care setting was feasible and acceptable. These results suggest risk assessment alone may be enough...

E Ozanne; Z Omer; and K Carlson

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Clonal Hematopoiesis and Blood-Cancer Risk Inferred from Blood DNA Sequence  

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...-derived DNA from thousands of persons to identify inherited risk factors for common diseases. We reasoned that such data offered the opportunity to test the hypothesis that clonal expansions with somatic mutations are common and often precede blood cancers and to identify the genes in which mutations... The development of disease often involves dynamic processes that begin years or decades before the clinical onset. In many cases, however, the process of pathogenesis goes undetected until after the patient has symptoms and presents with clinically ...

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease in Women after Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer  

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...Radiation doses to the structures of interest were then estimated with the use of the treatment-planning system Helax–TMS, version 6.1B (Nucletron). In manual planning, the doses were estimated on the basis of charts on which isodose curves (i.e. lines delimiting areas receiving the same radiation dose) had... A large study shows that irradiation of the chest in women with breast cancer delivers an average of about 5 Gy and that the risk of a subsequent coronary event increases at a rate of 7.4% per gray in a linear fashion, without a threshold and with no apparent decline over time.

Darby S.C.; Ewertz M.; McGale P.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Association of Cancer Susceptibility Variants with Risk of Multiple Primary Cancers: The Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology Study  

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...Chicago, IL Abstract 5087: UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser 2.0 Jingchun Zhu 1 Brian Craft...and analyze that data. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer...enhances the interpretability of the cancer genomics information. UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser...

S. Lani Park; Christian P. Caberto; Yi Lin; Robert J. Goodloe; Logan Dumitrescu; Shelly-Ann Love; Tara C. Matise; Lucia A. Hindorff; Jay H. Fowke; Fredrick R. Schumacher; Jennifer Beebe-Dimmer; Chu Chen; Lifang Hou; Fridtjof Thomas; Ewa Deelman; Ying Han; Ulrike Peters; Kari E. North; Gerardo Heiss; Dana C. Crawford; Christopher A. Haiman; Lynne R. Wilkens; William S. Bush; Charles Kooperberg; Iona Cheng; Loďc Le Marchand

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Neutron Lifetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. The nucleon vector and axial vector weak coupling constants G_V and G_A determine the neutron lifetime as well as the strengths of weak interaction processes involving free neutrons and protons that are important in astrophysics, cosmology, solar physics and neutrino detection. In combination with a neutron decay angular correlation measurement, the neutron lifetime can be used to determine the first element of the CKM matrix Vud. Unfortunately the two main experimental methods for measuring the neutron lifetime currently disagree by almost 4 sigma. I will present a brief review of the status of the neutron lifetime and prospects for the future.

Wietfeldt, F E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Neutron Lifetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. The nucleon vector and axial vector weak coupling constants G_V and G_A determine the neutron lifetime as well as the strengths of weak interaction processes involving free neutrons and protons that are important in astrophysics, cosmology, solar physics and neutrino detection. In combination with a neutron decay angular correlation measurement, the neutron lifetime can be used to determine the first element of the CKM matrix Vud. Unfortunately the two main experimental methods for measuring the neutron lifetime currently disagree by almost 4 sigma. I will present a brief review of the status of the neutron lifetime and prospects for the future.

F. E. Wietfeldt

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

97

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Artem Ponomarev 3 , Shaowen Hu 3 , Jennifer Anderson 4 , Jane Harper 4 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA; 3 U.S.R.A., Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX, USA; 4 MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Didcot, UK Abstract: On space missions astronauts are exposed to a steady flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of high-energy protons and heavy ions. In the next decades long- term missions of up to 200 days to the Earth's moon and 1100 days to Mars are planed by NASA where cumulative doses will not be low (>100 mSv) albeit dose-

98

One-Carbon Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Risk: Prospective Investigation of Seven Circulating B Vitamins and Metabolites  

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...not been studied before. Materials and Methods: We analyzed...illustrated in Fig. 1 Figure 1. Diagram of the one-carbon metabolism...to prostate cancer risk. Materials and Methods Study Cohort The...project coordination and data handling. 1 Kim YI. Folate and colorectal...

Mattias Johansson; Bethany Van Guelpen; Stein Emil Vollset; Johan Hultdin; Anders Bergh; Tim Key; Řivind Midttun; Göran Hallmans; Per M. Ueland; and Pär Stattin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Prospective Study of Solar Exposure, Dietary Vitamin D Intake, and Risk of Breast Cancer among Middle-aged Women  

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...cancer risk was not related to solar exposure variables, including...assess the association between solar exposure and dietary or supplementary...n = 1,213), had total energy intake outside of the 1% to...843), or lacked data on all solar exposure variables (26...

Hannah Kuper; Ling Yang; Sven Sandin; Marie Lof; Hans-Olov Adami; and Elisabete Weiderpass

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Postoperative Chemotherapy Followed by Conformal Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in High-Risk Gastric Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the efficacy, toxicity, and pattern of relapse after adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional irradiation and concomitant LV5FU2 chemotherapy (high-dose leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil bolus plus continuous infusion) in the treatment of completely resected high-risk gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients with high-risk gastric cancer initially treated by total/partial gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy between January 2002 and June 2007. Median age was 54 years (range, 36-75 years). Postoperative treatment consisted of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes at 4500 cGy/25 fractions in association with concomitant chemotherapy. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of a 2-h infusion of leucovorin (200 mg/m Superscript-Two ) followed by a bolus of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m Superscript-Two ) and then a 44-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400-3600 mg/m Superscript-Two ) given every 14 days, for three cycles (LV5FU2 protocol). Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival were 50% and 48%, respectively. Distant metastases and peritoneal spread were the most frequent sites of relapse (37% each). After multivariate analysis, only pathologic nodal status was significantly associated with disease-free and overall survival. Acute toxicities were essentially gastrointestinal and hematologic. One myocardial infarction and one pulmonary embolism were also reported. Eighteen patients had a radiotherapy program interruption because of acute toxicity. All patients but 2 have completed radiotherapy. Conclusion: Postoperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by conformal radiotherapy in association with concurrent 5-fluorouracil seemed to be feasible and resulted in successful locoregional control.

Quero, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.quero@sls.aphp.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Bouchbika, Zineb; Kouto, Honorine; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Gornet, Jean-Marc [Department of Gastroenterology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Munoz, Nicolas [Department of General Surgery, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Cojean-Zelek, Isabelle [Department of Medical Oncology, Croix Saint-Simon Hospital, Paris (France); Houdart, Remi [Department of Digestive Surgery, Croix Saint-Simon Hospital, Paris (France); Panis, Yves [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (France); Valleur, Patrice [Department of Digestive Surgery, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Aparicio, Thomas [Department of Gastroenterology, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (France); Maylin, Claude; Hennequin, Christophe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Risk assessment of mortality for all-cause, ischemic heart disease, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer due to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on recent understanding of PM2.5 health-related problems from fossil-fueled power plants emission inventories collected in Taiwan, we have determined the loss of life expectancy (LLE) and the lifetime (75-year) risks for PM2.5 health-related mortalities as attributed to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant; the Taichung Power Plant (TCP), with an installed nominal electrical capacity of 5780 MW in 2013. Five plausible scenarios (combinations of emission controls, fuel switch, and relocation) and two risk factors were considered. It is estimated that the lifetime (75-y) risk for all-cause mortality was 0.3%–0.6% for males and 0.2%–0.4% for females, and LLE at 84 days in 1997 for the 23 million residents of Taiwan. The risk has been reduced to one-fourth at 0.05%–0.10% for males and 0.03%–0.06% for females, and LLE at 15 days in 2007, which was mainly attributed to the installation of desulfurization and de-NOx equipment. Moreover, additional improvements can be expected if we can relocate the power plant to a downwind site on Taiwan, and convert the fuel source from coal to natural gas. The risk can be significantly reduced further to one-fiftieth at 0.001%–0.002% for males and 0.001% for females, and LLE at 0.3 days. Nonetheless, it is still an order higher than the commonly accepted elevated-cancer risk at 0.0001% (10?6), indicating that the PM2.5 health-related risk for operating such a world-class power plant is not negligible. In addition, this study finds that a better-chosen site (involving moving the plant to the leeward side of Taiwan) can reduce the risk significantly as opposed to solely transitioning the fuel source to natural gas. Note that the fuel cost of using natural gas (0.11 USD/kWh in 2013) in Taiwan is about twice the price of using coal fuel (0.05 USD/kWh in 2013).

Pei-Hsuan Kuo; Ben-Jei Tsuang; Chien-Jen Chen; Suh-Woan Hu; Chun-Ju Chiang; Jeng-Lin Tsai; Mei-Ling Tang; Guan-Jie Chen; Kai-Chen Ku

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Neutron LifetimeNeutron Lifetime IUCF Colloquium April 13,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron LifetimeNeutron Lifetime IUCF Colloquium April 13, 2007 Albert Steyerl Department 940 878.5±0.8 885.7±0.8 new result neutronlifetime(),s year world average Neutron lifetime data #12 world average Neutron lifetime data A. Serebrov et al. 2005Storage of ultra-cold neutrons878.5 ±±±± 0

Steyerl, Albert

103

Reference computations of public dose and cancer risk from airborne releases of plutonium. Nuclear safety technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of computations of doses and the associated health risks of postulated accidental atmospheric releases from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) of one gram of weapons-grade plutonium in a form that is respirable. These computations are intended to be reference computations that can be used to evaluate a variety of accident scenarios by scaling the dose and health risk results presented here according to the amount of plutonium postulated to be released, instead of repeating the computations for each scenario. The MACCS2 code has been used as the basis of these computations. The basis and capabilities of MACCS2 are summarized, the parameters used in the evaluations are discussed, and results are presented for the doses and health risks to the public, both the Maximum Offsite Individual (a maximally exposed individual at or beyond the plant boundaries) and the population within 50 miles of RFP. A number of different weather scenarios are evaluated, including constant weather conditions and observed weather for 1990, 1991, and 1992. The isotopic mix of weapons-grade plutonium will change as it ages, the {sup 241}Pu decaying into {sup 241}Am. The {sup 241}Am reaches a peak concentration after about 72 years. The doses to the bone surface, liver, and whole body will increase slightly but the dose to the lungs will decrease slightly. The overall cancer risk will show almost no change over this period. This change in cancer risk is much smaller than the year-to-year variations in cancer risk due to weather. Finally, x/Q values are also presented for other applications, such as for hazardous chemical releases. These include the x/Q values for the MOI, for a collocated worker at 100 meters downwind of an accident site, and the x/Q value integrated over the population out to 50 miles.

Peterson, V.L.

1993-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

Uptake of Risk-Reducing Surgery in Unaffected Women at High Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Is Risk, Age, and Time Dependent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitivity and specificity of the risk-score system were 76.3...HGSIL among women with a high risk-score using the community...respectively. Conclusion With an acceptable accuracy, our data suggest that the HGSIL risk predictive model can be used...

D. Gareth R. Evans; Fiona Lalloo; Linda Ashcroft; Andrew Shenton; Tara Clancy; Andrew D. Baildam; Anne Brain; Penelope Hopwood; and Anthony Howell

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, for other contaminants studied for the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction are presented in several other technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the ''report number field'' for the number DOE/OR/21981*. Be sure to place the asterisk after the base number so your search can list the complete series of reports related to Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction.

Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Project PREVENT: A Randomized Trial to Reduce Multiple Behavioral Risk Factors for Colon Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...beyond emphasis on a single risk factor are acceptable to patient populations...beyond emphasis on a single risk factor are acceptable to patient populations...beyond emphasis on a single risk factor are acceptable to patient populations...

Karen M. Emmons; Colleen M. McBride; Elaine Puleo; Kathryn I. Pollak; Elizabeth Clipp; Karen Kuntz; Bess H. Marcus; Melissa Napolitano; Jane Onken; Frank Farraye; and Robert Fletcher

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Alcohol-Folate Interactions in the Risk of Oral Cancer in Women: A Prospective Cohort Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2007;27:87-94. 7 WHO.int [Internet]. Geneva: WHO global status report...Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse 2004: Available from: http...alcconsumpt.pdf . 8 Cancer.org [Internet]. Alcohol and cancer. American...

Jayapriyaa R. Shanmugham; Athanasios I. Zavras; Bernard A. Rosner; and Edward L. Giovannucci

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Registry-based Analysis of Occupational Risks for Primary Liver Cancer in Sweden  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and had jobs described as chemical engineer, chemical worker, and motor repairman...and Rappaport, E. A Swedish cancer environment registry available for research. Scand...H., and Weiner, J. The cancer environment registry, 1961-1973: examples of...

Joseph K. McLaughlin; Hans S. R. Malker; Birgitta K. Malker; B. J. Stone; Jan L. E. Ericsson; William J. Blot; Jan A. Weiner; and Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ordered Subset Analysis Identifies Loci Influencing Lung Cancer Risk on Chromosomes 6q and 12q  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environmental factors including tobacco smoke, radon gas, asbestos, arsenic, and some forms...American Cancer Society.; 2009. 2. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC...Islands Genetic African American Registry (Project SuGAR).Diabetes 2009;58(1...

Shenying Fang; Susan M. Pinney; Joan E. Bailey-Wilson; Mariza A. de Andrade; Yafang Li; Elena Kupert; Ming You; Ann G. Schwartz; Ping Yang; Marshall W. Anderson; and Christopher I. Amos

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Abstract 2830: Energy balance and breast cancer risk among sisters pairs in the Breast Cancer Family Registry Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for Cancer Research 7 January 2010 meeting-abstract Behavioral...Abstracts - Energy Balance: From...and Community Abstracts: AACR International...Prevention Research-- Dec 6-9...Houston, TX Abstract CN05-04: Energy balance within...

Fang Fang Zhang; Esther M. John; Dee W. West; Julia Knight; Irene Andrulis; Saundra Buys; Mary Daly; Beth Stearman; Manleen Kaur; Jamboor Vishwanatha; Alfredo Morabia; and Mary Beth Terry

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer Risks 40 Years after Exposure Cessation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...water and cancer, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer...adjusted for (e.g., diet, radon) is also possible, but there...cam.ac.uk/research/projects/arsenic/symposium/S1...Vol 84. Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer...

Craig M. Steinmaus; Catterina Ferreccio; Johanna Acevedo Romo; Yan Yuan; Sandra Cortes; Guillermo Marshall; Lee E. Moore; John R. Balmes; Jane Liaw; Todd Golden; and Allan H. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Active and Passive Smoking and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excluded. Ever smokers excluded. Energy-adjusted intake. Table 2...population-based cohort study in Japan-the JPHC study. Cancer Causes...Active cigarette smoking, household passive smoke exposure, and...smoking and pancreatic cancer in Japan. Cancer Causes Control 2002...

Mirjam M. Heinen; Bas A.J. Verhage; R. Alexandra Goldbohm; and Piet A. van den Brandt

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Dietary intake of acrylamide and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...questionnaire-based acrylamide intake and EOC risk. Acrylamide was energy-adjusted using the residual method, and was evaluated both...and no evidence for a dose-response were observed between energy-adjusted acrylamide intake and EOC risk (HR10microg/day...

Mireia Obón-Santacana; Petra H. Peeters; Heinz Freisling; Laure Dossus; Francoise Clavel-Chapelon; Laura Baglietto; Helena Schock; Renée T. Fortner; Heiner Boeing; Anne Tjonneland; Anja Olsen; Kim Overvad; Virginia Menéndez; Maria-Jose Sanchez; Nerea Larranaga; José María Huerta Castańo; Aurelio Barricarte; Kay-Tee Khaw; Nick Wareham; Ruth C. Travis; Melissa A. Merritt; Antonia Trichopoulou; Dimitrios Trichopoulos; Philippos Orfanos; Giovanna Masala; Sabina Sieri; Rosario Tumino; Paolo Vineis; Amalia Mattiello; H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; N. Charlotte Onland-Moret; Elisabet Wirfalt; Tanja Stocks; Annika Idahl; Eva Lundin; Guri Skeie; Inger T. Gram; Elisabete Weiderpass; Elio Riboli; Eric J. Duell

114

Dietary intake of acrylamide and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Health Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway 35 Community Medicine, Faculty of Health...acrylamide intake and EOC risk. Acrylamide was energy-adjusted using the residual method...dose-response were observed between energy-adjusted acrylamide intake and EOC risk...

Mireia Obón-Santacana; Petra H. Peeters; Heinz Freisling; Laure Dossus; Francoise Clavel-Chapelon; Laura Baglietto; Helena Schock; Renée T. Fortner; Heiner Boeing; Anne Tjonneland; Anja Olsen; Kim Overvad; Virginia Menéndez; Maria-Jose Sanchez; Nerea Larranaga; José María Huerta Castańo; Aurelio Barricarte; Kay-Tee Khaw; Nick Wareham; Ruth C. Travis; Melissa A. Merritt; Antonia Trichopoulou; Dimitrios Trichopoulos; Philippos Orfanos; Giovanna Masala; Sabina Sieri; Rosario Tumino; Paolo Vineis; Amalia Mattiello; H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; N. Charlotte Onland-Moret; Elisabet Wirfalt; Tanja Stocks; Annika Idahl; Eva Lundin; Guri Skeie; Inger T. Gram; Elisabete Weiderpass; Elio Riboli; and Eric J. Duell

115

Effect of Radiotherapy Volume and Dose on Secondary Cancer Risk in Stage I Testicular Seminoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate and compare the secondary cancer risk (SCR) due to para-aortic (PA), dogleg field (DLF), or extensive field (EF) radiotherapy (RT) at different dose levels for Stage I testicular seminoma. Methods and Materials: The organ equivalent dose concept with a linear, plateau, and linear-exponential dose-response model was applied to the dose distributions to estimate the SCR. The dose distributions were calculated in a voxel-based anthropomorphic phantom. Three different three-dimensional plans were computed: PA, DLF, and EF. The plans were calculated with 6-MV photons and two opposed fields, using 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: The estimated cumulative SCR for a 75-year-old patient treated with PA-RT at age 35 was 23.3% (linear model), 20.9% (plateau model), and 20.8% (linear-exponential model) compared with 19.8% for the general population. Dependent on the model, PA-RT compared with DLF-RT reduced the SCR by 48-63% or 64-69% when normalized to EF-RT. For PA-RT, the linear dose-response model predicted a decrease of 45% in the SCR, using 20 Gy instead of 30 Gy; the linear-exponential dose-response model predicted no change in SCR. Conclusion: Our model suggested that the SCR after PA-RT for Stage I testicular seminoma is reduced by approximately one-half to two-thirds compared with DLF-RT, independent of the dose-response model. The SCR is expected to be equal or lower with 20 Gy than with 30 Gy. In the absence of mature patient data, the organ equivalent dose concept offers the best potential method of estimating the SCR when discussing treatment options with patients.

Zwahlen, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)], E-mail: daniel.zwahlen@gmx.ch; Martin, Jarad M. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Millar, Jeremy L. [William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Schneider, Uwe [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Triemli Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Treating radiation-induced trismus in head and neck cancer;Exercise intervention and risk structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the incidence of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) and to assess the treatment… (more)

Pauli, Nina

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Biomarkers of Dietary Energy Restriction in Women at Increased Risk of Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Articles Biomarkers of Dietary Energy Restriction in Women at Increased Risk...Edinburgh EH4 2XR, United Kingdom. Dietary energy restriction (DER) reduces risk of spontaneous...chemoprophylactic agents. biomarkers|diet|energy restriction|adipose|breast|obesity...

Kai Ren Ong; Andrew H. Sims; Michelle Harvie; Mary Chapman; Warwick B. Dunn; David Broadhurst; Royston Goodacre; Mary Wilson; Nicola Thomas; Robert B. Clarke; Anthony Howell

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Biomarkers of Dietary Energy Restriction in Women at Increased Risk of Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...restriction (DER) reduces risk of spontaneous mammary...years seems to reduce risk of postmenopausal breast...are required to develop acceptable DER regimens for breast...years seems to reduce risk of postmenopausal breast...are required to develop acceptable DER regimens for breast...

Kai Ren Ong; Andrew H. Sims; Michelle Harvie; Mary Chapman; Warwick B. Dunn; David Broadhurst; Royston Goodacre; Mary Wilson; Nicola Thomas; Robert B. Clarke; and Anthony Howell

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Obesity, High Energy Intake, Lack of Physical Activity, and the Risk of Kidney Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...modification of energy intake and physical...The respective ethics review boards of...classification of energy costs of human physical...factors affecting the development of renal cell cancer...family in cancer development and progression...Obesity, high energy intake, lack of...

Sai Yi Pan; Marie DesMeules; Howard Morrison; and Shi Wu Wen

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Multiple Diagnostic X-rays for Spine Deformities and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have such family history. The implication...Diane Cadell, Helen Price, Kathy Chimes...radiation, family history of breast cancer...International Atomic Energy Agency; 1978. 11...possibility that a family history of breast cancer...Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. | Journal Article...

Cécile M. Ronckers; Michele M. Doody; John E. Lonstein; Marilyn Stovall; and Charles E. Land

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Prediagnostic Circulating Anti-Müllerian Hormone Concentrations Are Not Associated with Prostate Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with prostate cancer pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we measured AMH concentrations...cancer remains poorly understood. The PSA test leads to many false-positive results...received annual screening with the PSA test (first 6 years) and digital rectal exam...

Martha M. Sklavos; Cindy Ke Zhou; Ligia A. Pinto; Michael B. Cook

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Diabetes and Risk of Endometrial Cancer: A Population-Based Prospective Cohort Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...activities, such as home/household work, walking/cycling...pack-years history of smoking. Energy intake was assessed with the...education, smoking, and total energy intake, did not change the...uterine endometrial cancer in Japan. Jpn J Cancer Res 1994;85...

Emilie Friberg; Christos S. Mantzoros; and Alicja Wolk

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Distant Metastasis Risk Stratification for Patients Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the prognostic factors predicting distant metastasis in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1995 and August 2006, 166 patients with EHBD cancer underwent resection with curative intent, followed by adjuvant chemoradiation. There were 120 males and 46 females, and median age was 61 years (range, 34-86). Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered to tumor bed and regional lymph nodes (median dose, 40 Gy; range, 34-56 Gy). A total of 157 patients also received fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer, and fluoropyrimidine-based maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 127 patients. Median follow-up duration was 29 months. Results: The treatment failed for 97 patients, and the major pattern of failure was distant metastasis (76 patients, 78.4%). The 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was 49.4%. The most common site of distant failure was the liver (n = 36). On multivariate analysis, hilar tumor, tumor size {>=}2 cm, involved lymph node, and poorly differentiated tumor were associated with inferior distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.0348, 0.0754, 0.0009, and 0.0078, respectively), whereas T stage was not (p = 0.8081). When patients were divided into four groups based on these risk factors, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates for patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 risk factors were 86.4%, 59.9%, 32.5%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Despite maintenance chemotherapy, distant metastasis was the major pattern of failure in patients undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation for EHBD cancer after resection with curative intent. Intensified chemotherapy is warranted to improve the treatment outcome, especially in those with multiple risk factors.

Kim, Kyubo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu, E-mail: ekchie93@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sung W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Risk of All-Cause and Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality After Brachytherapy in Men With Small Prostate Size  

SciTech Connect

Background: Brachytherapy for prostate cancer can be technically challenging in men with small prostates ({<=}20 cc), but it is unknown whether their outcomes are different than those of men with larger prostates. Methods and Materials: We studied 6,416 men treated with brachytherapy in one of 21 community-based practices. Cox regression and Fine and Gray's regression were used to determine whether volume {<=}20 cc was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) or prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), respectively, after adjustment for other known prognostic factors. Results: 443 patients (6.9%) had a prostate volume {<=}20 cc. After a median follow-up of 2.91 years (interquartile range, 1.06-4.79), volume {<=}20 cc was associated with a significantly higher risk of ACM (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.33 [95% CI 1.08-1.65], p = 0.0085) with 3-year estimates of ACM for {<=}20 cc vs. >20 cc of 13.0% vs. 6.9% (p = 0.028). Only 23 men (0.36%) have died of prostate cancer, and no difference was seen in PCSM by volume (p = 0.4). Conclusion: Men with small prostates at the time of implant had a 33% higher risk of ACM, and the underlying cause of this remains uncertain. No increase in PCSM was observed in men with volume {<=}20cc, suggesting that a small prostate should not in itself be a contraindication for brachytherapy, but inasmuch as absolute rates of PCSM were small, further follow-up will be needed to confirm this finding.

Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: E-pnguyen@LROC.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Ming H. [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Department of Urology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Martin, Neil E.; Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Katin, Michael J. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Ross, Rudi; Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Kantoff, Philip W. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Combined association of energy balance, lifestyle factors and breast cancer risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...controls aged 25-64 years. Energy intake was assessed with a...These findings suggest that energy balance, rather than its...factor for breast cancer. Energy balance is comprised of a complex constellation of behaviors; central adiposity...

Alecia S. Malin; Chuck Matthews; Hui Cai; Herbert Yu; Xiao-Ou Shu; Fan Jin; Yu-Tang Gao; and Wei Zheng

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

One-Carbon Metabolism, MTHFR Polymorphisms, and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...whereas the Gynecological Oncology Group (GOG) studies a constellation of reproductive cancers in women, and some groups address...the trial is expected. They also need to spend the time and energy required to cultivate their relationships with other investigators...

Jia Chen; Marilie D. Gammon; Wendy Chan; Caroline Palomeque; James G. Wetmur; Geoffrey C. Kabat; Susan L. Teitelbaum; Julie A. Britton; Mary Beth Terry; Alfred I. Neugut; and Regina M. Santella

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

No Evidence of Gene–Calcium Interactions from Genome-Wide Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...intake (from dietary or supplemental sources) in 9,006 colorectal cancer cases and 9,503 controls of European ancestry. To test for multiplicative interactions, we used multivariable logistic regression and defined statistical significance using the conventional...

Mengmeng Du; Xuehong Zhang; Michael Hoffmeister; Robert E. Schoen; John A. Baron; Sonja I. Berndt; Hermann Brenner; Christopher S. Carlson; Graham Casey; Andrew T. Chan; Keith R. Curtis; David Duggan; W. James Gauderman; Edward L. Giovannucci; Jian Gong; Tabitha A. Harrison; Richard B. Hayes; Brian E. Henderson; John L. Hopper; Li Hsu; Thomas J. Hudson; Carolyn M. Hutter; Mark A. Jenkins; Shuo Jiao; Jonathan M. Kocarnik; Laurence N. Kolonel; Loic Le Marchand; Yi Lin; Polly A. Newcomb; Anja Rudolph; Daniela Seminara; Mark D. Thornquist; Cornelia M. Ulrich; Emily White; Kana Wu; Brent W. Zanke; Peter T. Campbell; Martha L. Slattery; Ulrike Peters; Jenny Chang-Claude; John D. Potter

128

Genetic Ancestry and Risk of Breast Cancer among U.S. Latinas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Beck JC, et al. The Breast Cancer Family Registry: an infrastructure for cooperative multinational, interdisciplinary and translational...Chakraborty R, Weiss KM. Frequencies of complex diseases in hybrid populations. Am J Phys Anthropol 1986;70:489-503...

Laura Fejerman; Esther M. John; Scott Huntsman; Kenny Beckman; Shweta Choudhry; Eliseo Perez-Stable; Esteban González Burchard; and Elad Ziv

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes, Medical Exposure to Ionizing Radiation, and Breast Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the role of DSB repair in response to low-dose radiation, particularly the range experienced by women from mammograms and other...breast cancer associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. Although we specifically designed our questionnaire...

Robert C. Millikan; Jon S. Player; Allan Rene deCotret; Chiu-Kit Tse; and Temitope Keku

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Abstract 101: Pilot study of oral microbiome and risk of pancreatic cancer.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OTUs) with 97% identify and further classified by taxonomy. Non-parametric Wilcoxon Mann Whiteney U test and Kuskal-Wallis test were conducted to compare the relative abundance of taxa across pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and control...

I-Hsin Lin; Jing Wu; Steven M. Cohen; Calvin Chen; Darren Bryk; Mollie Marr; Marcovalerio Melis; Elliot Newman; H Leon Pachter; Alexander V. Alekseyenko; Richard B. Hayes; and Jiyoung Ahn

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Case–Control Study of the Metabolic Syndrome and Metabolic Risk Factors for Endometrial Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...considerably by long-term storage. Our low control response rate in this study has been...overweight), lifestyle (high energy intake and physical inactivity...endometrial cancer cases and 962 frequency age-matched controls. Data...

Christine M. Friedenreich; Rita K. Biel; David C.W. Lau; Ilona Csizmadi; Kerry S. Courneya; Anthony M. Magliocco; Yutaka Yasui; and Linda S. Cook

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Vitamin D Intake and the Risk for Pancreatic Cancer in Two Cohort Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...intervals), and total energy intake (kcal). * Multivariate...increasing categories of energy-adjusted total vitamin...both cohorts, whereas dark fish (salmon, mackerel...Nutrition Examination Survey. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers...Stampfer MJ. Total energy intake: implications...

Halcyon G. Skinner; Dominique S. Michaud; Edward Giovannucci; Walter C. Willett; Graham A. Colditz; and Charles S. Fuchs

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Abstract 1813: Frequency and risk factors of male breast cancer in Egypt and Morocco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A103: Breast cancer molecular subtype analysis in Egypt reveals high prevalence of Luminal A: Implications...Institute, Phoenix, AZ 2Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt 3Minya University, Minya, Egypt 4The Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids...

Meaghen Quinlan-Davidson; Ashley Strahley; Mohab Eissa; Abdellatif Benider; Noureddine Benjaafar; Ahmed Hablas; Mehdi Karkouri; Mohammad Ramadan; Ibrahim Seif Eldein; Anwar Nayera; Kathy Toy; Sofia D. Merajver; Amr S. Soliman

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

A critical evaluation of secondary cancer risk models applied to Monte Carlo dose distributions of 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional conformal and hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The comparison of radiotherapy techniques regarding secondary cancer risk has yielded contradictory results possibly stemming from the many different approaches used to estimate risk. The purpose of this study was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different available risk models applied to detailed whole-body dose distributions computed by Monte Carlo for various breast radiotherapy techniques including conventional open tangents, 3D conformal wedged tangents and hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). First, organ-specific linear risk models developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII committee were applied to mean doses for remote organs only and all solid organs. Then, different general non-linear risk models were applied to the whole body dose distribution. Finally, organ-specific non-linear risk models for the lung and breast were used to assess the secondary cancer risk for these two specific organs. A total of 32 different calculated absolute risks resulted in a broad range of values (between 0.1% and 48.5%) underlying the large uncertainties in absolute risk calculation. The ratio of risk between two techniques has often been proposed as a more robust assessment of risk than the absolute risk. We found that the ratio of risk between two techniques could also vary substantially considering the different approaches to risk estimation. Sometimes the ratio of risk between two techniques would range between values smaller and larger than one, which then translates into inconsistent results on the potential higher risk of one technique compared to another. We found however that the hybrid IMRT technique resulted in a systematic reduction of risk compared to the other techniques investigated even though the magnitude of this reduction varied substantially with the different approaches investigated. Based on the epidemiological data available, a reasonable approach to risk estimation would be to use organ-specific non-linear risk models applied to the dose distributions of organs within or near the treatment fields (lungs and contralateral breast in the case of breast radiotherapy) as the majority of radiation-induced secondary cancers are found in the beam-bordering regions.

A Joosten; F Bochud; R Moeckli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Reduced Risk of Colon Cancer with High Intake of Vitamin E: The Iowa Women's Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Further adjustment for total energy intake and other risk factors...Further adjustment for total energy intake and other risk factors...payment of page charges. This a tide must therefore be hereby marked...implausibly high or low total daily energy intake (5000 kcal...

Roberd M. Bostick; John D. Potter; David R. McKenzie; Thomas A. Sellers; Lawrence H. Kushi; Kristi A. Steinmetz; and Aaron R. Folsom

1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Oral Squamous Cell Cancer Risk in Relation to Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Dehydrogenase-3 Genotypes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...considered unscorable. Quality control samples included...average percentage of increase in OSCC risk, and 95...corresponding proportions for wine were 3% for cases and...the magnitude of the increase was more pronounced among...associated with a 2.2% increase in OSCC risk (95% CI...

Stephen M. Schwartz; David R. Doody; E. Dawn Fitzgibbons; Sherianne Ricks; Peggy L. Porter; and Chu Chen

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Measurement of the tau lifetime  

SciTech Connect

If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

Jaros, J.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Project PREVENT: A Randomized Trial to Reduce Multiple Behavioral Risk Factors for Colon Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research Article Research Articles Project PREVENT: A Randomized Trial...Dana-Farber Cancer Institute by Liberty Mutual and National Grid...examines the outcome data for Project PREVENT, a two-site randomized...to report on the outcomes of Project PREVENT, a multisite, randomized...

Karen M. Emmons; Colleen M. McBride; Elaine Puleo; Kathryn I. Pollak; Elizabeth Clipp; Karen Kuntz; Bess H. Marcus; Melissa Napolitano; Jane Onken; Frank Farraye; and Robert Fletcher

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Genetic Ancestry and Risk of Mortality among U.S. Latinas with Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...P. Perez-Galan); SAF12/31242 and IPT.2012-0673-010000 (to D. Colomer); and PI12/01847 (to G. Roue)], Redes Tematicas de Investigacion Cooperativa de Cancer from the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Spanish Ministry of Economy...

Laura Fejerman; Donglei Hu; Scott Huntsman; Esther M. John; Mariana C. Stern; Christopher A. Haiman; Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable; Elad Ziv

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer Risks 40 Years after Exposure Cessation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Articles Drinking Water Arsenic in Northern Chile: High Cancer...worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contaminated water. In the largest city in northern Chile...people were exposed to high arsenic drinking water concentrations from 1958 until 1970 when...

Craig M. Steinmaus; Catterina Ferreccio; Johanna Acevedo Romo; Yan Yuan; Sandra Cortes; Guillermo Marshall; Lee E. Moore; John R. Balmes; Jane Liaw; Todd Golden; Allan H. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Glycemic load of the diet and colorectal cancer risk, results from the Netherlands Cohort Study.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...serum-insulin levels like the glycemic load could potentially influence cancer...evaluated whether an elevated glycemic load of the diet is associated with...account the quantity, therefore, in data-analyses the glycemic load was used. The total daily glycemic...

Matty P. Weijenberg; Patrick Mullie; R A. Goldbohm; and Piet A. van den Brandt

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Premenopausal Dietary Carbohydrate, Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Fiber in Relation to Risk of Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...breast cancer by glycemic load was similar to that of carbohydrate intake (data not shown). Carbohydrate...index, and glycemic load were not related to...Energy-adjusted glycemic load 135 171 214 166 170 187 a Except for the data on mean age, all data...

Eunyoung Cho; Donna Spiegelman; David J. Hunter; Wendy Y. Chen; Graham A. Colditz; and Walter C. Willett

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Plasma Leptin Levels and Risk of Breast Cancer in Premenopausal Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cancer (yes/no), history of benign breast...organic metabolism and energy balance. In: Vander's...SN , Welter BH, Price TM. Presence of...characteristics and history of ovulatory infertility...Stampfer MJ. Total energy intake: implications...Boston, MA 02115, USA. hharris3@partners...

Holly R. Harris; Shelley S. Tworoger; Susan E. Hankinson; Bernard A. Rosner; and Karin B. Michels

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Lung Cancer in Never Smokers: Clinical Epidemiology and Environmental Risk Factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from coal smoke generated by unventilated coal-fueled fire pits and stoves (37, 38), volatilization of oils from cooking...Mortal Wkly Rep 2005;54:625-8. 3 Thun MJ , Henley SJ, Burns D, Jemal A, Shanks TG Calle EE. Lung cancer death rates in...

Jonathan M. Samet; Erika Avila-Tang; Paolo Boffetta; Lindsay M. Hannan; Susan Olivo-Marston; Michael J. Thun; and Charles M. Rudin

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Patterns of Alcohol Consumption and Breast Cancer Risk in the California Teachers Study Cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Center, 32960 Alvarado-Niles Road, Suite 600, Union City, CA 94587. Phone: (510) 429-2500; Fax: (510) 441-9975. E-mail: phornros@nccc.org Alison J. Canchola 1 Dee W. West 1 Susan L. Stewart 1 Leslie Bernstein 2 Dennis Deapen...

Pamela L. Horn-Ross; Alison J. Canchola; Dee W. West; Susan L. Stewart; Leslie Bernstein; Dennis Deapen; Rich Pinder; Ronald K. Ross; Hoda Anton-Culver; David Peel; Argyrious Ziogas; Peggy Reynolds; William Wright

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Dietary Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Risk of Incident Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prospectively with adequate power, while controlling for...relationship between glycemic load or index and breast cancer...estimates for glycemic load and index that were similar...is some evidence in our data that glycemic load and index are differentially...

Carolyn R. Jonas; Marjorie L. McCullough; Lauren R. Teras; Kimberly A. Walker-Thurmond; Michael J. Thun; and Eugenia E. Calle

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Race/Ethnicity and Multiple Cancer Risk Factors among Individuals Seeking Smoking Cessation Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...likely to report that exercising after a cancer diagnosis is dangerous (P=0.04). Conclusions: Recruitment of a multiethnic...exercise and eating a healthy diet are beneficial to their health. Given that many overweight and sedentary women had pre-existing...

Darla E. Kendzor; Tracy J. Costello; Yisheng Li; Jennifer Irvin Vidrine; Carlos A. Mazas; Lorraine R. Reitzel; Paul M. Cinciripini; Ludmila M. Cofta-Woerpel; Michael S. Businelle; and David W. Wetter

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Obesity, High Energy Intake, Lack of Physical Activity, and the Risk of Kidney Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...obesity and excess energy intake are important...case-control studies|energy intake|exercise...there were an 4,600 new cases of kidney cancer...prevention. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University...height, body mass, energy intake, and physical...

Sai Yi Pan; Marie DesMeules; Howard Morrison; and Shi Wu Wen

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dietary Carotenoids and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Seven Cohort Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...adjustment for tobacco use and radon exposure (53) . There is...previously found in the Pooling Project a nonsignificant 12% reduction...statistical expertise in the Pooling Project. 1 World Cancer Research Fund...Van Holten V., Muir C. . International Classification of Diseases...

Satu Männistö; Stephanie A. Smith-Warner; Donna Spiegelman; Demetrius Albanes; Kristin Anderson; Piet A. van den Brandt; James R. Cerhan; Graham Colditz; Diane Feskanich; Jo L. Freudenheim; Edward Giovannucci; R. Alexandra Goldbohm; Saxon Graham; Anthony B. Miller; Thomas E. Rohan; Jarmo Virtamo; Walter C. Willett; and David J. Hunter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dietary Inflammatory Index and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...therapy, education, diabetes, and total energy intake, revealed positive associations...skin cancer (n = 3,830), or extreme energy intake ( 600 kcal or 5,000 kcal per...replacement therapy (HRT) use, total energy intake, and history of diabetes in another...

Nitin Shivappa; Anna E. Prizment; Cindy K. Blair; David R. Jacobs, Jr; Susan E. Steck; James R. Hébert

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Air Pollution from Traffic and Risk for Lung Cancer in Three Danish Cohorts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the present study focused on vehicle traffic emissions, which is...time trends, supported by ecological correlations between the incidence...rates of adenocarcinomas and vehicle densities at county area level...and their relation to motor vehicle density. Cancer Epidemiol...

Ole Raaschou-Nielsen; Helle Bak; Mette Sřrensen; Steen Solvang Jensen; Matthias Ketzel; Martin Hvidberg; Peter Schnohr; Anne Tjřnneland; Kim Overvad; and Steffen Loft

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Consumption of Animal Foods, Cooking Methods, and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...associated with insulin resistance (41) . Consistent...factors related to insulin resistance, such as high insulin...education 3.6 5.5 Elementary school 8.5 8.4 Middle...Nooijen W. J. Insulin resistance and breast-cancer...

Qi Dai; Xiao-ou Shu; Fan Jin; Yu-Tang Gao; Zhi-Xian Ruan; and Wei Zheng

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece and 19Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands Email: Federico Canzian* - f.canzian@dkfz.de; Rudolf Kaaks - r... ; Inter- national Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France) using a fluorescent 5' endonuclease assay and the ABI- PRISM 7900 for sequence detection (TaqMan). Initial quality control checks of the SNP assays were performed by the manufacturer (Applied...

Canzian, Federico; Kaaks, Rudolf; Cox, David G; Henderson, Katherine D; Henderson, Brian E; Berg, Chrsitine; Bingham, Sheila; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie; Calle, Eugenia E; Chanock, Stephen J; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Dossus, Laure; Spencer Feigelson, Heather; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J; Isaacs, Claudine; Lenner, Per; Lund, Eiliv; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Quiros, Jose R; Riboli, Elio; Stram, Daniel O; Thomas, GIlles; Thun, Michael J; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; van Gils, Carla H; Ziegler, Regina G

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Abstract P5-13-03: Breast cancer risk assessment for underserved minority women in primary care: patient and provider perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, IL; OSF...assessment with their patients and provided computer-generated, risk-adapted recommendations...Acknowledgement: This research was supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (2P50CA106743...

KF Hoskins; EE Anderson; S Tejedo; M Stolley; K Van de Wydeven; V Korah; L Moreno; M Rojas; A Carillo; M Caseras; Y Awolala; E Calhoun; R Campbell; and R Warnecke

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Lifetime of Grand Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lifetime of the structure in grand design spiral galaxies is observationally ill-determined, but is essentially set by how accurately the pattern's rotation can be characterized by a single angular pattern speed. This paper derives a generalized version of the Tremaine-Weinberg method for observationally determining pattern speeds, in which the pattern speed is allowed to vary arbitrarily with radius. The departures of the derived pattern speed from a constant then provides a simple metric of the lifetime of the spiral structure. Application of this method to CO observations of NGC 1068 reveal that the pattern speed of the spiral structure in this galaxy varies rapidly with radius, and that the lifetime of the spiral structure is correspondingly very short. If this result turns out to be common in grand-design spiral galaxies, then these features will have to be viewed as highly transient phenomena.

M. R. Merrifield; R. J. Rand; S. E. Meidt

2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

Glycemic Index, Carbohydrates, Glycemic Load, and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in a Prospective Cohort Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exposures with follow-up data (1984, 1986, 1990...499 9,444 Glycemic load (mean) 76 119 175 127...yielded no associations (data not shown). In a recent...dietary intakes of glucose load or sugar and risk of colorectal...alcohol consumption (data not shown). Among women...

Li Jiao; Andrew Flood; Amy F. Subar; Albert R. Hollenbeck; Arthur Schatzkin; and Rachael Stolzenberg-Solomon

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Dietary Glycemic Load and Breast Cancer Risk in the Women’s Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cary, NC) to analyze these data. Results Mean follow-up time...with borderline significance (data not shown). Restricting the...index or smoking subgroups (data not shown). Examining risk...because of a lack of statistical power. Discussion We found no overall...

Susan Higginbotham; Zuo-Feng Zhang; I-Min Lee; Nancy R. Cook; Julie E. Buring; and Simin Liu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Spiritual Faith and Genetic Testing Decisions among High-Risk Breast Cancer Probands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...women ages 50 to 79. Using the decision theory concept of ambiguity as an analytic...ambiguous risk information. Theory Decision 1991;31:159-73. Perceived...women ages 50 to 79. Using the decision theory concept of "ambiguity" as an...

Marc D. Schwartz; Chanita Hughes; Joan Roth; David Main; Beth N. Peshkin; Claudine Isaacs; Carol Kavanagh; and Caryn Lerman

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

N-acetyltransferase 2 Phenotype, Occupation, and Bladder Cancer Risk: Results from the EPIC Cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 8 Danish...semiquantitative job-exposure matrix was applied to at-risk occupations to...technology and sequencing were applied as additional quality control...controls according to an approach applied for the estimation of lung...

Beate Pesch; Katarzyna Gawrych; Sylvia Rabstein; Tobias Weiss; Swaantje Casjens; Hans-Peter Rihs; Hui Ding; Jürgen Angerer; Thomas Illig; Norman Klopp; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; Martine M. Ros; Rudolf Kaaks; Jenny Chang-Claude; Nina Roswall; Anne Tjřnneland; Kim Overvad; Françoise Clavel-Chapelon; Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault; Laure Dossus; Heiner Boeing; Steffen Weikert; Dimitrios Trichopoulos; Domenico Palli; Sabina Sieri; Rosario Tumino; Salvatore Panico; José Ramón Quirós; Carlos González; Mariá José Sánchez; Miren Dorronsoro; Carmen Navarro; Aurelio Barricarte; Börje Ljungberg; Mattias Johansson; David Ulmert; Roy Ehrnström; Kay-Tee Khaw; Nick Wareham; Timothy J. Key; Pietro Ferrari; Isabelle Romieu; Elio Riboli; Thomas Brüning; and Paolo Vineis

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Patterns of Alcohol Consumption and Breast Cancer Risk in the California Teachers Study Cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...approximately 30 increase in risk (1 -6...some do suggest that wine and liquor but not...champagne, or a wine cooler; or one cocktail...beer, 11.1 for wine, and 15.0 for...maintains the highest quality standards so that...which means it increases with calendar year...

Pamela L. Horn-Ross; Alison J. Canchola; Dee W. West; Susan L. Stewart; Leslie Bernstein; Dennis Deapen; Rich Pinder; Ronald K. Ross; Hoda Anton-Culver; David Peel; Argyrious Ziogas; Peggy Reynolds; and William Wright

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effect of Smoking and Alcohol Consumption on Laryngeal Cancer Risk in Coastal Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...separate measures for beer, wine, and hard liquor intake...interviewer-assessed poor quality data, leaving 151 cases...while nonsignificant increases in risk were associated...few respondents drank wine. Compared to nondrinkers...alcohol intake tended to increase and then taper off...

Roni T. Falk; Linda W. Pickle; Linda Morris Brown; Thomas J. Mason; Patricia A. Buffler; and Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr.

1989-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Radiological Risk Assessment of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of the health risk from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium (DU) is an important outcome of the Capstone aerosol studies that established exposure ranges to personnel in armored combat vehicles perforated by DU munitions. Although the radiation exposure from DU is low, there is concern that DU deposited in the body may increase cancer rates. Radiation doses to various organs of the body resulting from the inhalation of DU aerosols measured in the Capstone studies were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Organs and tissues with the highest calculated committed equivalent 50-yr doses were lung and extrathoracic tissues (nose and nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, mouth and thoracic lymph nodes). Doses to the bone surface and kidney were about 5 to 10% of the doses to the extrathoracic tissues. The methodologies of the ICRP International Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) were used for determining the whole body cancer risk. Organ-specific risks were estimated using ICRP and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodologies. Risks for crewmembers and first responders were determined for selected scenarios based on the time interval of exposure and for vehicle and armor type. The lung was the organ with the highest cancer mortality risk, accounting for about 97% of the risks summed from all organs. The highest mean lifetime risk for lung cancer for the scenario with the longest exposure time interval (2 h) was 0.42%. This risk is low compared with the natural or background risk of 7.35%. These risks can be significantly reduced by using an existing ventilation system (if operable) and by reducing personnel time in the vehicle immediately after perforation.

Hahn, Fletcher; Roszell, Laurie E.; Daxon, Eric G.; Guilmette, Ray A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Risk analysis of thyroid cancer incidence after exposure in childhood in the most contaminated areas of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia in comparison with other studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current knowledge about thyroid cancer induction due to 131I exposures during childhood is limited. Due to the low incidences observed, it was assumed that 131I is less effective in cancer induction by a factor of 3, if compared to external exposures. An increase of the thyroid cancer incidence among children and adolescents from the south-eastern Belorussian, the northern Ukrainian, and the western Russian oblasts after the reactor accident in Chernobyl is reported. As a result of the further improvement of the dose estimation methods, the individual exposure doses based on the results of direct thyroid activity measurement were recalculated, and the geographical pattern of age-dependent thyroid doses was analysed. These resulted in the re-assessment of collective doses and of thyroid cancer risk.

G. Goulko; M. Tronko; T. Bogdanova; K. Henrichs; I. Kayro; V. Shpak; M. Lassmann; Chr. Reiners

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Mechanism of Low Dose Radiation Risk Associated with Diagnostic X-rays,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanism of Low Dose Radiation Risk Associated with Diagnostic X-rays, Mechanism of Low Dose Radiation Risk Associated with Diagnostic X-rays, PET, and Gamma-rays Douglas Boreham McMaster University Abstract The goal of this project was to investigate low dose ionizing radiation effects associated with exposure to diagnostic computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Biological effects were evaluated in wild type and Trp53+/- heterozygous females, following in vivo exposure to diagnostic CT (75kVp, 200µ) or PET (18F-FDG) scans. The short term biological effects following CT or PET scans were evaluated in order to understand biological modification of mechanisms, such as DNA repair processes and apoptosis, that might alter long term cancer risk. Corresponding life-time cancer risk studies are in progress. Short-term

165

Breast Cancer Risk and Exposure in Early Life to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using Total Suspended Particulates as a Proxy Measure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...steel mills, foundries, automobiles, coal combustion for electricity production and many other industrial and nonindustrial processes...provided information regarding medical history, diet, alcohol consumption, smoking history, lifetime passive smoke exposure, occupational...

Matthew R. Bonner; Daikwon Han; Jing Nie; Peter Rogerson; John E. Vena; Paola Muti; Maurizio Trevisan; Stephen B. Edge; and Jo L. Freudenheim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comparative pathophysiology, toxicology, and human cancer risk assessment of pharmaceutical-induced hibernoma  

SciTech Connect

In humans, hibernoma is a very rare, benign neoplasm of brown adipose tissue (BAT) that typically occurs at subcutaneous locations and is successfully treated by surgical excision. No single cause has been accepted to explain these very rare human tumors. In contrast, spontaneous hibernoma in rats is rare, often malignant, usually occurs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity, and metastases are common. In recent years, there has been an increased incidence of spontaneous hibernomas in rat carcinogenicity studies, but overall the occurrence remains relatively low and highly variable across studies. There have only been four reported examples of pharmaceutical-induced hibernoma in rat carcinogenicity studies. These include phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic antagonist; varenicline, a nicotine partial agonist; tofacitinib, a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor; and hydromorphone, an opiod analgesic. Potential non-genotoxic mechanisms that may contribute to the pathogenesis of BAT activation/proliferation and/or subsequent hibernoma development in rats include: (1) physiological stimuli, (2) sympathetic stimulation, (3) peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonism, and/or (4) interference or inhibition of JAK/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling. The evaluation of an apparent increase of hibernoma in rats from 2-year carcinogenicity studies of novel pharmaceutical therapeutics and its relevance to human safety risk assessment is complex. One should consider: the genotoxicity of the test article, dose/exposure and safety margins, and pathophysiologic and morphologic differences and similarities of hibernoma between rats and humans. Hibernomas observed to date in carcinogenicity studies of pharmaceutical agents do not appear to be relevant for human risk at therapeutic dosages. - Highlights: • Highly variable incidence of spontaneous hibernoma in carcinogenicity studies • Recent increase in the spontaneous incidence of hibernomas in Sprague–Dawley rats • Pharmaceutical-related hibernoma has been observed in rats, but not in humans. • Pathophysiologic and morphologic differences of hibernoma between rats and 7 humans. • Hibernomas are unlikely to be relevant to human risk assessment.

Radi, Zaher, E-mail: zaher.radi@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, 1 Burtt Rd., Andover, MA 01810 (United States); Bartholomew, Phillip, E-mail: phillip.m.bartholomew@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Elwell, Michael, E-mail: michael.elwell@covance.com [Covance Laboratories, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Vogel, W. Mark, E-mail: w.mark.vogel@pfizer.com [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Drug Safety R and D, 1 Burtt Rd., Andover, MA 01810 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Cytokinesis-Blocked Micronucleus Assay as a Strong Predictor of Lung Cancer: Extension of a Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model  

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...independent external lung cancer population and test discriminatory power improvement of the...506 participants were stratified into a test set of 995 (527 cases/468 controls...independent lung cancer population and test the effect of extending an existing lung...

Randa A. El-Zein; Mirtha S. Lopez; Anthony M. D'Amelio, Jr; Mei Liu; Reginald F. Munden; David Christiani; Li Su; Paula Tejera-Alveraz; Rihong Zhai; Margaret R. Spitz; Carol J. Etzel

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Abstract A48: Enhancing cancer genomics practice in public health departments to identify women at high risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GA Abstract A48: Enhancing cancer genomics practice in public health departments...Hispanic/Latino. The introduction of genomics practice within public health departments...Martin, Alice Kerber. Enhancing cancer genomics practice in public health departments...

Monique L. Martin and Alice Kerber

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Influence of egocentrism, future time perspective, and health locus of control on risk-takeing in adolescents diagosed with cancer and their siblings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WITH CANCER AND THEIR SIBLINGS A Thesis by NANCY ANN BAKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Robert..., and Health Locus of Control on Risk-Taking in Adolescents Diagnosed with Cancer and Their Siblings. (December 1998) Nancy Ann Baker, B. S. , Sam Houston State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert W. Heffer, Jr. Professionals have noted...

Baker, Nancy Ann

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy Intake and Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: An Expanded Analysis in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) Cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Zhu Z. Mechanisms by which energy restriction inhibits carcinogenesis...Zhu Z, Jiang W. Dietary energy restriction in breast cancer...133-42. 5 Kaaks R , Lukanova A. Energy balance and cancer: the role...the effect of World War II in Norway. Cancer Causes Control 1996...

Laura Y. Sue; Catherine Schairer; Xiaomei Ma; Craig Williams; Shih-Chen Chang; Anthony B. Miller; Catherine A. McCarty; Bradley J. Willcox; and Regina G. Ziegler

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Risk Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The last step of the risk assessment process, risk characterization, combines the results of the toxicity and exposure assessment to arrive at a risk estimate. The results of the toxicity assessment vary depending on whether the substance is identified as a carcinogen or a noncarcinogen. In the former case, the risk characterization provides an estimate of the incidence of cancer; e.g., additional cases per one million exposed individuals. In the latter, the characterization describes whether or not the risk exceeds an acceptable threshold.

M.A. Kamrin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Evidence That New Hypnotics Cause Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. , Hays, J. C. , Blazer,the likelihood of cancer causation is sufficiently strong

Kripke, Daniel F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less. Detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, for other contaminants studied in the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction are presented in several other technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the ''report number field'' for the number DOE/OR/21981*. Be sure to place the asterisk after the base number so your search can list the complete series of reports related to Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction.

Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Genetic susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary glandas a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland susceptibility to low-dose ionizing radiation in the mouse mammary gland as a means of understanding human risk for breast cancer Antoine M. Snijders 1 , Francesco Marchetti 1 , Ju Han 1 , Sandhya Bhatnagar 1 , Nadire Duru 1 , Zhi Hu 1 , Jian-Hua Mao 1 , Mina Bissell 1 , Joe Gray 1,2 , Gary H. Karpen 1 , Priscilla K. Cooper 1 and Andrew J. Wyrobek 1 1 Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 2 Current affiliation: Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health Science Univ, Portland, OR Goal: Our goal is to develop an in vivo mechanistic model of genetic variation in the low-dose damage responses of mammary glands using inbred mice known to vary in their sensitivity to low-dose induced mammary gland cancer, and to develop molecular predictors for susceptibility or resistance to low-dose induced breast cancer.

175

Regulatory Approval of Cancer Risk-Reducing (Chemopreventive) Drugs: Moving What We Have Learned into the Clinic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...shown a clear effect of counseled risk on actual uptake with this increasing from 1.8% at the lowest level of risk acceptable for preventive surgery (25-32%) to 6.4% of those at 40% to 45% risk. In BRCA1/2 carriers where risk...

Frank L. Meyskens, Jr.; Gregory A. Curt; Dean E. Brenner; Gary Gordon; Ronald B. Herberman; Olivera Finn; Gary J. Kelloff; Samir N. Khleif; Caroline C. Sigman; and Eva Szabo

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Influence of Androgen Deprivation Therapy on All-Cause Mortality in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer and a History of Congestive Heart Failure or Myocardial Infarction  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: It is unknown whether the excess risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) observed when androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is added to radiation for men with prostate cancer and a history of congestive heart failure (CHF) or myocardial infarction (MI) also applies to those with high-risk disease. Methods and Materials: Of 14,594 men with cT1c-T3aN0M0 prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy-based radiation from 1991 through 2006, 1,378 (9.4%) with a history of CHF or MI comprised the study cohort. Of these, 22.6% received supplemental external beam radiation, and 42.9% received a median of 4 months of neoadjuvant ADT. Median age was 71.8 years. Median follow-up was 4.3 years. Cox multivariable analysis tested for an association between ADT use and ACM within risk groups, after adjusting for treatment factors, prognostic factors, and propensity score for ADT. Results: ADT was associated with significantly increased ACM (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-2.34; p = 0.0001), with 5-year estimates of 22.71% with ADT and 11.62% without ADT. The impact of ADT on ACM by risk group was as follows: high-risk AHR = 2.57; 95% CI, 1.17-5.67; p = 0.019; intermediate-risk AHR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.13-2.73; p = 0.012; low-risk AHR = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.96-2.43; p = 0.075). Conclusions: Among patients with a history of CHF or MI treated with brachytherapy-based radiation, ADT was associated with increased all-cause mortality, even for patients with high-risk disease. Although ADT has been shown in Phase III studies to improve overall survival in high-risk disease, the small subgroup of high-risk patients with a history of CHF or MI, who represented about 9% of the patients, may be harmed by ADT.

Nguyen, Paul L., E-mail: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Beckman, Joshua A. [Department of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J.; Martin, Neil E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Division of Urologic Surgery, Brigham and Women's/Faulkner Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dosoretz, Daniel E. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Moran, Brian J. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Salenius, Sharon A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Braccioforte, Michelle H. [Chicago Prostate Center, Westmont, IL (United States); Kantoff, Philip W. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ennis, Ronald D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt and Beth Israel Hospitals, Continuum Cancer Centers of New York, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY (Israel)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced cancer detection Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced cancer detection Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Cancer Risk Clinic Cancer Risk Clinical...

178

Effect of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy on the Risk of Mucositis During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define the roles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the risk of Grade 3+ mucositis during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: 164 consecutive patients treated with IMRT at two institutions in nonoverlapping treatment eras were selected. All patients were treated with a dose painting approach, three dose levels, and comprehensive bilateral neck treatment under the supervision of the same radiation oncologist. Ninety-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy (cCHT) and 14 received induction chemotherapy (iCHT). Individual information of the dose received by the oral mucosa (OM) was extracted as absolute cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), corrected for the elapsed treatment days and reported as weekly (w) DVH. Patients were seen weekly during treatment, and peak acute toxicity equal to or greater than confluent mucositis at any point during the course of IMRT was considered the endpoint. Results: Overall, 129 patients (78.7%) reached the endpoint. The regions that best discriminated between patients with/without Grade 3+ mucositis were found at 10.1 Gy/w (V10.1) and 21 cc (D21), along the x-axis and y-axis of the OM-wDVH, respectively. On multivariate analysis, D21 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009-1.023, p < 0.001) and cCHT (OR = 4.118, 95% CI, 1.659-10.217, p = 0.002) were the only independent predictors. However, V10.1 and D21 were highly correlated (rho = 0.954, p < 0.001) and mutually interchangeable. cCHT would correspond to 88.4 cGy/w to at least 21 cc of OM. Conclusions: Radiotherapy and chemotherapy act independently in determining acute mucosal toxicity; cCHT increases the risk of mucosal Grade 3 toxicity Almost-Equal-To 4 times over radiation therapy alone, and it is equivalent to an extra Almost-Equal-To 6.2 Gy to 21 cc of OM over a 7-week course.

Sanguineti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gsangui1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sormani, Maria Pia [Department of Biostatistics, University of Genoa (Italy); Marur, Shanthi [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon; Rao, Nikhil; Cianchetti, Marco [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Ricchetti, Francesco; McNutt, Todd; Wu Binbin [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Self-reported chemicals exposure, beliefs about disease causation, and risk of breast cancer in the Cape Cod Breast Cancer and Environment Study: a case-control study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urinary concentrations of triclosan in the U.S. population:its analogs, and triclosan in bioassay screens: receptor-and androgenic activity of triclosan in breast cancer cells.

Zota, Ami R; Aschengrau, Ann; Rudel, Ruthann A; Brody, Julia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Dietary Intake of Conjugated Linoleic Acids and Risk of Premenopausal and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer, Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer Study (WEB Study)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Buffalo, Buffalo, New York Grant support...fat adjusted for energy, and other breast...cancer, Western New York Exposures and Breast...fat adjusted for energy, and other breast...Streets, Buffalo, New York 14263, USA. susan...

Susan E. McCann; Clement Ip; Margot M. Ip; Michelle K. McGuire; Paola Muti; Stephen B. Edge; Maurizio Trevisan; and Jo L. Freudenheim

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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181

Decision-making processes for risk-reducing surgery used by women at risk for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...listed their choice (have, not have, undecided) for RRO and RRM. These decisions were interpreted using conditions of Decision Theory (Resnik, 1987): decision under certainty, decision under risk, and decision under uncertainty. A decision...

Lois Loescher; Kyung Hee Lim; and April O'Connor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

4 4 PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC w I Project Accomplishments Summary (Attachment I) CRADA NO. TSB-1449-97 Date: U 1 8 1 9 8 Revision: 1 A . Parties The project is a relationship between the Lawrence Livennore National Laboratoq (LLNL) and Optiphase, Inc. University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 7000 East Avenue, L-399 Livermore, CA 94550 Optiphase, h c 7652 Haskell Ave. Van Nuys, CA 91406 Technical Contact - D r . Pepe Davis (8 18)782-0997ext 1 12 B . Background Fiber-optic-based sensors are excellent candidates for detecting the presence and monitoring the levels of degradation products in stockpiled weapons. Specifically, fl uorescence-based sensors are extremely sensitive, can have high specificity for compounds of interest, and are "e~ectrically

183

Sandia National Laboratories: accelerated lifetime testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accelerated lifetime testing Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage,...

184

Abstract A126: Risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer by tumor dominance, a surrogate for cell of origin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subgroup of patients with low risk and favorable outcome. Methods...hazard ratios (HR) for genomic risk were 4.9 (95%CI 1.2-20...prospectively evaluate if it is acceptable to withhold chemotherapy and...Her2-positive, genomic low risk patients. Citation Information...

Joanne Kotsopoulos; Margaret A. Gates; Jonathan L. Hecht; Bernard A. Rosner; Christopher C. Crum; and Shelley S. Tworoger

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Breast cancer risk in relation to urinary and serum biomarkers of phytoestrogen exposure in the EPIC-Norfolk study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of breast cancer, but only a limited range of phytoestrogens has been examined in prospective cohort studies. Methods Serum and urine samples from 237 incident breast cancer cases and 952 control individuals (aged 45 to 75 years) in the European Prospective...

Ward, Heather A; Chapelais, Gaelle; Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Bingham, Sheila

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Impact of Types of Lymphocyte Chromosomal Aberrations on Human Cancer Risk: Results from Nordic and Italian Cohorts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...genotoxic substances formed in cells (e.g., ethylene oxide from ethylene) will also generate CTAs. Thus, CSAs and CTAs...colorectal cancer. Cancer Res, 56: 4862-4, 1996. 27 Price EA, Bourne SL, Radbourne SL, et al Rare microsatellite...

Lars Hagmar; Ulf Strömberg; Stefano Bonassi; Inger-Lise Hansteen; Lisbeth Ehlert Knudsen; Carita Lindholm; and Hannu Norppa

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Physical Activity Is Associated with Reduced Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis  

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...modifiable aspect of energy expenditure, as...studies from the same Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study...with or without household) physical activity...Population; Japan (Japan Public Health Center...Population; Hawaii (Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study...172 Recreational (household) + occupational...

Siddharth Singh; Jithinraj Edakkanambeth Varayil; Swapna Devanna; Mohammad Hassan Murad; and Prasad G. Iyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dietary Patterns and Prostate Cancer Risk in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiological Follow-up Study Cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pearson correlations Energy (kcal) 0.29 0.73...poverty threshold for household size and adult/child...b All nutrients were energy-adjusted using the...moderate, heavy), and energy intake (tertiles...nutrition and cancer in Japan. Int. J. Cancer...

Marilyn Tseng; Rosalind A. Breslow; Robert F. DeVellis; and Regina G. Ziegler

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy (66 Gy in 22 Fractions at 3 Gy per Fraction) for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: Long-term Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report long-term outcomes of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 3 Gy without hormonal therapy. A uniform 7-mm margin was created around the prostate for the planning target volume, and treatment was prescribed to the isocenter. Treatment was delivered using daily ultrasound image-guided radiation therapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to prospectively score toxicity. Biochemical failure was defined as the nadir prostate-specific antigen level plus 2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 129 patients were treated between November 2002 and December 2005. With a median follow-up of 90 months, the 5- and 8-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 97% and 92%, respectively. The 5- and 8-year actuarial overall survival rates were 92% and 88%, respectively. Only 1 patient died from prostate cancer at 92 months after treatment, giving an 8-year actuarial cancer-specific survival of 98%. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, with 57% of patients not experiencing any acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity. For late toxicity, the worst grade ?2 rate for GI and GU toxicity was 27% and 33%, respectively. There was no grade >3 toxicity. At last follow-up, the rate of grade ?2 for both GI and GU toxicity was only 1.5%. Conclusions: Hypofractionation with 66 Gy in 22 fractions prescribed to the isocenter using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy produces excellent biochemical control rates, with moderate toxicity. However, this regimen cannot be extrapolated to the intensity modulated radiation therapy technique.

Patel, Nita [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Faria, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.faria@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio; David, Marc; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Ruo, Russell; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fecal DNA versus Fecal Occult Blood for Colorectal-Cancer Screening in an Average-Risk Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. Despite recommendations endorsing screening, less than 40 percent of people 50 years of age or older undergo screening for colorectal cancer. Guaiac-based chemical detection of fecal occult blood is the only... This prospective study of asymptomatic people 50 years of age or older compared a fecal DNA panel with a fecal occult-blood test (Hemoccult II) for colorectal-cancer screening. Colonoscopy was the reference standard. The fecal DNA panel detected 52 percent of cancers, whereas Hemoccult II detected only 13 percent. The sensitivity of the fecal DNA panel for any advanced neoplasia was 18 percent, as compared with 11 percent for Hemoccult II. The two tests had similar specificity.

Imperiale T.F.Ransohoff D.F.Itzkowitz S.H.Turnbull B.A.Ross M.E.

2004-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Exposure to traffic-related air pollution and the risk of developing breast cancer among women in eight Canadian provinces: A case–control study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A few recent studies have reported positive associations between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and the incidence of breast cancer. We capitalized on an existing Canadian multi-site population-based case–control study to further investigate this association. We used the National Enhanced Cancer Surveillance System, a population-based case–control study conducted in eight of 10 Canadian provinces from 1994 to 1997. A total of 1569 breast cancer cases and 1872 population controls who reported at least 90% complete self-reported addresses over the 1975–1994 exposure period were examined. Mean exposure levels to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) (an indicator of traffic-related air pollution) were estimated for this period using three different measures: (1) satellite-derived observations; (2) satellite-derived observations scaled with historical fixed-site measurements of NO2; and (3) a national land-use regression (LUR) model. Proximity to major roads was also examined. Using unconditional logistic regression, stratified by menopausal status, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for many individual-level and contextual breast cancer risk factors. We observed positive associations between incident breast cancer and all three measures of NO2 exposure from 1975 to 1994. In fully adjusted models for premenopausal breast cancer, a 10 ppb increase in NO2 exposure estimated from the satellite-derived observations, the scaled satellite-derived observations, and the national LUR model produced \\{ORs\\} of 1.26 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.92–1.74), 1.32 (95% CI: 1.05–1.67) and 1.28 (95% CI: 0.92–1.79). For postmenopausal breast cancer, we found corresponding \\{ORs\\} of 1.10 (95% CI: 0.88–1.36), 1.10 (95% CI: 0.94–1.28) and 1.07 (95% CI: 0.86–1.32). Substantial heterogeneity in the \\{ORs\\} was observed across the eight Canadian provinces and reduced \\{ORs\\} were observed when models were restricted to women who had received routine mammography examinations. No associations were found for road proximity measures. This study provides some support for the hypothesis that traffic-related air pollution may be associated with the development of breast cancer, especially in premenopausal women. With the few studies available, further research is clearly needed.

Perry Hystad; Paul J. Villeneuve; Mark S. Goldberg; Dan L. Crouse; Kenneth Johnson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime  

SciTech Connect

Recent measurements of the B hadron lifetime from PEP and PETRA experiments are presented. These measurements firmly establish that the B lifetime is long (approx.1 psec), implying that the mixing between the third generation of quarks and the lighter quarks is much weaker that the mixing between the first two generations.

Ong, R.A.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Energy Intake and Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: An Expanded Analysis in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) Cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high (4.5) diet quality score groups (P 0...survivors with low diet quality scores had lower intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrate...for age and total energy intake (Model 1...covariates and diet quality scores, the risk...

Laura Y. Sue; Catherine Schairer; Xiaomei Ma; Craig Williams; Shih-Chen Chang; Anthony B. Miller; Catherine A. McCarty; Bradley J. Willcox; and Regina G. Ziegler

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Health Risk Appraisal Models for Mass Screening for Esophageal and Pharyngeal Cancer: An Endoscopic Follow-up Study of Cancer-Free Japanese Men  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Short Communication Research Articles Health Risk Appraisal Models for Mass Screening...Kumagai Satellite Clinic; 3 Mitsukoshi Health and Welfare Foundation; 4 Department...Development, National Institute of Public Health, Wako, Saitama, Japan; 6 Departments...

Akira Yokoyama; Yoshiya Kumagai; Tetsuji Yokoyama; Tai Omori; Hoichi Kato; Hiroyasu Igaki; Toshimasa Tsujinaka; Manabu Muto; Masako Yokoyama; Hiroshi Watanabe

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fusion-component lifetime analysis  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modeling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The individual coefficients within the equations are different for each material. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO and to analyze the limiter for FED/INTOR.

Mattas, R.F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Lifetime measurements in Sc45  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lifetimes of levels in Sc45 have been determined by the Doppler-shift-attenuation method with the Ca44(p,?)Sc45 reaction for 11 levels between 1.4 and 3.8 MeV. The energies (keV) of the levels and mean lives (psec) studied in this work are: 1408 (< 0.12); 1800 (0.095); 2092 (0.012); 2151 (0.087); 2303 (0.080); 2352 (0.060); 2531 (0.12); 2590 (0.050); 2778 (0.019); 2895 (0.010); 3714 (0.019). On the basis of E2 transition strengths the spin assignment of 52 has been determined for the 2092-keV state and further restrictions have been made to the range of possible spins for a number of states.[NUCLEAR REACTIONS Ca44(p,?), E=0.86 MeV; Sc45 levels, Ex=1.4-3.8 MeV, measured T12, deduced J.

R. L. Schulte; J. D. King; H. W. Taylor

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Retention and Use of Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Information from Genomic Tests: The Role of Health Literacy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Conference on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities-- Sep 30-Oct 3...screening beliefs and behaviors: Implications for health promotion Jenna L. Davis 1 B...of these differences might help health professionals redirect their efforts...

Sarah E. Lillie; Noel T. Brewer; Suzanne C. O'Neill; Edward F. Morrill; E. Claire Dees; Lisa A. Carey; and Barbara K. Rimer

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Association of Leukocyte Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number with Colorectal Cancer Risk: Results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Prevention Online (http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/). Background: Mitochondria play an important role in cellular energy metabolism, free radical production, and apoptosis, and thus may be involved in cancer development. Methods: We evaluated...

Bo Huang; Yu-Tang Gao; Xiao-Ou Shu; Wanqing Wen; Gong Yang; Guoliang Li; Regina Courtney; Bu-Tian Ji; Hong-Lan Li; Mark P. Purdue; Wei Zheng; Qiuyin Cai

199

Dietary B Vitamin and Methionine Intakes and Plasma Folate Are Not Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk in Chinese Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and daily intakes of energy, vegetables, fruits...attainment, baseline household income, smoking status...and daily intakes of energy, vegetables, fruits...Stampfer MJ. Total energy intake: implications...case-control study in Japan. Nutr Cancer 2005...

Martha J. Shrubsole; Gong Yang; Yu-Tang Gao; Wang Ho Chow; Xiao Ou Shu; Qiuyin Cai; Nathaniel Rothman; Jin Gao; Conrad Wagner; and Wei Zheng

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Common variants in the ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 & TP53 cancer susceptibility genes are unlikely to increase breast cancer risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Introduction Certain rare, familial mutations in the ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 or TP53 genes increase susceptibility to breast cancer but it has not, until now, been clear whether common polymorphic variants in the same genes also increase...

Baynes, Caroline; Healey, Catherine S; Pooley, Karen A; Scollen, Serena A; Luben, Robert; Thompson, Deborah J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Twice-Weekly Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer With Low-Risk Nodal Involvement: Toxicity and Outcome From a Dose Escalation Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and preliminary outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated with twice-weekly hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 82 prostate cancer patients with a nodal involvement risk {<=}20% (Roach index) have been treated to the prostate with or without seminal vesicles with 56 Gy (4 Gy/fraction twice weekly) and an overall treatment time of 6.5 weeks. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. Median follow-up was 48 months (range, 9-67 months). Results: All patients completed the treatment without interruptions. No patient presented with Grade {>=}3 acute GU or GI toxicity. Of the patients, 4% presented with Grade 2 GU or GI persistent acute toxicity 6 weeks after treatment completion. The estimated 4-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival were 94.2% {+-} 2.9% and 96.1% {+-} 2.2%, respectively. One patient presented with Grade 3 GI and another patient with Grade 4 GU late toxicity, which were transitory in both cases. The 4-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival was 91.3% {+-} 5.9%, 76.4% {+-} 8.8%, and 77.5% {+-} 8.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Conclusions: In patients with localized prostate cancer, acute and late toxicity were minimal after dose-escalation administering twice-weekly 4 Gy to a total dose of 56 Gy, with IMRT. Further prospective trials are warranted to further assess the best fractionation schemes for these patients.

Zilli, Thomas, E-mail: thomaszilli@inwind.it [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Jorcano, Sandra [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Rouzaud, Michel; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Nouet, Philippe [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Toscas, Jose Ignacio [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Casanova, Nathalie; Wang, Hui [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Escude, Lluis; Molla, Meritxell; Linero, Dolors [Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain); Weber, Damien C. [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Miralbell, Raymond [Service de Radio-oncologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Servei de Radio-oncologia, Institut Oncologic Teknon, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime  

SciTech Connect

Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

EPA`s risk assessment guidelines: Overview  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment guidelines for cancer, quantification, and exposure issues are discussed.

Patton, D.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

LED LUMINAIRE LIFETIME: Recommendations for Testing and Reporting...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

LED LUMINAIRE LIFETIME: Recommendations for Testing and Reporting LED LUMINAIRE LIFETIME: Recommendations for Testing and Reporting 2011 Solid-State Lighting Product Quality...

205

Prospective Study of HPV16 Viral Load and Risk of In Situ and Invasive Squamous Cervical Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...by the limited prospective data on viral load and risk for invasive disease...associated with HPV16 viral load. Individual trajectories of viral load in women with multiple smears can vary substantially (data not shown), which is why...

Karin Sundström; Alexander Ploner; Lisen Arnheim Dahlström; Juni Palmgren; Joakim Dillner; Hans-Olov Adami; Nathalie Ylitalo; and Pär Sparén

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Residential Radon Exposure, Histologic Types, and Lung Cancer Risk. A Case–Control Study in Galicia, Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a federal action plan for saving lives...Radon_Action_Plan.pdf . 6. A citizen's...exposure? A systematic review.Int J Radiat Biol...and American Indian uranium miners: an update...carcinoma in German uranium miners.Cancer 2006...was measured using standard procedures. Results...

Juan Miguel Barros-Dios; Alberto Ruano-Ravina; Mónica Pérez-Ríos; Margarita Castro-Bernárdez; Jose Abal-Arca; and Marta Tojo-Castro

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Determination of the historical changes in primary and secondary risk factors for cancer using U.S. public health records  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overall cancer mortality rates have risen from about 4% of all deaths in the early 20th century to about 25% of all deaths by the end of the century in the United States. To assess any potential hypotheses for this increase ...

Herrero Jimenez, Pablo, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Estimating CDKN2A Carrier Probability and Personalizing Cancer Risk Assessments in Hereditary Melanoma Using MelaPRO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CDKN2A Carrier Probability and Personalizing...Department of Statistics, University of...the calculated probabilities with the observed...obtain evaluation statistics for MELPREDICT...BayesMendel/ 12DevCan: probability of developing...SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2005...

Wenyi Wang; Kristin B. Niendorf; Devanshi Patel; Amanda Blackford; Fabio Marroni; Arthur J. Sober; Giovanni Parmigiani; and Hensin Tsao

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Repair Capacity for UV Light–Induced DNA Damage Associated with Risk of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer and Tumor Progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reactivation|DNA repair capacity|epidemiology|skin...increasing levels of solar UV radiation (2-4...studying the DNA repair capacity (DRC) as a marker for...keratosis with cumulative solar ultraviolet exposure...influence the DNA repair capacity of normal and skin cancer-affected...

Li-E Wang; Chunying Li; Sara S. Strom; Leonard H. Goldberg; Abenaa Brewster; Zhaozheng Guo; Yawei Qiao; Gary L. Clayman; J. Jack Lee; Adel K. El-Naggar; Victor G. Prieto; Madeleine Duvic; Scott M. Lippman; Randal S. Weber; Margaret L. Kripke; and Qingyi Wei

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evidence that breast cancer risk at the 2q35 locus is mediated through IGFBP5 regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tchatchou52, Elinor J. Sawyer57, Ian Tomlinson58, Michael J. Kerin59, Nicola Miller59, Australian Ovarian Cancer Management Group2,60 , Christopher A. Haiman61, Brian E. Henderson61, Fredrick Schumacher61, Loic Le Marchand62, Annika Lindblom63, Sara...

Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Nord, Silje; Cowper-Sal•lari, Richard; Desai, Kinjal; Kar, Siddhartha; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Glubb, Dylan M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Daniel, Klevebring; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Břrge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Broeks, Annegien; Van’t Veer, Laura J.; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérčse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Qiuyin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Australian Ovarian Cancer Management Group; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Lee, Daphne S. C.; Wong, Tien Y.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W. M.; Collée, J. Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Kapuscinski, Miroslav K.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Grenaker Alnćs, Grethe; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Syed Buhari, Shaik Ahmad Bin; Teo, Yik Ying; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrčche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Koto, Yon-Dschun; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Helbig, Sonja; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; de Santiago, Ines; Carroll, Jason; Caldas, Carlos; Brown, Melissa A.; Lupien, Mathieu; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; French, Juliet D.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dietary Insulin Index and Insulin Load in Relation to Endometrial Cancer Risk in the Nurses' Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...II) and insulin load (IL) scores developed...blinded to questionnaire data reviewed the documents...limited statistical power, dietary IL strongly...most other covariate data (except height and...Glycemic index, glycemic load and endometrial cancer...Service, USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory. 2000...

Jennifer Prescott; Ying Bao; Akila N. Viswanathan; Edward L. Giovannucci; Susan E. Hankinson; and Immaculata De Vivo

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Strategy for Bounding Attributable Risk: a Lung Cancer Example Minh Ha-Duong1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Casman2 , and M. Granger. Morgan2 1 Centre International de Recherche sur l'Environnement et le, residential radon, and asbestos fibers) and describe the uncertainty surrounding those estimates Deaths, 2000 Projected Lung Cancer Deaths, 2003(2) ** All persons 56.5 281,421,906 159,200 157,200 Male

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

213

Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer survival: Lessons from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Page /1 5 Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer ( ). With regards to cancer risk, a first comprehensive review of socioeconomic inequalities was1 published by IARC in 1997 ( ). This review covered inequalities in cancer mortality, incidence and survival and discussed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naieve Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A 7-Year Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report clinical outcomes and early and late complications in 264 hormone-naieve patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between February 2000 and July 2007, 264 patients underwent HDR-BT in combination with EBRT as a treatment for their low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The HDR-BT was performed using ultrasound-based implantation. The total HDR-BT dose was 18 Gy in 3 fractions within 24 h, with a 6-h minimum interval. The EBRT started 2 weeks after HDR-BT and was delivered in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy to 45 Gy within 5 weeks. Results: After a mean follow-up of 74.5 months, 4 patients (1.5%) showed prostate-specific antigen progression according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology definition and 8 patients (3%) according to the Phoenix definition. A biopsy-proven local recurrence was registered in 1 patient (0.4%), and clinical progression (bone metastases) was documented in 2 patients (0.7%). Seven-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failure was 97%, and 7-year disease-specific survival and overall survival were 100% and 91%, respectively. Toxicities were comparable to other series. Conclusions: Treatment with interstitial HDR-BT plus EBRT shows a low incidence of late complications and a favorable oncologic outcome after 7 years follow-up.

Aluwini, Shafak, E-mail: s.aluwini@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter H. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kirkels, Wim J. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Peter P.; Praag, John O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bangma, Chris H. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced colon cancer Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cancer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced colon cancer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Cancer Risk Clinic Cancer Risk...

216

Prospective Study of HPV16 Viral Load and Risk of In Situ and Invasive Squamous Cervical Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lowest tertile of viral load was associated with a...a medium/high viral load was associated with an...sensitivity analyses using data from pre-1995 only...due to a reduction in power (Supplementary Table...regardless of viral load level) conferred a risk...

Karin Sundström; Alexander Ploner; Lisen Arnheim Dahlström; Juni Palmgren; Joakim Dillner; Hans-Olov Adami; Nathalie Ylitalo; and Pär Sparén

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Reference computations of public dose and cancer risk from airborne releases of uranium and Class W plutonium  

SciTech Connect

This report presents ``reference`` computations that can be used by safety analysts in the evaluations of the consequences of postulated atmospheric releases of radionuclides from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. These computations deal specifically with doses and health risks to the public. The radionuclides considered are Class W Plutonium, all classes of Enriched Uranium, and all classes of Depleted Uranium. (The other class of plutonium, Y, was treated in an earlier report.) In each case, one gram of the respirable material is assumed to be released at ground leveL both with and without fire. The resulting doses and health risks can be scaled to whatever amount of release is appropriate for a postulated accident being investigated. The report begins with a summary of the organ-specific stochastic risk factors appropriate for alpha radiation, which poses the main health risk of plutonium and uranium. This is followed by a summary of the atmospheric dispersion factors for unfavorable and typical weather conditions for the calculation of consequences to both the Maximum Offsite Individual and the general population within 80 km (50 miles) of the site.

Peterson, V.L.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Progesterone Receptor Exon 4 Val660Leu G/T Polymorphism and Risk of Breast Cancer in Australian Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...allele, given that we had 80% power to detect risks of 1.3 and...in the South Pacific, Indian Ocean, Caribbean islands, or Asia...estimate was 0.8. We had 90% power to detect an OR of 0.3 or...homozygous TT genotype and 80% power to detect an OR of 0.8 or...

Amanda B. Spurdle; John L. Hopper; Xiaoqing Chen; Margaret R. E. McCredie; Graham G. Giles; Deon J. Venter; Melissa C. Southey; and Georgia Chenevix-Trench

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission  

SciTech Connect

Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

Goldman, M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA)); Nelson, R.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Bollinger, L. (Air Force Inspection and Safety Center, Kirtland AFB, NM (USA)); Hoover, M.D. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

1990-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

220

Polymorphisms in Apoptosis- and Proliferation-Related Genes, Ionizing Radiation Exposure, and Risk of Breast Cancer among U.S. Radiologic Technologists  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radiation and breast cancer dose-response relationship...controls and quantified radiation breast doses in the low-to-moderate range. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers...Breast Cancer|SNPs|Ionizing radiation|Interaction|Radiobiological...

Alice J. Sigurdson; Parveen Bhatti; Michele M. Doody; Michael Hauptmann; Laura Bowen; Steven L. Simon; Robert M. Weinstock; Martha S. Linet; Marvin Rosenstein; Marilyn Stovall; Bruce H. Alexander; Dale L. Preston; Jeffrey P. Struewing; and Preetha Rajaraman

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Risk of Local Failure in Breast Cancer Patients With Lobular Carcinoma In Situ at the Final Surgical Margins: Is Re-excision Necessary?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the outcome of patients with invasive breast cancer both with and without lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)-positive/close surgical margins after breast-conserving treatment. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 2358 patients with T1-T2 invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy from January 1980 to December 2009. Median age was 57 years (range, 24-91 years). There were 82 patients (3.5%) with positive/close LCIS margins (<0.2 cm) and 2232 patients (95.7%) with negative margins. A total of 1789 patients (76%) had negative lymph nodes. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. A total of 1783 patients (76%) received adjuvant systemic therapy. Multivariable analysis (MVA) was performed using Cox's proportional hazards model. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5%-4.1%) for the 2232 patients with LCIS-negative surgical margins (median follow-up 104 months) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.7%-10.8%) for the 82 patients with LCIS-positive/close surgical margins (median follow-up 90 months). This was not statistically significant (P=.5). On MVA, LCIS-positive margins after the final surgery were not associated with increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio [HR] 3.4, 95% CI 0.5-24.5, P=.2). Statistically significant prognostic variables on Cox's MVA for risk of LRR included systemic therapy (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.33-0.75, P=.001), number of positive lymph nodes (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18, P=.001), menopausal status (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98, P=.001), and histopathologic grade (grade 3 vs grade 1/2) (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.7, P=.003). Conclusion: Our results suggest that the presence of LCIS at the surgical margin after lumpectomy does not increase the risk of LRR or the final outcome. These findings suggest that re-excision or mastectomy in patients with LCIS-positive/close final surgical margins is unnecessary.

Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; Abi Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Statistics Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keruakous, Amany R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goldberg, Saveli I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Statistics Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Effect of Cigar Smoking on the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and Cancer in Men  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...arterial disease, COPD and related conditions, and cancer at selected sites in a large cohort of men who were members of a health maintenance organization. Methods. Study Cohort. The study cohort was composed of 17,774 men 30 to 85 years of age who were enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care... Cigar sales in the United States increased nearly 50 percent between 1993 and 1997. Over the same period, sales of large, “premium” cigars increased by 68 percent,1 reversing a 20-year decline in cigar consumption that began in the early 1970s. The upward ...

Iribarren C.Tekawa I.S.Sidney S.Friedman G.D.

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Abstract OT2-6-11: PENELOPE: Phase III study evaluating palbociclib (PD-0332991), a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor in patients with hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-normal primary breast cancer with high relapse risk after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (GBG-78/BIG1-13)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prostate cancer at high risk for recurrence. Experimental...prostatectomy is feasible with acceptable toxicity. Additional...rates in this high-risk population. Because...prostatectomy is feasible with acceptable toxicity. Additional...rates in this high-risk population. Because...

G von Minckwitz; H Bear; H Bonnefoi; M Colleoni; K Gelmon; M Gnant; S-B Kim; S Loibl; A Makris; M Martin; V Nekljudova; H Rugo; KS Saini; M Toi; M Untch; and G Werutsky

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Early Lung Cancer Detection Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer.

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-related lung cancer Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the level of risk for lung and other cancers. Methods We performed a meta... household coal use and lung cancer risk, and to explore ... Source: Collection: Environmental...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment guidelines cancer Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the NYS Cancer Services Program Summary: cancer and should be referred to an appropriate health care provider for a full risk assessment which can... for risk assessment (http:...

227

Indoor Coal Combustion Emissions, GSTM1 and GSTT1 Genotypes, and Lung Cancer Risk: A Case-Control Study in Xuan Wei, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research Articles Indoor Coal Combustion Emissions, GSTM1 and GSTT1...associated with exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain high levels of...subjects who used less than 130 tons of smoky coal during their lifetime, heavier users...

Qing Lan; Xingzhou He; Debra J. Costa; Linwei Tian; Nathaniel Rothman; Guizhou Hu; Judy L. Mumford

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Do red giants have short mode lifetimes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show evidence that the red giant star ksi Hya has an oscillation mode lifetime, tau, of about 2 days significantly shorter than predicted by theory (tau = 17 days, Houdek & Gough 2002). If this is a general trend of red giants it would limit the prospects of asteroseismology on these stars because of poor coherence of the oscillations.

D. Stello; H. Kjeldsen; T. R. Bedding; D. Buzasi

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

229

RICE UNIVERSITY LIFETIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weeks. Pending in instructor approval, attending a lap swim time at the pool will make up most excusedRICE UNIVERSITY LIFETIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAM BEGINNING SWIMMING LPAP 166 Fall 2012 Beginning Swimming: LPAP # 166 Days: Mondays and Wednesdays Time: 9:00 a.m 9:50 p.m. Instructor: Kyle Coplen E

230

Lifetime-based TCP service differentiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a lifetime-based differentiation framework for TCP flows. The separation into two classes is based on a threshold technique. We introduce a scheme, FairShare, that handles the long-lived flows and achieves global max-min fairness. The short-lived ... Keywords: Active queue management, Bandwidth allocation, Fairness, TCP

I. Nikolaidis; X. Wu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Neutron lifetime measured with stored ultracold neutrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutron lifetime has been measured by counting the neutrons remaining in a fluid-walled bottle as a function of the duration of storage. Losses of neutrons caused by the wall reflections are eliminated by varying the bottle volume-to-surface ratio. The result obtained is ??=887.6±3 s.

W. Mampe; P. Ageron; C. Bates; J. M. Pendlebury; A. Steyerl

1989-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Modeling the Risk of Radiation-Induced Acute Esophagitis for Combined Washington University and RTOG Trial 93-11 Lung Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To construct a maximally predictive model of the risk of severe acute esophagitis (AE) for patients who receive definitive radiation therapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The dataset includes Washington University and RTOG 93-11 clinical trial data (events/patients: 120/374, WUSTL = 101/237, RTOG9311 = 19/137). Statistical model building was performed based on dosimetric and clinical parameters (patient age, sex, weight loss, pretreatment chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, fraction size). A wide range of dose-volume parameters were extracted from dearchived treatment plans, including Dx, Vx, MOHx (mean of hottest x% volume), MOCx (mean of coldest x% volume), and gEUD (generalized equivalent uniform dose) values. Results: The most significant single parameters for predicting acute esophagitis (RTOG Grade 2 or greater) were MOH85, mean esophagus dose (MED), and V30. A superior-inferior weighted dose-center position was derived but not found to be significant. Fraction size was found to be significant on univariate logistic analysis (Spearman R = 0.421, p < 0.00001) but not multivariate logistic modeling. Cross-validation model building was used to determine that an optimal model size needed only two parameters (MOH85 and concurrent chemotherapy, robustly selected on bootstrap model-rebuilding). Mean esophagus dose (MED) is preferred instead of MOH85, as it gives nearly the same statistical performance and is easier to compute. AE risk is given as a logistic function of (0.0688 Asterisk-Operator MED+1.50 Asterisk-Operator ConChemo-3.13), where MED is in Gy and ConChemo is either 1 (yes) if concurrent chemotherapy was given, or 0 (no). This model correlates to the observed risk of AE with a Spearman coefficient of 0.629 (p < 0.000001). Conclusions: Multivariate statistical model building with cross-validation suggests that a two-variable logistic model based on mean dose and the use of concurrent chemotherapy robustly predicts acute esophagitis risk in combined-data WUSTL and RTOG 93-11 trial datasets.

Huang, Ellen X.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia E. [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bosch, Walter R.; Matthews, John W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Sause, William T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Graham, Mary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Phelps County Regional Hospital, Rolla, MO (United States); Deasy, Joseph O., E-mail: deasyj@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation, USA ABSTRACT In order to optimize and extend the life of photovoltaics (PV) modules, scientific photovoltaics. The statisti- cally significant relationships were investigated using lifetime and degradation

Rollins, Andrew M.

234

Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance Nicholas R. Wheeler, Laura data from Underwriter Labs, featuring measurements taken on 18 identical photovoltaic (PV) modules in modules and their effects on module performance over lifetime. Index Terms--photovoltaics, statistical

Rollins, Andrew M.

235

ICALEPCS Lifetime Achievement Award to Martin Kraimer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cockroaches Advance Student's Study of Ancient Life Cockroaches Advance Student's Study of Ancient Life Bringing Fruit Flies in from the Cold DOE Environmental Sustainability Award to Three from APS 2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users The First Experiment at the LCLS APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed ICALEPCS Lifetime Achievement Award to Martin Kraimer OCTOBER 28, 2009 Bookmark and Share Left to right: Ryotaro Tanaka (ICALEPCS2009 Chair), Jeffrey O. Hill, Martin R. Kraimer, Bob Daleisio, and In Soo Ko (ICALEPCS ISAC Chair), October 15, 2009, Kobe Japan. Martin R. Kraimer, formerly of the Controls Group in the Argonne APS Engineering Support Division, is one of three recipients of the first Lifetime Achievement Award presented by the ICALEPCS International

236

Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect

Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); II. Phys. Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany)] (and others)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

Activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and risk of lung cancer among rural women in India who cook with biomass fuel  

SciTech Connect

The impact of indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass fuel burning on the risk of carcinogenesis in the airways has been investigated in 187 pre-menopausal women (median age 34 years) from eastern India who cooked exclusively with biomass and 155 age-matched control women from same locality who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas. Compared with control, Papanicolau-stained sputum samples showed 3-times higher prevalence of metaplasia and 7-times higher prevalence of dysplasia in airway epithelial cell (AEC) of biomass users. Immunocytochemistry showed up-regulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt{sup ser473} and p-Akt{sup thr308}) proteins in AEC of biomass users, especially in metaplastic and dysplastic cells. Compared with LPG users, biomass-using women showed marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) indicating oxidative stress. There were 2–5 times more particulate pollutants (PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}), 72% more nitrogen dioxide and 4-times more particulate-laden benzo(a)pyrene, but no change in sulfur dioxide in indoor air of biomass-using households, and high performance liquid chromatography estimated 6-fold rise in the concentration of benzene metabolite trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine of biomass users. Metaplasia and dysplasia, p-Akt expression and ROS generation were positively associated with PM and t,t-MA levels. It appears that cumulative exposure to biomass smoke increases the risk of lung carcinogenesis via oxidative stress-mediated activation of Akt signal transduction pathway. -- Highlights: ? Carcinogenesis in airway cells was examined in biomass and LPG using women. ? Metaplasia and dysplasia of epithelial cells were more prevalent in biomass users. ? Change in airway cytology was associated with oxidative stress and Akt activation. ? Biomass users had greater exposure to respirable PM, B(a)P and benzene. ? Cooking with biomass increases cancer risk in the airways via Akt activation.

Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayali; Dutta, Anindita; Siddique, Shabana; Ray, Manas Ranjan, E-mail: manasrray@rediffmail.com

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Lifetimes of levels in Sc45  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an attempt to clear up discrepancies between lifetimes measured by the nuclear resonance fluorescence method and by the Doppler shift attenuation method, the results of a further resonance fluorescence experiment are reported for the 720, 1237, 1409, 1662, and 2092 keV levels in Sc45.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Sc45(?, ?), bremsstrahlung 0.8

F. R. Metzger

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal... Start Time of Window 4 ?1 Shorter Lifetime in Two Dye System ?2 Longer Lifetime in Two Dye System LED Light Emitting Diode PMT Photomultiplier Tube DAQ Data Acquisition Board SD Standard Deviation 95% CI 95% Confidence Interval SNR Signal...

Shadfan, Adam

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

Abstract B56: An exploratory analysis of alcohol consumption and cancer-related dietary risk among low-income African American women in Washington, DC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...730: A prototype device for quality control of cancer specimens...A Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based SPTAN1...platform dedicated to specimen quality control. This foundational...Vortmeyer. A prototype device for quality control of cancer specimens...

Erin L. Mead and Ann Klassen

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Preventing Cancer with Vaccines: Progress in the Global Control of Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cancers are here, so political will and infrastructural...the world are at a high risk of death from liver cancer...vaccinated and so this high-risk immunization strategy...decade, no large-scale investment in screening has occurred...potentiates cervical cancer risk (21), making the control...

Mark A. Kane

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Anterior Myocardial Territory May Replace the Heart as Organ at Risk in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated whether the heart could be replaced by the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as the organ at risk (OAR) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of the breast for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with left-sided breast cancer who received postoperative radiation after breast-conserving surgery were studied. For each patient, we generated five IMRT plans including heart (H), left ventricle (LV), AMT, LV+AMT, and H+LV as the primary OARs, respectively, except both lungs and right breast, which corresponded to IMRT(H), IMRT(LV), IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV+AMT), and IMRT(H+LV). For the planning target volumes and OARs, the parameters of dose-volume histograms were compared. Results: The homogeneity index, conformity index, and coverage index were not compromised significantly in IMRT(AMT), IMRT(LV) and IMRT(LV+ AMT), respectively, when compared with IMRT(H). The mean dose to the heart, LV, and AMT decreased 5.3-21.5% (p < 0.05), 19.9-29.5% (p < 0.05), and 13.3-24.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. Similarly, the low (e.g., V5%), middle (e.g., V20%), and high (e.g., V30%) dose-volume of the heart, LV, and AMT decreased with different levels. The mean dose and V10% of the right lung increased by 9.2% (p < 0.05) and 27.6% (p < 0.05), respectively, in IMRT(LV), and the mean dose and V5% of the right breast decreased significantly in IMRT(AMT) and IMRT(LV+AMT). IMRT(AMT) was the preferred plan and was then compared with IMRT(H+LV); the majority of dose-volume histogram parameters of OARs including the heart, LV, AMT, both lungs, and the right breast were not statistically different. However, the low dose-volume of LV increased and the middle dose-volume decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in IMRT(AMT). Also, those of the right lung (V10%, V15%) and right breast (V5%, V10%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The AMT may replace the heart as the OAR in left-sided breast IMRT after breast-conserving surgery to decrease the radiation dose to the heart.

Tan Wenyong [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu Dong [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Xue Chenbin [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Xu Jiaozhen; Li Beihui [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Chen Zhengwang [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Hu Desheng [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Wang Xionghong, E-mail: tanwyym@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--22000000 58 Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer

Paxton, Anthony T.

244

Lifetimes of rovibrational levels of HD+  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for calculating the oscillator strengths for rovibrational transitions of a diatomic system within an approach that is not based on the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation is presented. The non-BO wave functions representing the bound states of the system are expanded in terms of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The method is applied to calculate oscillator strengths for the HD+ ion for transitions between rotationless vibrational states and vibrational states which are rotationally singly excited. The effect of the asymmetry of the HD+ charge distribution on the oscillator strengths and on the lifetimes of the states is elucidated.

Nikita Kirnosov; Keeper L. Sharkey; Ludwik Adamowicz

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.  

SciTech Connect

This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G. [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH; Terrill, Edward R. [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH; Borowczak, Marc [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Skin cancer is the most com-mon form of cancer in the United  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skin cancer is the most com- mon form of cancer in the United States. Excessive and unprotected exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation (UV light) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Howev- er, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer! The damaging and cumulative effects

247

Cancer Mortality and Wood Dust Exposure Among Participants in the American Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer Mortality and Wood Dust Exposure Among Participants in the American Cancer Society Cancer and Paolo Boffetta, MD, MPH3 In 1994, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified wood dust as a human carcinogen, based on very strong evidence of a carcinogenic risk of sino-nasal cancer

Salzman, Daniel

248

Phase II Study of Feasibility of Dose-Dense FEC Followed by Alternating Weekly Taxanes in High-Risk, Four or More Node-Positive Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...study of dose-dense 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) followed by weekly alternating...Patients with 4 node-positive breast cancer were...by weekly paclitaxel (80 mg...node-positive breast cancer...study of dose-dense 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) followed by weekly alternating...with >/=4 node-positive breast cancer were...by weekly paclitaxel (80 mg...

Chau T. Dang; Gabriella M. D’Andrea; Mary E. Moynahan; Maura N. Dickler; Andrew D. Seidman; Monica Fornier; Mark E. Robson; Maria Theodoulou; Diana Lake; Violante E. Currie; Arti Hurria; Katherine S. Panageas; Larry Norton; and Clifford A. Hudis

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Identification and characterisation of novel associations in the CASP8/ALS2CR12 region on chromosome 2 with breast cancer risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of 57 Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan County, 333, Taiwan, 3Department 58 of Internal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City Utah 84108-59 1266 USA, 4Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department... , London 77 School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK, 17Breakthrough Breast 78 4 Cancer Research Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK, 18Division 79 of Cancer Studies, Kings College London, Guy's Hospital...

Lin, Wei-Yu; Camp, Nicola J.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Cheng, Timothy; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marmé, Frederik; Surowy, Harald M.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérčse; Menegaux, Florence; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Břrge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; The GENICA Network; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Horio, Akiyo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; kConFab Investigators; Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Neven, Patrick; Wauters, Els; Wildiers, Hans; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrčche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Hassan, Norhashimah; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Blows, Fiona M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Hamann, Ute; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-ling; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Bui, Quang M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Irwanto, Astrid; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; The Breast and Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Study; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Adank, Muriel A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Hall, Per; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison; Easton, Douglas F.; Cox, Angela

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

Risks of Risk Decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...manuscript. 17. B. Fischhoff, P. Slovic, S. Lichtenstein, S. Read, B. Combs, Policy Sci...Perspectives on Benefit-Risk Decision Making...20. P. Slovic, B. Fischhoff, S. Lichtenstein, in So-cietal Risk Assessment: How Safe...

Chauncey Starr; Chris Whipple

1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

251

The lifetime of excess atmospheric carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution human activity has significantly altered biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. The uncertainties of future climate change rests partly on issues of physical-climate system dynamics and their representation in general circulation models. However understanding the carbon cycle is a key to comprehending the changing terrestrial biosphere and to developing a reasonable range of future concentrations of greenhouse gases. The authors look at correction of model uncertainties in the examination of the lifetime of carbon dioxide. The two difficulties analysed are as follows: (1) most model-derived estimates of the relaxation of the concentration of CO2 reveal a function which is not always well approximated by weighted sums of exponentials; (2) the function c(t) is quite sensitive to assumptions about the terrestrial biosphere and the relaxation experiment. 51 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Moore, B. III; Braswell, B.H. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Prospective Cohort Study of Body Size and Risk of Head and Neck Cancers in the NIH–AARP Diet and Health Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...day). Red and white meat intake, total energy intake, antacid, aspirin, and other...hypopharyngeal cancers in particular. Green and colleagues also showed a direct association...Nat Rev Cancer 2004;4:579-91. 26. Green J , Cairns BJ, Casabonne D, Wright FL...

Arash Etemadi; Mark G. O'Doherty; Neal D. Freedman; Albert R. Hollenbeck; Sanford M. Dawsey; and Christian C. Abnet

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Abstract 2198: A literature-based sum score of genetic variants in IGF genes modifies associations between indicators of energy balance and colorectal cancer risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Association for Cancer Research April 15, 2010 meeting-abstract Cellular and...Abstract 4834: Energy-dependent AMPK...in response to energy stress. Importantly...autophagy under energy stress conditions...Authors}. {Abstract title} [abstract...Association for Cancer Research; 2010 Apr 17-21...

Colinda CJM Simons; Leo J. Schouten; Roger Godschalk; Frederik-Jan van Schooten; Piet A. van den Brandt; and Matty P. Weijenberg

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

High frequency of K-ras codon 12 mutations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients at high risk for second primary lung cancer.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lung cancer. | A high frequency of K-ras mutations...Cancer Research 479 High Frequency of K-ras Codon 12...ABSTRACT A high frequency of K-ras mutations...9610 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850...specimens. Only a small, variable percent-age of bronchial...

F M Scott; R Modali; T A Lehman; M Seddon; K Kelly; E C Dempsey; V Wilson; M S Tockman; and J L Mulshine

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Urinary Excretion of Nitrate, N-Nitrosoproline, 3-Methyladenine, and 7-Methylguanine in a Colombian Population at High Risk for Stomach Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the population was based on a household survey in which volunteers...chromatography using a thermal energy analyzer (Thermo Electron...area for stomach cancer in Japan have an en hanced nitrosation...stomach cancer in northern Japan. In: H. Bartsch, 1.K...

W. G. Stillwell; Joseph Glogowski; H-X. Xu; John S. Wishnok; Diego Zavala; G. Montes; Pelayo Correa; and Steven R. Tannenbaum

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehiclesthe societal cost of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles with modelsand running costs) than hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles in 2030.

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Prospective Study of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-oophorectomy and Longitudinal CA-125 Screening among Women at Increased Genetic Risk of Ovarian Cancer: Design and Baseline Characteristics: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and given unstintingly of their time, energy, and tissue to advance our knowledge...Hospital; Mayo Clinic; Case Western Reserve University; Tampa Bay Cancer Consortium...349-57. 27 Rosenblatt KA, Thomas DB, The World Health Organization Collaborative Study...

Mark H. Greene; Marion Piedmonte; Dave Alberts; Mitchell Gail; Martee Hensley; Zoe Miner; Phuong L. Mai; Jennifer Loud; Gustavo Rodriguez; Jack Basil; John Boggess; Peter E. Schwartz; Joseph L. Kelley; Katie E. Wakeley; Lori Minasian; and Stephen Skates

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cancer Stem Cells: An Old Idea—A Paradigm Shift  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cancer stem cells. By virtue of their fundamental importance in organogenesis, normal...angiogenesis and in several human tumors [electronic resource]. BMC Cancer 2004;4:43...tumor cell biology. This hypothesis has fundamental implications for cancer risk assessment...

Max S. Wicha; Suling Liu; and Gabriela Dontu

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Quantitative Characterization of Filament Dynamics by Single-Molecule Lifetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER 29 Quantitative Characterization of Filament Dynamics by Single-Molecule Lifetime. Single-Molecule Lifetime Measurements A. Extract and Sample Preparation B. Microscopy C. Data Analysis Dynamics C. Connecting to Other Types of Measurements IV. Results and Conclusion References Abstract Single-molecule

Needleman, Daniel

262

AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fit of the two. Direct lifetime under a variety of loads spectra for wind tests of residual strength for a modified standard wind bone coupons were manufactured, tested and favorably turbine spectrum. When a single and residual strength. Over 900 tests spectrum loading and fatigue lifetimes of a typical wind have been run

263

Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before:the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron beta decay. The neutron lifetime obtained,878.5+/-0.7stat+/-0.3sys s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

A. P. Serebrov; V. E. Varlamov; A. G. Kharitonov; A. K. Fomin; Yu. N. Pokotilovski; P. Geltenbort; I. A. Krasnoschekova; M. S. Lasakov; R. R. Taldaev; A. V. Vassiljev; O. M. Zherebtsov

2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

264

Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons  

SciTech Connect

Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before: the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron {beta} decay. The neutron lifetime obtained, 878.5{+-}0.7{sub stat}{+-}0.3{sub sys} s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

Serebrov, A. P.; Varlamov, V. E.; Kharitonov, A. G.; Fomin, A. K.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Taldaev, R. R.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, RU-188300 Gatchina, Leningrad District (Russian Federation); Pokotilovski, Yu. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Max von Laue Paul Langevin, Boite Postal 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

European Journal of Cancer Prevention, vol.8, 1999, Corpet & Gerber, Energy balance and cancer 77 European Journal of Cancer Prevention 1999, 8, 77-89 Author's version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Journal of Cancer Prevention, vol.8, 1999, Corpet & Gerber, Energy balance and cancer 77 European Journal of Cancer Prevention 1999, 8, 77-89 Author's version REVIEW Energy balance and cancers M overweight, have been recognized as risk factors for the development of cancers. Human epidemiological

Boyer, Edmond

266

Risk-Related research at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk-Related Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Risk-Related Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Table of Contents Human Exposure Assessment Cancer Risk Assessment Extrapolation of Cancer Risks from Animals to Humans Biodosimetry to Assess Human Genotoxicity from Mutagenic or Clastogenic Agents Transgenic Mouse Models Biological Effects of Complex Chemical Mixtures Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and Cancer Models Electromagnetic Fields Risks of Ionizing Radiation in Space Risk-Based Remediation Strategy for Kesterson Reservoir Wetland Restoration and Sediment Quality Integrated, Risk-Based Environmental Clean-up SELECT: Environmental Decision-Making Software Introduction The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducts research to improve the scientific basis of risk assessment.

267

PCB contaminated dust on indoor surfaces – Health risks and acceptable surface concentrations in residential and occupational settings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been used in diverse purposes such as indoor paints. Removal of these paints with dust creating techniques, like sandblasting, will result in contamination of building surfaces with PCB-containing dust. Objectives of this study was to analyze the PCB concentrations on surfaces after sandblasting with silica using wipe samples and estimate the resulting health risks and further calculate the risk based acceptable PCB surface concentrations that do not cause incremental lifetime cancer risk higher that 10?5 or does not cause immunosupression effects in residential use or in occupational settings. Both deterministic and probabilistic approaches were used. The total PCB concentrations on surfaces ranged from 10 to 1100 ?g/m2. Estimated cancer risk was 1.2 × 10?4 for childhood exposure, 1.3 × 10?5 for adult residents and 1.5 × 10?5 for occupational exposure. Probabilistic risk assessment revealed that point estimates were quite reasonable and located between 45th and 79th percentiles on probabilistic distribution of risk. The noncancer risks were calculated as hazard quotients (HQ) which ranged from 3.3 to 35 depending on the exposure scenario. Acceptable surface concentrations based on noncancer effects that are protective for 95% of exposed population were 7 ?g/m2 for residential use, 65 ?g/m2 for residential use if only adults will be exposed and 140 ?g/m2 for occupational use. Preliminary cleanup experiment revealed that when contaminated dust was carefully removed with industrial vacuum cleaner and further washed with terpene containing liquid the surface concentration dropped below the acceptable levels calculated in this study.

Sari Kuusisto; Outi Lindroos; Tiina Rantio; Eero Priha; Tuula Tuhkanen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......higher fraction of depleted uranium (DU). These...in mandibular cancer patients following...Reprocessed uranium exposure and lung cancer risk. Health...and risks from uranium are not increased...The impact of depleted uranium (DU......

R. J. Tanner; J. S. Eakins; J. T. M. Jansen; J. D. Harrison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Unusual behavior in the first excited state lifetime of catechol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are presenting vibrationally selective pump-probe measurements of the first electronic excited-state (pp*) lifetime of jet-cooled neutral catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene). The lifetime of the 0-0 transition is very short (7 ps) as rationalized by the small pp*/psigma* gap calculated. However the lifetimes implying higher out-of-plane vibrational levels are longer (~11 ps). This emphasizes the role of the out-of-plane vibration in the pp*/psigma* coupling not only in its nature but also in the number of quanta

Weiler, Martin; Féraud, Géraldine; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Dedonder, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Fujii, Masaaki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cervical Cancer Burden and Prevention Strategies: Asia Oceania Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cancer, economic status, political background, cultures...DNA positive for high-risk genotypes, with detection...cytology National Health Insurance Corp. (NHIC) since...Australasia and Oceania: risk-factors, epidemiology...distribution and differential risks of human papillomavirus...

Suzanne M. Garland; Neerja Bhatla; and Hextan Y.S. Ngan

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: B_c lifetime measured using the D0 detector  

SciTech Connect

Using approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} meson is studied in the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{mu}{sup {+-}} + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/{psi} + {mu} invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 {+-} 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: {tau}(B{sub c}{sup {+-}}) = 0.448{sub -0.036}{sup +0.038}(stat) {+-} 0.032(sys) ps.

Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; /Indiana U.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Chronic Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer Risks among Asian Immigrants in New York City: Results from a Large, Community-Based Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment Program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Miller BA , Kolonel L, Bernstein L, Young JL, Swanson GM, West DW, et alRacial/ethnic cancer patterns in the United States...HBV) infection among Hmong immigrants in the San Joaquin Valley.J Community Health 2011;36:42-6. 27. United States...

Henry J. Pollack; Simona C. Kwon; Su H. Wang; Laura C. Wyatt; Chau Trinh-Shevrin; and on behalf of the AAHBP Coalition

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Exon 5 Polymorphisms in the O6-Alkylguanine DNA Alkyltransferase Gene and Lung Cancer Risk in Non–Smokers Exposed to Second-Hand Smoke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Training Awards from the International Agency for Research...the management of the project. Requests for reprints...Cancer Epidemiology, International Agency for Research...Malats N., Camus-Radon A. M., Nyberg F...environmental carcinogens. | International Agency of Research...

Catherine Cohet; Stephane Borel; Fredrik Nyberg; Anush Mukeria; Irene Brüske-Hohlfeld; Vali Constantinescu; Simone Benhamou; Paul Brennan; Janet Hall; and Paolo Boffetta

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Retrospective Analysis of Risk Factors of Central Nervous System Metastases in Operable Breast Cancer: Different Survival by Biological Subtype and Ki67 Overexpression.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Antonio, TX P4-17-11: Central Nervous System Involvement and Clinical Outcome, Review...cancer infiltrates into central nervous system (CNS) with the incidence of 10-20...122 patients received irradiation or operation, and 118 died. While major cause of...

M. Ishihara; H. Mukai; M. Onozawa; K. Nihei; T. Shimada; N. Wada; and S. Nagai

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Joint Effects of Dietary Vitamin D and Sun Exposure on Breast Cancer Risk: Results from the French E3N Cohort  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...women) total energy intake. A total...returned 1999 survey and continued...cancer-free survey. Incident Colorectal...canned tuna fish, dark-meat fish...nutrient values were energy adjusted according...the age- and energy-adjusted model...Likewise, dark or fatty fish...

Pierre Engel; Guy Fagherazzi; Sylvie Mesrine; Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault; and Francoise Clavel-Chapelon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evaluation of Epithelial Cell Proliferation Rate in Normal-appearing Colonic Mucosa as a High-Risk Marker for Colorectal Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Horii, Osaka, Japan). All of the patients...min at 500 W in a household microwave oven...Corp., Tokyo, Japan) as a primary antibody...patients who had higher energy intake had significantly...case-control study in Japan. Cancer Causes Control...Edwards S. L. Dietary energy sources and colon...

Ikuko Akedo; Hideki Ishikawa; Tatsuya Ioka; Itaru Kaji; Hiroyuki Narahara; Shingo Ishiguro; Takaichiro Suzuki; and Toru Otani

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Crypt-Restricted Loss and Decreased Protein Expression of Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I as Potential Hypothesis-Driven Biomarkers of Colon Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leading cause of cancer deaths around the world. Because the cure rate for metastatic...Villani G, Greco M, Papa S, et al. Low reserve of cytochrome c oxidase capacity in vivo...skeletal muscle in response to chronic energy deprivation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A...

Claire M. Payne; Hana Holubec; Carol Bernstein; Harris Bernstein; Katerina Dvorak; Sylvan B. Green; Megan Wilson; Monique Dall'Agnol; Barbora Dvorakova; James Warneke; and Harinder Garewal

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Lifetime exergy consumption as a sustainability metric for information technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes recent explorations of the use of lifetime exergy consumption as a thermodynamically based metric for sustainability of information technologies. Other proposed thermodynamic metrics are described and compared with life cycle exergy ...

David J. Lettieri; Christopher R. Hannemann; Van P. Carey; Amip J. Shah

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Lifetime of the Highly Efficient H- Ion Sources  

SciTech Connect

Factors limiting the operating lifetime of Compact Surface Plasma Sources (CSPS) are analyzed and possible treatments for lifetime enhancement are considered. Noiseless discharges with lower gas and cesium densities are produced in experiments with modified discharge cells. With these discharge cells it is possible to increase the emission aperture and extract the same beam with a lower discharge current and with correspondingly increased source lifetime. A design of an advanced CSPS is presented. Optimization of the discharge cells in a Penning H{sup -} ion source is a viable method for increasing the phase space of the stable region for noiseless discharge production. With this method, cesium usage would be decreased, potentially resulting in longer source lifetimes.

Bollinger, D.S.; /Fermilab; Dudnikov, V.G.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Faircloth, D.C.; Lawrie, S.R.; /Rutherford

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Lifetime of solar flare particles in coronal storage regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most discussions of lifetime of flare particles in the solar corona have assumed that collision loss is ... However, it is quite possible that the solar cosmic rays are not imbedded in 106...K coronal material bu...

Kinsey A. Anderson

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A two-parameter lifetime distribution with decreasing failure rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a new two-parameter lifetime distribution with decreasing failure rate is introduced. Various properties of the proposed distribution are discussed. The estimation of the parameters attained by the EM algorithm and their asymptotic variances ...

Rasool Tahmasbi; Sadegh Rezaei

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Measurement of the lifetimes of B meson mass eigenstates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, we present the results of the average lifetime measurements in ..., ..., and ... decays, as well as the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of ... and ... decays. The time-dependent angular ...

Anikeev, Konstantin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Sandia National Laboratories: acceler-ated lifetime test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acceler-ated lifetime test Sandia R&D Funded under New DOE SunShot Program On November 27, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar,...

284

Automatic measurement of the mean lifetime of the muon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a microcomputer?based apparatus for the measurement of the mean lifetime of the muon. The equipment exposes the student to many modern experimental techniques and is suitable for an advanced undergraduatephysics laboratory.

Roger J. Lewis

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Optimum maintenance strategy under uncertainty in the lifetime distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The problem of determining the optimal maintenance strategy for a machine given its lifetime distribution has been studied extensively. Solutions to this problem are outlined in the academic literature, prescribed in professional handbooks, implemented in reliability engineering software systems and widely used in practice. These solutions typically assume that the lifetime distribution and its parameter values are known with certainty, although this is usually not the case in practice. In this paper we study the effect of parameter uncertainty on the optimum age-based maintenance strategy. The effect of uncertainty is evaluated by considering both a theoretical uniform lifetime distribution and a more realistic Weibull lifetime distribution. The results show that admitting to the uncertainty does influence the optimal maintenance age and also provides a quantifiable cost benefit. The results can help maintenance managers in making maintenance decisions under uncertainty, and also in deciding when it is worthwhile to invest in advanced data improvement procedures.

Bram de Jonge; Warse Klingenberg; Ruud Teunter; Tiedo Tinga

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuation method lifetime Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 3 LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS OF EXCITED STATES IN EXOTIC... for the Doppler-effect based lifetime measurements program at the National ... Source: Magiera,...

287

Relation between charge carrier mobility and lifetime in organic photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between charge carrier lifetime and mobility in a bulk heterojunction based organic solar cell utilizing diketopyrrolopyrole-naphthalene co-polymer and PC71BM in the photoactive blend layer is investigated using the photoinduced charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage technique. Light intensity delay time and temperature dependent experiments are used to quantify the charge carrier mobility and density as well as the temperature dependence of both. From the saturation of photoinduced current at high laser intensities it is shown that Langevin-type bimolecular recombination is present in the studied system. The charge carrier lifetime especially in Langevin systems is discussed to be an ambiguous and unreliable parameter to determine the performance of organic solar cells because of the dependence of charge carrier lifetime on charge carrier density mobility and type of recombination. It is revealed that the relation between charge mobility (?) and lifetime (?) is inversely proportional where the ?? product is independent of temperature. The results indicate that in photovoltaic systems with Langevin type bimolecular recombination the strategies to increase the charge lifetime might not be beneficial because of an accompanying reduction in charge carrier mobility. Instead the focus on non-Langevin mechanisms of recombination is crucial because this allows an increase in the charge extraction rate by improving the carrier lifetime density and mobility simultaneously.

Chellappan Vijila; Samarendra P. Singh; Prashant Sonar; Almantas Pivrikas; Bronson Philippa; Elumalai Naveen Kumar; S. Gomathy Sandhya; Sergey Gorelik; Jonathan Hobley; Akihiro Furube; Hiroyuki Matsuzaki; Ryuzi Katoh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Direct Measurements of the Lifetime of Heavy Hypernuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lifetime of a Lambda particle embedded in a nucleus (hypernucleus) decreases from that of free Lambda decay due to the opening of the Lambda N to NN weak decay channel. However, it is generally believed that the lifetime of a hypernucleus attains a constant value (saturation) for medium to heavy hypernuclear masses, yet this hypothesis has been difficult to verify. The present paper reports a direct measurement of the lifetime of medium-heavy hypernuclei produced with a photon-beam from Fe, Cu, Ag, and Bi targets. The recoiling hypernuclei were detected by a fission fragment detector using low-pressure multi-wire proportional chambers. The experiment agrees remarkably well with the only previously-measured single-species heavy-hypernucleus lifetime, that of Fe56_Lambda at KEK, and has significantly higher precision. The experiment disagrees with the measured lifetime of an unknown combination of heavy hypernuclei with 180lifetime decrease.

X. Qiu; L. Tang; A. Margaryan; P. Achenbach; A. Ahmidouch; I. Albayrak; D. Androic; A. Asaturyan; R. Asaturyan; O. Ates; R. Badui; P. Baturin; W. Boeglin; J. Bono; E. Brash; P. Carter; C. Chen; X. Chen; A. Chiba; E. Christy; M. M. Dalton; S. Danagoulian; R. De Leo; D. Doi; M. Elaasar; R. Ent; H. Fenker; Y. Fujii; M. Furic; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; F. Garibaldi; D. Gaskell; A. Gasparian; T. Gogami; O. Hashimoto; T. Horn; B. Hu; E. V. Hungerford; M. Jones; H. Kanda; M. Kaneta; M. Kawai; D. Kawama; H. Khanal; M. Kohl; A. Liyanage; W. Luo; K. Maeda; P. Markowitz; T. Maruta; A. Matsumura; V. Maxwell; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; S. Nagao; S. N. Nakamura; A. Narayan; C. Neville; G. Niculescu; M. I. Niculescu; A. Nunez; Nuruzzaman; Y. Okayasu; T. Petkovic; J. Pochodzalla; J. Reinhold; V. M. Rodriguez; C. Samanta; B. Sawatzky; T. Seva; A. Shichijo; V. Tadevosyan; N. Taniya; K. Tsukada; M. Veilleux; W. Vulcan; F. R. Wesselmann; S. A. Wood; L. Ya; T. Yamamoto; Z. Ye; K. Yokota; L. Yuan; S. Zhamkochyan; L. Zhu

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Chapter 14 - Prostate Cancer Genomics as a Driver of Personalized Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men in the Western world. In North America, more than 275 000 men are diagnosed annually whereby approximately 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with CaP in their lifetime, and 1 in 34 men will die from castrate-resistant metastatic disease. Unfortunately, current clinical prognostic factors explain only a proportion of the observed variation in clinical outcome from patient to patient. Furthermore, over-treatment of indolent and low-risk cancers leads to inappropriate morbidity following radiotherapy or surgery. As such, better predictors of individualized prognosis and treatment response are urgently needed to triage patients to customized and intensified CaP treatment. Recent developments in next-generation sequencing have made it possible to identify prognostic and predictive signatures based on genomic profiles. Herein, we review the recent genetic data pertaining to prostate cancer carcinogenesis, progression, castrate-resistance and metastases. We discuss the genetic basis of CaP progression from localized to systemic disease (e.g. point mutations, copy number alterations and structural variants) and important considerations for CaP biology including intra- and inter-prostatic heterogeneity, multifocality and multiclonality, TMPRSS2–ERG and other ETS-family gene fusions and the role of the tumor microenvironment (e.g. hypoxia and the contribution of caner-associated stroma). Finally, we focus on the use of genomic markers as prognostic factors for local failure and for systemic disease, as novel risk stratification tools, in triaging patients to existing treatment options and, ultimately, the potential of genomics for the identification of molecular targets for CaP therapy. We conclude by summarizing selected outstanding questions in CaP biology that can be addressed effectively through international cooperation between genome sequencing projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC).

Michael Fraser; Alejandro Berlin; Veronique Ouellet; Fred Saad; Robert G. Bristow

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Political Management Issues and Societal Risk Trade-off for the Built Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Civil Engineering structures always entail a degree of risk [1] [2] [3]. They are planned to remain serviceable and productive over a design lifetime during which they will be subjected to natural and society-...

Ross B. Corotis

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acceptability of risk is a complex subject. Judgments of acceptability ... and by the society at large. A risk may be acceptable to the consumer of a product or ... but those who receive no benefit but some risk

Chris Whipple

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Risk Prioritization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Managers Quality Managers Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee Reference Document SQAS21.01.00 - 1999 Software Risk Management A Practical Guide February, 2000 Abstract This document is a practical guide for integrating software risk management into a software project. The purpose of Risk Management is to identify, assess and control project risks. Identified risks are analyzed to determine their potential impact and likelihood of occurrence. Risk Management Plans are developed to document the project's approach to risk management, risks, and decisions made about what should be done with each risk. Risks and risk actions are then tracked to closure. Software Risk Management: A Practical Guide SQAS21.01.00 Acknowledgments This document was prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) by a Working Group of the DOE

293

Risk assessment of soil-based exposures to plutonium at experimental sites located on the Nevada Test Site and adjoining areas  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a series of tests was conducted at or near the Nevada Test Site to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,240}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Access to the sites is strictly controlled; therefore, it does not constitute a threat to human health at the present time. However, because the residual {sup 239} Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), the sites could indeed represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, we defined three basic exposure scenarios that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,240}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision located at a test site, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility. Our screening analyses indicated that doses to organs are dominated by the intemal deposition of Pu via the inhalation pathway, and thus our risk assessment focused on those factors that affect inhalation exposures and associated doses, including inhalation rates, activity patterns, tenure at a residence or occupation, indoor/outdoor air relationships, and resuspension outdoors. Cancer risks were calculated as a function of lifetime cumulative doses to the key target organs (i.e., bone surface, liver, and lungs) and risk factors for those organs. Uncertainties in the predicted cancer risks were analyzed using Monte-Carlo simulations of the probability distributions used to represent assessment parameters. The principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Straume, T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Political Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investors in nondomestic securities face a number of risks beyond those of domestic securities. Political risk can affect a bond investor in a...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

miRNA Dysregulation in Breast Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2013 American Association for Cancer Research. 15 November 2013 review-article Reviews miRNA Dysregulation in Breast Cancer Laoighse Mulrane Sharon F. McGee William...identified to incur increased risk of breast cancer in certain populations. In addition...

Laoighse Mulrane; Sharon F. McGee; William M. Gallagher; Darran P. O'Connor

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Endocrine therapy initiation among Medicaid-insured breast cancer survivors with hormone receptor-positive tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hormone receptor-positive (HR+) cancers account for most breast cancer diagnoses and deaths. Among survivors with HR + breast cancers, endocrine therapy (ET) reduces 5-year risk of recurrence by up to 40 %. Ob...

Stephanie Brooke Wheeler; Racquel Elizabeth Kohler…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Thyroid Cancer Incidence among Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel, 1990–2004  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...immunizations and depleted uranium, may also influence cancer risk among...to prostate cancer, although...inconsistent, depleted uranium (the material...for prostate cancer (36). Because...exposed to depleted uranium, these factors...

Lindsey R. Enewold; Jing Zhou; Susan S. Devesa; Amy Berrington de Gonzalez; William F. Anderson; Shelia H. Zahm; Alexander Stojadinovic; George E. Peoples; Aizenhawar J. Marrogi; John F. Potter; Katherine A. McGlynn; and Kangmin Zhu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Radiative Lifetimes of Some Electronic States of Helium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we describe our measurements of the radiative lifetimes of the 3 3 P 3 3 D 4 1 D and 4 3 D electronic states of helium using a low-energy positive ion accelerator. The lifetimes in nanoseconds are 3 3 P?(111±5) 3 3 D?(14±3) 4 1 D?(34±4) and 4 3 D?(32±1) . In addition we discuss the desirability and feasibility of introducing undergraduates to this type of research.

Stanley A. Chin-Bing; Charles E. Head; Albert E. Green Jr.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Aspects of Thermoregulatory Physiology Pertinent to Hyperthermic Treatment of Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cigarette Filters: An Additional Health Risk to the Smoker? Cancer...Cigarette Filters: An Additional Health Risk to the Smoker? by Pauly...glass fibers that may be dangerous in any concentration and under...cigarette filters: an additional health risk to the smoker?. Cancer...

John Bligh

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Alcohol Consumption and Lung Cancer: A Review of the Epidemiologic Evidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...particularly beer intake may increase lung cancer risk after...has been suggested to increase lung cancer risk in a...that alcohol intake may increase lung cancer risk (3...criteria to assess the quality of the studies were assessment...usual consumption of wine (including Japanese...

Elisa V. Bandera; Jo L. Freudenheim; and John E. Vena

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Political risk  

SciTech Connect

A book that considers political risk and how it can be managed: what political risk is; the types of risk; how to forecast regime instability; case histories; using scenarios; regional and global corporate strategies; managing political analysis and decision making in the international company and bank including staff-line relationships; the question of centralization and information gathering; risk aversion; risk management; insurance and hedging.

Overholt, W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

"Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Skin Cancer- What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf May 20, 2010 #12;Supporters for the Deaf ("REAP") #12;Overview Skin Overview What is skin cancer? Who is at risk? How common is skin cancer? Signs of skin cancer Prevention Treatments #12;Skin Overview Skin is the largest organ in your body

Goldman, Steven A.

303

The shape of the hazard function for cancer incidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A population-based cohort consisting of 126,141 men and 122,208 women born between 1874 and 1931 and at risk for breast or colorectal cancer after 1965 was identified by linking the Utah Population Data Base and the Utah Cancer Registry. The hazard function ... Keywords: Breast cancer, Colorectal cancer, Hazard function, Survival analysis, Truncation

K. M. Boucher; R. A. Kerber

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimal lifetime consumption and investment under drawdown constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal lifetime consumption and investment under drawdown constraint Romuald Elie Nizar Touzi October 21, 2006 Abstract We consider the infinite horizon optimal consumption-investment problem under-form expressions for the optimal consumption and investment strategy. Key words: portfolio allocation, drawdown

Elie, Romuald

305

Optimal lifetime consumption and investment under drawdown constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal lifetime consumption and investment under drawdown constraint Romuald Elie Nizar Touzi consumption-investment problem under the drawdown constraint, i.e. the wealth process never falls below in explicit form, and we derive closed-form expressions for the optimal consumption and investment strategy

Touzi, Nizar

306

An approach for lifetime reliability analysis using theorem proving  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently proposed formal reliability analysis techniques have overcome the inaccuracies of traditional simulation based techniques but can only handle problems involving discrete random variables. In this paper, we extend the capabilities of existing ... Keywords: Failure rate, Formal methods, Fractile function, HOL, Hazard function, Lifetime analysis, Random variables, Reliability analysis, Statistical properties, Theorem proving

Naeem Abbasi; Osman Hasan; Sofične Tahar

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditions, load profiles, and type of electrocatalyst on the performance degradation, and ­ Determine-Horn ­ Massachusetts Institute of Technology Paulo Ferreira ­ University of Texas at Austin Dane Morgan ­ University systems to achieve the DOE lifetime targets. Technical Targets ­ Durability with cycling 5,000 hours (

308

Lifetime-Aware Intrusion Detection under Safeguarding Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lifetime-Aware Intrusion Detection under Safeguarding Constraints Ali Iranli, Hanif Fatemi, Massoud in whereby first the safeguarding constraints are satisfied and then the scheduling problem is solved Detection under Safeguarding constraint (IDS) is the version of the problem that we are interested to extend

Pedram, Massoud

309

Precision Measurement of the ?[0 over b] Baryon Lifetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ratio of the ?[0 over b] baryon lifetime to that of the B?[superscript 0] meson is measured using 1.0??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The ?[0 over ...

Williams, Michael

310

Precision measurement of the Lambda_b baryon lifetime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ratio of the \\Lambda b baryon lifetime to that of the B0 meson is measured using 1.0/fb of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The \\Lambda b baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode \\Lambda b -> J/\\psi pK-, while the B0 meson decay used is the well known B0 -> J/\\psi pi+K- mode, where the pi+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K*0(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976 +/- 0.012 +/- 0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B0 meson lifetime, the \\Lambda b lifetime is found to be 1.482 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.012 ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; C. Baesso; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; G. Busetto; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; H. Carranza-Mejia; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; P. Chen; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; W. De Silva; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; H. Dijkstra; M. Dogaru; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. Garofoli; P. Garosi; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; P. Gorbounov; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; E. Jans; P. Jaton; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; I. R. Kenyon; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; O. Kochebina; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefčvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; S. Leo; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; S. Lohn; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; D. Lucchesi; J. Luisier; H. Luo; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; S. Malde; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; J. Maratas; U. Marconi; P. Marino; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; D. Martins Tostes; A. Massafferri; R. Matev; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; E. Maurice; A. Mazurov; B. Mc Skelly; J. McCarthy; A. McNab; R. McNulty; B. Meadows; F. Meier; M. Meissner; M. Merk; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; A. Mordŕ; M. J. Morello; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Detection of Atherosclerotic Coronary Plaques by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Angioscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sliced open to have their lumens imaged. For each sample, 51 time resolved wide-field images were taken over 10 nanoseconds at 390 (±40) nm, 450 (±40) nm, and 550 (±88) nm wavelengths. To analyze the samples, the intensity map and lifetime map were...

Thomas, Patrick A.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Persistent Contrails and Contrail Cirrus. Part II: Full Lifetime Behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More than 200 large-eddy simulations of long-lived contrails from several-seconds age until their demise have been performed and their lifetime-integrated behavior has been analyzed. The simulations employ size-resolved microphysics and include ...

D. C. Lewellen

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.02.044 INDUCED SECOND CANCERS AFTER PROSTATE-CANCER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.02.044 EDITORIAL INDUCED SECOND CANCERS AFTER PROSTATE-CANCER University Medical Center, New York, NY The absolute risks of a radiation-induced second cancer among long concern, expressed by Kendal et al. (5) in this issue, that prostate cancer patients may be unduly

Brenner, David Jonathan

314

Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect

The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

Beral, V. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Lung Cancer and Arsenic Concentrations in Drinking Water in Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cancer risks was found in a small cohort study in Japan involving residents using well water con concentrations in water sources piped to households. It is the first large, popula- tion-based lung cancer case

California at Berkeley, University of

316

Inhomogeneous dephasing masks coherence lifetimes in ensemble measurements  

SciTech Connect

An open question at the forefront of modern physical sciences is what role, if any, quantum effects may play in biological sensing and energy transport mechanisms. One area of such research concerns the possibility of coherent energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Spectroscopic evidence of long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment protein complexes (PPCs), along with theoretical modeling of PPCs, has indicated that coherent energy transport might boost efficiency of energy transport in photosynthesis. Accurate assessment of coherence lifetimes is crucial for modeling the extent to which quantum effects participate in this energy transfer, because such quantum effects can only contribute to mechanisms proceeding on timescales over which the coherences persist. While spectroscopy is a useful way to measure coherence lifetimes, inhomogeneity in the transition energies across the measured ensemble may lead to underestimation of coherence lifetimes from spectroscopic experiments. Theoretical models of antenna complexes generally model a single system, and direct comparison of single system models to ensemble averaged experimental data may lead to systematic underestimation of coherence lifetimes, distorting much of the current discussion. In this study, we use simulations of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex to model single complexes as well as averaged ensembles to demonstrate and roughly quantify the effect of averaging over an inhomogeneous ensemble on measured coherence lifetimes. We choose to model the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex because that system has been a focus for much of the recent discussion of quantum effects in biology, and use an early version of the well known environment-assisted quantum transport model to facilitate straightforward comparison between the current model and past work. Although ensemble inhomogeneity is known to lead to shorter lifetimes of observed oscillations (simply inhomogeneous spectral broadening in the time domain), this important fact has been left out of recent discussions of spectroscopic measurements of energy transport in photosynthesis. In general, these discussions have compared single-system theoretical models to whole-ensemble laboratory measurements without addressing the effect of inhomogeneous dephasing. Our work addresses this distinction between single system and ensemble averaged observations, and shows that the ensemble averaging inherent in many experiments leads to an underestimation of coherence lifetimes in individual systems.

Pelzer, Kenley M.; Griffin, Graham B.; Engel, Gregory S. [James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Gray, Stephen K. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Risk of Subclinical Micrometastatic Disease in the Supraclavicular Nodal Bed According to the Anatomic Distribution in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the anatomic distribution of gross supraclavicular nodes within the supraclavicular fossa using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans, and to evaluate likely coverage of specific regions of the supraclavicular fossa using standard radiation fields. Methods and Materials: We identified 33 patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer who had a PET/CT scan demonstrating hypermetabolic supraclavicular lymph nodes in 2005. The locations of the involved lymph nodes were mapped onto a single CT set of images of the supraclavicular fossa. These lymph nodes were also mapped onto the treatment-planning CT dataset of 4 patients treated in our institution (2 patients with biopsy-proven supraclavicular nodes and 2 patients with clinically negative supraclavicular nodes). Results: We were able to determine the distribution of 52 supraclavicular lymph nodes in 32 patients. Of 32 patients, 28 (87%) had a history of metastatic disease, and 2 patients had isolated nodal recurrences. Five patients had supraclavicular nodes posterior to the vertebral body transverse process, and several lymph nodes were in close proximity to the medial field border, raising the possibility of geographic miss in these areas. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, increased coverage of the supraclavicular fossa medially and posteriorly may be warranted.

Reed, Valerie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cavalcanti, Jose L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yeung, Henry [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Whitman, Gary J. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bedrosian, Isabelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Macapinlac, Homer A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

AmericanLungAssociationStateofLungDiseaseinDiverseCommunities2010 55 Lung Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AmericanLungAssociationStateofLungDiseaseinDiverseCommunities2010 55 Lung Cancer Lung cancer of cancer cells (tumors) then form and grow . Besides interfering with how the lung functions, cancer cells organs . Causes Cigarette smoking is by far the most important cause of lung cancer, and the risk from

Kaski, Samuel

319

Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma among women in Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cytochrome P4501A1 polymorphism, and risk of breast cancer in Connecticut women. Yawei Zhang John P. Wise Theodore R. Holford Hong...PCBs on the risk of breast cancer among Caucasian women in Connecticut. A total of 374 histologically confirmed breast cancer cases...

Min Shen; Tongzhang Zheng; Qing Lan; Yawei Zhang; Shelia H. Zahm; Sophia S. Wang; Theodore R. Holford; Brian Leaderer; Meredith Yeager; Robert Welch; Dehaee Kang; Peter Boyle; Bing Zhang; Kaiyong Zou; Yong Zhu; Stephen Chanock; Nathaniel Rothman

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

G Protein-coupled Estrogen receptor is activated by G-1 which induces a signaling cascade that inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and is predominantly estrogen dependent [1]. About 1 in 8 women in the United States (12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. Failure in the current treatment...

Watts, Heather 1990-

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mean lifetime measurements  

SciTech Connect

We review B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mean lifetime measurements, including direct measurements and determination of the lifetime ratio via measurements of the ratios of branching ratios. We present world averages.

DeJongh, F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Public Affairs Office: Livermore Lab Physicist Dates Lifetime of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dating the Solar System: Where Were You When the Solar System Was Being Formed? Dating the Solar System: Where Were You When the Solar System Was Being Formed? Chemistry & Materials Science Directorate, LLNL Chronology of the early Solar System from chondrule-bearing calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions Nature, April 21, 2005 Building Planets at PSI: The Origin of the Solar System Planetary Science Institute Social Media Logos Follow LLNL on YouTube Subscribe to LLNL's RSS feed Follow LLNL on Facebook Follow LLNL on Twitter Follow LLNL on Flickr Contact: Anne M. Stark Phone: (925) 422-9799 E-mail: stark8@llnl.gov FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 20, 2005 NR-05-04-02 Livermore Lab physicist dates lifetime of solar nebula at two million years LIVERMORE, Calif. - The oxygen and magnesium content of some of the oldest objects in the universe are giving clues to the lifetime of the

323

CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement  

SciTech Connect

This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

NEUTRON LIFETIME EXPERIMENT USING UCN STORAGE IN AN `ACCORDION-LIKE' TRAP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEUTRON LIFETIME EXPERIMENT USING UCN STORAGE IN AN `ACCORDION-LIKE' TRAP BY ASHISH M. DESAI determination of the neutron lifetime has an impact on particle physics and cosmology. We report progress towards a measurement of the neutron lifetime using an accordion-like storage trap. Ultracold neutrons

Steyerl, Albert

326

Sequence Variation in Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 Serine Protease Gene, Low LDL Cholesterol, and Cancer Incidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pharmacologically might modestly increase cancer risk (4, 5...statins does not seem to increase cancer risk (6-8...cholesterol levels may increase cancer risk is to compare...usual consumption of wine, beer, and hard liquor...uses a 5 blind replicate quality assurance program for...

Aaron R. Folsom; James M. Peacock; and Eric Boerwinkle

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--22000000 34 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c ancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer L ung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung can cer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lun g cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cance r Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer

Paxton, Anthony T.

328

Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans, With or Without Anterior Myocardial Territory and Left Ventricle as Organs at Risk, in Early-Stage Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We evaluated heart sparing using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with the left ventricle (LV) and/or the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as additional organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer were selected for dosimetric planning. Both lungs, the right breast, heart, LV, and AMT were defined as OARs. We generated one tangential field plan and four IMRT plans for each patient. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of the planning target volume and OARs. Results: Compared with the tangential field plan, the mean dose to the heart in the IMRT plans did not show significant differences; however, the dose to the AMT and LV decreased by 18.7-45.4% and 10.8-37.4%, respectively. The maximal dose to the heart decreased by 18.6-35.3%, to the AMT by 22.0-45.1%, and to the LV by 23.5-45.0%, And the relative volumes of the heart (V{sub {>=}12}), AMT (V{sub >11}) and LV (V{sub >10}) decreased significantly with different levels, respectively. The volume of the heart, AMT, LV, both lungs, and right breast receiving {>=}5 Gy showed a significant increase. Compared with the IMRT (H) plan, the mean dose to the heart, AMT, and LV decreased by 17.5-21.5%, 25.2-29.8%, and 22.8-29.8% and the maximal dose by 13.6-20.6%, 23.1-29.6%, and 17.3-29.1%, respectively. The IMRT plans for both lungs and the right breast showed no significant differences. Conclusions: The IMRT plans with the addition of the AMT and/or LV as OARs considerably increased heart sparing. We recommend including the LV as an additional OAR in such plans.

Tan Wenyong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology College of Life Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang Xiaohong; Qiu Dasheng [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Liu Dong [Department of Radiology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Jia Shaohui; Zeng Fanyu [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Chen Zhengwang [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology College of Life Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li Beihui; Xu Jiaozhen; Wei Lai [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Hu Desheng, E-mail: tanwyym@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Star formation in Perseus: II. SEDs, classification and lifetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working with the submillimetre continuum map of the Perseus molecular cloud (Hatchell et al. 2005), we aimed to determine the evolutionary stage of each submm core in Perseus, and investigate the lifetimes of these phases. We compile spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 2MASS, Spitzer IRAC, Michelle, IRAS, SCUBA and Bolocam data. Sources are classified starless/protostellar on the basis of infrared and/or outflow detections and Class I/Class 0 on the basis of Tbol, Lbol/Lsmm and F_{3.6}/F_{850}. In order to investigate the dependence of these evolutionary indicators on mass, we construct radiative transfer models of Class 0 sources. Of the submm cores, 56/103 (54%) are confirmed protostars on the basis of infrared emission or molecular outflows. Of these, 22 are classified Class 1 on the basis of three evolutionary indicators, 34 are Class 0, and the remaining 47 are assumed starless. Perseus contains a much greater fraction of Class 0 sources than either Taurus or Rho Oph. Comparing the protostellar with the T Tauri population, the lifetime of the protostellar phase in Perseus is 0.25-0.67 Myr (95% confidence limits). The relative lifetime of the Class 0 and Class 1 phases are similar. We find that for the same source geometry but different masses, evolutionary indicators such as Tbol vary their value. It is therefore not always appropriate to use a fixed threshold to separate Class 0 and Class I sources. More modelling is required to determine the observational characteristics of the Class 0/Class I boundary over a range of masses.

J. Hatchell; G. A. Fuller; J. S. Richer; T. J. Harries; E. F. Ladd

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Lifetime of 981-Kev State in Li-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 3, NUMBER 2 FEBRUARY 1971 Lifetime of the 981-keV State in Li ~ M. J. Throop* University of Iosoa, Iozea City, Ious 52240 and D. H. Youngblood Texas A. @M University, College Station, Texas 77843 and G. C. Morrison...- tify contaminant peaks, spectra were obtained for C and 0 targets at a Liv energy of 7.4 MeV. In Fig. 2, the peaks from the Li7+ C reaction are those at 871 keV (from the 0.871 0.0-MeV trans- ition in 0") and at 960 keV (the double-escape peak from...

Throop, M. J.; Youngblood, David H.; Morrison, G. C.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Silicon avalanche photodiode operation and lifetime analysis for small satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are sensitive to operating temperature fluctuations and are also susceptible to radiation flux expected in satellite-based quantum experiments. We introduce a low power voltage adjusting mechanism to overcome the effects of in-orbit temperature fluctuations. We also present data on the performance of Si APDs after irradiation (gamma-ray and proton beam). Combined with an analysis of expected orbital irradiation, we propose that a Si APD in a 400 km equatorial orbit may operate beyond the lifetime of the satellite.

Tan, Yue Chuan; Cheng, Cliff; Ling, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Silicon avalanche photodiode operation and lifetime analysis for small satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are sensitive to operating temperature fluctuations and are also susceptible to radiation flux expected in satellite-based quantum experiments. We introduce a low power voltage adjusting mechanism to overcome the effects of in-orbit temperature fluctuations. We also present data on the performance of Si APDs after irradiation (gamma-ray and proton beam). Combined with an analysis of expected orbital irradiation, we propose that a Si APD in a 400 km equatorial orbit may operate beyond the lifetime of the satellite.

Yue Chuan Tan; Rakhitha Chandrasekara; Cliff Cheng; Alexander Ling

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging with a single diamond NV center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

Ryan Beams; Dallas Smith; Timothy W. Johnson; Sang-Hyun Oh; Lukas Novotny; Nick Vamivakas

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

A simulation model for the lifetime of wireless sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a model for the lifetime of wireless sensor networks. The model takes into consideration several parameters such as the total number of sensors, network size, percentage of sink nodes, location of sensors, the mobility of sensors, and power consumption. A definition of the life time of the network based on three different criteria is introduced; percentage of available power to total power, percentage of alive sensors to total sensors, and percentage of alive sink sensors to total sink sensors. A Matlab based simulator is developed for the introduced model. A number of wireless sensor networks scenarios are presented and discussed.

Elleithy, Abdelrahman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Body Weight Status, Inflammation, and Prognostic Markers in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Body Weight Status, Inflammation, and Prognostic Markers in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer Brown Bag (UICCC) IHRP Fellow #12;Outline Relative risk of cancer mortality in obese men Pathophysiologic basis for excess risk The case for inflammation/immunity in prostate cancer Preliminary results from

Illinois at Chicago, University of

336

Free electron lifetime achievements in Liquid Argon Imaging TPC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key feature for the success of the Liquid Argon TPC technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be initially and continuously kept at an exceptional purity. New purification techniques have been applied to a 120 litres LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to monitor the LAr purity. The short path length used (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic rays muons at sea level. A free electron lifetime of (21.4+7.3-4.3) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90 % C.L. has been observed under stable conditions over several weeks, corresponding to about 15 ppt (part per trillion) of Oxygen equivalent. At 500 V/cm, where the electron speed is approximately of 1.5 mm/us, the free electron lifetime >15 ms corresponds to an attenuation <15 % for a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to reliable operation of LAr TPC for exceptionall...

Baibussinov, B; Calligarich, E; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Varanini, F; Ventura, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Some problems of steam turbine lifetime assessment and extension  

SciTech Connect

The problems of lifetime assessment and extension in reference to power equipment (including high-temperature rotors and casings of power steam turbines) and theoretical and normative grounds for these procedures, as well as some specific measures to prolong the turbine service time and diagnose the turbine components` conditions in the operation process, were covered in many published works, including the authors` ones. The present paper is to consider in more details some aspects of these problems that have not been sufficiently considered in known publications. In particular, it seems important to dwell on experimental verification of some mathematical models for calculating temperatures, stresses, and strains in the turbine casings on the basis of direct measurements at turbines in service. Another item to be discussed ia an approach to choosing the system of interrelated criteria and safety factors referring to the upper admissible values of stresses, strains, cycles, and accumulated damage, as well as crack resistance, as applied to an adopted conception of the limiting states for the rotors and casings with taking into consideration their loads and resulted stress-strain states. In this connection, it is important to arrange and use properly the continuous monitoring of temperatures, stresses, and accumulated metal damage to assess the residual lifetime of the rotors and casings more accurately. Certain design, technology, and repair measures are briefly described. They have successfully been employed at fossil power plants of the former Soviet Union to raise the steam turbine reliability and durability.

Berlyand, V.; Pozhidaev, A.; Glyadya, A. [Kharkov Central Designers Bureau (Ukraine); Plotkin, E.; Avrutsky, G. [All-Russia Thermal Engineering Research Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Leyzerovich, A. [Actinium Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Genetic Susceptibility and Survival: Application to Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic Susceptibility and Survival: Application to Breast Cancer Edwin S. IVERSEN, JR., Giovanni are known to confer an elevated risk of both breast and ovarian cancers. The effect of carrying such a mutation on survival after developing breast or ovarian cancer is less well understood. We investigate

West, Mike

339

P3-14-27: Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (PLD) as Primary Treatment in Estrogen Receptor (ER) and HER2 Poor Breast Cancer and Risk of Developing Cardiotoxicity or Elderly Patients (pt). Results from the Phase II CAPRICE Study.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Houston, TX Abstract A126: Risk factors for epithelial ovarian...fallopian tube. Differences in the risk factors for tumors of ovarian...pathology reports, may be an acceptable surrogate for cell of origin...DOM). Therefore, to explore risk factor associations by cell...

MJ Gil; C Bellet; A Llombart; B Ojeda; L Manso; C Mesia; S Morales; H Garcia-Martinez; N Martinez; M Mele; A Fernandez-Ortega; and J Baselga

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

340

P4-11-13: Influence of Two Years of Exemestane on Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women at Increased Risk of Developing Breast Cancer; a Companion Study to the NCIC CTG MAP.3 Trial.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...studies of chronic disease risk. Methods: Using archived...biomarkers displayed acceptable to excellent within-person...prospective study of disease risk. By that criterion...receptor molecules show acceptable to excellent within-person...studies of chronic disease risk. Within-person variation...

PE Goss; H Richardson; JN Ingle; RT Chlebowski; CJ Fabian; JE Garber; GE Sarto; A Hiltz; D Tu; and AM Cheung

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Consistency of quantitative multiplexed - methylation specific PCR (QM-MSP) performed on breast epithelial cells acquired by random periareolar fine needle aspiration (RPFNA) of women at high risk for development of breast cancer.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...women with persistent high-risk HPV infection and low-grade...Polyphenon E was shown to be acceptable, safe and well tolerated...defined as negative for high risk HPV and normal histopathology...clearance of persistent high risk HPV and related CIN 1. Further...

Bruce Kimler; Mary Jo Fackler; Trina Metheny; Teresa Phillips; Saraswati Sukumar; and Carol Fabian

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cervical-Cancer Screening with Human Papillomavirus and Cytologic Cotesting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...-year risks of histologic HSIL (approximated by data for CIN 2 and CIN 3) and cancer and the currently recommended management are shown in Table 2. Risk-based management guidelines were developed to ensure that women at equal risk for cancer receive similar care according to existing and accepted practice... For women 30 years of age or older (past the age at which new HPV infections peak), HPV and cytologic cotesting every 5 years is now an accepted alternative to cytologic testing alone every 3 years, since the risk of cervical cancer is very low in the years after a negative HPV test.

Schiffman M.; Solomon D.

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Prophylactic radiotherapy against heterotopic ossification following internal fixation of acetabular fractures: a comparative estimate of risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on quality of life. Estimating risk from RT A method to estimate the risk of fatal radiation-induced malignancy over the lifetime of the patient is provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [25]. It is based largely... on epidemiological studies of individuals exposed to whole body low dose irradiation, particularly survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and provides an estimate of global population risk, irrespective of age. However, this is designed explicitly for use...

Burnet, N. G.; Nasr, P.; Yip, G.; Scaife, J. E.; House, T.; Thomas, S. J.; Harris, F.; Owen, P. J.; Hull, P.

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

344

Polymorphisms in the Two Helicases ERCC2/XPD and ERCC3/XPB of the Transcription Factor IIH Complex and Risk of Lung Cancer: A Case-Control Analysis in a Chinese Population  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences...smokers, and those with family history of cancer, particularly for...and environmental exposure history, including tobacco smoking...distribution of the controls. Family history of cancer was defined as any...

Zhibin Hu; Liang Xu; Minhua Shao; Jing Yuan; Yi Wang; Feng Wang; Wentao Yuan; Ji Qian; Hongxia Ma; Ying Wang; Hongliang Liu; Weihong Chen; Lin Yang; Guangfu Jing; Xiang Huo; Feng Chen; Li Jin; Qingyi Wei; Tangchun Wu; Daru Lu; Wei Huang; and Hongbing Shen

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Downregulation of microRNAs 145-3p and 145-5p Is a Long-term Predictor of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Risk: The ORDET Prospective Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...human cancers, including breast, lung, brain, liver, colon, prostate, ovarian cancers...indicated in parentheses in the column heads. The last column contains P values for...rate in behavior genetics research.Behav Brain Res 2001;125:279-84. 24. Kaufman...

Paola Muti; Andrea Sacconi; Ahmed Hossain; Sara Donzelli; Noa Bossel Ben Moshe; Federica Ganci; Sabina Sieri; Vittorio Krogh; Franco Berrino; Francesca Biagioni; Sabrina Strano; Joseph Beyene; Yosef Yarden; Giovanni Blandino

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Abstract 3841: Bevacizumab (BEV) and risk of arterial (ATE) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated on CALGB 90401(ALLIANCE)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated on CALGB 90401(ALLIANCE) Jai N. Patel 1 Chen Jiang 2 Daniel L. Hertz 3 Flora A...prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated on CALGB 90401(ALLIANCE). [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the 105th Annual Meeting...

Jai N. Patel; Chen Jiang; Daniel L. Hertz; Flora A. Mulkey; Paula N. Friedman; Susan Halabi; Mark J. Ratain; Michael J. Morris; Eric J. Small; Kouros Owzar; William K. Kelly; Howard L. McLeod

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)] [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Singh, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)] [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Aspirin Use and Risk of Fatal Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lundholm, K. The effect of indomethacin on food and water intake, motor activity and survival in tumour-bearing rats. Eur...Kuwayama. H.. and Eastwood. G. L. Effects of water immersion restraint stress and chronic indomethacin ingestion...

Michael J. Thun; Mohan M. Namboodiri; Eugenia E. Calle; W. Dana Flanders; and Clark W. Heath, Jr.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Asthma, Asthma Medications, and Prostate Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calculate nutrients and energy intake (7). Body mass...follow-up. Medication audit at baseline At baseline...complete the medication audit, and were, therefore...consumption, and total energy intake did not materially...obtained at the drug audit using a Cox regression...

Gianluca Severi; Laura Baglietto; David C. Muller; Dallas R. English; Mark A. Jenkins; Michael J. Abramson; Jo A. Douglass; John L. Hopper; and Graham G. Giles

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Risk Model for Lung Cancer Incidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 17 Institute...810-0.875), the Bach model applied to the same data gave an AUC...the Netherlands (Bilthoven, Utrecht), Greece, Germany (Potsdam...only smoking information. We applied these models to the test set...

Clive Hoggart; Paul Brennan; Anne Tjonneland; Ulla Vogel; Kim Overvad; Jane Nautrup Řstergaard; Rudolf Kaaks; Federico Canzian; Heiner Boeing; Annika Steffen; Antonia Trichopoulou; Christina Bamia; Dimitrios Trichopoulos; Mattias Johansson; Domenico Palli; Vittorio Krogh; Rosario Tumino; Carlotta Sacerdote; Salvatore Panico; Hendriek Boshuizen; H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita; Petra H.M. Peeters; Eiliv Lund; Inger Torhild Gram; Tonje Braaten; Laudina Rodríguez; Antonio Agudo; Emilio Sánchez-Cantalejo; Larraitz Arriola; Maria-Dolores Chirlaque; Aurelio Barricarte; Torgny Rasmuson; Kay-Tee Khaw; Nicholas Wareham; Naomi E. Allen; Elio Riboli; and Paolo Vineis

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Mitochondrial Genetic Background Modifies Breast Cancer Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RIP140-binding sites proximal to RIP140-dependent genes. Pie charts showing genes with proximal binding sites only containing...RIP140-affected genes, based on response to E2 treatment. Pie charts were generated as in F, but now genes were scored on...

Ren-Kui Bai; Suzanne M. Leal; Daniel Covarrubias; Aiyi Liu; Lee-Jun C. Wong

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Abstract 5494: The development and validation of risk predictive models for cervical low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indicate that oophorectomy at about age 40 reduces breast cancer risk by approximately a half in high risk women. Widespread use of risk reducing oophorectomy is unlikely to be acceptable to these women. We explored the feasibility of giving goserelin...

Ming-Tsang Wu

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Smoking and Lung Cancer: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...show markedly increased risks of lung cancer in smokers...personalizing" the economic risk of smoking. The study...their totals, since life insurance will "defray" some...in the costs of health insurance should be a fairly straight...Cost In the contemporary political and economic environment...

Lawrence A. Loeb; Virginia L. Emster; Kenneth E. Warner; John Abbotts; and John Laszlo

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Thermalization, Error Correction, and Memory Lifetime for Ising Anyon Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider two-dimensional lattice models that support Ising anyonic excitations and are coupled to a thermal bath. We propose a phenomenological model for the resulting short-time dynamics that includes pair creation, hopping, braiding, and fusion of anyons. By explicitly constructing topological quantum error-correcting codes for this class of system, we use our thermalization model to estimate the lifetime of the quantum information stored in the encoded spaces. To decode and correct errors in these codes, we adapt several existing topological decoders to the non-Abelian setting. We perform large-scale numerical simulations of these two-dimensional Ising anyon systems and find that the thresholds of these models range from 13% to 25%. To our knowledge, these are the first numerical threshold estimates for quantum codes without explicit additive structure.

Courtney G. Brell; Simon Burton; Guillaume Dauphinais; Steven T. Flammia; David Poulin

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Lifetime of nuclear velocity dispersion drops in barred galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have made hydro/N-body simulations with and without star formation to shed some light on the conditions under which a central kinematically cold stellar component (characterized by a velocity dispersion drop or \\sigma-drop) could be created in a hot medium (e.g. a bulge) and survive enough time to be observed. We found that the timescale for a \\sigma-drop formation could be short (less than 500 Myr) whereas its lifetime could be long (more than 1 Gyr) provided that the central region is continuously or regularly fed by fresh gas which leads to a continuous star formation activity. Star formation in the central region, even at a low rate as 1M_{sol} yr^{-1}, is mandatory to sustain a permanent \\sigma-drop by replacing heated particles by new low-\\sigma ones. We moreover show that as soon as star formation is switched off, the \\sigma-drop begins to disappear.

Herve Wozniak; Nicolas Champavert

2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependentBreast Cancers  

SciTech Connect

Age is one of the most important risk factors for human malignancies, including breast cancer; in addition, age-at-diagnosis has been shown to be an independent indicator of breast cancer prognosis. However, except for inherited forms of breast cancer, there is little genetic or epigenetic understanding of the biological basis linking aging with sporadic breast cancer incidence and its clinical behavior.

Yau, Christina; Fedele, Vita; Roydasgupta, Ritu; Fridlyand, Jane; Hubbard, Alan; Gray, Joe W.; Chew, Karen; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Moore, DanH.; Schittulli, Francesco; Tommasi, Stefania; Paradiso, Angelo; Albertson, Donna G.; Benz, Christopher C.

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate atomic lifetime Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the trapped atom lifetime... and atomic gases are sufficiently stable against inelas- tic decay. In ... Source: Jin, Deborah - JILA, University of Colorado at Boulder...

358

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic lifetime measurements Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0022-37274221214008 Summary: ) doi:10.10880022-37274221214008 Subcritical crack growth law and its consequences for lifetime... , the probability distribution of...

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation lifetime spectroscopy Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectroscopy... us the information on the exciton lifetime and exciton coherence time. It is therefore needed... to perform micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy...

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation lifetime measurement Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with recent positron lifetime measurements for group IV and V refractory metal carbides and in hexagonal WC... ; this is lower than the values found for most transition...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing positron lifetime Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with recent positron lifetime measurements for group IV and V refractory metal carbides and in hexagonal WC... a very high electronic density. The corresponding positron ......

362

Enhancing Lifetime Reliability Of Chip Multiprocessors Through 3D Resource Sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

macroscopic distribution of failures in reliability design.in reliability analysis than the exponential distribution [distributions can be used to provide a methodology for simulating lifetime reliability

Strikos, Nikolaos

363

Mechanisms of Action of Metformin as an Anti-cancer Agent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide and epidemiological studies suggest the association of diabetes mellitus with an enhanced risk for multiple cancers. Metformin (1,1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride) is the most widely prescribed...

Ramachandran Nair Vasanthakum, Vijayalekshmi

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing cancer stage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cancer stage Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assessing cancer stage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Risk Assessment of Breast and...

365

Intervening to Reduce the Future Burden of Occupational Cancer in Britain: What Could Work?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Expected increases in cancer in general as the population ages contribute...risk threshold approach zero. In general, 90% compliance has been assumed...Cancers associated with asbestos, diesel engine exhaust, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons...

Sally Hutchings; John W. Cherrie; Martie Van Tongeren; and Lesley Rushton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

RISK ANALYSIS AND QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Risk analysis is a decision-oriented process consisting of risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication. Risk analysis is a formalized scientifically based approach recognized by the World Trade Organization as the tool to address food safety issues and which shall found food safety regulation. Risk analysis is designed to meet specified goals for risk management activities, which should be related to the acceptable level of protection deemed appropriate in a country. Quantitative risk management can be based on relevant risk-based metrics, such as food safety objectives and Performance Objectives. The article addresses the elements and steps involved in risk analysis as currently recommended.

C. Heggum

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Prostate Cancer Risk in Relation to Selected Genetic Polymorphisms in Insulin-like Growth Factor-I, Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3, and Insulin-like Growth Factor-I Receptor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OTUs) with 97% identify and further classified by taxonomy. Non-parametric Wilcoxon Mann Whiteney U test and Kuskal-Wallis test were conducted to compare the relative abundance of taxa across pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and control...

Chu Chen; Robert Freeman; Lynda F. Voigt; Annette Fitzpatrick; Stephen R. Plymate; and Noel S. Weiss

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Framework for Cancer Survivorship Research and Translation to Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and patient-specific risk factors and age. The...policy arenas run the risk of being akin to 2 parallel...cancer survivorship on the political agenda. To do so, their...organizations with an investment in survivorship research...individuals at higher risk of long-term or late...

Eva Grunfeld; Craig C. Earle; and Ellen Stovall

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Risk management  

SciTech Connect

In the autumn of 1993 an incident occurred with a diving support vessel, whereby a live pipeline from a NAM gas production platform, situated in the Dutch sector of the North Sea, was considerably displaced. Key element in the repair of the line was to identify potential hazards involved in various remedial scenarios and to manage the associated risks.

Visser, M. [Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Velsen (Netherlands)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Maximizing Lifetime in an Energy Constrained Wireless Sensor Array Using Team Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximizing Lifetime in an Energy Constrained Wireless Sensor Array Using Team Optimization or using intermediate hop nodes. For a given node constellation, there ex- ist many wireless connection trees to do this. For a known node constellation, the maximum lifetime of a single tree is equal

Arabshahi, Payman

371

A simple approach to lifetime learning in genetic programming-based symbolic regression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genetic programming GP coarsely models natural evolution to evolve computer programs. Unlike in nature, where individuals can often improve their fitness through lifetime experience, the fitness of GP individuals generally does not change during their ... Keywords: Genetic programming, hybrid genetic algorithms, lifetime learning, local search, memetic algorithms, symbolic regression

Raja Muhammad Atif Azad; Conor Ryan

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

Martin, Randall

373

On Lifetime Extension and Route Stabilization of Energy-Efficient Broadcast Routing over MANET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of network lifetime. Keywords MANET, Adhoc Networks, Energy Efficient Routing, Multicasting Tree, BIP an approach that tries to develop energy-efficient broadcast routing trees. They presented a tree constructionOn Lifetime Extension and Route Stabilization of Energy- Efficient Broadcast Routing over MANET

Poovendran, Radha

374

Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect

By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Influence of Fe Contamination on the Minority Carrier Lifetime of Multi-crystalline Silicon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the influence of Fe contamination on the minority carrier lifetimes of multi-crystalline silicon. The minority carrier lifetime is measured by the microwave photoconductive decay method. The original bulk lifetime is about 30 ?s after passivation with iodine solution. After intentional Fe contamination, the bulk lifetime declines with increasing temperature. Fast cooling in air conduces to the formation of more interstitial Fe ([Fe]i). Slow cooling through the control of the furnace temperature limits the formation of more [Fe]i, but leads to the formation of precipitation. The data support the idea that the minority carrier lifetime in multi-crystalline silicon mainly depends on the distribution of Fe but not the total amount. A favorite effect of [Fe]i gettering is discovered after conventional phosphorus diffusion, and the [Fe]i concentration remaining in the silicon wafer is acceptable for solar cell applications.

Meng Xia-Jie; Ma Zhong-Quan; Li Feng; Shen Cheng; Yin Yan-Ting; Zhao Lei; Li Yong-Hua; Xu Fei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

How will improved forecasts of individual lifetimes affect underwriting?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...there is a huge life insurance industry, run on...long- term care insurance industries, run...is because of the political climate, in which...able to exclude bad risks. This is, after all, the model of insurance underwriting which...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Measuring the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron beta-decay lifetime plays an important role both in understanding weak interactions within the framework of the Standard Model and in theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of 4He in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In previous work, we successfully demonstrated the trapping of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a conservative potential magnetic trap. A major upgrade of the apparatus is nearing completion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid 4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. A fraction of the neutrons is downscattered in the helium to energies <200 neV, and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process is suppressed by the low phonon density of helium at temperatures less than 200 mK, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed. When the neutron decays the energetic electron ionizes the helium, producing scintillation light that is detected using photomultiplier tubes. Statistical limitations of the previous apparatus will be alleviated by significant increases in field strength and trap volume resulting in twenty times more trapped neutrons.

C. M. O'Shaughnessy; R. Golub; K. W. Schelhammer; C. M. Swank; P. -N. Seo; P. R. Huffman; S. N. Dzhosyuk; C. E. H. Mattoni; L. Yang; J. M. Doyle; K. J. Coakley; A. K. Thompson; H. P. Mumm; S. K. Lamoreaux; G. Yang

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Measuring the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron beta-decay lifetime plays an important role both in understanding weak interactions within the framework of the Standard Model and in theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of 4He in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In previous work, we successfully demonstrated the trapping of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a conservative potential magnetic trap. A major upgrade of the apparatus is nearing completion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid 4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. A fraction of the neutrons is downscattered in the helium to energies <200 neV, and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process is suppressed by the low phonon density of helium at temperatures less than 200 mK, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed. When the neutron decays the energetic electron ionizes the helium, producing sci...

O'Shaughnessy, C M; Schelhammer, K W; Swank, C M; Seo, P -N; Huffman, P R; Dzhosyuk, S N; Mattoni, C E H; Yang, L; Doyle, J M; Coakley, K J; Thompson, A K; Mumm, H P; Lamoreaux, S K; Yang, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Lifetime measurements in {sup 63}Co and {sup 65}Co  

SciTech Connect

Lifetimes of the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} states in {sup 63}Co and the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 65}Co were measured using the recoil distance Doppler shift and the differential decay curve methods. The nuclei were populated by multinucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. {gamma} rays were measured with the EXOGAM Ge array and the recoiling fragments were fully identified using the large-acceptance VAMOS spectrometer. The E2 transition probabilities from the 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} states to the 7/2{sup -} ground state could be extracted in {sup 63}Co as well as an upper limit for the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -}{yields}7/2{sub 1}{sup -} B(E2) value in {sup 65}Co. The experimental results were compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the pf and pfg{sub 9/2} model spaces, allowing us to draw conclusions on the single-particle or collective nature of the various states.

Dijon, A.; Clement, E.; France, G. de; Van Isacker, P.; Rejmund, M.; Schmitt, C. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Boulevard H. Becquerel, F-14076, Caen (France); Ljungvall, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Boulevard H. Becquerel, F-14076, Caen (France); CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3, 91400 Orsay, Cedex (France); CEA Saclay, IRFU, SPHN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Goergen, A. [CEA Saclay, IRFU, SPHN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Obertelli, A.; Korten, W. [CEA Saclay, IRFU, SPHN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dewald, A.; Hackstein, M.; Pissulla, Th.; Rother, W.; Zell, K. O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Gadea, A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-University of Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Gaudefroy, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mengoni, D. [Dipartimentito di Fisica dell'Universita and INFN, I-35131 Padova (Italy); University of the West of Scotland, Paisley (United Kingdom); Recchia, F. [Dipartimentito di Fisica dell'Universita and INFN, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sahin, E. [LNL - INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation  

SciTech Connect

The deployment and use of lithium-ion batteries in automotive and stationary energy storage applications must be optimized to justify their high up-front costs. Given that batteries degrade with use and storage, such optimizations must evaluate many years of operation. As the degradation mechanisms are sensitive to temperature, state-of-charge histories, current levels, and cycle depth and frequency, it is important to model both the battery and the application to a high level of detail to ensure battery response is accurately predicted. To address these issues, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) suite of tools. This suite of tools pairs NREL's high-fidelity battery degradation model with a battery electrical and thermal performance model, application-specific electrical and thermal performance models of the larger system (e.g., an electric vehicle), application-specific system use data (e.g., vehicle travel patterns and driving data), and historic climate data from cities across the United States. This provides highly realistic, long-term predictions of battery response and thereby enables quantitative comparisons of varied battery use strategies.

Neubauer, J.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites  

SciTech Connect

Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Lifetime measurements in $^{63}$Co and $^{65}$Co  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lifetimes of the $9/2^-_1$ and $3/2^-_1$ states in $^{63}$Co and the $9/2^-_1$ state in $^{65}$Co were measured using the recoil distance Doppler shift and the differential decay curve methods. The nuclei were populated by multi-nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. Gamma rays were measured with the EXOGAM Ge array and the recoiling fragments were fully identified using the large-acceptance VAMOS spectrometer. The E2 transition probabilities from the $3/2^-_1$ and $9/2^-_1$ states to the $7/2^-$ ground state could be extracted in $^{63}$Co as well as an upper limit for the $9/2^-_1\\rightarrow7/2^-_1$ $B$(E2) value in $^{65}$Co. The experimental results were compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the $pf$ and $pfg_{9/2}$ model spaces, allowing to draw conclusions on the single-particle or collective nature of the various states.

A. Dijon; E. Clément; G. De France; P. Van Isacker; J. Ljungvall; A. Görgen; A. Obertelli; W. Korten; A. Gadea; L. Gaudefroy; M. Hackstein; D. Mengoni; Th. Pissulla; F. Recchia; M. Rejmund; W. Rother; E. Sahin; C. Schmitt; A. Shrivastava; J. J. Valiente-Dobon; K. O. Zell; M. Zielinska

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

Abstract CN05-01: Genomics and cancer management: Mind the gap!  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2013 meeting-abstract Carcinogenesis Genomics and Epigenetics of Risk Prediction in Early Disease Genomics and Epigenetics of Risk Prediction in...National Harbor, MD Abstract CN05-01: Genomics and cancer management: Mind the gap...

Janusz A. Jankowski

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM 2010 ANNUAL REPORT WITH STATISTICAL DATA FROM 2009 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS MEDICAL CENTER #12;2 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2 #12;3 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 3 UIMC CANCER PROGRAM CHANGING MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE. FOR GOOD. #12;4 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT

Illinois at Chicago, University of

385

Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Lifetimes of atoms trapped in an optical lattice in proximity of a surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the lifetime of an atom trapped in an optical vertical lattice in proximity of a massive surface using a complex-scaling approach. We analyze how the presence of the surface modifies the known lifetimes of Wannier-Stark states associated with Landau-Zener tunneling. We also investigate how the existence of a hypothetical short-distance deviation from Newton's gravitational law could affect these lifetimes. Our study is relevant in order to discuss the feasibility of any atomic-interferometry experiment performed near a surface. Finally, the difficulties encountered in applying the complex-scaling approach to the atom-surface Casimir-Polder interaction are addressed.

Sophie Pelisson; Riccardo Messina; Marie-Christine Angonin; Peter Wolf

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Risk Management Tool Attributes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Tools & SMEs - Tools & SMEs Outline for Breakout Session TOOLS 1. Types of Tools a. Risk Management - Database & Reports, risk register, risk forms, risk tracking & monitoring, basis of estimate, action item tracking, historical record of risks & changes, configuration control, enterprise-wide, metrics, risk performance index, risk checklist, graphical display, management reporting (various levels), risk communications b. Risk Analysis i. Cost, ii. budgets, funding, cash-flow analysis, iii. Schedule iv. tailoring categories v. Integrated Cost & Schedule vi. Project phase analysis; organization ownership & joint planning c. Risk Knowledge and Lessons Learned Database i. Enterprise-wide ii. Job/owner-specific iii. Workshops - project specific, risk management,

388

Generation and Recombination Carrier Lifetimes in 4H SiC Epitaxial Wafers , M. J. Loboda1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation and Recombination Carrier Lifetimes in 4H SiC Epitaxial Wafers G. Chung1) , M. J. Loboda comparative studies of recombination and carrier lifetimes in SiC. For the first time, both generation-wafer structures. The ratio of the generation to recombination lifetime is much different in SiC compared to Si

Schroder, Dieter K.

389

Risk Identification and Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Technique |Internal Control (if needed)| ||| ||| ||| References RiskOpportunity Categories People - Risks that affect the individual well being. Mission...

390

Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case control study using life grid interviews.   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a modestly raised risk of lung cancer with prolonged residence close to heavy industry, although the confidence intervals were wide. The effect of air pollution on the incidence of lung cancer merits continued study....

Edwards, R; Pless-Mulloli, T; Howel, D; Chadwick, TJ; Bhopal, Raj; Harrison, R N; Gribbin, H

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Association of Energy Intake and Energy Balance with Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...13-6. 3 Willett WC. Fat, energy and breast cancer. J Nutr...den BT, van den Brandt PA. Energy restriction and the risk of...Zhu Z. Mechanisms by which energy restriction inhibits carcinogenesis...of diet and breast cancer in Argentina. Int J Cancer 1989;44...

Shih-Chen Chang; Regina G. Ziegler; Barbara Dunn; Rachael Stolzenberg-Solomon; James V. Lacey, Jr.; Wen-Yi Huang; Arthur Schatzkin; Douglas Reding; Robert N. Hoover; Patricia Hartge; and Michael F. Leitzmann

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

“It’s Not If I Get Cancer, It’s When I Get Cancer”: Exploring Previvors’ Management of Uncertainty for Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Encounters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decisions affect their subsequent sense of uncertainty. A previvor is an individual who is highly predisposed to breast and ovarian cancer due to a genetic mutation called BRCA1/2. Previvors have a 44 to 87 percent risk of developing cancer during...

Dean, Marleah Lynn

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorber element lifetime Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

) o - is the change in the ring-down lifetime without and with the absorber present... -water interface as a function of bulk pH by the direct measurement of the absorbance of...

394

Modeling Minority-Carrier Lifetime Techniques That Use Transient Excess-Carrier Decay: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Lifetime spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the characterization of PV materials. This paper combines modeling and experimental results to illustrate the injection-level dependent response of three transient excess-carrier decay techniques.

Johnston, S. W.; Berman, G. M.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

AYUSH: A Technique for Extending Lifetime of SRAM-NVM Hybrid Caches  

SciTech Connect

Recently, researchers have explored way-based hybrid SRAM-NVM (non-volatile memory) last level caches (LLCs) to bring the best of SRAM and NVM together. However, the limited write endurance of NVMs restricts the lifetime of these hybrid caches. We present AYUSH, a technique to enhance the lifetime of hybrid caches, which works by using data-migration to preferentially use SRAM for storing frequently-reused data. Microarchitectural simulations confirm that AYUSH achieves larger improvement in lifetime than a previous technique and also maintains performance and energy efficiency. For single, dual and quad-core workloads, the average increase in cache lifetime with AYUSH is 6.90X, 24.06X and 47.62X, respectively.

Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Improved Measurement of the Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MuLan collaboration has measured the lifetime of the positve muon to a precision of 1.0 parts per million. The Fermi constant is determined to a precision of 0.6 parts per million.

P. T. Debevec

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Micro- and Sub-nanosecond Lifetime Measurements Using a UV Light-Emitting Diode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors describe the use of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED), Nichia NSHU590E, as a 373 nm excitation light source for fluorescence lifetime measurements. A...

Szmacinski, Henryk; Chang, Qing

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Energy-level and lifetime measurements for Sb iv and Sb v  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of the beam-foil spectrum produced by a 1-MeV beam of antimony ions has yielded lifetimes for nine lowlying terms of Sb iv and six of Sb v. Decay-curve analysis incorporating...

Pinnington, E H; Ansbacher, W; Kernahan, J A; Gosselin, R N; Bahr, J L; Inamdar, A S

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Norwegian National Program for Lifetime Commissioning and Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project “Life-Time Commissioning for Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings” is actually a network of industrial companies, private and public entities, and R&D organizations. The overall objective of the project is to contribute...

Novakovic, V.; Djuric, N.; Holst, J.; Frydenlund, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Sacrificial high-temperature phosphorus diffusion gettering for lifetime improvement of multicrystalline silicon wafers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron is among the most deleterious lifetime-limiting impurities in crystalline silicon solar cells. In as-grown material, iron is present in precipitates and in point defects. To achieve conversion efficiencies in excess ...

Scott, Stephanie Morgan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Muon capture in Ar. The muon lifetime and yields of Cl isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The time and energy spectra of ? rays, accompanying negative muon capture in a 40Ar target, have been measured using Ge detectors. The results of measuring the muon lifetime in 40Ar and yields of different Cl and...

A. V. Klinskikh; S. Brianson; V. B. Brudanin…

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Quasiparticle lifetimes in magnesium clusters modeled by self-consistent GW? calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasiparticle (QP) lifetimes in magnesium clusters are calculated using many-body Green's-function theory. We analyze the effect of the self-consistency of the one-particle Green's function G on the calculations and ...

He, Yi

403

Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As  

SciTech Connect

Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e INFN Milano (Italy); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw (Poland); University of York (United Kingdom); and others

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Motor Exhaust-related Occupations and Bladder Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Epidemiological Investigations Motor Exhaust-related Occupations...occupations with potential exposure to motor exhaust and bladder cancer risk...residentialhistory, sourceofdrinking water, fluid intake, use of hair...association between employment in a motor exhaust-related occupation...

Debra T. Silverman; Robert N. Hoover; Thomas J. Mason; and G. Marie Swanson

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P-03/001F P-03/001F March 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1. PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.2. ORGANIZATION AND APPLICATION OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.1. Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.2. Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 1.3. KEY FEATURES OF THE CANCER GUIDELINES .

406

Examination of sun awareness behavior, knowledge, and attitudes before and after a sun awareness program in 4th to 8th grade students.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sun exposure is a potential risk factor for skin cancer and melanoma. Since most sun exposure during one's lifetime occurs during childhood, sun protection at… (more)

Tavares, Venessa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements  

SciTech Connect

Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 ?M. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D., E-mail: salthouse@ecs.umass.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J. [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States) [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Lifetime measurement in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}I  

SciTech Connect

The Recoil-Distance Doppler-shift method has been combined with Recoil-Decay Tagging for the first time to measure a lifetime in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 109}I. The lifetime value was determined using the Differential Decay-Curve method in singles mode. The result has been compared to theoretical shell-model calculations in order to better understand the nature of unbound valence nucleons at the proton drip line.

Procter, M. G.; Lumley, N. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Taylor, M. J. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D. M. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P.; Scholey, C.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Saren, J.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); and others

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

EVOLUTION AND LIFETIME OF TRANSIENT CLUMPS IN THE TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of dense clumps and provide an argument that the existence of the clumps is not limited by their crossing times. We claim that the lifetimes of the clumps are determined by turbulent motions on a larger scale, and we predict the correlation of clump lifetime with column density. We use numerical simulations to successfully test this relation. In addition, we study the morphological asymmetry and the magnetization of the clumps as functions of their masses.

Falceta-Goncalves, D. [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade de Sao Paulo-Rua Arlindo Bettio 1000, CEP 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 North Charter Street, WI 53711 (United States)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cascade Problems in Some Atomic Lifetime Measurements at a Heavy-Ion Storage Ring  

SciTech Connect

Lifetimes of 3s{sup 2}3p{sup k} ground configuration levels of Al-, Si-, P-, and S-like ions of Be, Co, and Ni have been measured at a heavy-ion storage ring. Some of the observed decay curves show strong evidence of cascade repopulation from specific 3d levels that feature lifetimes in the same multi-millisecond range as the levels of the ground configuration.

Trabert, E; Hoffmann, J; Krantz, C; Wolf, A; Ishikawa, Y; Santana, J

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Determinants of papillary cancer of the thyroid  

SciTech Connect

Determinants of papillary thyroid cancer were evaluated in a questionnaire-based case-control study from southeastern Sweden. A total of 104 cases, diagnosed from 1977 to 1987, and 387 randomly selected controls were included in the analyses. Female subjects with papillary cancer reported a work history as dentists/dental assistants, telephone operators, teachers, and day nursery personnel, and an occupational contact with chemicals and video display terminals more often than did controls. The 11 male cases more often reported working as mechanics and metal workers and having occupational contact with solvents. Other factors associated with increased risk for female papillary cancer were having private well water at the birth address; leisure time exposure to combustion smoke; low intake of cruciferous vegetables and seafood; and a family history of goiter, heart disease, biliary disorder, or female genital cancer. Diagnostic radiographic examinations, especially to the head, neck, or upper back/chest area, or repeated dental examinations, were also found to be associated with this form of cancer. With regard to the possible influence from hormonal factors among women less than age 50 years at time of diagnosis, an increased risk was found for a pregnancy soon after puberty. Tendencies toward a decreasing risk with increasing age at first pregnancy as well as an increasing risk with increasing number of pregnancies were found as well. Multiparity seemed to potentiate the effect from prior radiographic examinations.

Wingren, G.; Hatschek, T.; Axelson, O. (University Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Association between thyroid cancer incidence and the distance from nuclear power plants in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Concerns have been widespread that living near nuclear power plants might increase the risk of cancer in surrounding communities. Nuclear power generation is still the… (more)

Watase, Hiroko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

D.E. Corpet / Meat Science 2011 -doi:10.1016/j.meatsci.2011.04.009 Red meat and colon cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.E. Corpet / Meat Science 2011 - doi:10.1016/j.meatsci.2011.04.009 . 1 Red meat and colon cancer consumption on cancer risk is a controversial issue. However, recent meta-analyses show that high consumers of cured meats and red meat are at increased risk of colorectal cancer. This increase is significant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

414

A Review of Cancer in U.S. Hispanic Populations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...populations of European ancestry and to search for novel risk variants that may be more...Cohort N a Expected cancer cases b Cohort website California Teachers Study 50,000 530...Publica 2009;25:394-400. 84. Chuang SC , La Vecchia C, Boffetta P.Liver cancer...

Robert W. Haile; Esther M. John; A. Joan Levine; Victoria K. Cortessis; Jennifer B. Unger; Melissa Gonzales; Elad Ziv; Patricia Thompson; Donna Spruijt-Metz; Katherine L. Tucker; Jonine L. Bernstein; Thomas E. Rohan; Gloria Y.F. Ho; Melissa L. Bondy; Maria Elena Martinez; Linda Cook; Mariana C. Stern; Marcia Cruz Correa; Jonelle Wright; Seth J. Schwartz; Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati; Victoria Blinder; Patricia Miranda; Richard Hayes; George Friedman-Jiménez; Kristine R. Monroe; Christopher A. Haiman; Brian E. Henderson; Duncan C. Thomas; and Paolo Boffetta

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Introduction Dynamic Risk Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Dynamic Risk Measures Dynamic Risk Measures from BMO martingales Bid-Ask Dynamic Pricing Procedure Conclusion MESURES DE RISQUE DYNAMIQUES DYNAMIC RISK MEASURES Jocelyne Bion-Nadal CNRS Risk Measures Dynamic Risk Measures from BMO martingales Bid-Ask Dynamic Pricing Procedure Conclusion

Bion-Nadal, Jocelyne

416

Country Political Risk Contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For investors, domestic and international, the assessment of political risk is very important to decide whether to ... not in a particular market or country. Political risk can simply be defined as the risk of lo...

Mohamed A. Ramady

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Perception of risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DECISION-THEORY, ANNUAL REVIEW OF PSYCHOLOGY 12 : 473 ( 1961 ). EDWARDS, W, IN PRESS RISK ANAL . FISCHHOFF, B, ACCEPTABLE RISK ( 1981 ). FISCHHOFF, B, POLICY SCI 8 : 127 ( 1978 ). FISCHHOFF, B, DEFINING RISK, POLICY SCIENCES 17 : 123...

P Slovic

1987-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

418

Estimation of radiation dose and risk to children undergoing cardiac catheterization for the treatment of a congenital heart disease using Monte Carlo simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many mathematical models have been developed for estimating the cancer risk resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation. One such set of models has been...10...]. The BEIR VII committee has derived risk models ...

Emmanuel Yakoumakis; Helen Kostopoulou; Triantafilia Makri…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

LastingNVCache: A Technique for Improving the Lifetime of Non-volatile Caches  

SciTech Connect

Use of NVM (Non-volatile memory) devices such as ReRAM (resistive RAM) and STT-RAM (spin transfer torque RAM) for designing on-chip caches holds the promise of providing a high-density, low-leakage alternative to SRAM. However, low write endurance of NVMs, along with the write-variation introduced by existing cache management schemes may significantly limit the lifetime of NVM caches. We present LastingNVCache, a technique for improving lifetime of NVM caches by mitigating the intra-set write variation. LastingNVCache works on the key idea that by periodically flushing a frequently-written data-item, the next time the block can be made to load into a cold block in the set. Through this, the future writes to that data-item can be redirected from a hot block to a cold block, which leads to improvement in the cache lifetime. Microarchitectural simulations have shown that LastingNVCache provides 6.36X, 9.79X, and 10.94X improvement in lifetime for single, dual and quad-core systems. Also, its implementation overhead is small and it outperforms a recently proposed technique for improving lifetime of NVM caches.

Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Dong [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Sudden Lifetime Drop Phenomena and their Effective Cures in PF-ring and PF-AR  

SciTech Connect

In PF-ring and PF-AR, sudden drops in the electron beam lifetime, which are attributed to dust trapping, were frequently observed after extensive renewals of the storage rings. The reduced-lifetime state sometimes lasts for a few hours, and the mitigation of this problem was strongly demanded for stable user operations. Since a major source of dust particles was thought to be a distributed ion pump (DIP), we attempted switching the DIPs off during user operations in both the rings. As a result, occurrence of the lifetime drops was almost completely suppressed during single-bunch mode in PF-ring, while the occurrence frequency was reduced by only 38% in PF-AR. We found that the lifetime drops were sometimes accompanied by a transient increase in the vacuum pressure at some discharge-prone devices. Based on the hypothesis that the harmful dust could be generated by an electric discharge in vacuum, we attempted the conditioning of these devices in PF-AR by storing 25% higher current than usual. By combination of the DIP-OFF operation and the high-current conditioning, the occurrence frequency of the lifetime drops in PF-AR was reduced by no less than 67%.

Tanimoto, Yasunori; Honda, Tohru; Uchiyama, Takashi; Nogami, Takashi [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Decomposition of Risk Functionals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well known that most risk measures (risk functionals) are time .... to identify acceptable strategies in a decision or optimization process: the acceptability ...

Alois Pichler

2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

Smoking and Lung Cancer: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...show markedly increased risks of lung cancer in smokers...Net Cost In the contemporary political and economic environment...cigarette smoking. The other is a political motivation. Proponents of...viewed as any other business investment, where the financial bottom...

Lawrence A. Loeb; Virginia L. Emster; Kenneth E. Warner; John Abbotts; and John Laszlo

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report precision measurements of the excited state lifetime of the $5p$ $^2P_{1/2}$ and $5p$ $^2P_{3/2}$ levels of a single trapped Cd$^+$ ion. The ion is excited with picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked laser and the distribution of arrival times of spontaneously emitted photons is recorded. The resulting lifetimes are 3.148 $\\pm$ 0.011 ns and 2.647 $\\pm$ 0.010 ns for $^2P_{1/2}$ and $^2P_{3/2}$ respectively. With a total uncertainty of under 0.4%, these are among the most precise measurements of any atomic state lifetimes to date.

D. L. Moehring; B. B. Blinov; D. W. Gidley; R. N. Kohn Jr.; M. J. Madsen; T. D. Sanderson; R. S. Vallery; C. Monroe

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Precision lifetime measurements of a single trapped ion with ultrafast laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

We report precision measurements of the excited state lifetime of the 5p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 5p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels of a single trapped Cd{sup +} ion. Combining ion trap and ultrafast laser technologies, the ion is excited with picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked laser and the distribution of arrival times of spontaneously emitted photons is recorded. The resulting lifetimes are 3.148{+-}0.011 ns and 2.647{+-}0.010 ns for {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} respectively. With a total uncertainty of under 0.4%, these are among the most precise measurements of any atomic state lifetimes to date.

Moehring, D. L.; Blinov, B. B.; Gidley, D. W.; Kohn, R. N. Jr.; Madsen, M. J.; Sanderson, T. D.; Vallery, R. S.; Monroe, C. [FOCUS Center and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Phonon lifetime in SiSn and its suitability for hot-carrier solar cells  

SciTech Connect

We present a phononic and electronic study of SiSn in the zinc-blende phase. A detailed description of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon decay in a three-phonon process is presented together with the corresponding lifetime. The necessity to go beyond the zone center phonon approximation in this case is highlighted as it reveals a steep dependence of the lifetime on the initial phonon wavenumber, which differs from usual semiconductors. The electronic band structure is calculated within the GW formalism and shows a small direct band gap. It is shown that the LO-phonon resulting from electron cooling has a lifetime four to eight orders of magnitude above all the known value in semiconductors for this process. We finally show the suitability of SiSn for hot-carrier solar cells, as it is endowed with ultra-slow cooling of hot carriers.

Levard, Hugo; Laribi, Sana; Guillemoles, Jean-François [Institute for Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR 7174, EDF R and D/CNRS/Chimie ParisTech, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

426

What is the probability that radiation caused a particular cancer  

SciTech Connect

Courts, lawyers, health physicists, physicians, and others are searching for a credible answer to the question posed in the title of this paper. The cases in which the question arises frequently stem from an individual that has cancer and they, or their next-of-kin, are convinced that a past radiation exposure - usually small - is responsible for causing it. An arithmetic expression of this problem is simple: the probability of causation by the radiation dose in question is equal to the risk of cancer from the radiation dose divided by the risk of cancer from all causes. The application of risk factors to this equation is not so simple. It must involve careful evaluation of the reliability of and variations in risk coefficients for development of cancer due to radiation exposure, other carcinogenic agents, and natural causes for the particular individual. Examination of our knowledge of these various factors indicates that a large range in the answers can result due to the variability and imprecision of the data. Nevertheless, the attempts to calculate and the probability that radiation caused the cancer is extremely useful to provide a gross perspective on the probability of causation. It will likely rule in or out a significant number of cases despite the limitations in our understandings of the etiology of cancer and the risks from various factors. For the remaining cases, a thoughtful and educated judgment based on selected data and circumstances of the case will also be needed before the expert can develop and support his opinion.

Voelz, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Radon risk reassessed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... UNDERGROUND miners who are heavily exposed to the radioactive decay products of radon gas (see figure) suffer especially high rates of lung cancer. Extrapolation from these ... figure) suffer especially high rates of lung cancer. Extrapolation from these data suggests that radon in people's homes may cause some 2,000 lung cancers each year in Britain1 ...

Julian Peto; Sarah Darby

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Path to a 0.1 s Neutron Lifetime Measurement Using the Beam Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The beam method obtains the beta decay lifetime of the free neutron from the specific activity of a slow neutron beam. The best previous result had an overall uncertainty of 3.4 s [Nico, et al. (2005)]. We present a plan for a phased experimental program that will improve the overall uncertainty using this method to 0.1 s or below and may help elucidate systematic effects that could explain the current disagreement between the most recent beam and bottle method neutron lifetime experiments.

F.E. Wietfeldt; G. Darius; M.S. Dewey; N. Fomin; G.L. Greene; J. Mulholland; W.M. Snow; A.T. Yue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements  

SciTech Connect

The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guilford, GU27XH (United Kingdom); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States) and National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States) and Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

Reporting on the lifetime of charmless B/s meson decay to K+ K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors use data collected by the displaced track trigger of the CDF Run II detector at TeVatron to measure the B mesons lifetime in the hadronic decays: B{sub u} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}, B{sub d} {yields} D{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sub d} {yields} D{sup {-+}}3{pi}, B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}3{pi}. Recent developments in the measurement of the lifetime of the charmless B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}k{sup -} mode is presented.

Donega, M.; /Geneva U.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOLS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The relatively long lifetime of droplets in atmospheric haze and fog in comparison with similar droplets of pure water is attributed to the presence of a monolayer of surfactant film and to the accumulation Of soluble salts from chemical reactions. The lifetime of these droplets is a significant factor in the evaluation of the role of heterogeneous aqueous chemical reactions occurring in the troposphere. Several mechanisms of SO{sub 2} oxidation in the presence of liquid water are investigated. It is shown that soot-catalyzed oxidation of sulfur dioxide could be responsible for the high level of sulfate concentration observed in the coastal industrial areas.

Toossi, R.; Novakov, T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Calculation of the lifetime of a Davydov soliton at finite temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The standard Davydov Hamiltonian can be partially diagonalized using a method due to Eremko, Gaididei, and Vakhnenko. The complete Hamiltonian in this partially diagonalized form, however, includes a term omitted by these authors. Using this term in a first-order perturbation theory calculation results in an estimate of the lifetime of a Davydov soliton at finite temperatures. The lifetime at 300 K is on the order of 10-12 s for parameters appropriate for the ?-helical protein molecule. This is too short to be useful in biological processes.

James P. Cottingham and John W. Schweitzer

1989-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Observation of quartet-state fine structures and lifetimes in lithiumlike Ne VIII  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wavelength and lifetime measurements for the fine-structure components of the 1s 2s 2p Po4-1s 2p2 P4 multiplet in lithiumlike Ne VIII have been made using foil excitation of a fast-ion beam. The results are compared with recent theoretical calculations and with previous measurements for other ions of the same isoelectronic sëquence. An apparent discrepancy between theory and experiment for the 1s 2p2 P324 lifetime is removed.

A. E. Livingston; J. E. Hardis; L. J. Curtis; R. L. Brooks; H. G. Berry

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Abstract C50: Results of a phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial of Polyphenon E in women with persistent high-risk HPV infection and low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mouse models in human cancer risk assessment. David A. Eastmond...Whether these models provide an acceptable replacement for the conventional...bioassay for assessing human cancer risks is the subject of ongoing debate...assessing the potential human health risks associated with exposure to...

Tomas Nuno; Francisco A.R. Garcia; Terri Cornelison; Amy L. Mitchell; David L. Greenspan; John W. Byron; Chiu-Hsieh Hsu; David S. Alberts; and Sherry Chow

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs presented to WSU SOM PAD January 10, 2012 presented by Sandra A. Rempel, Ph.D. Associate Director of Research, JFCC #12;JFCC Cancer Research Programs Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program Members: Gwen Alexander, Andrea Cassidy

Berdichevsky, Victor

436

Recent developments in risk acceptability for technical facilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent developments in risk acceptance for technical facilities exposed to man-made and natural hazards are reviewed and discussed. Present value lifetime utilities involving the utility from consumption, discounting and survival probabilities by predictive cohort life tables are derived. Suitable parameters for the utility function are based on the so-called work-leisure optimisation principle. Intergenerationally acceptable, time-dependent discount rates are proposed. A risk acceptability criterion involving the increments in costs to reduce risks, the associated reductions in the failure rate and a constant defining of the societal value of a statistical life and the corresponding willingness-to-pay is given. These values are computed for a number of countries for two mortality reduction schemes. An example illustrates the results.

Rudiger Rackwitz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

OF RISKS IN INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the process of as sessing risk, taking steps to reduce risk to an acceptable level, and main tainingMarch 1998 MANAGEMENT OF RISKS IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS: PRACTICES OF SUCCESSFUL ORGANIZATIONS that the potential exists for severe damage. Systems are at risk from fraud, user errors, accidents and natural

438

UNIVERSITY SERVICES RISK REGISTER Risk Impact Likelihood Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 · Alignment of planning and budgeting · Regular budget review · Participation in UoG-wide planning Review Programme 6 The risk that key projects are not managed effectively and that standard business/management tool 1 The risk that US is unable to deliver its plan due to insufficient availability of resource 4 3

Glasgow, University of

439

Linking Tobacco Control Policies and Practices to Early Cancer Endpoints: Surveillance as an Agent for Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Organizing Committee 1 Risk Factor Monitoring...social, economic, political, and physical factors...and direct mail, political contribution and...cancer sites and risk factors at the national...population-based surveillance of risk factors and the use...state-level data on (a) political lobbying, campaign...

Anne M. Hartman; Michael J. Thun; and Rachel Ballard-Barbash

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Role of State Health Agencies in Cancer Prevention and Control: Lessons Learned from Massachusetts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cancer) or specific risk factors (e.g...population lacks health insurance (7) . Our goal...knowledge, through political support and social...areas: (a) health risks and behaviors...state (regardless of insurance status) with access...or a specific risk factor (e.g...

Howard K. Koh and Deborah K. Walker

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Understanding Population and Individual Risk Assessment: The Case of Polychlorinated Biphenyls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University Medical Center, 3800 Reservoir...Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC...population-risk assessment process intended...Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists A1-Confirmed...

Peter G. Shields

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

UCSC cancer genomics browser.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chicago, IL Abstract 5087: UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser 2.0 Jingchun Zhu 1 Brian Craft...and analyze that data. The UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser (https://genome-cancer...enhances the interpretability of the cancer genomics information. UCSC Cancer Genomics Browser...

J Zhu; JZ Sanborn; T Wang; F Hsu; S Benz; C Szeto; L Esserman; D Haussler

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

444

Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology Michael L) In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained world, the deployment of CCS has been hindered by uncertainty in geo

445

Experimental determination of neutron lifetimes through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor  

SciTech Connect

The neutron lifetimes of the core, reflector, and global were experimentally obtained through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor for five levels of subcriticality. The theoretical Auto Power Spectral Densities were derived by point kinetic equations taking the reflector effect into account, and one of the approaches consider an additional group of delayed neutrons.

Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP Travessa R-400, 05508-900, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Lifetime Optimization of Multi-hop Wireless Sensor Networks by Regulating the Frequency of Use of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cooperative Transmission Jin Woo Jung and Mary Ann Ingram School of Electrical and Computer EngineeringLifetime Optimization of Multi-hop Wireless Sensor Networks by Regulating the Frequency of Use model, we show how Cooperative Transmission (CT), when it is used to extend the communication range, can

Ingram, Mary Ann

447

Re-evaluation of the lifetimes of the major CFCs and CH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re-evaluation of the lifetimes of the major CFCs and CH3 CCl3 using atmospheric trends* M. Rigby, R interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

448

Photoconductive Decay Lifetime and Suns-Voc Diagnostics of Efficient Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

We report results of minority carrier lifetime measurements for double-sided p-type Si heterojunction devices and compare Suns-Voc results to Light I-V measurements on 1 cm2 solar cell devices measured on an AM1.5 calibrated XT-10 solar simulator.

Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal L.; Bauer, R.; Yan, H.-C.; Wang, Q.; Meier, D. L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Lifetime-Aware Hierarchical Wireless Sensor Network Architecture with Mobile Overlays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,morteza,pedram}@usc.edu ABSTRACT-- Recent technological advances have led to the emergence of small battery-powered sensors, delay, and local storage size. Fixed event aggregation relays and mobile relays are used to collect lifetime subject to constraints on local storage, delay, and maintenance cost. Network behavior is studied

Pedram, Massoud

450

Assessment of Lifetime Cumulative Sun Exposure Using a Self-Administered Questionnaire: Reliability of Two Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...latitude influences outdoor temperatures, which to some extent, determines...Analysis Cumulative lifetime sun exposure during 9:00 a...averaged to give the rate of sun exposure (i.e., average...categories would have a similar distribution to the time-based response...

Chu-Ling Yu; Yan Li; D. Michal Freedman; Thomas R. Fears; Richard Kwok; Gabriel Chodick; Bruce Alexander; Michael G. Kimlin; Anne Kricker; Bruce K. Armstrong; and Martha S. Linet

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Lifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Toughness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the thermally grown oxide (TGO), and a porous ceramic topcoat which serves as the thermal insulation. DetailsLifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Mechanisms leading to degradation of the adherence of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) used in aircraft

Hutchinson, John W.

452

Precision measurement of the ratio of the $?^0_b$ to $\\overline{B}^0$ lifetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb measurement of the lifetime ratio of the $\\Lambda^0_b$ to the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson is updated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected using 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The decay modes used are $\\overline{B}^0\\to J/\\psi p K^-$ and $\\overline{B}^0\\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ K^-$, where the $\\pi^+K^-$ mass is consistent with that of the $\\overline{K}^{*0}(892)$ meson. The lifetime ratio is determined with unprecedented precision to be $0.974\\pm0.006\\pm0.004$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with original theoretical predictions based on the heavy quark expansion. Using the current world average of the $\\overline{B}^0$ lifetime, the $\\Lambda^0_b$ lifetime is found to be $1.479 \\pm 0.009 \\pm 0.010$ ps.

LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; M. Andreotti; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; A. Badalov; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; V. Batozskaya; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; M. Borsato; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Bursche; G. Busetto; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; R. Calabrese; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; F. Caponio; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; H. Carranza-Mejia; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Cassina; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; S. -F. Cheung; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; I. Counts; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; M. Cruz Torres; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; J. Dalseno; P. David; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; W. De Silva; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; H. Dijkstra; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; M. Dorigo; P. Dorosz; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; S. Esen; A. Falabella; C. Färber; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; M. Fiorini; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; J. Fu; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; S. Gambetta; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; L. Gavardi; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; A. Gianelle; S. Giani'; V. Gibson; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; L. Grillo; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; T. W. Hafkenscheid; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; L. Henry; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; M. Heß; A. Hicheur; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; E. Jans; P. Jaton; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; N. Jurik; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; M. Kelsey; I. R. Kenyon; T. Ketel; B. Khanji; C. Khurewathanakul; S. Klaver; O. Kochebina; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; K. Kurek; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; B. Langhans; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefčvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; S. Leo; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; F. Lionetto; B. Liu; G. Liu; S. Lohn; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; N. Lopez-March; P. Lowdon; H. Lu; D. Lucchesi; H. Luo; E. Luppi; O. Lupton; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; S. Malde; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; M. Manzali; J. Maratas; U. Marconi; C. Marin Benito; P. Marino; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; F. Martinez Vidal; D. Martins Tostes; A. Massafferri; R. Matev; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; A. Mazurov

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

453

Sensor Node Lifetime Analysis: Models and Tools Deokwoo Jung, Thiago Teixeira, Andreas Savvides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decisions, compute energy budgets and duty-cycles, and to preform side-by-side comparison of different's average lifetime for a given event arrival rate. Through comparison of the two models and a case study & Simulation Package (MATSNL). This demonstrates the use of the models using sample applications drawn from

Teixeira, Thiago

454

Feasibility of Underwater Sensor Networks for Lifetime Assessment of Offshore Civil Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feasibility of Underwater Sensor Networks for Lifetime Assessment of Offshore Civil Structures is to investigate the feasibility of underwater sensor networks for offshore and deep-sea structural monitoring. In this paper, the network communication topology and in-network processing algorithm for two offshore wind

Zhou, Shengli

455

Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees Ling Shi , Agostino Capponi , Karl H. Johansson and Richard M. Murray Abstract

Johansson, Karl Henrik

456

Minimizing Energy and Maximizing Network Lifetime Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trees with multiple optimization objectives. A. Related Work A number of energy-aware broadcast] that the problem of finding a minimum-energy broadcast tree is NP-hard. Particularly in [2], they have shownMinimizing Energy and Maximizing Network Lifetime Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa

Liang, Weifa

457

The average person sheds 40 pounds of skin during his or her lifetime. That's the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Q: MSU N 19 o. The average person sheds 40 pounds of skin during his or her lifetime. That whether they are facts or opinions. Fact or opinion? A fact is something that can be tested. An opinion is something that someone thinks or believes. 1. Wooly mammoths are extinct. fact opinion 2. Ear wax can

458

Shirokov's contracting lifetimes and the interpretation of velocity eigenstates for unstable quantons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the interpretation of velocity eigenstates for unstable quantons, their relationship to space like momentum eigenstates for such quantons and the explanation of Shirokovs contracting lifetimes for such velocity eigenstates. It is an elaboration of a portion of the authors earlier study.

Gordon N. Fleming

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

459

MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES IN TOKAMAKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES reliability and characterize the performance of this key component. A novel particle-in-cell (PIC) technique) as consequence of plasma instabilities in tokamak reactors still represents the biggest obstacle

Harilal, S. S.

460

Information About The American Opportunity and Lifetime Learning Education Tax Credits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information About The American Opportunity and Lifetime Learning Education Tax Credits and the Above-the-Line Tax Deduction Tax Year 2013 TAX CREDITS AND DEDUCTIONS FOR COLLEGE EDUCATION everal TAX CREDIT (a modification of the Hope credit), originally slated to expire at the end of 2012, has

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lifetime cancer risk" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Precision Measurement of the Mass and Lifetime of the ?[? over b] Baryon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the ?[- over b] baryon using about 1800 ?[- over b] decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0??fb[superscript ...

Aaij, R.

462

Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety thermal management system (BTMS) is an important and integral part of battery management system (BMS battery pack ecosystem. Fig. 1 corresponds a generic battery thermal management system operating

Andreasen, Søren Juhl

463

STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY-dimensional morphology and life cycle of clouds. Detailing key cloud processes as they transit from the formation stage to precipitation onset and cloud dissipation is critical towards establishing uncertainties in climate models

464

Distributed Algorithms for Lifetime Maximization in Sensor Networks via Min-Max  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the network and edges between nodes within maximum transmission range. Although the problem can in principle.lastname@tkk.fi Abstract We consider the problem of static transmission-power assignment for lifetime maximization to forward the collected data, at what intervals, transmission power levels, etc. One important goal

Orponen, Pekka

465

Alternative Size and Lifetime Measurements for High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-Particle correlations based on the interference of identical particles has provided the chief means for determining the shape and lifetime of sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, Strong and Coulomb induced correlations are shown to provide equivalent information.

Scott Pratt; Silvio Petriconi

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei based on Doppler-shift techniques  

SciTech Connect

A recent progress in precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University is presented. The Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique has been applied to nuclear reactions involving intermediate-energy rare isotope (RI) beams, to determine absolute transition strengths between nuclear states model independently from level lifetimes of interest. As such an example, recent lifetime measurements of the first 2{sup +} states in the neutron-rich {sup 62,64,66}Fe isotopes at and around N=40 are introduced. The experiment was performed at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL using a unique combination of several experimental instruments; the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA), the plunger device, and the S800 spectrograph. The reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) are determined directly from the measured lifetimes. The observed trend of B(E2) clearly demonstrates that an enhanced collectivity persists in {sup 66}Fe despite the harmonic-oscillator magic number N=40. The present results are also discussed in comparison with the large-scale shell model calculations, pointing to a possible extension of the deformation region beyond N=40.

Iwasaki, Hironori [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

467

Accurate Single Molecule FRET Efficiency Determination for Surface Immobilized DNA Using Maximum Likelihood Calculated Lifetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate Single Molecule FRET Efficiency Determination for Surface Immobilized DNA Using MaximumVed: October 4, 2006; In Final Form: January 12, 2007 Single molecule fluorescent lifetime trajectories directly measured using time-tagged single-photon counting and scanning confocal microscopy. A modified

468

Near Infrared Dyes as Lifetime Solvatochromic Probes for Micropolarity Measurements of Biological Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near Infrared Dyes as Lifetime Solvatochromic Probes for Micropolarity Measurements of Biological, metabolism, and excretion. With the recent widespread use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes, ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared (NIR) absorption, and fluorescence (7,8) have been developed. The latter

Larson-Prior, Linda

469

Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2×105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

Scaling of strength and lifetime probability distributions of quasibrittle structures based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

law for subcritical creep crack growth, hitherto considered empirical. The theory is further extended of the cdf of structural strength and lifetime is outlined. cohesive fracture | crack growth rate | extreme distribution exists only for perfectly brittle structures failing at macro- crack initiation from a negligibly

Bazant, Martin Z.

471

Investigation on the performance of airliner cabin air filter throughout the lifetime usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, China 200092 2 School' exposure to particulate pollutants, most of aircraft environmental control systems have been installed1 Investigation on the performance of airliner cabin air filter throughout the lifetime usage Bin

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

472

Electron generation of leptons and hadrons with reciprocal -quantized lifetimes and masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Electron generation of leptons and hadrons with reciprocal -quantized lifetimes and masses generation occurs via an initial "-leap" from an electron pair to a "platform state" M, and then subsequent in the generation of hadron masses. In fact, the role of the electron in generating lepton masses has never been

473

1 888 939 3333 | cancer.ca Cancer Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 888 939 3333 | cancer.ca Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 Special topic: Liver cancer Produced by Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Provincial/Territorial Cancer Registries cancer.ca/statistics #12;2Canadian Cancer Society n Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 Citation

Habib, Ayman

474

Former Worker Program - Early Lung Cancer Detection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former Worker Program (FWP) Former Worker Program (FWP) Home Covered Sites/Populations › Construction Worker Screening Projects › Production Worker Screening Projects › Supplemental Screening Program › Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Upcoming Events Program Implementation Outreach Medical Screening - Conventional Medical Screening - Early Lung Cancer Detection Communicating Results Protecting Participant Information Sharing De-identified Data Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) Worker Testimonials Contact Us FWP Scientific Publications FWP Documents Related Links Office of Health and Safety Home Page HSS Logo Early Lung Cancer Detection Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer. Through the FWP, DOE initiated the Early Lung Cancer Detection (ELCD) program using low-dose helical CT scans to detect lung cancers at an earlier, more treatable stage. Lung cancer results in about 160,000 deaths in the U.S. every year. The most common causes of lung cancer are long-term exposures to tobacco smoke and residential radon emissions, but occupational hazards, such as asbestos and ionizing radiation, also cause or contribute to the disease.

475

Seminars in Cancer Biology 14 (2004) 413426 Role and limitations of epidemiology in establishing a causal association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seminars in Cancer Biology 14 (2004) 413­426 Role and limitations of epidemiology in establishing MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA e Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract Cancer risk assessment is one of the most visible

Barthelat, Francois

476

Cancer-Causing Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins Display Major Differences in the Phospho-Regulation of their PDZ Interactions.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Rights Reserved. 2014 research-article Cancer-Causing Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins...I-34149 Trieste, Italy ^ School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham...Previous studies have shown that that the cancer-causing high risk HPV E6 oncoproteins...

Siaw Shi Boon; Vjekoslav Tomai?; Miranda Thomas; Sally Roberts; Lawrence Banks

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

477

Radiation damage and lifetime estimation of the proton beam window at the Japan Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The proton beam window (PBW) is a component that separates the high-vacuum area of the accelerator from the target area in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex’s Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS). It is important to estimate the damage accumulated from proton beam irradiation to establish a safe lifetime for the window. The PBW is made of an aluminum alloy, which was chosen because of its successful use in the target safety hull of the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ). Post-irradiation examination (PIE) performed on SINQ Target 3 after irradiation with a 0.6 GeV proton beam measured the gas production in its aluminum safety hull. To estimate a safe lifetime for the JSNS PBW, we calculated the displacement per atom (DPA) and gas production rate using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) for 0.6- and 3-GeV protons. For the hydrogen gas production rate, PHITS shows good agreement with the SINQ PIE results; however, for the helium production rate, it predicts a 45% lower value than the experimental result of 1125 appm. The calculated result for helium production was normalized to fit the experimental results of SINQ. We conservatively estimate the lifetime of the JSNS PBW using the condition that the hydrogen production rate does not exceed the value measured at SINQ. The lifetime of the PBW corresponds to a proton beam fluence of 1.8 × 1021 cm?2, which is equivalent to an integrated beam power of 8000 MW h with the designed current density of 10 ?A cm?2. The peak density will be reduced to 8.4 ?A cm?2 to suppress cavitation pitting damage in the mercury target vessel. Consequently, the lifetime of the PBW will be 9500 MW h.

Shin-ichiro Meigo; Motoki Ooi; Masahide Harada; Hidetaka Kinoshita; Atushi Akutsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Wafer Preparation and Iodine-Ethanol-Ethanol Passivation Procedure for Reproducible Minority-Carrier Lifetime Measurement: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes reasons that lifetime measurments may be irreproducible using iodine-in-ethanol (I-E) passivation. Possible factors include the strength of the iodine in ethanol solution, wafer cleaning procedures, influence of wafer container during lifetime measurement, and stability of I-E.

Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Appel, J.; Mehta, V.; Li, C.; Johnston, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Predicting the Remaining Useful Lifetime of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using an Echo State Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Predicting the Remaining Useful Lifetime of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using an Echo industrial Fuel Cell (FC) application resides in the system limited useful lifetime. Consequently, it Membrane Fuel Cell using an iterative predictive structure, which is the most common approach performing

Boyer, Edmond

480

LPP Risk Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

History and Process History and Process Slide 2 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management History â—¦ Current Baseline Process Overview â—¦ Identification â—¦ Simulation â—¦ Management Successes & Challenges Slide 3 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ 1 Week Risk Summit held week of August 4 th , 2008 Broad representation from all levels of Isotek, DOE, PTC, and outside consultants Focused on risk and opportunity identification Included risk description, assumptions, and triggers No quantification or analysis No restrictions, constraints, or filtering HQ provided facilitator Prescribed format and capture methodology Slide 4 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ Risk Summit Results

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481

Risk Communication: Talking About Risk Reduction Instead of Acceptable Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The best way to communicate risk is NOT TO. Often the concern raised by people, ostensibly over the hazards associated with facilities in their community, tends to reflect a lack of trust of the firms that own...

Alfred Levinson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Risk assessment for organic micropollutants: U. S. point of view  

SciTech Connect

Basic research and monitoring of sludge utilization programs have identified specific pathways by which potentially toxic constituents of sewage sludge can reach and cause toxicity to livestock, humans, plants, soil biota, wildlife, etc. In the process of preparing a new regulation for land application of sewage sludge in the US, a pathway approach to risk assessment was undertaken. Two Pathways were found to comprise the greatest risk from persistent lipophilic organic compounds such as PCBs: (1) direct ingestion of sludge by children; and (2) adherence of sludge to forage/pasture crops from surface application of fluid sludge, followed by grazing and ingestion of sludge by livestock used as human food. Each pathway considers risk to Most Exposed Individuals (MEIs) who have high exposure to sludge. Because 1990 sewage sludges contain very low levels of PCBs, the estimated risk level to MEIs was less 0.0001, low sludge PCBs and low probability of simultaneously meeting all the constraints of the MEI indicate that MEIs are at less 0.0000001 lifetime risk. The authors conclude that quantitative risk assessment for potentially toxic constituents in sewage sludge can be meaningfully conducted because research has provided transfer coefficients from sludges and sludge-amended soils to plants and animals needed for many organic compounds.

Chaney, R.L.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Types of Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Types of risk associated with range ecosystems include climatic, biological, financial and political risks. These risks are explained so that managers can know how to handle them....

White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Risk Assess - updated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

485

Country Risk Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are a multitude of organizations providing country risk services using their proprietary benchmarking. The central ... in a quantifiable manner, individual country sovereign risk and the implication of such...

Mohamed A. Ramady

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Enterprise Risk Management Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Model is a system used to analyze the cost and benefit of addressing risks inherent in the work performed by the Department of Energy....

487

Risk Mitigation and Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are combined to form a technical risk reduction strategy, sometimes referred to as a technology roadmap. The tools can be applied to non-technical, programmatic risk areas as...

488

Uncertainty and Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter shows how multiple realizations can be used to support the assessment of uncertainty and risk.

Mario E. Rossi; Clayton V. Deutsch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

CancerCancer SBL101SBL101  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CancerCancer SBL101SBL101 James Gomes School of Biological Sciences Indian Institute of Technology either Block the control point so that cell cycle continues in the absence of telomeres Acquire

Mittal, Aditya

490

Learning and risk aversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contains three essays on learning and risk aversion. In the first essay we consider how learning may lead to risk averse behavior. A learning rule is said to be risk averse if it is expected to add more probability to an action...

Oyarzun, Carlos

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

491

Risk, uncertainty and regulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...themselves, is What is an acceptable level of risk? The 27 million, 16-volume...deciding whether or not a risk is acceptable is comparison. There is...government should be to reduce risk to a level that is acceptable to most people, and this...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

February 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to an acceptable level. The objective of performing risk man agement is to enable the organization to accomplishFebruary 2002 RISK MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS By Joan S. Hash, Computer This ITL Bulletin describes risk man agement methodology and how to integrate it into an information tech

493

Whole-Genome Sequencing of Asian Lung Cancers: Second-Hand Smoke Unlikely to Be Responsible for Higher Incidence of Lung Cancer among Asian Never-Smokers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...994-1007. 11. Zhao Y , Wang S, Aunan K, Seip HM Hao J.Air pollution and lung cancer risks in China-a meta-analysis...Goldberg MS, Gao YT Jin F.Lung cancer and indoor air pollution arising from Chinese-style cooking among nonsmoking...

Vidhya G. Krishnan; Philip J. Ebert; Jason C. Ting; Elaine Lim; Swee-Seong Wong; Audrey S.M. Teo; Yong G. Yue; Hui-Hoon Chua; Xiwen Ma; Gary S.L. Loh; Yuhao Lin; Joanna H.J. Tan; Kun Yu; Shenli Zhang; Christoph Reinhard; Daniel S.W. Tan; Brock A. Peters; Stephen E. Lincoln; Dennis G. Ballinger; Jason M. Laramie; Geoffrey B. Nilsen; Thomas D. Barber; Patrick Tan; Axel M. Hillmer; and Pauline C. Ng

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

GCC Composite Risk: Political Risk at the Heart  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The individual GCC country risk chapters have revealed divergent risk parameters in the three core risk areas—economic, financial, and political. This chapter examines the GCC composite risk as a whole, and compa...

Mohamed A. Ramady

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495