National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for lifestage sex effect

  1. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ? 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  2. The role of estrogen in turtle sex determination and the effect of PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crews, D.; Bergeron, J.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); McLachlan, J.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Gonadal sex is fixed at fertilization by specific chromosomes, a process known as genotypic sex determination (GSD). Only after the gonad is formed do hormones begin to exert an influence that modifies specific structures that eventually will differ between the sexes. Many egg-laying reptiles do not exhibit GSD but rather depend on the temperature of the incubating egg to determine the gonadal sex of the offspring, a process termed temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Research on TSD indicates that gonadal sex is not irrevocably set by the genetic composition inherited at fertilization but depends ultimately on which genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes and hormone receptors are activated during the midtrimester of embryonic development by temperature. Incubation temperature modifies the activity as well as the temporal and spatial sequence of enzymes and hormone receptors to determine gonad type. Estrogen is the physiologic equivalent of incubation temperature and the proximate cue that initiates female sex determination. increasing evidence indicates some polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds are capable of disrupting reproductive and endocrine function in fish, birds, and mammals, including humans. Reproductive disorders resulting from exposure to these xenobiotic compounds may include reductions in fertility, hatch rate in fish and birds, and viability of offspring, as well as alterations in hormone levels or adult sexual behaviors. Research on the mechanism through which these compounds may be acting to alter reproductive function indicates estrogenic activity, by which the compounds may be altering sexual differentiation. In TSD turtles, the estrogenic effect of some PCBs reverses gonadal sex in individuals incubating at an otherwise male-producing temperature. Furthermore, certain PCBs are synergistic in their effect at very low concentrations. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Sex-specific tissue weighting factors for effective dose equivalent calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X.G. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Reece, W.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent was defined in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 26 in 1977 and later adopted by the U.S. Nuclear REgulatory Commission. To calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent for external exposures using Monte Carlo simulations, sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and sex-specific weighting factors are always employed. This paper presents detailed mathematical derivation of a set of sex-specific tissue weighting factors and the conditions which the weighting factors must satisfy. Results of effective dose equivalent calculations using female and male phantoms exposed to monoenergetic photon beams of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV are provided and compared with results published by other authors using different sex-specific weighting factors and phantoms. The results indicate that females always receive higher effective dose equivalent than males for the photon energies and geometries considered and that some published data may be wrong due to mistakes in deriving the sex-specific weighting factors. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Cadmium effect on microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity in rat livers with respect to differences in age and sex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, M.

    1982-04-01

    The effect of cadmium on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system was investigated. Cadmium chloride caused the conversion of cytochrome P-450 to P-420 in rat liver microsomes. The destruction of cytochrome P-450 by cadmium caused the reduction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme activity and prolonged the pentobarbital sleeping time. There is a sex-related difference in the ability of cadmium to inhibit the hepatic drug metabolism in rats: male rats are more sensitive to cadmium than females. The effective period when cadmium prolonged their sleep depended upon the age of rats; older rats were more sensitive to cadmium than younger ones. The maximum increase of sleeping time depended upon the dose level of cadium, and the rate constant of the equations seems to depend upon the age of the animals.

  5. Long-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on Spatial Memory of Mice: Role of Sex and Apolipoprotein E Isoform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villasana, Laura E.; Benice, Theodore S.; Raber, Jacob

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the effects of cranial {sup 56}Fe irradiation on the spatial memory of mice in the water maze are sex and apolipoprotein E (apoE) isoform dependent and whether radiation-induced changes in spatial memory are associated with changes in the dendritic marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. Methods and Materials: Two-month-old male and female mice expressing human apoE3 or apoE4 received either a 3-Gy dose of cranial {sup 56}Fe irradiation (600 MeV/amu) or sham irradiation. Mice were tested in a water maze task 13 months later to assess effects of irradiation on spatial memory retention. After behavioral testing, the brain tissues of these mice were analyzed for synaptophysin and MAP-2 immunoreactivity. Results: After irradiation, spatial memory retention of apoE3 female, but not male, mice was impaired. A general genotype deficit in spatial memory was observed in sham-irradiated apoE4 mice. Strikingly, irradiation prevented this genotype deficit in apoE4 male mice. A similar but nonsignificant trend was observed in apoE4 female mice. Although there was no change in MAP-2 immunoreactivity after irradiation, synaptophysin immunoreactivity was increased in irradiated female mice, independent of genotype. Conclusions: The effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on the spatial memory retention of mice are critically influenced by sex, and the direction of these effects is influenced by apoE isoform. Although in female mice synaptophysin immunoreactivity provides a sensitive marker for effects of irradiation, it cannot explain the apoE genotype-dependent effects of irradiation on the spatial memory retention of the mice.

  6. Sex Cells Elijah Wolfson Newsweek

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sex Cells Elijah Wolfson Newsweek August 12, 2015 4:00 p.m. The media, of course, likes a big headline - the First something in history, the Biggest something of all time, the Only...

  7. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubinsky, M.S. [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children`s Hospital, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  8. Sex ratios in fetuses and liveborn infants with autosomal aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuther, C.A.; Martin, R.L.M.; Stoppelman, S.M. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-14

    Ten data sources were used substantially to increase the available data for estimating fetal and livebirth sex ratios for Patau (trisomy 13), Edwards (trisomy 18), and Down (trisomy 21) syndromes and controls. The fetal sex ratio estimate was 0.88 (N = 584) for trisomy 13, 0.90 (N = 1702) for trisomy 18, and 1.16 (N = 3154) for trisomy 21. All were significantly different from prenatal controls (1.07). The estimated ratios in prenatal controls were 1.28 (N = 1409) for CVSs and 1.06 (N = 49427) for amniocenteses, indicating a clear differential selection against males, mostly during the first half of fetal development. By contrast, there were no sex ratio differences for any of the trisomies when comparing gestational ages <16 and >16 weeks. The livebirth sex ratio estimate was 0.90 (N = 293) for trisomy 13, 0.63 (N = 497) for trisomy 18, and 1.15 (N = 6424) for trisomy 21, the latter two being statistically different than controls (1.05) (N = 3660707). These ratios for trisomies 13 and 18 were also statistically different than the ratio for trisomy 21. Only in trisomy 18 did the sex ratios in fetuses and livebirths differ, indicating a prenatal selection against males >16 weeks. No effects of maternal age or race were found on these estimates for any of the fetal or livebirth trisomies. Sex ratios for translocations and mosaics were also estimated for these aneuploids. Compared to previous estimates, these results are less extreme, most likely because of larger sample sizes and less sample bias. They support the hypothesis that these trisomy sex ratios are skewed at conception, or become so during embryonic development through differential intrauterine selection. The estimate for Down syndrome livebirths is also consistent with the hypothesis that its higher sex ratio is associated with paternal nondisjunction. 36 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Variations in the Retention and Excretion of {sup 137}Cs with Age and Sex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boni, A.L.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses the effects of age and sex on the retention and excretion of {sup 137}Cs in the body in a cross section of the general population over a four-year period.

  10. The candidate sex-reversing DAX1 gene is autosomal in marsupials: Implications for the evolution of sex determination in mammals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pask, A.; Toder, R.; Wilcox, S.A. [La Trobe Univ., Melbourne (Australia)] [and others] [La Trobe Univ., Melbourne (Australia); and others

    1997-05-01

    The human X-linked DAX1 gene was cloned from the region of the short arm of the human X found in duplicate in sex-reversed X{sub dup}Y females. DAX1 is suggested to be required for ovarian differentiation and to play an important role in mammalian sex determination or differentiation pathways. Its proposed dose-dependent effect on sexual development suggests that DAX1 could represent an evolutionary link with an ancestral sex-determining mechanism that depended on the dosage of an X-linked gene. Furthermore, DAX1 could also represent the putative X-linked switch gene, which independently controls sexual dimorphisms in marsupial mammals in an X-dose-dependent manner. If DAX1 has a present role in marsupial sexual differentiation or had an ancestral role in mammalian sex determination, it would be expected to lie on the marsupial X chromosome, despite the autosomal localization of other human Xp genes. We therefore cloned and mapped the DAX1 gene in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). DAX1 was located on wallaby chromosome 5p near other human Xp genes, indicating that it was originally autosomal and that it is not involved in X-linked dose-dependent sex determination in an ancestral mammal nor in marsupial sexual differentiation. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Sex-based differences in gene expression in hippocampus following postnatal lead exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J.S. Anderson, D.W.; Sonnenahalli, H.; Vadigepalli, R.

    2011-10-15

    The influence of sex as an effect modifier of childhood lead poisoning has received little systematic attention. Considering the paucity of information available concerning the interactive effects of lead and sex on the brain, the current study examined the interactive effects of lead and sex on gene expression patterns in the hippocampus, a structure involved in learning and memory. Male or female rats were fed either 1500 ppm lead-containing chow or control chow for 30 days beginning at weaning.Blood lead levels were 26.7 {+-} 2.1 {mu}g/dl and 27.1 {+-} 1.7 {mu}g/dl for females and males, respectively. The expression of 175 unique genes was differentially regulated between control male and female rats. A total of 167 unique genes were differentially expressed in response to lead in either males or females. Lead exposure had a significant effect without a significant difference between male and female responses in 77 of these genes. In another set of 71 genes, there were significant differences in male vs. female response. A third set of 30 genes was differentially expressed in opposite directions in males vs. females, with the majority of genes expressed at a lower level in females than in males. Highly differentially expressed genes in males and females following lead exposure were associated with diverse biological pathways and functions. These results show that a brief exposure to lead produced significant changes in expression of a variety of genes in the hippocampus and that the response of the brain to a given lead exposure may vary depending on sex. - Highlights: > Postnatal lead exposure has a significant effect on hippocampal gene expression patterns. > At least one set of genes was affected in opposite directions in males and females. > Differentially expressed genes were associated with diverse biological pathways.

  12. Fluorochemicals used in food packaging inhibit male sex hormone synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenmai, A.K.; Nielsen, F.K.; Pedersen, M.; Hadrup, N.; Trier, X.; Christensen, J.H.; Vinggaard, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Polyfluoroalkyl phosphate surfactants (PAPS) are widely used in food contact materials (FCMs) of paper and board and have recently been detected in 57% of investigated materials. Human exposure occurs as PAPS have been measured in blood; however knowledge is lacking on the toxicology of PAPS. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of six fluorochemicals on sex hormone synthesis and androgen receptor (AR) activation in vitro. Four PAPS and two metabolites, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (8:2 FTOH) were tested. Hormone profiles, including eight steroid hormones, generally showed that 8:2 diPAPS, 8:2 monoPAPS and 8:2 FTOH led to decreases in androgens (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione) in the H295R steroidogenesis assay. Decreases were observed for progesterone and 17-OH-progesterone as well. These observations indicated that a step prior to progestagen and androgen synthesis had been affected. Gene expression analysis of StAR, Bzrp, CYP11A, CYP17, CYP21 and CYP19 mRNA showed a decrease in Bzrp mRNA levels for 8:2 monoPAPS and 8:2 FTOH indicating interference with cholesterol transport to the inner mitochondria. Cortisol, estrone and 17β-estradiol levels were in several cases increased with exposure. In accordance with these data CYP19 gene expression increased with 8:2 diPAPS, 8:2 monoPAPS and 8:2 FTOH exposures indicating that this is a contributing factor to the decreased androgen and the increased estrogen levels. Overall, these results demonstrate that fluorochemicals present in food packaging materials and their metabolites can affect steroidogenesis through decreased Bzrp and increased CYP19 gene expression leading to lower androgen and higher estrogen levels. -- Highlights: ► Fluorochemicals found in 57% of paper and board food packaging were tested. ► Collectively six fluorochemicals were tested for antiandrogenic potential in vitro. ► Three out of six tested fluorochemicals inhibited synthesis of male sex hormones. ► Generally, levels of estrogens and cortisol stayed unaffected or increased. ► The effect on steroid synthesis was specific on gene expression of Bzrp and CYP19.

  13. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  14. Infant sex-specific placental cadmium and DNA methylation associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, April F.; Farin, Fred M.; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Afsharinejad, Zahra; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Siscovick, David S.; and others

    2015-04-15

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that maternal cadmium (Cd) burden and fetal growth associations may vary by fetal sex. However, mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. Objectives: Among 24 maternal-infant pairs, we investigated infant sex-specific associations between placental Cd and placental genome-wide DNA methylation. Methods: We used ANOVA models to examine sex-stratified associations of placental Cd (dichotomized into high/low Cd using sex-specific Cd median cutoffs) with DNA methylation at each cytosine-phosphate-guanine site or region. Statistical significance was defined using a false discovery rate cutoff (<0.10). Results: Medians of placental Cd among females and males were 5 and 2 ng/g, respectively. Among females, three sites (near ADP-ribosylation factor-like 9 (ARL9), siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3 (SIAH3), and heparin sulfate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulfotransferase 4 (HS3ST4) and one region on chromosome 7 (including carnitine O-octanoyltransferase (CROT) and TP5S target 1 (TP53TG1)) were hypomethylated in high Cd placentas. Among males, high placental Cd was associated with methylation of three sites, two (hypomethylated) near MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus (MECOM) and one (hypermethylated) near spalt-like transcription factor 1 (SALL1), and two regions (both hypomethylated, one on chromosome 3 including MECOM and another on chromosome 8 including rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 10 (ARHGEF10). Differentially methylated sites were at or close to transcription start sites of genes involved in cell damage response (SIAH3, HS3ST4, TP53TG1) in females and cell differentiation, angiogenesis and organ development (MECOM, SALL1) in males. Conclusions: Our preliminary study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations, possibly accounting for previously reported differences in Cd-fetal growth associations across fetal sex. Larger studies are needed to replicate and extend these findings. Such investigations may further our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms underlying maternal Cd burden with suboptimal fetal growth associations. - Highlights: • We examine sex-specific placental-Cd and -genome-wide DNA methylation associations. • In females, associated sites were at/near genes involved in cell damage response. • In males, associated sites were at/near angiogenesis and organ development genes. • Our study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations.

  15. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael . E-mail: mowens@uams.edu

    2005-12-15

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats.

  16. Sex ratio of the offspring of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in utero and lactationally in a three-generation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowlands, J.C.; Budinsky, R.A. . E-mail: RABudinsky@dow.com; Aylward, L.L.; Faqi, A.S.; Carney, E.W.

    2006-10-01

    Reports of a decreased male/female sex ratio in children born to males exposed to TCDD in Seveso, Italy, at a young age have sparked examinations of this endpoint in other populations exposed to TCDD or related compounds. Overall, the male/female sex ratio results reported in these studies, with slightly different age-exposed male populations, have shown mixed results. Experimental studies of the effects of in utero exposure to TCDD in laboratory animals have reported no effect on the f{sub 1} sex ratio and mixed results for the sex ratio of the f{sub 2} generation. In order to better understand the potential effects of TCDD on second generation sex ratio, we retrieved archived data from a comprehensive three-generation feeding study of TCDD in rats that was conducted and published in the 1970s, but which did not publish data on sex ratio of the offspring [Murray, F.J., Smith, F.A., Nitschke, K.D., Humiston, C.G., Kociba, R.J., Schwetz, B.A., 1979. Three-generation reproduction study of rats given 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in the diet. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 50, 241-252]. A re-examination of the original Murray et al. data found no statistically significant treatment-related changes in postnatal day 1 sex ratio in any generation of treated animals, consistent with one other relatively large study reporting on this endpoint. We discuss mechanistic data underlying a potential effect of TCDD on this endpoint. We conclude that the inconsistency in findings on sex ratio of the offspring of male rats exposed to TCDD in utero is likely due to random variation associated with a relatively small sample size, although differences between studies in strain of rat, dose regimen, and day of ascertainment of sex ratio cannot be ruled out.

  17. Sex-specific vitellogenin production in immature rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, D.B.; Williams, D.E.

    1999-10-01

    Many xenobiotics interact with hormone systems of animals, potentially leading to a phenomenon commonly called endocrine disruption. Much attention has focused on steroid hormone systems and corresponding receptor proteins, particularly estrogens. Vitellogenin (Vg) was measured in sexually immature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) in the diet. Mixed-sex populations of trout aged 3, 6, 12, or 18 months were maintained separately and fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 or 2.5 mg/kg for 7d. Females fed E{sub 2} at 0.05 mg/kg consistently produced three- to fourfold greater amounts of Vg than similarly aged males. Age- and sex-matched fish fed E{sub 2} at 2.5 mg/kg produced equivalent amounts of Vg. Sex differences in Vg production were apparent only at a dose of E{sub 2} (0.05 mg/kg) that results in submaximal Vg induction. Their results document the importance of considering the sex of juvenile fish when using Vg production as a marker of xenoestrogen exposure.

  18. Auger electron spectroscopy for the determination of sex and age related Ca/P ratio at different bone sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Tzaphlidou, Margaret

    2010-10-15

    The Ca/P ratio of normal cortical and trabecular rat bone was measured by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Semiquantitative analysis was carried out using ratio techniques to draw conclusions on how age, sex and bone site affect the relative composition of calcium and phosphorus. Results show that Ca/P ratio is not sex dependent; quite the opposite, bone sites exhibit variations in elemental stoichiometry where femoral sections demonstrate higher Ca/P ratio than rear and front tibias. Age-related changes are more distinct for cortical bone in comparison with the trabecular bone. The latter's Ca/P ratio remains unaffected from all the parameters under study. This study confirms that AES is able to successfully quantify bone mineral main elements when certain critical points, related to the experimental conditions, are addressed effectively.

  19. RESONANCES REQUIRED: DYNAMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE 24 Sex AND HD 200964 PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.

    2012-12-20

    We perform several suites of highly detailed dynamical simulations to investigate the architectures of the 24 Sextantis and HD 200964 planetary systems. The best-fit orbital solution for the two planets in the 24 Sex system places them on orbits with periods that lie very close to 2:1 commensurability, while that for the HD 200964 system places the two planets therein in orbits whose periods lie close to a 4:3 commensurability. In both cases, the proposed best-fit orbits are mutually crossing-a scenario that is only dynamically feasible if the planets are protected from close encounters by the effects of mutual mean-motion resonance (MMR). Our simulations reveal that the best-fit orbits for both systems lie within narrow islands of dynamical stability, and are surrounded by much larger regions of extreme instability. As such, we show that the planets are only feasible if they are currently trapped in mutual MMR-the 2:1 resonance in the case of 24 Sex b and c, and the 4:3 resonance in the case of HD 200964 b and c. In both cases, the region of stability is strongest and most pronounced when the planetary orbits are mutually coplanar. As the inclination of planet c with respect to planet b is increased, the stability of both systems rapidly collapses.

  20. Intervention of D-glucose ameliorates the toxicity of streptozotocin in accessory sex organs of rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikram, A.; Tripathi, D.N.; Ramarao, P.; Jena, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is a naturally occurring compound isolated from Streptomyces achromogens. It is used extensively for inducing diabetes in experimental animals. Diabetes mellitus is known to have proven adverse effects on male sexual organs and their reproductive functions. The atrophy of prostate gland and other organs of the genitourinary tract were observed in experimental diabetic animals. STZ exhibits a structural resemblance to D-glucose due to the presence of sugar moiety in its structure. Pancreatic {beta}-cells mainly contain GLUT1 and GLUT2 glucose transporters. Possibly due to structural resemblance, STZ and D-glucose, share a common recognition site for entry into the {beta}-cells. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of D-glucose on STZ-induced toxicity in accessory sex organs of male rats. Animals were kept on overnight fasting. One group received vehicle and served as negative control, while all other groups were given STZ (45 mg/kg). Animals that received only STZ served as positive control. The effect of D-glucose was studied on STZ treated animals with different dosage of D-glucose (250, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg). Restoration of body weight, plasma glucose and plasma insulin was evident only at 1000 and 2000 mg/kg of D-glucose. The protective effect of D-glucose is evident only when it is administered simultaneously with STZ. In the present investigation, we report that simultaneous administration of D-glucose along with STZ ameliorates STZ-induced toxicity. This is evident from the restoration of accessory sex organ's weight, cellular morphology as well as insulin level.

  1. Etiology of Early Lifestage Diseases, Project 84-44, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauter, R.W.

    1986-10-01

    Each year hatcheries experience loss of eggs, fry and fingerlings due to a group of poorly defined diseases called White Spot and Coagulated Yolk. Samples of maternal blood and ovarian fluid (coelomic fluid), as well as unfertilized eggs, were collected at spawning and subsequently tested for the presence of bacteria. Our tests reveal that there is a wide range in mortality rates experienced by the progeny of different brood salmon. Microbiologic tests revealed that these eggs contained a variety of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria within their yolk and that the fluids from the females who produced these lots were contaminated with a variety of bacteria. In contrast the eggs and maternal fluids from the six egg lots which experienced the lowest mortalities did not contain high numbers of Gram positive bacteria and contributed only 5% of the total mortalities observed within the 30 egg lots tested. From the 60 egg lots tested over two brood years we have isolated 18 different bacterial genera containing 32 different species from within the yolk surface sterilized, unfertilized eggs. Our tests suggest that Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas (3 species) Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio sp., Corynebacterium hoffmanii, Listeria sp. and Bacillus sp. when detected within the yolk of eggs sampled from egg lots prior to fertilization will be associated with higher than normal mortality rates when the remainder of the egg lots containing these bacteria are incubated and reared. 36 refs., 16 figs.

  2. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming; Gunter, Lee E; Blaudez, D

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  3. Preconception maternal polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and the secondary sex ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Kira C. [Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institutes of Child Health and Development (NICHD), NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive Blvd, Room 7B03, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Department of Epidemiology, 1518 Clifton Road, NE Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Jackson, Leila W. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, WG37, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-4945 (United States); Lynch, Courtney D. [Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institutes of Child Health and Development (NICHD), NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive Blvd, Room 7B03, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Kostyniak, Paul J. [Toxicology Research Center, 134 Cary Hall, University at Buffalo, State of New York, 3434 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14214-3000 (United States); Buck Louis, Germaine M. [Division of Epidemiology, Statistics and Prevention Research, National Institutes of Child Health and Development (NICHD), NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive Blvd, Room 7B03, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)]. E-mail: louisg@mail.nih.gov

    2007-01-15

    The secondary sex ratio is the ratio of male to female live births and historically has ranged from 102 to 106 males to 100 females. Temporal declines have been reported in many countries prompting authors to hypothesize an environmental etiology. Blood specimens were obtained from 99 women aged 24-34 prior to attempting pregnancy and quantified for 76 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners using dual column gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Women were prospectively followed until pregnancy or 12 cycles of trying. The odds of a male birth for three PCB groupings (total, estrogenic, anti-estrogenic) controlling for maternal characteristics were estimated using logistic regression. Among the 50 women with live births and PCB data, 26 female and 24 male infants were born (ratio 0.92). After adjusting for age and body mass index, odds of a male birth were elevated among women in the second (OR=1.29) and third (OR=1.48) tertiles of estrogenic PCBs; odds (OR=0.70) were reduced among women in the highest tertile of anti-estrogenic PCBs. All confidence intervals included one. The direction of the odds ratios in this preliminary study varied by PCB groupings, supporting the need to study specific PCB patterns when assessing environmental influences on the secondary sex ratio.

  4. Hormone-dependence of sarin lethality in rats: Sex differences and stage of the estrous cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Carl D. Wright, Linnzi K.M.; Garcia, Gregory E.; Lee, Robyn B.; Lumley, Lucille A.

    2015-09-15

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are highly toxic compounds that cause a cascade of symptoms and death, if exposed casualties are left untreated. Numerous rodent models have investigated the toxicity and mechanisms of toxicity of CWNAs, but most are limited to male subjects. Given the profound physiological effects of circulating gonadal hormones in female rodents, it is possible that the daily cyclical fluctuations of these hormones affect females' sensitivity to the lethal effects of CWNAs, and previous reports that included female subjects did not control for the stage of the hormonal cycle. The aim of the current study was to determine the 24-hour median lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) of the CWNA sarin in male, ovariectomized (OVEX) female, and female rats during different stages of the estrous cycle (diestrus, proestrus, and estrus). Additionally, baseline activity levels of plasma acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and carboxylesterase were measured to determine differences among the groups. Results indicated that females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD{sub 50} of sarin compared to OVEX and estrous females. Although some sex differences were observed in the activity levels of plasma esterases, they were not consistent and likely not large enough to significantly affect the LD{sub 50}s. These results suggest that hormonal cyclicity can influence the outcome of CWNA-related studies using female rodents, and that this variability can be minimized by controlling for the stage of the cycle. Additional research is necessary to determine the precise mechanism of the observed differences because it is unlikely to be solely explained by plasma esterase activity. - Highlights: • The LD{sub 50} of sarin was determined in female rats throughout the stages of the estrous cycle. • Females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD{sub 50} compared to estrous or ovariectomized females. • No sex differences were observed between male and female rats. • It is unlikely that plasma esterase activity underlies the observed differences in LD{sub 50}s.

  5. Loss of sex chromosomes in the hematopoietic disorders: Questions, concerns and data interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slovak, M.L. [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The significance of sex chromosome aberrations in the hematopoietic disorders has not yet been defined. Interpretive problems stem from (1) the loss of a sex chromosome associated with aging, (2) sex chromosome loss as the sole aberration in leukemia is rare, (3) random -(X or Y) is observed frequently in bone marrow samples, and (4) constitutional sex chromosome anomalies must be ruled out in cancer and follow-up may not be possible. The COH database identified 41 patients (pts) with sex chromosome loss. Loss of a sex chromosome was common in myeloid disorders (21/41). In t(8;21) leukemia (n=10), -(X or Y) was a common secondary karyotypic change. Additionally, -Y was associated with clonal evolution in 2 Ph + CML pts. In 2 elderly pts with myeloid disorders, -(X or Y) was observed in complex karyotypes with dmins; however, in the lymphoproliferative disorders -(X or Y) was noted in elderly pts without apparent pathogenetic significance. Three pts had constitutional sex chromosome aberrations: CML in 45,X; ALL in 47, XXY; and RAEB-IT in mos45,X/46,XX. In the mos45,X/46,XX pt, the leukemic clone was associated with the 45,X line without other karyotypic changes. Non-clonal aberrations were observed in 11 cases; in 3 cases these non-clonal losses were observed in serial samples. In a sex-mismatched BMT case, -(X or Y) in 4 cells was one of the first pathogenetic signs of leukemia relapse. These data suggest (1) interpretation of sex chromosome loss in leukemia must be made with caution and after a baseline sample, (2) non-clonal aberrations should be recorded, and (3) -(X or Y) appears to have pathogenetic significance in the myeloid disorders. Multi-institutional studies are needed to define (1) the incidence of leukemia in pts with constitutional sex chromosome anomalies and (2) the incidence and significance of sex chromosome aberrations as the primary (sole) cytogenetic aberration in leukemia.

  6. Sex ratios, bill deformities, and PCBs in nestling double-crested cormorants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromborg, K.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay, WI (United States); Sileo, L. [National Biological Service, Madison, WI (United States); Tuinen, P. van [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Deformed double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nestlings examined from 1988--1992 had a sex ratio highly skewed toward females (66 of 81) compared to normal nestlings (43 of 80) (P < 0.005). The collection site, Green Bay, WI, is heavily contaminated with PCBs and the possibility of gender alteration was investigated in a designed study by comparing the sex of nestling birds determined using three techniques. These nestlings were collected at five sites, both contaminated and uncontaminated. Genetic sex was determined by cytogenetic techniques and phenotypic sex was determined by macroscopic and histologic examination of gonads. Differences between techniques resulted in a few instances of classifying genetic males as females by one or the other gonadal examinations. Sex ratios of the nestlings from the five sites were compared to binomial distributions assuming equal probabilities of males and females. Sex ratios of normal nestlings were not different from expected regardless of sex determination technique (P > 0.10). Deformed nestlings sexed cytogenetically or histologically did not differ from expected (P > 0.40), but deformed nestlings tended to be classified , macroscopically as females at a higher rate than expected (P = 0.092). The observed sex ratios obtained by macroscopic techniques did not differ between the 1968--1992 observational study and the designed study (P > 0.50). Histologic examination suggested two explanations for the skewed sex ratio: nestlings with undeterminable macroscopic sex usually had testes and, some gonads which grossly resembled ovaries were, in fact, testes. If phenotypic gender alteration is present in these birds, it is more evident at the gross structural level than at the histologic level.

  7. The hyperthermia mediated by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) is sensitive to sex differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyeth, Richard P.; Mills, Edward M.; Ullman, Alison; Kenaston, M. Alexander; Burwell, Johanna; Sprague, Jon E.

    2009-02-15

    Female subjects have been reported to be less sensitive to the hyperthermic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamine (MDMA) than males. Studies were designed to examine the cellular mechanisms involved in these sex sensitive differences. Gonadectomized female and male rats were treated with a 200 {mu}g 100 {mu}L{sup -1} of estrogen or 100 {mu}g 100 {mu}L{sup -1} of testosterone respectively every 5 days for a total of three doses. Rats were then challenged with either saline or MDMA (20 mg kg{sup -1}, sc). Rats were then euthanized and aortas were constricted, in vitro, by serial phenylephrine (Phe) addition with or without the inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, g-nitro-L-Arginine-Methyl Ester (L-NAME). Skeletal muscle uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) expression was measured as well as plasma norepinephrine (NE) levels. All males but no females developed hyperthermia following MDMA treatment. The EC{sub 50} for Phe dose response curves increased only in the females treated with MDMA and T{sub max} for Phe increased following L-NAME only in the females. Both males and females demonstrated an increase in plasma NE following MDMA treatment; however, males displayed a significantly greater NE concentration. Skeletal muscle UCP3 expression was 80% less in females than in males. These results suggest that the inability of MDMA to induce a thermogenic response in the female subjects may be due to four sex-specific mechanisms: 1) Female subjects have reduced sympathetic activation following MDMA challenge; 2) Female vasculature is less sensitive to {alpha}{sub 1}-AR stimulation following MDMA challenge; 3) Female vasculature has an increased sensitivity to NO; 4) UCP3 expression in skeletal muscle is less in females.

  8. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young C. [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: youckim@snu.ac.kr; Yim, Hye K.; Jung, Young S. [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae H. [College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinrim-Dong, Kwanak-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Y. [College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, 344-2 Shinyong-Dong, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards.

  9. Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of particles with large gyroradii on resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability V. A. Svidzinski and S. C. Prager University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 19 September 2003; accepted 25 November 2003͒ Fast ions in tokamaks are known to have a significant influence on global plasma instabilities. In normal mode analyses for tokamaks, the perturbed electric and magnetic fields have been evaluated at the position of the particle's guiding center. The effect of

  10. Estimating Small-area Populations by Age and Sex Using Spatial Interpolation and Statistical Inference Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qai, Qiang; Rushton, Gerald; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Coleman, Phil R

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to compute population estimates by age and sex for small areas whose boundaries are different from those for which the population counts were made. In our approach, population surfaces and age-sex proportion surfaces are separately estimated. Age-sex population estimates for small areas and their confidence intervals are then computed using a binomial model with the two surfaces as inputs. The approach was implemented for Iowa using a 90 m resolution population grid (LandScan USA) and U.S. Census 2000 population. Three spatial interpolation methods, the areal weighting (AW) method, the ordinary kriging (OK) method, and a modification of the pycnophylactic method, were used on Census Tract populations to estimate the age-sex proportion surfaces. To verify the model, age-sex population estimates were computed for paired Block Groups that straddled Census Tracts and therefore were spatially misaligned with them. The pycnophylactic method and the OK method were more accurate than the AW method. The approach is general and can be used to estimate subgroup-count types of variables from information in existing administrative areas for custom-defined areas used as the spatial basis of support in other applications.

  11. Genome structure and emerging evidence of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Tongming; DiFazio, Stephen P; Gunter, Lee E; Zhang, Xinye; Sewell, Mitchell; Woolbright, Dr. Scott; Allan, Dr. Gery; Kelleher, Colin; Douglas, Carl; Wang, Prof. Mingxiu; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus consists of dioecious woody species with largely unknown genetic mechanisms for gender determination. We have discovered genetic and genomic features in the peritelomeric region of chromosome XIX that suggest this region of the Populus genome is in the process of developing characteristics of a sex chromosome. We have identified a gender-associated locus that consistently maps to this region. Furthermore, comparison of genetic maps across multiple Populus families reveals consistently distorted segregation within this region. We have intensively characterized this region using an F1 interspecific cross involving the female genotype that was used for genome sequencing. This region shows suppressed recombination and high divergence between the alternate haplotypes, as revealed by dense map-based genome assembly using microsatellite markers. The suppressed recombination, distorted segregation, and haplotype divergence were observed only for the maternal parent in this cross. Furthermore, the progeny of this cross showed a strongly male-biased sex ratio, in agreement with Haldane's rule that postulates that the heterogametic sex is more likely to be absent, rare, or sterile in interspecific crosses. Together, these results support the role of chromosome XIX in sex determination and suggest that sex determination in Populus occurs through a ZW system in which the female is the heterogametic gender.

  12. Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trani, Daniela; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia; Maastricht Radiation Oncology Lab, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht ; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia ; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P.; Datta, Kamal; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia ; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

  13. Absence of correlation between Sry polymorphisms and XY sex reversal caused by the M.m. domesticus Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, C.; Nagamine, C.M. [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [Vanderbilt Univ., School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Winkinig, H.; Weichenhan, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)] [Medizinische Universitaet Zu Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    Mus musculus domesticus Y chromosomes (Y{sup DOM} Chrs) vary in their ability to induce testes in the strain C57BL/6J. In severe cases, XY females develop (XY{sup DOM} sex reversal). To identify the molecular basis for the sex reversal, a 2.7-kb region of Sry, the testis-determining gene, was sequenced from Y{sup DOM} Chrs linked to normal testis determination, transient sex reversal, and severe sex reversal. Four mutations were identified. However, no correlation exists between these mutations and severity of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. RT-PCR identified Sry transcripts in XY{sup DOM} sex-reversed fetal gonads at 11 d.p.c., the age when Sry is hypothesized to function. In addition, no correlation exists between XY{sup DOM} sex reversal and copy numbers of pSx1, a Y-repetitive sequence whose deletion is linked to XY sex reversal. We conclude that SRY protein variants, blockade of Sry transcription, and deletion of pSx1 sequences are not the underlying causes of XY{sup DOM} sex reversal. 63 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Sex difference in the principal cytochrome P-450 for tributyltin metabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohhira, Shuji . E-mail: s-ohhira@dokkyomed.ac.jp; Enomoto, Mitsunori; Matsui, Hisao

    2006-01-15

    Tributyltin is metabolized by cytochrome P-450 (CYP) system enzymes, and its metabolic fate may contribute to the toxicity of the chemical. In the present study, it is examined whether sex differences in the metabolism of tributyltin exist in rats. In addition, the in vivo and in vitro metabolism of tributyltin was investigated using rat hepatic CYP systems to confirm the principal CYP involved. A significant sex difference in metabolism occurred both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that one of the CYPs responsible for tributyltin metabolism in rats is male specific or predominant at least. Eight cDNA-expressed rat CYPs, including typical phenobarbital (PB)-inducible forms and members of the CYP2C subfamily, were tested to determine their capability for tributyltin metabolism. Among the enzymes studied, a statistically significant dealkylation of tributyltin was mediated by CYP2C6 and 2C11. Furthermore, the sex difference in metabolism disappeared in vitro after anti-rat CYP2C11 antibody pretreatment because CYP2C11 is a major male-specific form in rats. These results indicate that CYP2C6 is the principal CYP for tributyltin metabolism in female rats, whereas CYP2C11 as well as 2C6 is involved in tributyltin metabolism in male rats, and it is suggested that CYP2C11 is responsible for the significant sex difference in the metabolism of tributyltin observed in rats.

  15. Designed modulation of sex steroid signaling inhibits telomerase activity and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal; Sharma, Siddharth; Bishnoi, Ajay Kumar; Chandra, Vishal; Maikhuri, J.P.; Dwivedi, Anila; Kumar, Atul; Gupta, Gopal

    2014-10-15

    The predominant estrogen-receptor (ER)-β signaling in normal prostate is countered by increased ER-α signaling in prostate cancer (CaP), which in association with androgen-receptor (AR) signaling results in pathogenesis of the disease. However CaP treatments mostly target AR signaling which is initially effective but eventually leads to androgen resistance, hence simultaneous targeting of ERs has been proposed. A novel series of molecules were designed with multiple sex-steroid receptor modulating capabilities by coalescing the pharmacophores of known anti-CaP molecules that act via modulation of ER(α/β) and/or AR, viz. 3,3′diindolylmethane (DIM), mifepristone, toremifene, tamoxifen and raloxifene. N,N-diethyl-4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl) aniline (DIMA) was identified as the most promising structure of this new series. DIMA increased annexin-V labelling, cell-cycle arrest and caspase-3 activity, and decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen in LNCaP cells, in vitro. Concurrently, DIMA increased ER-β, p21 and p27 protein levels in LNCaP cells and exhibited ∼ 5 times more selective binding for ER-β than ER-α, in comparison to raloxifene. DIMA exhibited a dose-dependent ER-β agonism and ER-α antagonism in classical gene reporter assay and decreased hTERT (catalytic subunit of telomerase) transcript levels in LNCaP at 3.0 μM (P < 0.05). DIMA also dose-dependently decreased telomerase enzyme activity in prostate cancer cells. It is thus concluded that DIMA acts as a multi-steroid receptor modulator and effectively inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells through ER-β mediated telomerase inhibition, by countering actions of ER-α and AR. Its unique molecular design can serve as a lead structure for generation of potent agents against endocrine malignancies like the CaP.

  16. Currently used pesticides and their mixtures affect the function of sex hormone receptors and aromatase enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjeldsen, Lisbeth Stigaard; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-10-15

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of pesticides is of health concern, since they are found ubiquitously in the environment and in food items. We investigated in vitro effects on estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) transactivity, and aromatase enzyme activity, of the following pesticides: 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), terbuthylazine, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, mesosulfuron-methyl, metsulfuron-methyl, chlormequat chloride, bitertanol, propiconazole, prothioconazole, mancozeb, cypermethrin, tau fluvalinate, malathion and the metabolite ethylene thiourea (ETU). The pesticides were analyzed alone and in selected mixtures. Effects of the pesticides on ER and AR function were assessed in human breast carcinoma MVLN cells and hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells, respectively, using luciferase reporter gene assays. Effects on aromatase enzyme activity were analyzed in human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells, employing the classical [{sup 3}H]{sub 2}O method. Five pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole, prothioconazole, cypermethrin and malathion) weakly induced the ER transactivity, and three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole and mancozeb) antagonized the AR activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Three pesticides (terbuthylazine, propiconazole and prothioconazole) weakly induced the aromatase activity. In addition, two mixtures, consisting of three pesticides (bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin) and five pesticides (terbuthylazine, bitertanol, propiconazole, cypermethrin, malathion), respectively, induced the ER transactivity and aromatase activity, and additively antagonized the AR transactivity. In conclusion, our data suggest that currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting potential in vitro which can be mediated via ER, AR and aromatase activities. The observed mixture effects emphasize the importance of considering the combined action of pesticides in order to assure proper estimations of related health effect risks. - Highlights: • Currently used pesticides possess endocrine-disrupting (ED) potential in vitro. • ED effects can be mediated via sex hormone receptors and/or the aromatase enzyme. • Additive mixture effects on androgen receptor transactivity were observed.

  17. On the SW Sex-type eclipsing cataclysmic variable SDSS0756+0858

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovmassian, Gagik; Hernandez, Mercedes Stephania; González-Buitrago, Diego; Zharikov, Sergey; García-Díaz, Maria Teresa

    2014-03-01

    We conducted a spectroscopic and photometric study of SDSS J075653.11+085831. X-ray observations were also attempted. We determined the orbital period of this binary system to be 3.29 hr. It is a deep eclipsing system, whose spectra show mostly single-peaked, Balmer emission lines and a rather intense He II line. There is also the presence of faint (often double-peaked) He I emission lines as well as several absorption lines, Mg I being the most prominent. All of these features point toward the affiliation of this object with the growing number of SW Sex-type objects. We developed a phenomenological model of an SW Sex system to reproduce the observed photometric and spectral features.

  18. Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittenger, D B

    1992-02-01

    The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

  19. Repeated in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure affects male gonads in offspring, leading to sex ratio changes in F{sub 2} progeny

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Masahiko . E-mail: ikedam@ys2.u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp; Tamura, Masashi; Yamashita, Junko; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Tomita, Takako

    2005-08-15

    The effects of in utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the reproductive system of male rat offspring (F{sub 1}) and the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F{sub 2}) were examined. Female Holtzman rats were gavaged with an initial loading dose of 400 ng/kg TCDD prior to mating, followed by weekly maintenance doses of 80 ng/kg during mating, pregnancy, and the lactation period. Maternal exposure to TCDD had no significant effects on fetus/pup (F{sub 1}) mortality, litter size, or sex ratio on gestation day (GD) 20 or postnatal day (PND) 2. The TCDD concentration in maternal livers and adipose tissue on GD20 was 1.21 and 1.81 ng/kg, respectively, and decreased at weaning to 0.72 in the liver and 0.84 in the adipose tissue. In contrast, the TCDD concentration in pup livers was 1.32 ng/kg on PND2 and increased to 1.80 ng/kg at weaning. Ventral prostate weight of male offspring was significantly decreased by TCDD exposure on PND28 and 120 compared with that of controls. Weight of the testes, cauda epididymides, and seminal vesicle, and sperm number in the cauda epididymis were not changed by TCDD exposure at PND120. TCDD- or vehicle-exposed male offspring were mated with unexposed females. The sex ratio (percentage of male pups) of F{sub 2} offspring was significantly reduced in the TCDD-exposed group compared with controls. These results suggest that in utero and lactational TCDD exposures affect the development of male gonads in offspring (F{sub 1}), leading to changes in the sex ratio of the subsequent generation (F{sub 2})

  20. Diversity Based on Race, Ethnicity, and Sex, of the US Radiation Oncology Physician Workforce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Christina H.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the current diversity of the US radiation oncology (RO) physician workforce by race, ethnicity, and sex. Methods and Materials: Publicly available American Medical Association, American Association of Medical Colleges, and US census registries were used to assess differences by race, ethnicity, and sex for 2010 among RO practicing physicians, academic faculty, residents, and residency applicants. RO resident diversity was compared to medical school graduates and medical oncology (MO) fellows. Significant differences in diversity of RO residents by race, ethnicity, and sex were evaluated between 2003 and 2010 academic years. Results: Females and traditionally underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM), blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders are underrepresented as RO residents (33.3% and 6.9%, respectively), faculty (23.8%, 8.1%), and practicing physicians (25.5%, 7.2%) levels compared with the US population (50.8%, 30.0%; P<.01). Although females and URMs remain underrepresented at the resident trainee level compared with their proportions as medical school graduates (48.3%, 15.6%) and MO fellows (45.0%, 10.8%; P<.01), females are significantly increased in proportion as RO residents compared with RO practicing physicians (P<.01), whereas representation of individual URM groups as RO residents is no different than current practicing physicians. There is no trend toward increased diversification for female or URM trainees over 8 years, suggesting underrepresentation is not diminishing. Conclusions: Females and URM are underrepresented in the RO physician workforce. Given existing cancer disparities, further research and efforts are needed to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse society.

  1. Associations between cadmium exposure and circulating levels of sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Imran; Engström, Annette; Vahter, Marie; Skerfving, Staffan; Lundh, Thomas; Lidfeldt, Jonas; Samsioe, Göran; Halldin, Krister; Åkesson, Agneta

    2014-10-15

    Recent epidemiological as well as in vivo and in vitro studies collectively suggest that the metalloestrogen cadmium (Cd) could be a potential risk factor for hormone-related cancers in particularly breast cancer. Assessment of the association between Cd exposure and levels of endogenous sex hormones is of pivotal importance, as increased levels of such have been associated with a higher risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The present study investigated the perceived relationship (multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses) between Cd exposure [blood Cd (B-Cd) and urinary Cd (U-Cd)], and serum levels of androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), in 438 postmenopausal Swedish women without hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A significant positive association between B-Cd (median 3.4 nmol/L) and serum testosterone levels, as well as a significant inverse association between B-Cd and serum estradiol levels and with the estradiol/testosterone ratio were encountered. However, U-Cd (median 0.69 nmol/mmol creatinine) was inversely associated with serum estradiol levels only. Our data may suggest that Cd interferes with the levels of testosterone and estradiol in postmenopausal women, which might have implications for breast cancer risk. - Highlights: • Low level cadmium exposure may interfere with the levels of steroid hormones. • Cadmium exposure was associated with increased serum testosterone concentrations. • Cadmium exposure was associated with decreased estradiol/testosterone ratio. • Cadmium exposure may have implications for breast-cancer promotion.

  2. Moving up down in the mine: Sex segregation in underground coal mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallichet, S.E.

    1991-01-01

    This study employs both individualist theories of human capital and sex-role spillover and structuralist theories from the socialist feminist perspective, emphasizing the formal and informal organizational factors operating within a patriarchal capitalist society to explain job-level sex segregation among underground coal miners. Both quantitative and qualitative data on women in coal mining are used to evaluate these theories. A logistic regression analysis performed on data obtained in 1986 by the US Bureau of Mines demonstrates that while human capital variables are predictive of a miner's job rank, variation in job rank attributed to gender is even greater. For men, training and experience in mining combine to increase the probability of being in a more skilled job in a coal mine. Age and seniority are curvilinearly related to the variation in men's job rank. For women, only age accounts for their advancement such that younger, not older women who have slightly more mining experience, occupy the more skilled positions in the work place. These findings suggest that, in terms of job advancement, men enjoy a greater return on their human capital investments than women, and that factors other than those representing a miner's human capital are affecting women's positions underground more than men's.

  3. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Lee, Jamie; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500 μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6 h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144 h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. - Highlights: • Differences exist between the toxicity phenotypes to TCDD in male and female mice. • TCDD-mediated transcriptomic differences were identified between the sexes. • Resistant female mice displayed a large, early-onset, transcriptomic response. • Sensitive male mice displayed a large, late-onset, transcriptomic response. • Fmo2, Fmo3 and Nr1i3 were induced across the time-course in only male mice.

  4. Sprague-Dawley rats display metabolism-mediated sex differences in the acute toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonsart, Julien [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Menet, Marie-Claude [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Plateau Spectrometrie de Masse (IFR 71), Service de Chimie Analytique, Paris F-75006 (France); Decleves, Xavier [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Galons, Herve [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U648, Paris F-75006 (France); Crete, Dominique; Debray, Marcel; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Noble, Florence [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France)], E-mail: florence.noble@univ-paris5.fr

    2008-07-01

    The use of the amphetamine derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has been associated with unexplained deaths. Male humans and rodents are more sensitive to acute toxicity than are females, including a potentially lethal hyperthermia. MDMA is highly metabolized to five main metabolites, by the enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP2D. The major metabolite in rats, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), also causes hyperthermia. We postulated that the reported sex difference in rats is due to a sexual dimorphism(s). We therefore determined (1) the LD50 of MDMA and MDA, (2) their hyperthermic effects, (3) the activities of liver CYP1A2 and CYP2D, (4) the liver microsomal metabolism of MDMA and MDA, (5) and the plasma concentrations of MDMA and its metabolites 3 h after giving male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats MDMA (5 mg.kg{sup -1} sc). The LD50 of MDMA was 2.4-times lower in males than in females. MDMA induced greater hyperthermia (0.9 deg. C) in males. The plasma MDA concentration was 1.3-fold higher in males, as were CYP1A2 activity (twice) and N-demethylation to MDA (3.3-fold), but the plasma MDMA concentration (1.4-fold) and CYP2D activity (1.3-fold) were higher in females. These results suggest that male SD rats are more sensitive to MDMA acute toxicity than are females, probably because their CYP1A2 is more active, leading to higher N-demethylation and plasma MDA concentration. This metabolic pathway could be responsible for the lethality of MDMA, as the LD50 of MDA is the same in both sexes. These data strongly suggest that the toxicity of amphetamine-related drugs largely depends on metabolic differences.

  5. Sprague-Dawley rats display sex-linked differences in the pharmacokinetics of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its metabolite 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonsart, Julien, E-mail: julien.fonsart@lrb.aphp.f [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France); INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Biologique, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris F-75010 (France); Menet, Marie-Claude [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Plateau Spectrometrie de Masse (IFR 71), Service de Chimie Analytique, Paris F-75006 (France); Debray, Marcel; Hirt, Deborah; Noble, Florence; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Decleves, Xavier [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France); INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France)

    2009-12-15

    The use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has increased in recent years; it can lead to life-threatening hyperthermia and serotonin syndrome. Human and rodent males appear to be more sensitive to acute toxicity than are females. MDMA is metabolized to five main metabolites by the enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2D and COMT. Little is presently known about sex-dependent differences in the pharmacokinetics of MDMA and its metabolites. We therefore analyzed MDMA disposition in male and female rats by measuring the plasma and urine concentrations of MDMA and its metabolites using a validated LC-MS method. MDA AUC{sub last} and C{sub max} were 1.6- to 1.7-fold higher in males than in females given MDMA (5 mg/kg sc), while HMMA C{sub max} and AUC{sub last} were 3.2- and 3.5-fold higher, respectively. MDMA renal clearance was 1.26-fold higher in males, and that of MDA was 2.2-fold higher. MDMA AUC{sub last} and t{sub 1/2} were 50% higher in females given MDMA (1 mg/kg iv). MDA C{sub max} and AUC{sub last} were 75-82% higher in males, with a 2.8-fold higher metabolic index. Finally, the AUC{sub last} of MDA was 0.73-fold lower in males given 1 mg/kg iv MDA. The volumes of distribution of MDMA and MDA at steady-state were similar in the two sexes. These data strongly suggest that differences in the N-demethylation of MDMA to MDA are major influences on the MDMA and MDA pharmacokinetics in male and female rats. Hence, males are exposed to significantly more toxic MDA, which could explain previously reported sexual dysmorphism in the acute effects and toxicity of MDMA in rats.

  6. Mono-hydroxy methoxychlor alters levels of key sex steroids and steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Zelieann R.; Leslie, Traci C.; Hatfield, Kimberly P.; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2010-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by decreasing antral follicle numbers and increasing follicular death. MXC is metabolized in the body to mono-hydroxy MXC (mono-OH). Little is known about the effects of mono-OH on the ovary. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that mono-OH exposure decreases production of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) by cultured mouse antral follicles. Antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mice (age 35-39 days) and exposed to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or mono-OH (0.1-10 {mu}g/mL) for 96 h. Media and follicles were collected for analysis of sex steroid levels and mRNA expression, respectively. Mono-OH treatment (10 {mu}g/mL) decreased E{sub 2} (DMSO: 3009.72 {+-} 744.99 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1679.66 {+-} 461.99 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 1752.72 {+-} 532.41 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 45.89 {+-} 33.83 ng/mL), testosterone (DMSO: 15.43 {+-} 2.86 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 17.17 {+-} 4.71 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 13.64 {+-} 3.53 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 1.29 {+-} 0.23 ng/mL), androstenedione (DMSO: 1.92 {+-} 0.34 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 1.49 {+-} 0.43 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 0.64 {+-} 0.31 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 0.12 {+-} 0.06 ng/mL) and progesterone (DMSO: 24.11 {+-} 4.21 ng/mL; mono-OH 0.1 {mu}g/mL: 26.77 {+-} 4.41 ng/mL; 1 {mu}g/mL: 20.90 {+-} 3.75 ng/mL; 10 {mu}g/mL: 9.44 {+-} 2.97 ng/mL) levels. Mono-OH did not alter expression of Star, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1 and Cyp1b1, but it did reduce levels of Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1 and Cyp19a1 mRNA. Collectively, these data suggest that mono-OH significantly decreases levels of key sex steroid hormones and the expression of enzymes required for steroidogenesis.

  7. Role of chalcogen vapor annealing in inducing bulk superconductivity in Fe1+yTe1-xSex [How does annealing in chalcogen vapor induce superconductivity in Fe1+yTe-xSex?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Ganesh, P.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony; Wang, Jun; Berlijn, Tom; Maier, Thomas A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sales, Brian C.; Pan, Minghu

    2015-02-01

    Recent investigations have shown that Fe1+yTe1-xSex can be made superconducting by annealing it in Se and O vapors. The current lore is that these chalcogen vapors induce superconductivity by removing the magnetic excess Fe atoms. To investigate this phenomenon we performed a combination of magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and transport measurements together with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on Fe1+yTe1-xSex treated with Te vapor. We conclude that the main role of the Te vapor is to quench the magnetic moments of the excess Fe atoms by forming FeTem (m ≥ 1) complexes. We show thatmore » the remaining FeTem complexes are still damaging to the superconductivity and therefore that their removal potentially could further improve superconductive properties in these compounds.« less

  8. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H. [Prostate Centre at the Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Child and Family Research Institute, 950 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Cherkasov, Artem [Prostate Centre at the Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6 (Canada)], E-mail: artc@interchange.ubc.ca; Hammond, Geoffrey L. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Child and Family Research Institute, 950 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4 (Canada)

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [{sup 3}H]5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 {mu}M concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost.

  9. Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittenger, D.B.

    1992-02-01

    The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

  10. Altered microRNA expression patterns in irradiated hematopoietic tissues suggest a sex-specific protective mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Zemp, Franz J.; Koturbash, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-12-05

    To investigate involvement of miRNAs in radiation responses we used microRNAome profiling to analyze the sex-specific response of radiation sensitive hematopoietic lymphoid tissues. We show that radiation exposure resulted in a significant and sex-specific deregulation of microRNA expression in murine spleen and thymus tissues. Among the regulated miRNAs, we found that changes in expression of miR-34a and miR-7 may be involved in important protective mechanisms counteracting radiation cytotoxicity. We observed a significant increase in the expression of tumor-suppressor miR-34a, paralleled by a decrease in the expression of its target oncogenes NOTCH1, MYC, E2F3 and cyclin D1. Additionally, we show that miR-7 targets the lymphoid-specific helicase LSH, a pivotal regulator of DNA methylation and genome stability. While miR-7 was significantly down-regulated LSH was significantly up-regulated. These cellular changes may constitute an attempt to counteract radiation-induced hypomethylation. Tissue specificity of miRNA responses and possible regulation of miRNA expression upon irradiation are discussed.

  11. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  12. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karman, Bethany N. Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Craig, Zelieann R. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1–100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 μM) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3–4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ►TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ►Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ►TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  13. Age- and sex-related differences of organic anion-transporting polypeptide gene expression in livers of rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Cheng, Xing-Guo; Liu, Jie

    2014-10-15

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps) play important roles in transporting endogenous substances and xenobiotics into the liver and are implicated in drug-drug interactions. Many factors could influence their expression and result in alterations in drug disposition, efficacy and toxicity. This study was aimed to examine the development-, aging-, and sex-dependent Oatps expression in livers of rats. The livers from SD rats during development (− 2, 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 60 d) and aging (60, 180, 540 and/or 800 d) were collected and total RNAs were extracted, purified, and subjected to real-time PCR analysis. Total proteins were extracted for western-blot analysis. Results showed that Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5 and Oatp1b2 were all hardly detectable in fetal rat livers, low at birth, rapidly increased after weaning (21 d), and reached the peak at 60 d. The Oatps remained stable during the age between 60–180 d, and decreased at elderly (540 and/or 800 d). After birth, Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, and Oatp1b2 were all highly expressed in liver, in contrast, Oatp1a5 expression was low. Oatp expressions are male-predominant in rat livers. In the livers of aged rats, the Oatp expression decreased and shared a consistent ontogeny pattern at the mRNA and protein level. In conclusion, this study showed that in rat liver, Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5 and Oatp1b2 gene expressions are influenced by age and gender, which could provide a basis of individual variation in drug transport, metabolism and toxicity in children, elderly and women. - Highlights: • Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5 and Oatp1b2 expression in livers of rats. • Ontogenic changes of Oatps at − 2, 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 60 days. • Age-related changes of Oatps at 60, 180, 540, and 800 days. • Sex-difference of Oatps at the both mRNA and protein levels.

  14. Sex-specific patterns and deregulation of endocrine pathways in the gene expression profiles of Bangladeshi adults exposed to arsenic contaminated drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muñoz, Alexandra; Chervona, Yana; Hall, Megan; Kluz, Thomas; Gamble, Mary V.; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water occurs globally and is associated with numerous diseases including skin, lung and bladder cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research indicates that arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor. This study was conducted to evaluate the nature of gene expression changes among males and females exposed to arsenic contaminated water in Bangladesh at high and low doses. Twenty-nine (55% male) Bangladeshi adults with water arsenic exposure ranging from 50 to 1000 μg/L were selected from the Folic Acid Creatinine Trial. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells for gene expression profiling using Affymetrix 1.0 ST arrays. Differentially expressed genes were assessed between high and low exposure groups for males and females separately and findings were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. There were 534 and 645 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of males and females, respectively, when high and low water arsenic exposure groups were compared. Only 43 genes overlapped between the two sexes, with 29 changing in opposite directions. Despite the difference in gene sets both males and females exhibited common biological changes including deregulation of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, deregulation of genes downstream of Sp1 (specificity protein 1) transcription factor, and prediction of estrogen receptor alpha as a key hub in cardiovascular networks. Arsenic-exposed adults exhibit sex-specific gene expression profiles that implicate involvement of the endocrine system. Due to arsenic's possible role as an endocrine disruptor, exposure thresholds for arsenic may require different parameters for males and females. - Highlights: • Males and females exhibit unique gene expression changes in response to arsenic. • Only 23 genes are common among the differentially expressed genes for the sexes. • Male and female gene lists exhibit common biological implications. • Both sexes exhibit deregulation of cardiovascular and endocrine pathways.

  15. Effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children: a cross-sectional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spinaci, S.; Arossa, W.; Bugiani, M.; Natale, P.; Bucca, C.; de Candussio, G.

    1985-09-01

    To investigate the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children, a subject of some controversy, a comparative study was undertaken of 2,385 school children who lived in central urban, peripheral urban, and suburban areas. Daily monitoring of sulfur dioxide and total suspended particle concentrations in all areas showed that pollutant concentrations in central and peripheral urban areas were above commonly accepted safety levels for respiratory health, while concentrations in the suburban area were within acceptable limits. A questionnaire administered to each mother assessed environmental exposure to pollutants in the household, the occurrence of respiratory symptoms as well as lung diseases as diagnosed by a physician, and general information. Children were interviewed about smoking habits and any acute respiratory symptoms. Children also performed standard lung function tests. Results showed that children from both urban areas had lessened pulmonary function and a higher prevalence of bronchial secretion with common colds than did those from the suburban area. These differences persisted after corrections for exposure to indoor pollutants, active or passive smoking, socioeconomic status, and sex. Parental cigarette smoking was related to a fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and an increased incidence of acute respiratory illnesses and chronic cough in children. Although boys had higher lung volumes and lower air flow, regression analysis showed no significant influence of the interactions sex-geographic area and sex-smoking on lung function. It was concluded that air pollution has a significant effect on the respiratory health of children.

  16. Health effects of Halon 1301 exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holness, D.L.; House, R.A. )

    1992-07-01

    An accidental discharge of a Halon 1301 system is reported. Thirty-one workers were assessed, 22 who were present at the time of the discharge, and 9 who worked the next shift. The incident was complicated by a small Freon-22 leak several hours later. Throat, eye, and nasal irritation and lightheadedness were reported by the majority of workers. Workers present during the halon discharge reported significantly more lightheadedness, headache, voice change, cough, and a fast heartbeat than did those who worked the later shift. These differences were significant even after correcting for confounding factors such as age, sex, and sense of anxiety at the time of the incident. The possible causes for the irritant symptoms include breakdown products of Halon 1301 and Freon-22 or contaminants from the halon discharge system. Although these irritant effects may not be an effect of Halon 1301 alone, they may occur in these discharge situations, and workers should be advised of this possibility. The possible cardiac and central nervous system effects also should be considered. The importance of a clear-cut protocol to deal with such incidents as well as worker education are discussed.

  17. Surface collective modes in the topological insulators Bi2Se3 and Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3-xSex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kogar, A.; Gu, G.; Vig, S.; Thaler, A.; Wong, M. H.; Xiao, Y.; Reig-i-Plessis, D.; Cho, G. Y.; Valla, T.; Pan, Z.; et al

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we used low-energy, momentum-resolved inelastic electron scattering to study surface collective modes of the three-dimensional topological insulators Bi2Se3 and Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3-xSex. Our goal was to identify the “spin plasmon” predicted by Raghu and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 116401 (2010)]. Instead, we found that the primary collective mode is a surface plasmon arising from the bulk, free carriers in these materials. This excitation dominates the spectral weight in the bosonic function of the surface χ''(q,ω) at THz energy scales, and is the most likely origin of a quasiparticle dispersion kink observed in previous photoemission experiments. Our study suggestsmore » that the spin plasmon may mix with this other surface mode, calling for a more nuanced understanding of optical experiments in which the spin plasmon is reported to play a role.« less

  18. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary layer of water flowing over the blade surface. The study quantified both immediate and delayed mortalities (observed immediately, 3 hours, and 24 hours after encountering the blade) among freshwater YOY fish resulting from contact with the blade or turbulent flows in the wake of the blade.

  19. Differential effects of a complex organochlorine mixture on the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aube, Michel; Larochelle, Christian; Ayotte, Pierre; Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, 945 avenue Wolfe, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 5B3

    2011-04-15

    Organochlorine compounds (OCs) are a group of persistent chemicals that accumulate in fatty tissues with age. Although OCs has been tested individually for their capacity to induce breast cancer cell proliferation, few studies examined the effect of complex mixtures that comprise compounds frequently detected in the serum of women. We constituted such an OC mixture containing 15 different components in environmentally relevant proportions and assessed its proliferative effects in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, CAMA-1, MDAMB231) and in non-cancerous CV-1 cells. We also determined the capacity of the mixture to modulate cell cycle stage of breast cancer cells and to induce estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects using gene reporter assays. We observed that low concentrations of the mixture (100x10{sup 3} and 50x10{sup 3} dilutions) stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7 cells while higher concentrations (10x10{sup 3} and 5x10{sup 3} dilutions) had the opposite effect. In contrast, the mixture inhibited the proliferation of non-hormone-dependent cell lines. The mixture significantly increased the number of MCF-7 cells entering the S phase, an effect that was blocked by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Low concentrations of the mixture also caused an increase in CAMA-1 cell proliferation but only in the presence estradiol and dihydrotestosterone (p<0.05 at the 50x10{sup 3} dilution). DDT analogs and polychlorinated biphenyls all had the capacity to stimulate the proliferation of CAMA-1 cells in the presence of sex steroids. Reporter gene assays further revealed that the mixture and several of its constituents (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, toxaphene) induced estrogenic effects, whereas the mixture and several components (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin and PCBs) inhibited the androgen signaling pathway. Our results indicate that the complex OC mixture increases the proliferation of MCF-7 cells due to its estrogenic potential. The proliferative effect of the mixture on CAMA-1 cells in the presence of sex steroids appears mostly due to the antiandrogenic properties of p,p'-DDE, a major constituent of the mixture. Other mixtures of contaminants that include emerging compounds of interest such as brominated flame retardants and perfluoroalkyl compounds should be tested for their capacity to induce breast cancer cell proliferation. - Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of a complex organochlorine mixture on breast cancer cell growth. {yields} Weak xenoestrogens in the mixture stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. {yields} Antiandrogens increased the proliferation CAMA-1 cells grown with sex steroids. {yields} High concentrations of the mixture decreased the proliferation of all cell lines.

  20. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

  1. Effects of the UV filter benzophenone-2 on reproduction in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrod, Christin J.; Kunz, Petra Y.; Zenker, Armin K. [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gruendenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Fent, Karl [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gruendenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Department of Environmental Sciences, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch

    2007-12-15

    The UV filter benzophenone-2 (BP-2) is largely used in personal care products such as cosmetics and in numerous other materials for UV protection. Like other UV filters, BP-2 has been found to be estrogenic in vitro and in vivo, but potential effects on reproduction of fish are unknown. In this study, we evaluate whether BP-2 affects important reproductive parameters such as fecundity, gametogenesis and secondary sex characteristics. After a pre-exposure period of 19 days, reproductively mature fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to 0.002, 0.1, 1.2, 5.0 and 9.7 mg/L BP-2 for 15 days. BP-2 was accumulated in fish up to 3.1 {mu}g/g body weight. In males, a dose-dependent vitellogenin induction and decrease in the number of nuptial tubercles occurred. Moreover, significant dose-related effects on gonads of male and female fish were observed. At concentrations of 1.2 mg/L and higher, spermatocyte and oocyte development was significantly inhibited in male and female fish, respectively. Testes of exposed males had much fewer spermatocytes and ovaries of exposed females had much fewer mature and more atretic follicles. Reproduction was negatively affected in a dose-dependent manner with a decrease in egg production at 5.0 mg/L and a complete cessation of spawning activity at 9.7 mg/L BP-2. Our findings show significant estrogenic effects of the common UV filter BP-2 on vitellogenin induction, secondary sex characteristics, gonadal development, and reproduction in fish.

  2. Subacute effects of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) on hepatic gene expression profiles in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canton, Rocio F. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: rfcanton@gmail.com; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H.; Ven, Leo T.M. van der [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Laboratory for Heath Protection Research, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heneweer, Marjoke [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2008-09-01

    Hexabromoyclododecane (HBCD), used as flame retardant (FR) mainly in textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacture, has been identified as a contaminant at levels comparable to other brominated FRs (BFRs). HBCD levels in biota are increasing slowly and seem to reflect the local market demand. The toxicological database of HBCD is too limited to perform at present a solid risk assessment, combining data from exposure and effect studies. In order to fill in some gaps, a 28-day HBCD repeated dose study (OECD407) was done in Wistar rats. In the present work liver tissues from these animals were used for gene expression profile analysis. Results show clear gender specificity with females having a higher number of regulated genes and therefore being more sensitive to HBCD than males. Several specific pathways were found to be affected by HBCD exposure, like PPAR-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism, triacylglycerol metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, and phase I and II pathways. These results were corroborated with quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid metabolism were especially down-regulated in females. Genes involved in phase I and II metabolism were up-regulated predominantly in males, which could explain the observed lower HBCD hepatic disposition in male rats in this 28-day study. These sex-specific differences in gene expression profiles could also underlie sex-specific differences in toxicity (e.g. decreased thyroid hormone or increased serum cholesterol levels). To our knowledge, this is the fist study that describes the changes in rat hepatic gene profiles caused by this commonly used flame retardant.

  3. SREL Reprint #3321

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of vegetation structure and artificial nesting habitats on hatchling sex ... (artificial) nesting habitat on hatchling sex ratios and nest depredation for a declining ...

  4. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  5. Effective Incentive Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an in-depth look at effective incentive structures, how to clarify your program goals, and tips to plan for the long term.

  6. Renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in Thai children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Mahasakpan, Pranee; Jeekeeree, Wanpen; Funkhiew, Thippawan; Sanjum, Rungaroon; Apiwatpaiboon, Thitikarn; Phopueng, Ittipol

    2015-01-15

    Very few studies have shown renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. This population study examined associations between urinary cadmium excretion, a good biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, and renal dysfunctions and blood pressure in environmentally exposed Thai children. Renal functions including urinary excretion of β{sub 2}-microglobulin, calcium (early renal effects), and total protein (late renal effect), and blood pressure were measured in 594 primary school children. Of the children studied, 19.0% had urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine. The prevalence of urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine was significantly higher in girls and in those consuming rice grown in cadmium-contaminated areas. The geometric mean levels of urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin, calcium, and total protein significantly increased with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. The analysis did not show increased blood pressure with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. After adjusting for age, sex, and blood lead levels, the analysis showed significant positive associations between urinary cadmium and urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin and urinary calcium, but not urinary total protein nor blood pressure. Our findings provide evidence that environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children. A follow-up study is essential to assess the clinical significance and progress of renal effects in these children. - Highlights: • Few studies show renal effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. • We report renal and blood pressure effects from cadmium exposure in Thai children. • Urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin and calcium increased with increasing urinary cadmium. • The study found no association between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure. • Environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children.

  7. Nonrelativistic effective Lagrangians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leutwyler, H. )

    1994-03-15

    Chiral perturbation theory is extended to nonrelativistic systems with spontaneously broken symmetry. In the effective Lagrangian, order parameters associated with the generators of the group manifest themselves as effective coupling constants of a topological term, which is gauge invariant only up to a total derivative. In the case of the ferromagnet, a term connected with the Brouwer degree dominates the derivative expansion. The general analysis includes antiferromagnetic magnons and phonons, while the effective field theory of fluids or gases is beyond the scope of the method.

  8. Health effects of acid aerosols on North American children: Respiratory symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dockery, D.W. |; Cunningham, J.; Damokosh, A.I.

    1996-05-01

    We examined the respiratory health effects of exposure to acidic air pollution among 13,369 white children 8 to 12 years old from 24 communities in the United States and Canada between 1988 and 1991. Each child`s parent or guardian completed a questionnaire. Air quality and meteorology were measured in each community for a 1-year period. We used a two-stage logistic regression model to analyze the data, adjusting for the period confounding effects of sex, history of allergies, parental asthma, parental education, and current smoking in the home. Children living in the community with the highest levels of particle strong acidity were significantly more likely [odds ratio (OR) = 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.48] to report at least one episode of bronchitis in the past year compared to children living in the least-polluted community. Fine particulate sulfate was also associated with higher reporting of bronchitis (OR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.12-2.42). No other respiratory symptoms were significantly higher in association with any of the air pollutants of interest. No sensitive subgroups were identified. Reported bronchitis, but neither asthma, wheeze, cough, nor phlegm, were associated with levels of particle strong acidity for these children living in a nonurban environment. 26 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. High Burnup Effects Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barner, J.O.; Cunningham, M.E.; Freshley, M.D.; Lanning, D.D.

    1990-04-01

    This is the final report of the High Burnup Effects Program (HBEP). It has been prepared to present a summary, with conclusions, of the HBEP. The HBEP was an international, group-sponsored research program managed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). The principal objective of the HBEP was to obtain well-characterized data related to fission gas release (FGR) for light water reactor (LWR) fuel irradiated to high burnup levels. The HBEP was organized into three tasks as follows: Task 1 -- high burnup effects evaluations; Task 2 -- fission gas sampling; and Task 3 -- parameter effects study. During the course of the HBEP, a program that extended over 10 years, 82 fuel rods from a variety of sources were characterized, irradiated, and then examined in detail after irradiation. The study of fission gas release at high burnup levels was the principal objective of the program and it may be concluded that no significant enhancement of fission gas release at high burnup levels was observed for the examined rods. The rim effect, an as yet unquantified contributor to athermal fission gas release, was concluded to be the one truly high-burnup effect. Though burnup enhancement of fission gas release was observed to be low, a full understanding of the rim region and rim effect has not yet emerged and this may be a potential area of further research. 25 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Dissipative Effects in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Dissipative Effects in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dissipative Effects in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation We generalize the effective field theory of single clock inflation to include dissipative effects. Working in unitary gauge we couple a set of composite operators, {Omicron}{sub {mu}{nu}}..., in the effective action which is constrained solely by

  11. Effective Public Participation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper provides guidance to Department of Energy personnel for involving the public effectively and meaningfully in DOE processes conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act. It was prepared in furtherance of the Secretary of Energy's 1994 Public Participation Policy and Policy on the National Environmental Policy Act.

  12. Latent effects decision analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J. Arlin; Werner, Paul W.

    2004-08-24

    Latent effects on a system are broken down into components ranging from those far removed in time from the system under study (latent) to those which closely effect changes in the system. Each component is provided with weighted inputs either by a user or from outputs of other components. A non-linear mathematical process known as `soft aggregation` is performed on the inputs to each component to provide information relating to the component. This information is combined in decreasing order of latency to the system to provide a quantifiable measure of an attribute of a system (e.g., safety) or to test hypotheses (e.g., for forensic deduction or decisions about various system design options).

  13. Radiation Effects Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects Sciences - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  14. An effective Z'

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Liu, Jia; Tucker-Smith, David; Weiner, Neal

    2011-12-06

    We describe a method to couple Z' gauge bosons to the standard model (SM), without charging the SM fields under the U(1)', but instead through effective higher-dimension operators. This method allows complete control over the tree-level couplings of the Z' and does not require altering the structure of any of the SM couplings, nor does it contain anomalies or require introduction of fields in nonstandard SM representations. Moreover, such interactions arise from simple renormalizable extensions of the SM—the addition of vectorlike matter that mixes with SM fermions when the U(1)' is broken. We apply effective Z' models as explanations ofmore » various recent anomalies: the D0 same-sign dimuon asymmetry, the CDF W+di-jet excess and the CDF top forward-backward asymmetry. In the case of the W+di-jet excess we also discuss several complementary analyses that may shed light on the nature of the discrepancy. We consider the possibility of non-Abelian groups, and discuss implications for the phenomenology of dark matter as well.« less

  15. Unconventional Quantum Hall Effect and Tunable Spin Hall Effect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to an Isolated MoS2 Trilayer Title: Unconventional Quantum Hall Effect and Tunable Spin Hall Effect in Dirac Materials: Application to an Isolated MoS2 Trilayer Authors: Li, ...

  16. Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2010-07 has been issued. It lists ALs currently in effect and the discontinued ALs along with the reason why the AL is no longer in effect.

  17. Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-01 has been issued. It lists ALs currently in effect and the discontinued ALs, along with the reason why the AL is no longer in effect.

  18. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol effective radius

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol effective radius Aerosol effective radius is the ratio of the third and...

  19. Sustaining Cost-Effective Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents how understanding the way in which customers' minds process incentives can help energy efficiency programs structure effective incentives.

  20. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  1. The potential reproductive, neurobehavioral and systemic effects of soluble sodium tungstate exposure in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInturf, S.M. [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Bekkedal, M.Y.V. [Two Steps Forward, LLC, Sun Prairie, WI (United States); Wilfong, E. [U.S. Naval Academy, 572M Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD (United States); Arfsten, D. [Navy Drug Screening Laboratory P.O. Box 113, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, FL (United States); Chapman, G. [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Gunasekar, P.G., E-mail: palur.gunasekar@wpafb.af.mil [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The debate on tungsten (W) is fostered by its continuous usage in military munitions. Reports demonstrate W solubilizes in soil and can migrate into drinking water supplies and, therefore, is a potential health risk to humans. This study evaluated the reproductive, systemic and neurobehavioral effects of sodium tungstate (NaW) in rats following 70 days of daily pre-and postnatal exposure via oral gavage to 5, 62.5 and 125 mg/kg/day of NaW through mating, gestation and weaning (PND 0-20). Daily administration of NaW produced no overt evidence of toxicity and had no apparent effect on mating success or offspring physical development. Distress vocalizations were elevated in F{sub 1} offspring from the high dose group, whereas righting reflex showed unexpected sex differences where males demonstrated faster righting than females; however, the effects were not dose-dependent. Locomotor activity was affected in both low and high-dose groups of F{sub 1} females. Low-dose group showed increased distance traveled, more time in ambulatory movements and less time in stereotypic behavior than controls or high dose animals. The high-dose group had more time in stereotypical movements than controls, and less time resting than controls and the lowest exposure group. Maternal retrieval was not affected by NaW exposure. Tungsten analysis showed a systemic distribution of NaW in both parents and offspring, with preferential uptake within the immune organs, including the femur, spleen and thymus. Histopathological evidence suggested no severe chronic injury or loss of function in these organs. However, the heart showed histological lesions, histiocytic inflammation from minimal to mild with cardiomyocyte degeneration and necrosis in several P{sub 0} animals of 125 mg NaW dose group. The result of this study suggests that pre and postnatal exposure to NaW may produce subtle neurobehavioral effects in offspring related to motor activity and emotionality.

  2. Dose-Effect Relationships for Adverse Events After Cranial Radiation Therapy in Long-term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijk, Irma W.E.M. van, E-mail: i.w.vandijk@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pal, Helena J.H. van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heinen, Richard C. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Flora E. van [Department of Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe; Os, Rob M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ronckers, Ccile M. [Dutch Childhood Oncology Group, Long-term Effects after Childhood Cancer, The Hague (Netherlands)] [Dutch Childhood Oncology Group, Long-term Effects after Childhood Cancer, The Hague (Netherlands); Schoutenvan Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Caron, Huib N. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands) [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kremer, Leontien C.M. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands) [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children's Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of clinical adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT), with the aim of assessing dose-effect relationships. Methods and Materials: The retrospective study cohort consisted of 1362 Dutch childhood cancer survivors, of whom 285 were treated with CRT delivered as brain irradiation (BI), as part of craniospinal irradiation (CSI), and as total body irradiation (TBI). Individual CRT doses were converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Survivors had received their diagnoses between 1966 and 1996 and survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. A complete inventory of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3.0 AEs was available from our hospital-based late-effect follow-up program. We used multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses to examine the EQD{sub 2} in relation to the prevalence and severity of AEs, correcting for sex, age at diagnosis, follow-up time, and the treatment-related risk factors surgery and chemotherapy. Results: There was a high prevalence of AEs in the CRT group; over 80% of survivors had more than 1 AE, and almost half had at least 5 AEs, both representing significant increases in number of AEs compared with survivors not treated with CRT. Additionally, the proportion of severe, life-threatening, or disabling AEs was significantly higher in the CRT group. The most frequent AEs were alopecia and cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, and neurologic events. Using the EQD{sub 2}, we found significant dose-effect relationships for these and other AEs. Conclusion: Our results confirm that CRT increases the prevalence and severity of AEs in childhood cancer survivors. Furthermore, analyzing dose-effect relationships with the cumulative EQD{sub 2} instead of total physical dose connects the knowledge from radiation therapy and radiobiology with the clinical experience.

  3. Combined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and maternal restraint stress on hypothalamus adrenal axis (HPA) function in the offspring of mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribes, Diana; Fuentes, Silvia; Torrente, Margarita; Colomina, M. Teresa [Department of Psychology and Research Center for Behavioral Assessment (CRAMC), 'Rovira i Virgili' University, Sescelades Campus, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, 'Rovira i Virgili' University, Sant Llorenc 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Domingo, Jose L., E-mail: joseluis.domingo@urv.ca [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, 'Rovira i Virgili' University, Sant Llorenc 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Although it is known that prenatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) can cause developmental adverse effects in mammals, the disruptive effects of this compound on hormonal systems are still controversial. Information concerning the effects of PFOS on hypothalamus adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress and corticosterone levels is not currently available. On the other hand, it is well established that stress can enhance the developmental toxicity of some chemicals. In the present study, we assessed the combined effects of maternal restraint stress and PFOS on HPA axis function in the offspring of mice. Twenty plug-positive female mice were divided in two groups. Animals were given by gavage 0 and 6 mg PFOS/kg/day on gestation days 12-18. One half of the animals in each group were also subjected to restraint stress (30 min/session, 3 sessions/day) during the same period. Five plug-positive females were also included as non-manipulated controls. At 3 months of age, activity in an open-field and the stress response were evaluated in male and female mice by exposing them to 30 min of restraint stress. Male and female offspring were subsequently sacrificed and blood samples were collected to measure changes in corticosterone levels at four different moments related to stress exposure conditions: before stress exposure, immediately after 30 min of stress exposure, and recuperation levels at 60 and 90 min after stress exposure. Results indicate corticosterone levels were lower in mice prenatally exposed to restraint. In general terms, PFOS exposure decreased corticosterone levels, although this effect was only significant in females. The recuperation pattern of corticosterone was mainly affected by prenatal stress. Interactive effects between PFOS and maternal stress were sex dependent. The current results suggest that prenatal PFOS exposure induced long-lasting effects in mice.

  4. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  5. Searching for Novel Gravitational Effects

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christopher Stubb

    2010-09-01

    Stubbs, Chair of the Physics Department at Harvard University, discusses experiments that search for novel gravitational effect and scientific observations about it.

  6. Correlation effects and bound states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2012-11-15

    Bound states in a simple quark model that are due to correlation effects are analyzed. The confining properties of this model in meson (quark-antiquark and diquark) channels manifest themselves at any quark momenta, and an extra potential field may only enhance the confining effect.

  7. Radiation Effects Facility - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Effects Facility Typical DUT(device under test) set-up at the end of the Radiation Effects beamline. The Radiation Effects Facility is available for commercial,...

  8. Policy Memo: Working Effectively with Contractors | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Memo: Working Effectively with Contractors Policy Memo: Working Effectively with Contractors Guidance on working effectively with contractors. PDF icon MAPolicyMemoWorkingw...

  9. Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory: Quantum nonlocal effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-04-15

    We develop the Maxwell-Garnett theory for the effective medium approximation of composite materials with metallic nanoparticles by taking into account the quantum spatial dispersion effects in dielectric response of nanoparticles. We derive a quantum nonlocal generalization of the standard Maxwell-Garnett formula, by means the linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory in conjunction with the Poisson equation as well as the appropriate additional quantum boundary conditions.

  10. Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From Acquisition Letter (Acquisition Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued Als have been superseded by a formal rule-making, incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled.)

  11. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  12. Investigating the Effects of Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating the Effects of Temperature on Power Output Objective: Students will use concepts learned in class to explore the many variables that effect the efficiency of solar panels in regards to power output. Materials: * PV Array or Solar Panel * 2 Multimeter * Frozen Ice Packs * Low Power DC Bulb * Halogen Lamp (500 Watts) * 4 or 5 Alligator clip wires * Timer Investigative Question: How does the power output change as the temperature of the PV system changes. Procedure: 1) Attach the

  13. Health Effects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Effects Health Effects The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers research programs and monitoring activities, both domestic and international, that support the protection and promotion of the health of DOE workers, their families, and residents of neighboring communities near DOE sites, affected by exposure to hazardous materials from DOE sites or a result of nuclear weapons testing, use or accident. Domestic health activities include studies of historical workplace exposures,

  14. Effects of the UV filter benzophenone-3 (oxybenzone) at low concentrations in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blthgen, Nancy [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland) [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); University of Basel, Division of Molecular and Systems Toxicology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Klingelbergstrasse 50, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Zucchi, Sara [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland)] [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland) [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Grndenstrasse 40, CH?4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ), Department of Environmental Sciences, CH?8092 Zrich (Switzerland)

    2012-09-01

    Organic UV filters including benzophenone-3 (BP-3) are widely used to protect humans and materials from damage by UV irradiation. Despite the environmental occurrence of BP-3 in the aquatic environment, little is known about its effects and modes of action. In the present study we assess molecular and physiological effects of BP-3 in adult male zebrafish (Danio rerio) and in eleuthero-embryos by a targeted gene expression approach focusing on the sex hormone system. Fish and embryos are exposed for 14 days and 120 hours post fertilization, respectively, to 2.4312 ?g/L and 8.2438 ?g/L BP-3. Chemical analysis of water and fish demonstrates that BP-3 is partly transformed to benzophenone-1 (BP-1) and both compounds are accumulated in adult fish. Biotransformation to BP-1 is absent in eleuthero-embryos. BP-3 exposure leads to similar alterations of gene expression in both adult fish and eleuthero-embryos. In the brain of adult males esr1, ar and cyp19b are down-regulated at 84 ?g/L BP-3. There is no induction of vitellogenin expression by BP-3, both at the transcriptional and protein level. An overall down-regulation of the hsd3b, hsd17b3, hsd11b2 and cyp11b2 transcripts is observed in the testes, suggesting an antiandrogenic activity. No histological changes were observed in the testes after BP-3 treatment. The study leads to the conclusion that low concentrations of BP-3 exhibit similar multiple hormonal activities at the transcription level in two different life stages of zebrafish. Forthcoming studies should show whether this translates to additional physiological effects. Highlights: ? Activity of UV filter benzophenone-3 (BP-3) is assessed in zebrafish. ? BP-3 is partly metabolized to benzophenone-1 by adult fish but not embryos. ? Alterations of gene expression are similar in adult males and embryos. ? Gene expression alterations point to multiple hormonal activity of BP-3.

  15. Modeling the Potential Effects of New Tobacco Products and Policies: A Dynamic Population Model for Multiple Product Use and Harm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Rostron, Brian L.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Choiniere, Conrad J.; Coleman, Blair N.; Paredes, Antonio; Apelberg, Benjamin J.

    2015-03-27

    Background Recent declines in US cigarette smoking prevalence have coincided with increases in use of other tobacco products. Multiple product tobacco models can help assess the population health impacts associated with use of a wide range of tobacco products. Methods and Findings We present a multi-state, dynamical systems population structure model that can be used to assess the effects of tobacco product use behaviors on population health. The model incorporates transition behaviors, such as initiation, cessation, switching, and dual use, related to the use of multiple products. The model tracks product use prevalence and mortality attributable to tobacco use for the overall population and by sex and age group. The model can also be used to estimate differences in these outcomes between scenarios by varying input parameter values. We demonstrate model capabilities by projecting future cigarette smoking prevalence and smoking-attributable mortality and then simulating the effects of introduction of a hypothetical new lower-risk tobacco product under a variety of assumptions about product use. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the range of population impacts that could occur due to differences in input values for product use and risk. We demonstrate that potential benefits from cigarette smokers switching to the lower-risk product can be offset over time through increased initiation of this product. Model results show that population health benefits are particularly sensitive to product risks and initiation, switching, and dual use behaviors. Conclusion Our model incorporates the variety of tobacco use behaviors and risks that occur with multiple products. As such, it can evaluate the population health impacts associated with the introduction of new tobacco products or policies that may result in product switching or dual use. Further model development will include refinement of data inputs for non-cigarette tobacco products and inclusion of health outcomes such as morbidity and disability.

  16. Modeling the Potential Effects of New Tobacco Products and Policies. A Dynamic Population Model for Multiple Product Use and Harm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Rostron, Brian L.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Choiniere, Conrad J.; Coleman, Blair N.; Paredes, Antonio; Apelberg, Benjamin J.

    2015-03-27

    Background Recent declines in US cigarette smoking prevalence have coincided with increases in use of other tobacco products. Multiple product tobacco models can help assess the population health impacts associated with use of a wide range of tobacco products. Methods and Findings We present a multi-state, dynamical systems population structure model that can be used to assess the effects of tobacco product use behaviors on population health. The model incorporates transition behaviors, such as initiation, cessation, switching, and dual use, related to the use of multiple products. The model tracks product use prevalence and mortality attributable to tobacco use for the overall population and by sex and age group. The model can also be used to estimate differences in these outcomes between scenarios by varying input parameter values. We demonstrate model capabilities by projecting future cigarette smoking prevalence and smoking-attributable mortality and then simulating the effects of introduction of a hypothetical new lower-risk tobacco product under a variety of assumptions about product use. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the range of population impacts that could occur due to differences in input values for product use and risk. We demonstrate that potential benefits from cigarette smokers switching to the lower-risk product can be offset over time through increased initiation of this product. Model results show that population health benefits are particularly sensitive to product risks and initiation, switching, and dual use behaviors. Conclusion Our model incorporates the variety of tobacco use behaviors and risks that occur with multiple products. As such, it can evaluate the population health impacts associated with the introduction of new tobacco products or policies that may result in product switching or dual use. Further model development will include refinement of data inputs for non-cigarette tobacco products and inclusion of health outcomes such as morbidity and disability.

  17. Modeling the Potential Effects of New Tobacco Products and Policies. A Dynamic Population Model for Multiple Product Use and Harm

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Rostron, Brian L.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Choiniere, Conrad J.; Coleman, Blair N.; Paredes, Antonio; Apelberg, Benjamin J.

    2015-03-27

    Background Recent declines in US cigarette smoking prevalence have coincided with increases in use of other tobacco products. Multiple product tobacco models can help assess the population health impacts associated with use of a wide range of tobacco products. Methods and Findings We present a multi-state, dynamical systems population structure model that can be used to assess the effects of tobacco product use behaviors on population health. The model incorporates transition behaviors, such as initiation, cessation, switching, and dual use, related to the use of multiple products. The model tracks product use prevalence and mortality attributable to tobacco use formore » the overall population and by sex and age group. The model can also be used to estimate differences in these outcomes between scenarios by varying input parameter values. We demonstrate model capabilities by projecting future cigarette smoking prevalence and smoking-attributable mortality and then simulating the effects of introduction of a hypothetical new lower-risk tobacco product under a variety of assumptions about product use. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the range of population impacts that could occur due to differences in input values for product use and risk. We demonstrate that potential benefits from cigarette smokers switching to the lower-risk product can be offset over time through increased initiation of this product. Model results show that population health benefits are particularly sensitive to product risks and initiation, switching, and dual use behaviors. Conclusion Our model incorporates the variety of tobacco use behaviors and risks that occur with multiple products. As such, it can evaluate the population health impacts associated with the introduction of new tobacco products or policies that may result in product switching or dual use. Further model development will include refinement of data inputs for non-cigarette tobacco products and inclusion of health outcomes such as morbidity and disability.« less

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  19. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  20. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  1. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Benedetto, E.; Fischer, W.; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, K.; Schulte, D.; Sonnad, K.; Tomas, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; Rumolo, G.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2007-06-18

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e+e- scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed.

  2. Simplified air change effectiveness modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rock, B.A.; Anderson, R.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes recent progress in developing practical air change effectiveness modeling techniques for the design and analysis of air diffusion in occupied rooms. The ultimate goal of this continuing work is to develop a simple and reliable method for determining heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system compliance with ventilation standards. In the current work, simplified two-region models of rooms are used with six occupancy patterns to find the air change effectiveness. A new measure, the apparent ACH effectiveness, yields the relative ventilation performance of an air diffusion system. This measure can be used for the prediction or evaluation of outside air delivery to the occupants. The required outside air can be greater or less than that specified by ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62-89.

  3. Using OpenMP Effectively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using OpenMP Effectively Using OpenMP Effectively Performance Implications of Using OpenMP A combined team of NERSC and Cray staff has formed a Cray "Center of Excellence" to examine programming models beyond pure MPI on the 24 core Hopper nodes. One of the key findings with hybrid MPI-OpenMP codes is that although OpenMP may not alter the performance of an application very much, using OpenMP can dramatically decrease memory usage, allowing larger problems to be addressed. See the

  4. Maintain Pumping Systems Effectively | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maintain Pumping Systems Effectively Maintain Pumping Systems Effectively This tip sheet offers preventive and predictive actions to effectively maintain pumping systems. PUMPING SYSTEMS TIP SHEET #5 PDF icon Maintain Pumping Systems Effectively (September 2005) More Documents & Publications Minimize Compressed Air Leaks Determining the Right Air Quality for Your Compressed Air System Effect of Intake on Compressor Performance

  5. APBF Effects on Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    APBF Effects on Combustion APBF Effects on Combustion 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ft001_bunting_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel and Lubricant Effects APBF Effects on Combustion Non-Petroleum Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion

  6. Ecotoxicology: Behavior, exposure, and effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.

    1988-10-01

    Understanding the behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to toxicants is essential to predicting organism exposure and subsequent effects on survival and ecological success. Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to environmental change can mitigate or exacerbate exposures. Often, however, predictions are based on bioassay-tolerance data on the effects of various contaminant increments above ambient and unsubstantiated assumptions of organism exposure. Studies at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, USA, have evaluated fish response to thermal discharge, gas supersaturated water, water-soluble fractions of coal liquids, and other stresses. Approaches have included biotelemetry in the field, and avoidance/attraction and predator/prey studies in the laboratory. In most cases, fish avoided acutely lethal conditions, although they did not necessarily avoid conditions causing chronic effects (effects on growth, reproduction, etc.). Behavioral responses of fish to toxicants varied with species, natural schooling instincts and matrix of the contaminant. Results of these studies led to the conceptualization of a model that links toxicological and behavioral data and considers the influence of environmental and other variables (feeding, schooling, spawning, etc.) on fish response. Further development of this model will allow more realistic assessments than can presently be attempted using acute and chronic toxicity data alone. 63 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Effective Public Participation (DOE, 1998)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper provides guidance to Department of Energy personnel for involving the public effectively and meaningfully in DOE processes conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act. It was prepared in furtherance of the Secretary of Energy's 1994 Public Participation Policy and Policy on the National Environmental Policy Act.

  8. Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, Sediment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sediment Transport, and Water Quality) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, Sediment Transport, and Water Quality) Effects on the Physical Environment ...

  9. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector This ...

  10. Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Working with Utilities Peer Exchange Call: Effective Strategies for Participating ...

  11. Maintain Pumping Systems Effectively; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effectively Effective pump maintenance allows industrial plants to keep pumps operating well, to detect problems in time to schedule repairs, and to avoid early pump failures. ...

  12. Temperature effects on airgun signatures (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Temperature effects on airgun signatures Experiments in an 850 liter water tank were performed in order to study temperature effects on airgun signatures, and to...

  13. Leadership through Effective Communication (FLD 142), Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leadership through Effective Communication (FLD 142), Washington DC Leadership through Effective Communication (FLD 142), Washington DC April 25, 2016 8:00AM EDT to April 27, 2016 ...

  14. Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs...

  15. Imprinted genes and transpositions: epigenomic targets for low dose radiation effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jirtle, Randy L.

    2012-10-11

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (<10 cGy) during early gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the increased use of CT scans in disease diagnosis, increased number of people predicted to live and work in space, and the present concern about radiological terrorism. We showed for the first time that LDIR significantly increased DNA methylation at the A{sup vy} locus in a sex-specific manner (p=0.004). Average DNA methylation was significantly increased in male offspring exposed to doses between 0.7 cGy and 7.6 cGy with maximum effects at 1.4 cGy and 3.0 cGy (p<0.01). Offspring coat color was concomitantly shifted towards pseudoagouti (p<0.01). Maternal dietary antioxidant supplementation mitigated both the DNA methylation changes and coat color shift in the irradiated offspring (p<0.05). Thus, LDIR exposure during gestation elicits epigenetic alterations that lead to positive adaptive phenotypic changes that are negated with antioxidants, indicating they are mediated in part by oxidative stress. These findings provide evidence that in the isogenic Avy mouse model epigenetic alterations resulting from LDIR play a role in radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in animals and humans needs to be defined.

  16. Effective perfect fluids in cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Bellazzini, Brando E-mail: brando.bellazzini@pd.infn.it

    2013-04-01

    We describe the cosmological dynamics of perfect fluids within the framework of effective field theories. The effective action is a derivative expansion whose terms are selected by the symmetry requirements on the relevant long-distance degrees of freedom, which are identified with comoving coordinates. The perfect fluid is defined by requiring invariance of the action under internal volume-preserving diffeomorphisms and general covariance. At lowest order in derivatives, the dynamics is encoded in a single function of the entropy density that characterizes the properties of the fluid, such as the equation of state and the speed of sound. This framework allows a neat simultaneous description of fluid and metric perturbations. Longitudinal fluid perturbations are closely related to the adiabatic modes, while the transverse modes mix with vector metric perturbations as a consequence of vorticity conservation. This formalism features a large flexibility which can be of practical use for higher order perturbation theory and cosmological parameter estimation.

  17. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 - In the Matter of Vaughn Thermal Corp EXC-14-0003 - In the Matter of Vaughn Thermal Corp On April 9, 2015, OHA issued a decision denying an Application for Exception filed by Vaughn Thermal Corporation (Vaughn), in which the firm seeks relief from DOE's revised water heater energy efficiency standards, effective April 16, 2015. Vaughn, headquartered in Salisbury, Massachusetts, is a manufacturer of residential heaters and electronic water heater controls devices used by utilities in electric

  18. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui-Jia (Oak Ridge, TN); Peng, Fang Z. (Okemos, MI)

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  19. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  20. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kinetic effects on interferometry, polarimetry and Thomson scattering measurements in burning plasmas (invited)a) V. V. Mirnov, D. L. Brower, D. J. Den Hartog, W. X. Ding, J. Duff, and E. Parke Citation: Review of Scientific Instruments 85, 11D302 (2014); doi: 10.1063/1.4891176 View online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4891176 View Table of Contents: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/rsi/85/11?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in First

  1. Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M.A.

    2012-11-30

    Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

  2. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  3. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  4. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID)

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  5. Substrate dielectric effects on graphene field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Zhaoying; Prasad Sinha, Dhiraj; Ung Lee, Ji, E-mail: jlee1@albany.edu; Liehr, Michael [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, The State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    Graphene is emerging as a promising material for future electronics and optoelectronics applications due to its unique electronic structure. Understanding the graphene-dielectric interaction is of vital importance for the development of graphene field effect transistors (FETs) and other novel graphene devices. Here, we extend the exploration of substrate dielectrics from conventionally used thermally grown SiO{sub 2} and hexagonal boron nitride films to technologically relevant deposited dielectrics used in semiconductor industry. A systematic analysis of morphology and optical and electrical properties was performed to study the effects of different substrates (SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS)-oxide, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) on the carrier transport of chemical vapor deposition-derived graphene FET devices. As baseline, we use graphene FETs fabricated on thermal SiO{sub 2} with a relatively high carrier mobility of 10?000 cm{sup 2}/(V s). Among the deposited dielectrics studied, silicon nitride showed the highest mobility, comparable to the properties of graphene fabricated on thermal SiO{sub 2}. We conclude that this result comes from lower long range scattering and short range scattering rates in the nitride compared those in the other deposited films. The carrier fluctuation caused by substrates, however, seems to be the main contributing factor for mobility degradation, as a universal mobility-disorder density product is observed for all the dielectrics examined. The extrinsic doping trend is further confirmed by Raman spectra. We also provide, for the first time, correlation between the intensity ratio of G peak and 2D peak in the Raman spectra to the carrier mobility of graphene for different substrates.

  6. Electromagnetic Effects in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2010-02-12

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Motivated by this interest we have started to investigate whether significant electro-magnetic effects show up in our small-scale experiments. However, the design of instrumentation for this purpose is far from straightforward, since there are a number of open questions. Thus the main aim of the feasibility tests is to find - if possible - a simple and reliable method that can be used as a diagnostic tool for electro-magnetic effects. SDF charges with a 0.5-g PETN booster and a filling of 1 g aluminum flakes have been investigated in three barometric bomb calorimeters with volumes ranging from 6.3 l to of 6.6 l. Though similar in volume, the barometric bombs differed in the length-to-diameter ratio. The tests were carried out with the bombs filled with either air or nitrogen at ambient pressure. The comparison of the test in air to those in nitrogen shows that the combustion of TNT detonation products or aluminum generates a substantial increase of the quasi-steady overpressure in the bombs. Repeated tests in the same configuration resulted in some scatter of the experimental results. The most likely reason is that the aluminum combustion in most or all cases is incomplete and that the amount of aluminum actually burned varies from test to test. The mass fraction burned apparently decreases with increasing aspect ratio L/D. Thus an L/D-ratio of about 1 is optimal for the performance of shock-dispersed-fuel combustion. However, at an L/D-ratio of about 5 the combustion still yields appreciable overpressure in excess of the detonation. For a multi-burst scenario in a tunnel environment with a number of SDF charges distributed along a tunnel section a spacing of 5 tunnel diameter and a fuel-specific volume of around 7 l/g might provide an acceptable compromise between optimizing the combustion performance and keeping the number of elementary charges low. Further tests in a barometric bomb calorimeter of 21.2 l volume were performed with four types of aluminum. The mass fraction burned in this case appeared to depend on the morphology of the aluminum particles. Flake aluminum exhibited a better performance than granulated aluminum with particle sizes ranging from below 25 {micro}m to 125 {micro}m for the coarsest material. In addition, a feasibility study on electro-magnetic effects from SDF charges detonated in a tunnel has been performed. A method was developed to measure the local, unsteady electro-conductivity in the detonation/combustion products cloud. This method proved to yield reproducible results. A variety of methods were tested with regard to probing electro-magnetic pulses from the detonation of SDF charges. The results showed little reproducibility and were small compared to the effect from pulsed high voltage discharges of comparatively small energy (around 32 J). Thus either no significant electromagnetic pulse is generated in our small-scale tests or the tested techniques have to be discarded as too insensitive or too limited in bandwidth to detect possibly very high frequency electro-magnetic disturbances.

  7. Iron production maintenance effectiveness system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augstman, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

  8. How to effectively revalidate PHAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumpler, D.K.; Whittle, D.K. [JBF Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Under OSHA process safety management (PSM) standard 29 CFR 1910.119, process hazard analyses (PHAs) must be updated and revalidated at least every five years. This rule was promulgated in 1992; however, many operating companies began PHA programs as early as 1990. Now these initial PHAs must be revalidated due to the time limit. Because OSHA 1910.119 only gives guidance, hydrocarbon processing industry companies can select the revalidation method to use and have several options: redo the PHA as if it were the initial one; retrofit, update and revalidate the PHA by concentrating on deficiencies in the original analysis and incorporating process changes; and update and revalidate the original PHA for process changes only. Using guidelines and the evaluation flow diagram, companies can cost-effectively decide how much rework is needed to maintain PSM compliance. The paper discusses regulatory requirements, revalidation approaches, collect supporting documentation, initial/previous PHA quality, operating experience, conducting and documenting revalidation analyses, and documentation.

  9. Mechanical effects in cookoff modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, R.J.; Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Complete cookoff modeling of energetic material in confined geometries must couple thermal, chemical and mechanical effects. In the past, modeling has focused on the prediction of the onset of combustion behavior based only on thermal-chemistry effects with little or no regard to the mechanical behavior of the energetic material. In this paper, an analysis tool is outlined which couples thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior for one-dimensional Geometries comprised of multi-materials. A reactive heat flow code, XCHEM, and a quasistatic mechanics code, SANTOS, have been completely coupled using, a reactive, elastic-plastic constitutive model describing pressurization of the energetic material. This new Thermally Reactive Elastic-plastic explosive code, TREX, was developed to assess the coupling, of mechanics with thermal chemistry making multidimensional cookoff analysis possible. In this study, TREX is applied to confined and unconfined systems. The confined systems simulate One-Dimensional Time to explosion (ODTX) experiments in both spherical and cylindrical configurations. The spherical ODTX system is a 1.27 cm diameter sphere of TATB confined by aluminum exposed to a constant external temperature. The cylindrical ODTX system is an aluminum tube filled with HMX, NC, and inert exposed to a constant temperature bath. Finally. an unconfined system consisting of a hollow steel cylinder filled with a propellant composed of Al, RMX, and NC, representative of a rocket motor, is considered. This model system is subjected to transient internal and external radiative/convective boundary conditions representative of 5 minutes exposure to a fire. The confined systems show significant pressure prior to ignition, and the unconfined system shows extrusion of the propellent suggesting that the energetic material becomes more shock sensitive.

  10. Ideas for Effective Communication of Statistical Results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-03-01

    Effective presentation of statistical results to those with less statistical training, including managers and decision-makers requires planning, anticipation and thoughtful delivery. Here are several recommendations for effectively presenting statistical results.

  11. Effects of Biodiesel on NOx Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.

    2005-06-01

    A presentation about the effects of biodiesel on nitrogen oxide emissions presented at the ARB Biodiesel Workshop June 8, 2005.

  12. Blast Effects Suppression System - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blast Effects Suppression System HydroSuppressor (TM) Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Blast Effects Suppression System Patent (162 KB) PDF Document Publication Blast Effects Suppression System Picture (33 KB) Technology Marketing Summary The HydroSuppressor system was developed to protect critical facilities from the devastating effects of blast from a vehicle bomb. HydroSuppressor uses high volume water sprays to absorb the

  13. Designing Effective Incentives to Drive Residential Retrofit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incentives to Drive Residential Retrofit Program Participation Designing Effective Incentives to Drive Residential Retrofit Program Participation This webinar covered retrofit ...

  14. Ethanol's Effect on Grain Supply and Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    This document provides graphical information about ethanol's effect on grain supply and prices, uses of corn, and grain price trends.

  15. Evolving Utility Cost-Effectiveness Test Criteria

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an overview of tests done to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency program benefits.

  16. Effect of geotropism on instrument readings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolph, James T.

    2006-11-01

    A review of gravity's effect on instrument readings, also referred to as geotropism. In this essay a review of meter movement construction and the effect are reviewed as it applies to portable radiation instruments. Reference to the three ANSI standards and their requirements are reviewed. An alternate approach to test for the effects is offered.

  17. Graphene nanopore field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2014-07-14

    Graphene holds great promise for replacing conventional Si material in field effect transistors (FETs) due to its high carrier mobility. Previously proposed graphene FETs either suffer from low ON-state current resulting from constrained channel width or require complex fabrication processes for edge-defecting or doping. Here, we propose an alternative graphene FET structure created on intrinsic metallic armchair-edged graphene nanoribbons with uniform width, where the channel region is made semiconducting by drilling a pore in the interior, and the two ends of the nanoribbon act naturally as connecting electrodes. The proposed GNP-FETs have high ON-state currents due to seamless atomic interface between the channel and electrodes and are able to be created with arbitrarily wide ribbons. In addition, the performance of GNP-FETs can be tuned by varying pore size and ribbon width. As a result, their performance and fabrication process are more predictable and controllable in comparison to schemes based on edge-defects and doping. Using first-principle transport calculations, we show that GNP-FETs can achieve competitive leakage current of ∼70 pA, subthreshold swing of ∼60 mV/decade, and significantly improved On/Off current ratios on the order of 10{sup 5} as compared with other forms of graphene FETs.

  18. Triple-effect absorption chiller cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, R.C. ); Grossman, G. )

    1992-01-01

    Gas-fired absorption chillers are widely used for air-conditioning buildings. Even the highest efficiency double-effect absorption chillers used more primary energy for air-conditioning buildings than the better electric chillers. Two different triple-effect absorption chiller cycles are capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. One cycle uses two condensers and two absorbers to achieve the triple effect.'' A second cycle, the Double-Condenser Coupled Triple-Effect, uses three condensers as well as a third condenser subcooler (which exchanges heat with the lowest temperature first-effect generator). These triple-effect absorption cycles have the potential to be as energy efficient (on a primary fuel basis) as the best electric chillers. 19 refs.

  19. Triple-effect absorption chiller cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, R.C.; Grossman, G.

    1992-06-01

    Gas-fired absorption chillers are widely used for air-conditioning buildings. Even the highest efficiency double-effect absorption chillers used more primary energy for air-conditioning buildings than the better electric chillers. Two different triple-effect absorption chiller cycles are capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. One cycle uses two condensers and two absorbers to achieve the ``triple effect.`` A second cycle, the Double-Condenser Coupled Triple-Effect, uses three condensers as well as a third condenser subcooler (which exchanges heat with the lowest temperature first-effect generator). These triple-effect absorption cycles have the potential to be as energy efficient (on a primary fuel basis) as the best electric chillers. 19 refs.

  20. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B.; Yazzie, A.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T.; Leavitt, C.P.

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  1. The First Aerosol Indirect Effect: Beyond Twomey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Dunn, M.; Daum, P.

    2008-03-10

    The traditional first aerosol indirect effect or the Twomey effect involves several fundamental assumptions. Some of the assumptions (e.g., constant liquid water content) are explicitly stated in studies of the Twomey effect whereas others are only implicitly embedded in the quantitative formulation. This work focuses on examining the implicit assumptions. In particular, we will show that anthropogenic pollution not only increases aerosol loading and droplet concentrations but also alters the relative dispersions of both the aerosol and subsequent droplet size distributions. The indirect effects resulting from the two altered relative dispersions (aerosol dispersion effect and droplet dispersion effect) are likely opposite in sign and proportional in magnitude to the conventional Twomey effect. This result suggests that the outstanding problems of the Twomey effect (i.e., large uncertainty and overestimation reported in literature) may lie with violation of the constant spectral shapes of aerosol and droplet size distributions implicitly assumed in evaluation of the Twomey effect, and therefore, further progress in understanding and quantification of the first aerosol indirect effect demands moving beyond the traditional paradigm originally conceived by Twomey.

  2. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism in lead exposed Bangladeshi children and its effect on urinary aminolevulinic acid (ALA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasmin, Saira; Furusawa, Hana; Ahmad, Sk. Akhtar; Watanabe, Chiho

    2015-01-15

    Background and objective: Lead has long been recognized as a harmful environmental pollutant. People in developing countries like Bangladesh still have a higher risk of lead exposure. Previous research has suggested that the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) genotype can modify lead toxicity and individual susceptibility. As children are more susceptible to lead-induced toxicity, this study investigated whether the ALAD genotype influenced urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA) among children exposed to environmental lead in Bangladesh. Methods: Subjects were elementary schoolchildren from a semi-urban industrialized area in Bangladesh. A total of 222 children were studied. Blood and urine were collected to determine ALAD genotypes, blood lead levels and urinary aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA). Results: The mean BPb level was 9.7 µg/dl for the study children. BPb was significantly positively correlated with hemoglobin (p<0.01). In total, allele frequency for ALAD 1 and 2 was 0.83 and 0.17 respectively. The mean U-ALA concentration was lower in ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers than ALAD1-1 carriers for boys (p=0.001). But for girls, U-ALA did not differ significantly by genotype (p=0.26). When U-ALA was compared by genotype at the same exposure level in a multiple linear regression analysis, boys who were ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers still had a lower level of U-ALA compared to ALAD1-1carriers. Conclusion: This study provides information about the influence of ALAD polymorphism and its association with U-ALA in Bangladeshi children. Our results indicate that the ALAD1-2/2-2 genotype may have a protective effect in terms of U-ALA for environmentally lead exposed boys. - Highlights: • High blood lead level for the environmentally exposed schoolchildren. • BPb was significantly correlated with U-ALA and Hb. • Effect of ALAD genotype on U-ALA is differed by sex. • Lower U-ALA in ALAD2 than ALAD1 carriers only for boys at same exposure.

  3. Coulomb collision effects on linear Landau damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callen, J. D.

    2014-05-15

    Coulomb collisions at rate ? produce slightly probabilistic rather than fully deterministic charged particle trajectories in weakly collisional plasmas. Their diffusive velocity scattering effects on the response to a wave yield an effective collision rate ?{sub eff} ? ? and a narrow dissipative boundary layer for particles with velocities near the wave phase velocity. These dissipative effects produce temporal irreversibility for times t???1/?{sub eff} during Landau damping of a small amplitude Langmuir wave.

  4. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  5. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  6. Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 2: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report The ORSSAB presented to DOE Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation. PDF icon Recommendation 192 PDF icon DOE response to recommendation 192 More Documents & Publications ORSSAB Meeting - May 2013 ORSSAB Meeting - June 2013 ORSSAB Meeting - April 2014

  7. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  8. Effect of Intake on Compressor Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet briefly describes the effect of intake air on air compressor performance, offers guidance on selecting intake air filters, and outlines when to pursue filter replacement.

  9. Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the operation of the permeable treatment wall, pictured here, WVDP conducted extensive engineering and planning to ensure it would effectively remove strontium-90. This 2009...

  10. Support - Facilities - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chamber In-Air Station Software Support Support During experiments at the Radiation Effects Facility users are assisted by the experienced on-site support staff. Our...

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Telluride Aerogels: Effect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthesis and Characterization of Telluride Aerogels: Effect of Gelation on Thermoelectric ... Research Org: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC); Revolutionary Materials for Solid ...

  12. Approaches for Effective Climate Change Communication (NPS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register here. Join us for a webinar exploring the importance of effective communication strategies as a key component of climate change response. The presentation will highlight examples and...

  13. ARM - Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ListGreenhouse Effect and Global Warming Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students ...

  14. Software - Facilities - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frame Drawing Test frame Drawing Platter Drawing Radiation Effects Facility Cyclotron Institute Texas A&M University MS 3366 College Station, TX 77843 Ph: 979-845-1411 ...

  15. Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline (DOE, 1981) Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental ...

  16. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental...

  17. BASE - Rad Effects - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to provide beams of protons and heavy ions for radiation effects testing. When running, the facility is manned 24-hours a day with...

  18. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 1997) This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on ...

  19. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts Tyler, Texas ... Building Component: Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC), whole-building ...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  1. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  2. Fuel and Lubricant Effects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ft001_bunting_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications APBF Effects on Combustion APBF Effects on Combustion Response of Oil Sands Derived Fuels in Diesel HCCI Operation

  3. Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    clemson.pdf More Documents & Publications Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effects of ...

  4. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Office presentation icon ...

  5. New Insights into the EMC Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2012-08-17

    Deep-inelastic scattering cross section ratios plotted as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable, xB, show an unexpected structure indicating that partonic structure in nuclei is different than in free nucleons. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as the EMC effect. Recent Jefferson Lab experimental data showed that the slope of the EMC effect in the 0.3 < xB > 0.7 region scales as the local nuclear density rather than the average nuclear density. This result lead to the comparison of xB>1 short-range correlation plateaus, also a local density effect, to the magnitude of the EMC effect slopes and a clear linear relation was found. In this talk, I will discuss the EMC effect and the short-range correlation plateaus and what this phenomenological relationship between the two implies.

  6. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

    2011-01-07

    Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

  7. Interfacial effects revealed by ultrafast relaxation dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Interfacial effects revealed by ultrafast relaxation dynamics in BiFeO 3 YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 bilayers Authors: Springer, D. ; Nair, Saritha K. ; He, Mi ; Lu, C. L. ; Cheong, S. ...

  8. Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The simulation domain can be chosen as the scale of block size in the field-scale modeling. The effective conductivity is computed from the steady-state flux at the lower boundary ...

  9. Making Effective Use of Compilers at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Use of Compilers Making Effective Use of Compilers at NERSC August 15, 2012 Michael-Stewart.jpg NERSC Training Event 11:00 - 12:00 PDT Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Concurrently...

  10. Heat pipe effect in porous medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, M.

    1992-12-01

    In this thesis a parametric study of the thermal and hydrologic characteristics of the fractured porous tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada was conducted. The effects of different fracture and matrix properties including permeability, thermal conductivity, specific heat, porosity, and tortuosity on heat pipe performance in the vicinity of the waste package were observed. Computer simulations were carried out using TOUGH code on a Cray YMP-2 supercomputer. None of the fracture parameters affected the heat pipe performance except the mobility of the liquid in the fracture. Matrix permeability and thermal conductivity were found to have significant effect on the heat pipe performance. The effect of mass injection was studied for liquid water and air injected at the fracture boundary. A high rate of mass injection was required to produce any effect on the heat pipe. The fracture-matrix equilibrium is influenced by the matrix permeability and the matrix thermal conductivity.

  11. Proximity effects of superconducting multilayer film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xueyu, C.; Daole, Y.

    1984-07-01

    The proximity effects of superconducting multilayer films composed of different metals are considered. The relationship between the critical temperature of a superconducting multilayer film with strong heterogeneity and its geometric structure is given.

  12. General Embedded Brane Effective Field Theories

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Goon, Garrett L.; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Trodden, Mark

    2011-06-10

    We presented a new general class of four-dimensional effective field theories with interesting global symmetry groups, which may prove relevant to the cosmology of both the early and late universe.

  13. Search for: kondo effect | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    kondo effect Find + Advanced Search × Advanced Search All Fields: kondo effect Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Accepted Manuscript Published Article Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org: Sponsoring Org: Publication Date: to Update Date: to Sort: Relevance (highest to lowest) Publication Date (newest first) Publication Date (oldest first) Close Clear All Find Switch to Detail View

  14. Suppressing CMB low multipoles with ISW effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Santanu; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2014-02-01

    Recent results of Planck data reveal that the power [1,2] in the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum, approximately up to l = 30, is significantly lower than the theoretically predicted in the best fit ?CDM model. There are different known physical effects that can affect the power at low multipoles, such as features in the primordial power spectrum (PPS) in some models of inflation and ISW effect. In this paper we investigate the possibility of invoking the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect to explain the power deficit at low multipoles. The ISW effect that originates from the late time expansion history of the universe is rich in possibilities given the limited understanding of the origin of dark energy (DE). It is a common understanding that the ISW effect adds to the power at the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum. In this paper we carry out an analytic study to show that there are some expansion histories in which the ISW effect, instead of adding power, provides negative contribution to the power at low multipoles. Guided by the analytic study, we present examples of the features required in the late time expansion history of the universe that could explain the power deficiency through the ISW effect. We also show that an ISW origin of power deficiency is consistent, at present, with other cosmological observations that probe the expansion history such as distance modulus, matter power spectrum and the evolution of cluster number count. We also show that the ISW effect may be distinguished from power deficit originating from features in the PPS using the measurements of the CMB polarization spectrum at low multipoles expected from Planck. We conclude that the power at low multipoles of the CMB anisotropy could well be closely linked to Dark Energy puzzle in cosmology and this observation could be actually pointing to richer phenomenology of DE beyond the cosmological constant ?.

  15. Search for: kondo effect | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    kondo effect Find + Advanced Search × Advanced Search All Fields: kondo effect Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator / Author: Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Accepted Manuscript Published Article Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org: Sponsoring Org: Publication Date: to Update Date: to Sort: Relevance (highest to lowest) Publication Date (newest first) Publication Date (oldest first) Close Clear All Find Switch to Detail View

  16. Quantum Transport Effects and Coherent Ultrafast Multidimensional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy of Light Harvesting Photosynthetic Complexes | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Transport Effects and Coherent Ultrafast Multidimensional Spectroscopy of Light Harvesting Photosynthetic Complexes March 16, 2010 at 3pm/36-428 Shaul Mukamel Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine shaul_001 abstract: The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. Whether quantum effects persist in the energy transport is

  17. Making Effective User of Compilers at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effective Use of Compilers at NERSC Michael Stewart NERSC User Services Group August 15, 2012 Introduction ● Description of the Hopper compiling environment. ● Strengths and weaknesses of each compiler. ● Advice on choosing the most appropriate compiler for your work. ● Comparative results on benchmarks and other codes. ● How to use the compilers effectively. ● Carver compiling environment. ● Plans for the new Cray Cascade system (NERSC 7) compiling environment. ● Your feedback.

  18. Advancing the surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish: a gap analysis and research agenda based on a review of trends in intracoelomic tagging effects studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2011-03-08

    Early approaches to surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish were often through trial and error, however, in recent years there has been an interest in using scientific research to identify techniques and procedures that improve the outcome of surgical procedures and determine the effects of tagging on individuals. Here we summarize the trends in 108 peer-reviewed electronic tagging effect studies focused on intracoleomic implantation to determine opportunities for future research. To date, almost all of the studies have been conducted in freshwater, typically in laboratory environments, and have focused on biotelemetry devices. The majority of studies have focused on salmonids, cyprinids, ictalurids and centrarchids, with a regional bias towards North America, Europe and Australia. Most studies have focused on determining whether there is a negative effect of tagging relative to control fish, with proportionally fewer that have contrasted different aspects of the surgical procedure (e.g., methods of sterilization, incision location, wound closure material) that could advance the discipline. Many of these studies included routine endpoints such as mortality, growth, healing and tag retention, with fewer addressing sublethal measures such as swimming ability, predator avoidance, physiological costs, or fitness. Continued research is needed to further elevate the practice of electronic tag implantation in fish in order to ensure that the data generated are relevant to untagged conspecifics (i.e., no long-term behavioural or physiological consequences) and the surgical procedure does not impair the health and welfare status of the tagged fish. To that end, we advocate for i) rigorous controlled manipulations based on statistical designs that have adequate power, account for inter-individual variation, and include controls and shams, ii) studies that transcend the laboratory and the field with more studies in marine waters, iii) incorporation of knowledge and techniques emerging from the medical and veterinary disciplines, iv) addressing all components of the surgical event, v) comparative studies that evaluate the same surgical techniques on multiple species and in different environments, vi) consideration of how biotic factors (e.g., sex, age, size) influence tagging outcomes, and vii) studies that cover a range of endpoints over ecologically-relevant time periods.

  19. Simulating a 4-effect absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, G.; Zaltash, A.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1995-06-01

    Absorption chillers are heat-operated refrigeration machines that operate on one of the earliest known principles of refrigeration. Current absorption chillers typically use either steam or a gas-fired burner as the energy source. All current gas-fired absorption cooling systems are based on the well known single-effect or double-effect cycles. To further improve utilization of the high temperature heat available from natural gas, a variety of triple-effect cycles have been proposed and are being developed that are capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. This article describes a study that investigated the possibility of even further improving utilization of the high temperature heat available from natural gas combustion. During the study, performance simulation was conducted for a 4-effect lithium bromide/water cycle. From an environmental perspective, absorption chillers provide several benefits. They use absorption pairs (such as lithium bromide/water) as the working fluids, rather than chlorofluorocarbons or hydrochlorofluorocarbons, which contribute to ozone depletion and global warming.

  20. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  1. The Evolution of Soft Collinear Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Christopher

    2015-02-25

    Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) is an effective field theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) for processes where there are energetic, nearly lightlike degrees of freedom interacting with one another via soft radiation. SCET has found many applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, especially in recent years the physics of hadronic jets in e+e-, lepton-hadron, hadron-hadron, and heavy-ion collisions. SCET can be used to factorize multi-scale cross sections in these processes into single-scale hard, collinear, and soft functions, and to evolve these through the renormalization group to resum large logarithms of ratios of the scales that appear in the QCD perturbative expansion, as well as to study properties of nonperturbative effects. We overview the elementary concepts of SCET and describe how they can be applied in high-energy and nuclear physics.

  2. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  3. Neutralino dark matter in BMSSM effective theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Marcus; Edsj, Joakim; Lundstrm, Erik; Sjrs, Stefan; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: edsjo@physto.se E-mail: erik@physto.se

    2009-08-01

    We study thermal neutralino dark matter in an effective field theory extension of the MSSM, called ''Beyond the MSSM'' (BMSSM) in Dine, Seiberg and Thomas (2007). In this class of effective field theories, the field content of the MSSM is unchanged, but the little hierarchy problem is alleviated by allowing small corrections to the Higgs/higgsino part of the Lagrangian. We perform parameter scans and compute the dark matter relic density. The light higgsino LSP scenario is modified the most; we find new regions of parameter space compared to the standard MSSM. This involves interesting interplay between the WMAP dark matter bounds and the LEP chargino bound. We also find some changes for gaugino LSPs, partly due to annihilation through a Higgs resonance, and partly due to coannihilation with light top squarks in models that are ruled in by the new effective terms.

  4. The Evolution of Soft Collinear Effective Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Christopher

    2015-02-25

    Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) is an effective field theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) for processes where there are energetic, nearly lightlike degrees of freedom interacting with one another via soft radiation. SCET has found many applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, especially in recent years the physics of hadronic jets in e+e-, lepton-hadron, hadron-hadron, and heavy-ion collisions. SCET can be used to factorize multi-scale cross sections in these processes into single-scale hard, collinear, and soft functions, and to evolve these through the renormalization group to resum large logarithms of ratios of the scales that appear in the QCD perturbativemore » expansion, as well as to study properties of nonperturbative effects. We overview the elementary concepts of SCET and describe how they can be applied in high-energy and nuclear physics.« less

  5. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyriakou, Georgios; Davidson, Erlend R.; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Singh, Suyash; Boucher, Matthew B.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-05-27

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to 190 K and for D2 up to 140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation.

  6. Oscillating magnetocaloric effect of a multilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Paixão, L. S.; Reis, M. S.

    2014-12-08

    The oscillating magnetocaloric effect of a multilayer graphene in Bernal and rhombohedral stacking is investigated to extend the previous knowledge of the effect on a single layer graphene. We started from results of a tight-binding model and obtained analytical expressions for the thermodynamic potential and for the entropy change. The last exhibits the same dependence on field and temperature observed for other diamagnetic systems; it oscillates with the inverse magnetic field and presents a maximum value at a given temperature. The amplitude of the oscillating entropy change decreases with the number of layers and the stacking sequence rules the magnetocaloric properties of the system.

  7. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  8. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  9. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  10. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  11. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

    2002-11-01

    Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

  12. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  13. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  14. The effects of a nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alred, W.T. )

    1990-10-01

    Many factors influence the impact that a nuclear war would have on both the environment and survivors. These factors include, although are not limited to, the type of nuclear weapons used, the amount of these weapons, and the time of year a war would take place. The effects that a major nuclear war would have on the environment would vary greatly depending on the factors previously mentioned. Some effects that would occur are: major climatic changes, destruction of most food crops, contamination of current food and water supplies, and the deaths of animals and insects that are crucial to the balance of the environment. The factors that influence the survivors also vary; however, certain problems have been predicted by researchers. Among these problems are psychological disorders, lack of food supplies, the elimination of medical relief, and exposure from both radiation and the changing environment. All these effects, as well as others, tend to give researchers a much different view of the effects that a nuclear war would have on the environment and survivors than has been predicted since before the mid nineteen-eighties.

  15. AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT Acquisition Letters (AL) that remain in effect are identified below. All other...

  16. AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT AL 2014-06 ACQUISITION LETTERS REMAINING IN EFFECT Acquisition Letters (AL)...

  17. EFFECT e-learning courses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.esmap.orgesmapEFFECT Cost: Free Language: English References: EFFECT e-learning courses1 The EFFECT Model is an Excel-based,...

  18. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  19. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  20. Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (KMS and ERES) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (KMS and ERES) Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (KMS and ERES) Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (KMS and ERES) Office presentation icon 53_teth_pnnl_copping_v4_presentation.ppt More Documents & Publications Effects on Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction) Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (all Conceptual Model work) Effects on the

  1. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and 3He Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral effective field theory...

  2. Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector - New SEE Action Publication March 24, 2014 - 12:56pm Addthis Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State ...

  3. Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency ... for an Improved Understanding of Fuel Effects on Advanced-Combustion Strategies Vehicle ...

  4. Combustion, Efficiency, and Fuel Effects in a Spark-Assisted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion, Efficiency, and Fuel Effects in a Spark-Assisted HCCI Gasoline Engine Combustion, Efficiency, and Fuel Effects in a Spark-Assisted HCCI Gasoline Engine 2004 Diesel ...

  5. Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel ...

  6. Effects on Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction) Effects on Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction) Effects on Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and ...

  7. Effects of Strain and Quantum Confinement in Optically Pumped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of Strain and Quantum Confinement in Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of Strain and Quantum Confinement in ...

  8. STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED ELASTOMERS - RECENT INSIGHTS FROM EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING Citation Details In-Document Search Title: STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF ...

  9. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism, ...

  10. HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  11. Market Effects of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Effects of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 5 Market Effects of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 5 Final ...

  12. Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Our research shows ...

  13. Effects of the magnetic equilibrium on gyrokinetic simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of the magnetic equilibrium on gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak ... This content will become publicly available on June 4, 2016 Title: Effects of the magnetic ...

  14. Hydrocarbon and Deposit Morphology Effects on EGR Cooler Deposit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Deposit Morphology Effects on EGR Cooler Deposit Stability and Removal Hydrocarbon and Deposit Morphology Effects on EGR Cooler Deposit Stability and Removal This paper reports ...

  15. Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  16. Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (all Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (all Conceptual Model work) Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors (all Conceptual Model work) Categorizing and ...

  17. Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle-Number Emissions Study of Engine Operating Parameter Effects on GDI Engine Particle-Number Emissions Results show ...

  18. Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates Title: Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with ...

  19. Radiation Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future Radiation Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future August 2009 This document provides historical information about the ...

  20. Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Presentation given at the 16th Directions in ...

  1. Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Highly Dispersed Alloy ...

  2. Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lanl.pdf More Documents & Publications Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Advanced Cathode ...

  3. Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions ...

  4. Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005 ...

  5. Twist-3 fragmentation effects for ALT in light hadron production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Twist-3 fragmentation effects for ALT in light hadron production from proton-proton collisions Title: Twist-3 fragmentation effects for ALT in light hadron production from...

  6. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume ...

  7. Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective Field Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective Field Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective ...

  8. Effective Strategies for Working with Workforce Development Partners...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working with Workforce Development Partners Effective Strategies for Working with Workforce Development Partners BetterBuildings Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Effective Strategies ...

  9. Natural Ventilation in California Offices: Estimated Health Effects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects and Economic Consequences Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Natural Ventilation in California Offices: Estimated Health Effects and Economic Consequences ...

  10. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Surface roughness effects on the solar ...

  11. Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality ...

  12. President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply President Discusses Hurricane Effects on Energy Supply September 26, 2005 - 10:47am Addthis Washington, DC On Monday,...

  13. Effect of Proline Mutations on the Monomer Conformations of Amylin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Proline Mutations on the Monomer Conformations of Amylin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Proline Mutations on the Monomer Conformations of Amylin ...

  14. Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite Utilizing Heavy Ion-Irradiation- Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite...

  15. Assessment of Uncertainty in Cloud Radiative Effects and Heating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    functions of effective radius (Re), ice water content (IWC), extinction, ice number ... quantities on the cloud radiative effect and radiative heating rates are presented. ...

  16. The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment The Weekend Ozone Effect - The Weekly Ambient Emissions Control Experiment 2003 DEER Conference ...

  17. Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability Presented at the Department of ...

  18. The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Supporting a Hawaii Hydrogen Economy Effects of Impurities of Fuel Cell Performance and Durability Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC ...

  19. Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions (CEQ, 1979...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline (DOE, 1981) EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal ...

  20. Rapid Compression Machine … A Key Experimental Device to Effectively...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Effectively Collaborate with Basic Energy Sciences Rapid Compression Machine A Key Experimental Device to Effectively Collaborate with Basic Energy Sciences 2011 DOE ...

  1. Effects of hydrogen/deuterium absorption on the magnetic properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of hydrogendeuterium absorption on the magnetic properties of CoPd multilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of hydrogendeuterium absorption on the...

  2. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implementing Effective Enterprise Security Governance, approved at the March 12-13, 2014 meeting. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective Enterprise...

  3. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Implementing Effective Enterprise Security Governance, approved at the March 12-13, 2014 meeting. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Implementing Effective...

  4. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #04 Setting Effective Date for New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    04 Setting Effective Date for New Hires POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 04 Setting Effective Date for New Hires The purpose of this memorandum is to establish the Department of...

  5. Effective Energy Behavior Change for Low-Income Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective Energy Behavior Change for Low-Income Weatherization Clients Effective Energy Behavior Change for Low-Income Weatherization Clients This document contains the transcript ...

  6. Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First Comparisong Using External Costs on Urban Buses Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First ...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Effective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Fabrication of High-Temperature Ceramic Capacitors for Power Inverters Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Effective Fabrication of High-Temperature ...

  8. Water Efficiency and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Efficiency and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating Innovative Water Measures? Water Efficiency and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating Innovative Water ...

  9. Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity, Oxidation and Corrosion Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity, Oxidation and Corrosion ...

  10. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Human bone is strong...

  11. New Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New...

  12. Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall Nematics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective Field Theory of Fractional Quantized Hall ...

  13. The Effective Field Theory of Multifield Inflation (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Effective Field Theory of Multifield Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effective Field Theory of Multifield Inflation Authors: Senatore, Leonardo ; ...

  14. Revised DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (DOE, 2014) Revised DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas ...

  15. Mullins effect in a filled elastomer under uniaxial tension ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mullins effect in a filled elastomer under uniaxial tension Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mullins effect in a filled elastomer under uniaxial tension Modulus softening ...

  16. Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories Authors: ...

  17. Effective field theory of fractional quantized Hall nematics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effective field theory of fractional quantized Hall nematics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective field theory of fractional quantized Hall nematics Authors: ...

  18. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators ...

  19. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum You are accessing a document...

  20. Effects of passivation on synthesis, structure and composition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of passivation on synthesis, structure and composition of molybdenum carbide supported platinum water-gas shift catalysts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects ...

  1. DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and ...

  2. Effect of pressure on elastic, mechanical and electronic properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of pressure on elastic, mechanical and electronic properties of WSesub 2: A first-principles study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of pressure on ...

  3. Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Prev Next Title: Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Authors: Hu,...

  4. The Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection You are accessing a...

  5. Energy Department Announces Projects to Advance Cost-Effective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department Announces Projects to Advance Cost-Effective Concentrating Solar Power Systems Energy Department Announces Projects to Advance Cost-Effective Concentrating Solar ...

  6. Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Title: Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Authors: Bi, ...

  7. Quantum Hall effects in a Weyl semimetal: Possible application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum Hall effects in a Weyl semimetal: Possible application in pyrochlore iridates Title: Quantum Hall effects in a Weyl semimetal: Possible application in pyrochlore iridates ...

  8. Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Actions in the United States with Transboundary Effects Revised DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (DOE, 2014)

  9. Remarkable Effect of Molecular Architecture on Chain Exchange...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Remarkable Effect of Molecular Architecture on Chain Exchange in Triblock Copolymer Micelles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Remarkable Effect of Molecular Architecture...

  10. Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Authors: Xue, Dezhen ; Zhou, Yumei ; ...

  11. Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Title: Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Authors: Xue, Dezhen ; Zhou, Yumei ; Ding, Xiangdong ; Lookman, Turab ; ...

  12. NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae February 11, 2016 ...

  13. Effect Of Ventilation On Chronic Health Risks In Schools And...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Effect Of Ventilation On Chronic Health Risks In Schools And Offices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect Of Ventilation On Chronic Health Risks In ...

  14. The Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effective Field Theory of Dark Matter Direct Detection Authors: ...

  15. Ionic Effects on the Behavior of Thermoresponsive PEO-PNIPAAm...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ionic Effects on the Behavior of Thermoresponsive PEO-PNIPAAm Block Copolymers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ionic Effects on the Behavior of...

  16. Effect of Bubbles and Silica Dissolution on Melter Feed Rheology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Effect of Bubbles and Silica Dissolution on Melter Feed Rheology during Conversion to Glass Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Bubbles and Silica ...

  17. Molecular Weight Effects on Particle and Polymer Microstructure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Weight Effects on Particle and Polymer Microstructure in Concentrated Polymer Solutions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Weight Effects on Particle ...

  18. The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effective Field Theory of Cosmological Large Scale Structures...

  19. Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy ...

  20. Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories, Phase II Meeting Schedule Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories, ...

  1. Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electromagnetic effects on the light hadron spectrum Authors: Basak, S. ...

  2. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and ...

  3. AVTA: Battery Testing - DC Fast Charging's Effects on PEV Batteries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    describes DC fast charging's effects on plug-in electric vehicle batteries. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon DC Fast Charge Effects on Battery ...

  4. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels You are...

  5. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Authors:...

  6. Heat diode effect and negative differential thermal conductance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heat diode effect and negative differential thermal conductance across nanoscale metal-dielectric interfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heat diode effect and ...

  7. Real and effective thermal equilibrium in artificial square spin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real and effective thermal equilibrium in artificial square spin ices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Real and effective thermal equilibrium in artificial square spin ...

  8. Strain effect on the adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Strain effect on the adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation of hydrogen on Mg (0001) surface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Strain effect on the adsorption,...

  9. Engine control techniques to account for fuel effects (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Engine control techniques to account for fuel effects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engine control techniques to account for fuel effects A technique for ...

  10. Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective Field Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective Field Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective Field Theory ...

  11. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  12. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun’ichi

    2015-03-12

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  13. Quantum gravity effects in the Kerr spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.; Tuiran, E.

    2011-02-15

    We analyze the impact of the leading quantum gravity effects on the properties of black holes with nonzero angular momentum by performing a suitable renormalization group improvement of the classical Kerr metric within quantum Einstein gravity. In particular, we explore the structure of the horizons, the ergosphere, and the static limit surfaces as well as the phase space available for the Penrose process. The positivity properties of the effective vacuum energy-momentum tensor are also discussed and the 'dressing' of the black hole's mass and angular momentum are investigated by computing the corresponding Komar integrals. The pertinent Smarr formula turns out to retain its classical form. As for their thermodynamical properties, a modified first law of black-hole thermodynamics is found to be satisfied by the improved black holes (to second order in the angular momentum); the corresponding Bekenstein-Hawking temperature is not proportional to the surface gravity.

  14. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-07-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  15. Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranowski, LL; Snyder, GJ; Toberer, ES

    2013-05-28

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from a temperature gradient. Optimizing these devices for maximum power production can be difficult due to the many heat transport mechanisms occurring simultaneously within the TEG. In this paper, we develop a model for heat transport in thermoelectric materials in which an "effective thermal conductivity" (kappa(eff)) encompasses both the one dimensional steady-state Fourier conduction and the heat generation/consumption due to secondary thermoelectric effects. This model is especially powerful in that the value of kappa(eff) does not depend upon the operating conditions of the TEG but rather on the transport properties of the TE materials themselves. We analyze a variety of thermoelectric materials and generator designs using this concept and demonstrate that kappa(eff) predicts the heat fluxes within these devices to 5% of the exact value. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  16. Impurity effects in superconducting UPt sub 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, M.C. (The Harrison M. Randall Laboratory of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (USA)); Vorenkamp, T.; Koziol, Z.; de Visser, A.; Bakker, K.; Franse, J.J.M. (Natuurkundig Laboratorium der Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands (USA)); Smith, J.L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    Superconducting UPt{sub 3} is characterized by a novel and complex magnetic field-temperature phase diagram, with two superconducting transitions at {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} and {ital T}{sub {ital c}2} in zero field. We have studied the effects of Pd and Y impurities on the zero field superconducting properties of UPt{sub 3}. Resistance measurements show that both dopants increase the residual resistivity and decrease the spin fluctuation temperature in the normal state. {ital T}{sub {ital c}1} is depressed by both dopants, but more effectively by Pd. {vert bar}{ital T}{sub {ital c}1} {minus} {ital T}{sub {ital c}2}{vert bar} is essentially unaffected by Y doping, but increases dramatically with Pd doping.

  17. Regioselective synthesis using the deuterium isotope effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyano, M.

    1981-04-24

    Dehydration of 1a by various procedures invariably produced more exo olefin 2a than endo olefin 3a. This could be reversed by introduction of deuterium in the Me-21 group of the starting material. Thus, dehydration of 1b could afford more endo olefin 3b than exo olefin 2b due to the deuterium isotope effect. A regioselective synthesis of 18-oxoprogesterone (15a) from 3..beta..-hydroxypregn-5-en-20-one (5a) was carried out taking advantage of the deuterium isotope effect as depicted in Scheme I. The key steps were dehydration of 7b to predominantly endo olefin 9b and removal of the deuteriums from 18-oxoprogesterone-17..cap alpha..,21,21,21-d/sub 4/ (15b) to give 15a.

  18. Derivative expansion of the effective action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheyette, O.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes some methods for calculating derivative terms in the one loop effective action for a quantum field theory. The functional approach and background field method are first used to derive the general form of the one loop determinant. Then the determinant is expanded in powers of derivatives of the background fields. The form of this expansion is described for the simple case of an interacting scalar field, and then for the more complicated problem of a non-abelian gauge field. Finally, the expansion is applied to the task of calculating Higgs mass dependent effects in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model, and all terms which grow with the Higgs mass M/sub H/ are found in the one loop approximation. The result of this calculation is used to find the dependence of the gauge boson mass ratio rho on M/sub H/, and also to estimate the size of corrections to W and Z scattering theorems.

  19. Observable effects of anisotropic bubble nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Salem, Michael P. E-mail: salem@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2010-07-01

    Our universe may have formed via bubble nucleation in an eternally-inflating background. Furthermore, the background may have a compact dimension — the modulus of which tunnels out of a metastable minimum during bubble nucleation — which subsequently grows to become one of our three large spatial dimensions. Then the reduced symmetry of the background is equivalent to anisotropic initial conditions in our bubble universe. We compute the inflationary spectrum in such a scenario and, as a first step toward understanding the effects of anisotropy, project it onto spherical harmonics. The resulting spectrum exhibits anomalous multipole correlations, their relative amplitude set by the present curvature parameter, which appear to extend to arbitrarily large multipole moments. This raises the possibility of future detection, if slow-roll inflation does not last too long within our bubble. A full understanding of the observational signal must account for the effects of background anisotropy on photon free streaming, and is left to future work.

  20. Health effects of coal technologies: research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

  1. NEPA effectiveness -- a survey of academics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.; Clark, R.

    1997-09-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) went into effect in the United States on January 1, 1970, just over 25 years ago. In light of this milestone, a survey of academics on the effectiveness of NEPA has been conducted regarding the preparation of environmental assessments (EAs) or environmental impact statements (EISs). This paper summarizes the results of a survey of 31 academics in 12 disciplines from 21 states. Several strengths of NEPA were identified, most importantly that NEPA encourages agencies and decision makers: (1) to acknowledge potential environmental consequences to the public, thus opening up the decision process; and (2) to think about environmental consequences before resources are committed. Surveyed participants also prioritized needs for improvement. While this survey was focused on the NEPA process in the United States, the identified issues have implications for the worldwide practice of environmental impact assessment. Finally, recommendations are described that are primarily associated with guidance, possible modifications in the NEPA process and follow-on training.

  2. Ensuring cost effectiveness in the TAP process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trego, A.L.

    1992-06-16

    The Training Accredition Program (TAP) at the Waste Isolation Division (WID) is discussed by the general manager. Cost effectiveness in the TAP process is made possible by saving through sharing which refers to the exchange and co-development of information and technology among Westinghouse Government owned-contractor operators and with other organizations. In 1990 a comprehensive management and supervisor training (MAST) program plan was devised and a MAST certification program of 31 self-paced written moduler was developed. This program has proven to be inexpensive to develop and implement when compared to classroom training. In addition, total quality is used as a tool to continuously improve work process. Continuous improvement requires continued evaluation of work process, such as TAP analysis and development in summary to make training at DOE facilities the most cost-effective training anywhere, we need to share, challenge conventional wisdom, and seek to continuously improve.

  3. Effect of noise on the standard mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karney, C.F.F.; Rechester, A.B.; White, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    The effect of a small amount of noise on the standard mapping is considered. Whenever the standard mapping possesses accelerator models (where the action increases approximately linearly with time), the diffusion coefficient contains a term proportional to the reciprocal of the variance of the noise term. At large values of the stochasticity parameter, the accelerator modes exhibit a universal behavior. As a result the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on stochasticity parameter also shows some universal behavior.

  4. Alpha particles in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caniu, C.

    2014-11-11

    Using an effective field theory for alpha (?) particles at non-relativistic energies, we calculate the strong scattering amplitude modified by Coulomb corrections for a system of two ?s. For the strong interaction, we consider a momentum-dependent interaction which, in contrast to an energy dependent interaction alone [1], could be more useful in extending the theory to systems with more than two ? particles. We will present preliminary results of our EFT calculations for systems with two alpha particles.

  5. Effective Theory of Chiral Superfluids and Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Materials Science Seminar Effective Theory of Chiral Superfluids and Superconductors WHEN: Mar 24, 2016 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Hot Rocks Conference Room, TA-3, Bldg. 4200, Room 203-A SPEAKER: Sergej Moroz, Condensed Matter Theory Group, University of Colorado CONTACT: Caryll Blount (505) 665-3950 CATEGORY: Community Science TYPE: Seminar INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Two-dimensional fermionic chiral superfluidity and superconductivity is an active area of

  6. TRITIUM EFFECTS ON WELDMENT FRACTURE TOUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, M; Michael Tosten, M; Scott West, S

    2006-07-17

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L stainless steel and its weldments were measured. Fracture toughness data are needed for assessing tritium reservoir structural integrity. This report provides data from J-Integral fracture toughness tests on unexposed and tritium-exposed weldments. The effect of tritium on weldment toughness has not been measured until now. The data include tests on tritium-exposed weldments after aging for up to three years to measure the effect of increasing decay helium concentration on toughness. The results indicate that Type 304L stainless steel weldments have high fracture toughness and are resistant to tritium aging effects on toughness. For unexposed alloys, weldment fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. Tritium-exposed-and-aged base metals and weldments had lower toughness values than unexposed ones but still retained good toughness properties. In both base metals and weldments there was an initial reduction in fracture toughness after tritium exposure but little change in fracture toughness values with increasing helium content in the range tested. Fracture modes occurred by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed and tritium-exposed steels and welds. This corroborates further the resistance of Type 304L steel to tritium embrittlement. This report fulfills the requirements for the FY06 Level 3 milestone, TSR15.3 ''Issue summary report for tritium reservoir material aging studies'' for the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign (ESC). The milestone was in support of ESC L2-1866 Milestone-''Complete an annual Enhanced Surveillance stockpile aging assessment report to support the annual assessment process''.

  7. Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Indirect Effects in China In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to conduct a comprehensive investigation of regional aerosol impacts in China as part of a joint program with the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The joint program is under the "Climate Sciences" agreement established in 1987 between the DOE and China Ministry of

  8. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) Tutorial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) Tutorial - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  9. Review of the `cold fusion` effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storms, E.

    1996-09-01

    More than 190 studies reporting evidence for the `cold fusion` effect are evaluated. New work has answered criticisms by eliminating many of the suggested errors. Evidence for large and reproducible energy generation as well as various nuclear reactions, in addition to fusion, from a variety of environments and methods in accumulating. The field can no longer be dismissed by invoking obvious error or prosaic explanations. 192 refs., 12 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association Over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool X. Wu National Center for Atmospheric Research (a) Boulder, Colorado X. -Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey Champaign, Illinois Introduction The representation of cloud systems and cloud-radiation interaction is considered to be one of major uncertainties in general circulation models (GCMs). This arises because (1) complete observations of cloud systems are impossible and available

  11. Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1C Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop - Broomfield, CO July 9 th , 2012 Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects Outline  Overview of SNL's Large-Scale Wave and WEC Array Modeling Activities * WEC Farm Modeling on Roadmap * SNL Current Modeling Capabilities * SNL WEC Farm Model Tool Development WEC Farm Modeling  WEC Farms * Currently focused on improving large scale wave models for environmental assessments WEC Farm Modeling: WEC

  12. Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Posters The Effects of Radiative Transfer on Low-Level Cyclogenesis M. J. Leach and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina Introduction Many investigators have documented the role that thermodynamic forcing due to radiative flux divergence plays in the enhancement or generation of circulation. Most of these studies involve large-scale systems (e.g., Slingo et al. 1988), small-scale systems such as thunderstorms

  13. Substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement via nanolayering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Fenggong; Young, Steve M.; Zheng, Fan; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-01-21

    Spontaneous polarization and inversion symmetry breaking in ferroelectric materials lead to their use as photovoltaic devices. However, further advancement of their applications are hindered by the paucity of ways of reducing bandgaps and enhancing photocurrent. By unravelling the correlation between ferroelectric materials’ responses to solar irradiation and their local structure and electric polarization landscapes, here we show from first principles that substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement can be achieved by nanolayering PbTiO3 with nickel ions and oxygen vacancies ((PbNiO2)x(PbTiO3)1–x). The enhancement of the total photocurrent for different spacings between the Ni-containing layers can be as high as 43 times duemore » to a smaller bandgap and photocurrent direction alignment for all absorption energies. This is due to the electrostatic effect that arises from nanolayering. Lastly, this opens up the possibility for control of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric materials by nanoscale engineering of their structure and composition.« less

  14. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  15. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage carcinogenesis models that incorporate the ''initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion'' paradigm of carcinogenesis are indicating that promotion of initiated cells is the most important cellular mechanism driving the shape of the age specific hazard for many types of cancer. Second, we have realized that many of the genes that are modified in early stages of the carcinogenic process contribute to one or more of four general cellular pathways that confer a promotional advantage to cells when these pathways are disrupted.

  16. DOE Ex Parte Memorandum - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Memorandum - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness DOE Ex Parte Memorandum - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness The Center for Regulatory Effectiveness (CRE) is submitting this memorandum pursuant to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Guidance on Ex Parte Communications. PDF icon Center_for_Reg_Effectiveness.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments Regulatory Burden RFI: Revitalization of DOE's Role as a Regulatory

  17. LDRD report: Smoke effects on electrical equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TANAKA,TINA J.; BAYNES JR.,EDWARD E.; NOWLEN,STEVEN P.; BROCKMANN,JOHN E.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.; SHADDIX,CHRISTOPHER R.

    2000-03-01

    Smoke is known to cause electrical equipment failure, but the likelihood of immediate failure during a fire is unknown. Traditional failure assessment techniques measure the density of ionic contaminants deposited on surfaces to determine the need for cleaning or replacement of electronic equipment exposed to smoke. Such techniques focus on long-term effects, such as corrosion, but do not address the immediate effects of the fire. This document reports the results of tests on the immediate effects of smoke on electronic equipment. Various circuits and components were exposed to smoke from different fields in a static smoke exposure chamber and were monitored throughout the exposure. Electrically, the loss of insulation resistance was the most important change caused by smoke. For direct current circuits, soot collected on high-voltage surfaces sometimes formed semi-conductive soot bridges that shorted the circuit. For high voltage alternating current circuits, the smoke also tended to increase the likelihood of arcing, but did not accumulate on the surfaces. Static random access memory chips failed for high levels of smoke, but hard disk drives did not. High humidity increased the conductive properties of the smoke. The conductivity does not increase linearly with smoke density as first proposed; however, it does increase with quantity. The data can be used to give a rough estimate of the amount of smoke that will cause failures in CMOS memory chips, dc and ac circuits. Comparisons of this data to other fire tests can be made through the optical and mass density measurements of the smoke.

  18. Investigating Temperature Effects on PV Arrays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schmidt Unit Title: Circuits and Electricity Subject: Physics Lesson Title: Investigating Temperature Effects on PV Arrays Grade Level(s): 11/12 Date(s): July 18, 2014 Lesson Length: 1 Class Period (65 minutes) * Learning Goal(s) [What should students know, understand, or be able to do as a result of this lab or activity.] Students will be able to measure current and voltage using a Multimeter. Students will be able to calculate the power of a PV array using voltage and current. Students will

  19. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kompaneets, Roman Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force is due to the protons.

  20. EMC effect: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the EMC effect over 30 years ago, it has been of great theoretical interest and studied in several experimental measurements. No unified picture arose to explain the underlying cause of per nucleon structure function modification in nuclei. Precise measurements on light nuclei from JLab’s 6 GeV era revitalized this research by showing that traditional A or density dependent models of this nuclear modification do not work. The measurements will be reviewed, discussed and preliminary data on heavy targets from JLab’s E03-103 will be presented.

  1. Radiation effects on corrosion of zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1989-06-01

    From the wide use of zirconium alloys as components in nuclear reactors, has come clear evidence that reactor radiation is a major corrosion parameter. The evidence emerges from comparisons of zirconium alloy corrosion behavior in different reactor types, for example, BWRs versus PWRs and in corresponding reactor loop chemistries; also, oxidation rates differ with location along components such as fuel rods and reactor pressure tubes. In most respects, oxidation effects on power reactor components are paralleled by oxidation behavior on specimens exposed to radiation in reactor loops.

  2. Tritium Aging Effects in Palladium on Kieselguhr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.L.; Holder, J.S.; Wermer, J.R.

    1998-10-01

    50 weight % Pd on kieselguhr (Pd/k) is used in hydrogen isotope separation processes at the Savannah River Site. Long term aging studies on this material were undertaken in June, 1992. P-c-T data showing the aging effect of tritium loading for long periods will be presented and discussed covering from June, 1992 to March, 1997. Lowering of plateau pressures and increasing indications of in homogeneities have been observed in both tritium and deuterium absorption isotherms at 0 C, and desorption isotherms at 80 and 120 C.

  3. Defining a Possible Low LET Bystander Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles R. Geard

    2009-05-04

    Current radiation protection guidelines assume a linear response to ionizing radiations down through doses where epidemiological studies provide very limited to no information as to the propriety of such assumptions. The bystander response is a non-targeted effect which might impact such guidelines. These studies while clearly affirming a bystander response for high LET radiations, do not provide such affirmation for environmentally relevant low dose, low LET radiations. Caution and further study are necessary before making judgements that could impact on current standards.

  4. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  5. Effect of fractons in strongly coupled superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, S.P.; Gumber, P.K. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of fractons on strongly coupled superconductors has been studied using both McMillan's equation and Kresin's equation which is valid for any arbitrary value of {lambda}. Contrary to common belief it is found that there is no significant increase in {ital T}{sub {ital c}} when the crystal lattice is changed into a fractal lattice. However, under certain conditions there may be a substantial increase in the critical temperature in the fractal superconductor over its value in the corresponding crystalline superconductor.

  6. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  7. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  8. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J. G.; Booth, C. H.; Shuh, D. K.; van der Laan, G.; Sokaras, D.; Weng, T. -C.; Yu, S. W.; Bagus, P. S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Nordlund, D.

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  9. APBF Effects on Combustion | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AO Role-Based Training PDF icon AO Role-Based Training Part I, DAA Overview More Documents & Publications Part I, DAA Overview ; AODR Role-Based Training Audit Report: IG-0752 Audit Report: IG-0807

    9 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ft_01_bunting.pdf More Documents & Publications APBF Effects on Combustion Response of Oil Sands Derived Fuels in Diesel HCCI Operation

  10. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    2010-07-15

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  11. Realising effective theories of tribrid inflation: are there effects from messenger fields?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antusch, Stefan; Nolde, David

    2015-09-22

    Tribrid inflation is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation in which the inflaton is a matter field (which can be charged under gauge symmetries) and inflation ends by a GUT-scale phase transition of a waterfall field. These features make tribrid inflation a promising framework for realising inflation with particularly close connections to particle physics. Superpotentials of tribrid inflation involve effective operators suppressed by some cutoff scale, which is often taken as the Planck scale. However, these operators may also be generated by integrating out messenger superfields with masses below the Planck scale, which is in fact quite common in GUT and/or flavour models. The values of the inflaton field during inflation can then lie above this mass scale, which means that for reliably calculating the model predictions one has to go beyond the effective theory description. We therefore discuss realisations of effective theories of tribrid inflation and specify in which cases effects from the messenger fields are expected, and under which conditions they can safely be neglected. In particular, we point out how to construct realisations where, despite the fact that the inflaton field values are above the messenger mass scale, the predictions for the observables are (to a good approximation) identical to the ones calculated in the effective theory treatment where the messenger mass scale is identified with the (apparent) cutoff scale.

  12. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  13. Effective Higgs vertices in the generic MSSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivellin, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    In this article we consider chirally enhanced corrections to Higgs vertices in the most general MSSM. We include the contributions stemming from bilinear terms, from the trilinear A terms, and from their nonholomorphic analogues, the A{sup '} terms, which couple squarks to the ''wrong'' Higgs field. We perform a consistent renormalization of the Higgs vertices beyond the decoupling limit (M{sub SUSY{yields}{infinity}}), using a purely diagrammatic approach. The cancellation of the different contributions in and beyond the decoupling limit is discussed and the possible size of decoupling effects which occur if the supersymmetry particles are not much heavier than the electroweak scale are examined. In the decoupling limit we recover the results obtained in the effective-field-theory approach. For the nonholomorphic A{sup '} terms we find the well known tan{beta} enhancement in the down sector similar to the one for terms proportional to {mu}. Because of the a priori generic flavor structure of these trilinear terms large flavor-changing neutral Higgs couplings can be induced. We also discover new tan{beta} enhanced contributions involving the usual holomorphic A terms, which were not discussed before in the literature. These corrections occur only if also flavor-diagonal nonholomorphic corrections to the Higgs couplings are present. This reflects the fact that the A terms, and also the chirality-changing self-energies, are physical quantities and cannot be absorbed into renormalization constants.

  14. Effect of additives on lithium cycling efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Toshiro; Yoshimatsu, Isamu; Yamaki, J. )

    1994-09-01

    Lithium cycling efficiency was evaluated for LiAsF[sub 6]-ethylene carbonate/2-methyltetrahydrofuran mixed-solvent electrolyte (LiAsF[sub 6]-EC/2MeTHF) with several additives: tetraalkylammonium chlorides with a long n-alkyl chain and three methyl groups. The ammonium chlorides with n-alkyl group longer than n-C[sub 12]H[sub 25]- increased lithium cycling efficiency. Cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) produced the best improvement in lithium cycling efficiency. A figure of merit (FOM) of lithium for 0.01 M CTAC was 46, which was 1.5 times the FOM for the corresponding additive-free electrolyte. The LiAsF[sub 6]-EC/2MeTHF with CTAC showed an increase in FOM with stack pressure, but the effect was less than that for the additive-free LiAsF[sub 6]-EC/2MeTHF. Scanning electron microscope observation showed that the addition of CTAC decreased the needle-like lithium deposition and increased particulate lithium deposition. This deposition morphology may be the main cause of the increase in FOM. The additive had no effect on rate capability for cell cycling at 3 mA/cm[sup 2] discharge and 1 mA/cm[sup 2] charge.

  15. Municipal solid waste effective stress analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shariatmadari, Nader; Machado, Sandro Lemos; Noorzad, Ali; Karimpour-Fard, Mehran

    2009-12-15

    The mechanical behavior of municipal solid waste (MSW) has attracted the attention of many researchers in the field of geo-environmental engineering in recent years and several aspects of waste mechanical response under loading have been elucidated. However, the mechanical response of MSW materials under undrained conditions has not been described in detail to date. The knowledge of this aspect of the MSW mechanical response is very important in cases involving MSW with high water contents, seismic ground motion and in regions where landfills are built with poor operation conditions. This paper presents the results obtained from 26 large triaxial tests performed both in drained and undrained conditions. The results were analyzed taking into account the waste particles compressibility and the deformation anisotropy of the waste samples. The waste particles compressibility was used to modify the Terzaghi effective stress equation, using the Skempton (1961) proposition. It is shown that the use of the modified effective stress equation led to much more compatible shear strength values when comparing Consolidated-Drained (CD) and Consolidated-Undrained (CU), results, explaining the high shear strength values obtained in CU triaxial tests, even when the pore pressure is almost equal to the confining stress.

  16. Technical WOrk Plan for: Construction Effects Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Goodin

    2006-09-14

    This document is the technical work plan (TWP) for performing the Construction Effects Monitoring (CEM) activity, which is one of 20 testing and monitoring activities included in Performance Confirmation Plan (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172452]). Collectively, the 20 activities make up the Performance Confirmation Program described in the plan. Each of the other 19 activities will have a separate TWP. This plan, though titled Construction Effects Monitoring, in accordance with the Performance Confirmation Plan, also includes testing that may be performed in addition to monitoring, if required. Performance confirmation is required by regulation 10 CFR Part 63 [DIRS 173273], and was started during site characterization (consistent with the regulation) and will continue until permanent closure of the repository (10 CFR 63.13 1 (b) [DIRS 173273]). This CEM activity has two primary goals: (1) to collect, analyze, and report on repository rock properties data for the purpose of confirming geotechnical and design parameters used in repository design, and (2) to provide information intended to confirm that the ability to retrieve waste from the repository has been preserved. It will be necessary for information from this CEM activity to be evaluated in combination with that obtained from other Performance Confirmation Program activities to achieve these goals. These relationships with other Performance Confirmation Program activities (e.g., drift inspection, subsurface mapping, and seismicity monitoring) will be discussed in later sections of this TWP.

  17. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1990-08-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

  18. The Effect of Element Formulation on the Prediction of Boost Effects in Numerical Tube Bending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardelcik, A.; Worswick, M.J.

    2005-08-05

    This paper presents advanced FE models of the pre-bending process to investigate the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost effects in tube bending. Tube bending experiments are conducted with 3'' (OD) IF (Interstitial-Free) steel tube on a fully instrumented Eagle EPT-75 servo-hydraulic mandrel-rotary draw tube bender. Experiments were performed in which the bending boost was varied at three levels and resulted in consistent trends in the strain and thickness distribution within the pre-bent tubes. A numerical model of the rotary draw tube bender was used to simulate pre-bending of the IF tube with the three levels of boost from the experiments. To examine the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost, the tube was modeled with shell and solid elements. Both models predicted the overall strain and thickness results well, but showed different trends in each of the models.

  19. Effects of interactions on the generalized Hong–Ou–Mandel effect

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gertjerenken, B.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2015-04-11

    We numerically investigate the influence of interactions on the generalized Hong–Ou–Mandel (HOM) effect for bosonic particles in a (quasi-)one-dimensional set-up with weak harmonic confinement and show results for the cases of N = 2, N = 3 and N = 4 bosons interacting with a beam splitter, whose role is played by a δ-barrier. In particular, we focus on the effect of attractive interactions and compare the results with the repulsive case, as well as with the analytically available results for the non-interacting case (that we use as a benchmark). In addition, we observe a fermionization effect both for growingmore » repulsive and attractive interactions, i.e., the dip in the HOM coincidence count is progressively smeared out, for increasing interaction strengths. The role of input asymmetries is also explored.« less

  20. Effect of Subgrid Cloud Variability on Parameterization of Indirect Aerosol Effect in Large-Scale Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets October 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data,

  1. Electron correlation effects on the magnetostructural transition and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    magnetocaloric effect in Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electron correlation effects on the magnetostructural transition and magnetocaloric effect in Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron correlation effects on the magnetostructural transition and magnetocaloric effect in Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} Electron correlation effects on the electronic structure of Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} have been studied using the

  2. Dual-circuit, multiple-effect refrigeration system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVault, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    A dual circuit absorption refrigeration system comprising a high temperature single-effect refrigeration loop and a lower temperature double-effect refrigeration loop separate from one another and provided with a double-condenser coupling therebetween. The high temperature condenser of the single-effect refrigeration loop is double coupled to both of the generators in the double-effect refrigeration loop to improve internal heat recovery and a heat and mass transfer additive such as 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is used in the lower temperature double-effect refrigeration loop to improve the performance of the absorber in the double-effect refrigeration loop.

  3. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electron’s relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO₃ and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O₃, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, inducesmore » a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO₃/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O₃ heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.« less

  4. Parametric effects in nanobeams and AFM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claeyssen, J. C. R.; Tonetto, L.; Carvalho, J. B.; Copetti, R. D.

    2014-12-10

    Vibration dynamics of forced cantilever beams that are used in nanotechnology such as atomic force microscope modeling and carbon nanotubes is considered in terms of a fundamental response within a matrix framework. The modeling equations are written as a matrix differential equation subject to tip-sample general boundary conditions. At the junctions, where there are discontinuities due to different material or beam thickness, compatibility conditions are prescribed. Forced responses are given by convolution of the input load with the time domain Green matrix function. The corresponding matrix transfer function and modes of a multispan cantilever beam are determined in terms of solution basis of the same shape generated by a fundamental solution. Simulations were performed for a three stepped beam with a piezoelectric patch subject to pulse forcing terms and with surface effects.

  5. Thermofield dynamics and Casimir effect for fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Queiroz, H. . E-mail: hebe@fis.ufba.br; Silva, J.C. da . E-mail: jcsilva@cefetba.br; Khanna, F.C. . E-mail: khanna@phys.ualberta.ca; Malbouisson, J.M.C. . E-mail: jmalbou@phys.ualberta.ca; Revzen, M. . E-mail: revzen@physics.technion.ac.il; Santana, A.E. . E-mail: asantana@fis.unb.br

    2005-05-01

    A generalization of the Bogoliubov transformation is developed to describe a space compactified fermionic field. The method is the fermionic counterpart of the formalism introduced earlier for bosons [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 052101], and is based on the thermofield dynamics approach. We analyze the energy-momentum tensor for the Casimir effect of a free massless fermion field in a d-dimensional box at finite temperature. As a particular case the Casimir energy and pressure for the field confined in a three-dimensional parallelepiped box are calculated. It is found that the attractive or repulsive nature of the Casimir pressure on opposite faces changes depending on the relative magnitude of the edges. We also determine the temperature at which the Casimir pressure in a cubic box changes sign and estimate its value when the edge of the cube is of the order of the confining lengths for baryons.

  6. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electron’s relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO₃ and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O₃, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, induces a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO₃/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O₃ heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.

  7. Giant switchable Rashba effect in oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Zhicheng; Si, Liang; Zhang, Qinfang; Yin, Wei-Guo; Yunoki, Seiji; Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electrons relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction. Interfacing ferroelectric BaTiO? and a 5d (or 4d) transition metal oxide with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir,Ru)O?, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, induces a large (Os,Ir,Ru)-O distortion. The BaTiO?/Ba(Os,Ru,Ir)O? heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for switching and studying the Rashba effect and allows applications at room temperature.

  8. Field-effect P-N junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, William; Zettl, Alexander

    2015-05-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to field-effect p-n junctions. In one aspect, a device includes an ohmic contact, a semiconductor layer disposed on the ohmic contact, at least one rectifying contact disposed on the semiconductor layer, a gate including a layer disposed on the at least one rectifying contact and the semiconductor layer and a gate contact disposed on the layer. A lateral width of the rectifying contact is less than a semiconductor depletion width of the semiconductor layer. The gate contact is electrically connected to the ohmic contact to create a self-gating feedback loop that is configured to maintain a gate electric field of the gate.

  9. Interface effect in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2014-06-28

    This paper intends to theoretically investigate the effect of the interfaces on the Rashba spin splitting of two coupled quantum wells. The results show that the interface related Rashba spin splitting of the two coupled quantum wells is both smaller than that of a step quantum well which has the same structure with the step quantum well in the coupled quantum wells. And the influence of the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction of the coupled quantum wells is larger than that of a step quantum well. It demonstrates that the spin relaxation time of the two coupled quantum wells will be shorter than that of a step quantum well. As for the application in the spintronic devices, a step quantum well may be better than the coupled quantum wells, which is mentioned in this paper.

  10. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. S.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-02-15

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  11. PID Control Effectiveness for Surface Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, David D.; Marsh, Christopher L.; Poston, David I.

    2007-01-30

    Control of space and surface fission reactors should be kept as simple as possible, because of the need for high reliability and the difficulty to diagnose and adapt to control system failures. Fortunately, compact, fast-spectrum, externally controlled reactors are very simple in operation. In fact, for some applications it may be possible to design low-power surface reactors without the need for any reactor control after startup; however, a simple proportional, integral, derivative (PID) controller can allow a higher performance concept and add more flexibility to system operation. This paper investigates the effectiveness of a PID control scheme for several anticipated transients that a surface reactor might experience. To perform these analyses, the surface reactor transient code FRINK was modified to simulate control drum movements based on bulk coolant temperature.

  12. Measures of effectiveness:an annotated bibliography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Philip LaRoche

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidance, from the open literature, on developing a set of ''measures of effectiveness'' (MoEs) and using them to evaluate a system. Approximately twenty papers and books are reviewed. The papers that provide the clearest understanding of MoEs are identified (Sproles [46], [48], [50]). The seminal work on value-focused thinking (VFT), an approach that bridges the gap between MoEs and a system, is also identified (Keeney [25]). And finally three examples of the use of VFT in evaluating a system based on MoEs are identified (Jackson et al. [21], Kerchner & Deckro [27], and Doyle et al. [14]). Notes are provided of the papers and books to pursue in order to take this study to the next level of detail.

  13. Electric field effect in ultrathin black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenig, Steven P.; Schmidt, Hennrik; Doganov, Rostislav A.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-03-10

    Black phosphorus exhibits a layered structure similar to graphene, allowing mechanical exfoliation of ultrathin single crystals. Here, we demonstrate few-layer black phosphorus field effect devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} and measure charge carrier mobility in a four-probe configuration as well as drain current modulation in a two-point configuration. We find room-temperature mobilities of up to 300 cm{sup 2}/Vs and drain current modulation of over 10{sup 3}. At low temperatures, the on-off ratio exceeds 10{sup 5}, and the device exhibits both electron and hole conduction. Using atomic force microscopy, we observe significant surface roughening of thin black phosphorus crystals over the course of 1 h after exfoliation.

  14. Constraint effects observed in crack initiation stretch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.M.; Ernst, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    The current paper characterizes constraint in fracture: J-modified resistance (Jr) curves were developed for two tough structural materials, 6061-T651 (aluminum) and IN718-STA1 (nickel-base superalloy). A wide variety of configurations was tested to consider load configurations from bending to tension including three specimen types (compact tension, center-crack tension, and single-edge notched tension), and a range of ligament lengths and thicknesses, as well as side-grooved and smooth-sided ligaments. The Jr curves exhibited an inflection point after some crack extension, and the data were excluded beyond the inflection. Qualified Jr curves for the two materials showed similar behavior, but R-curves were identical for equal ligament length-to-thickness ratio (RL), for the aluminum alloy, with increasing slope for increasing RL, while for the nickel, the resistance curves aligned for equal ligament thickness, B, and the slope increased for decreasing B. Displacements at the original crack tip (CToD) were recorded throughout the test for several specimens. CToD-versus-crack extension curves were developed, and data were excluded beyond the inflection point (as with the Jr curves). The data collapsed into two distinct curves, thought to represent the surface, plane stress effect and the central, plane strain effect. This was observed for both materials. A technique called profiling is presented for the aluminum alloy only, where the crack face displacements are recorded at the final point of the test as a function of the position throughout the crack cavity, along with an effort to extract the observations in a usable form. Displacements were consistent throughout the cross-section at and behind the original crack tip. In the region where the crack grew, this displacement was developed by a combination of stretch and crack growth. The stretch required to initiate crack extension was a function of the depth beneath the surface into the cross-section.

  15. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This is the second report in the sequence and describes the results of conceptual feasibility studies of tidal power plants deployed in Tacoma Narrows, Washington. The Narrows contain many of the same competing stakeholder interactions identified at other tidal power sites and serves as a representative case study. Tidal power remains at an early stage of development. As such, a wide range of different technologies are being pursued by different manufacturers. In order to properly characterize impacts, it is useful to characterize the range of technologies that could be deployed at the site of interest. An industry survey informs the process of selecting representative tidal power devices. The selection criteria is that such devices are at an advanced stage of development to reduce technical uncertainties and that enough data are available from the manufacturers to inform the conceptual design process of this study. Further, an attempt is made to cover the range of different technologies under development to capture variations in potential environmental effects. A number of other developers are also at an advanced stage of development including Verdant Power, which has demonstrated an array of turbines in the East River of New York, Clean Current, which has demonstrated a device off Race Rocks, BC, and OpenHydro, which has demonstrated a device at the European Marine Energy Test Center and is on the verge of deploying a larger device in the Bay of Fundy. MCT demonstrated their device both at Devon (UK) and Strangford Narrows (Northern Ireland). Furthermore OpenHydro, CleanCurrent, and MCT are the three devices being installed at the Minas Passage (Canada). Environmental effects will largely scale with the size of tidal power development. In many cases, the effects of a single device may not be measurable, while larger scale device arrays may have cumulative impacts that differ significantly from smaller scale deployments. In order to characterize these effects, scenarios are established at three deployment scales which nominally represent (1) a small pilot deployment, (2) an early, small commercial deployment, and (3) a large commercial scale plant. For the three technologies and scales at the selected site, this results in a total of nine deployment scenarios outlined in the report.

  16. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.; Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P.

    2013-12-28

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10?nm at 355?nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  17. Working with Utilities: Effective Paths for Tribal Governments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working with Utilities: Effective Paths for Tribal Governments Webinar Working with Utilities: Effective Paths for Tribal Governments Webinar September 30, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM...

  18. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays From Gamma-Ray Bursts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on...

  19. Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EFFECT) EFFECT is an open, Excel-based modeling tool used to forecast greenhouse gas emissions from a range of development scenarios at the regional and national levels....

  20. Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped PbTe Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for charge Kondo effect in superconducting Tl-doped PbTe ...

  1. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxOCu(111) (x2) ... Title: Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxOCu(111) (x2) ...

  2. Effect of Chemical Pressure on the Charge Density Wave Transition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Chemical Pressure on the Charge Density Wave Transition in Rare-Earth Tritellurides RTe3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Chemical Pressure on the ...

  3. EPA Diesel Rule and the Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-08

    The VT program collaborated with industry stakeholders and the EPA (in an effort initiated in 1998 called Diesel Emission Control – Sulfur Effects study, otherwise known as DECSE) to quantify the effects of fuel sulfur on emission control technologies.

  4. COLLATERAL EFFECTS ON SOLAR NEBULA OXYGEN ISOTOPES DUE TO INJECTION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COLLATERAL EFFECTS ON SOLAR NEBULA OXYGEN ISOTOPES DUE TO INJECTION OF sup 26Al BY A NEARBY SUPERNOVA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: COLLATERAL EFFECTS ON SOLAR ...

  5. Effects of antiferro-ferromagnetic phase coexistence and spin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of antiferro-ferromagnetic phase coexistence and spin fluctuations on the magnetic and related properties of NdCuSi Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of...

  6. Theory of Fano Resonances in Graphene: The Kondo effect probed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theory of Fano Resonances in Graphene: The Kondo effect probed by STM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory of Fano Resonances in Graphene: The Kondo effect probed by ...

  7. Heavy Quarks, QCD, and Effective Field Theory (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy Quarks, QCD, and Effective Field Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy Quarks, QCD, and Effective Field Theory The research supported by this OJI award is ...

  8. Biogenic Aerosols„Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogenic Aerosols-Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) Final Campaign Summary T Petj ... DOESC-ARM-15-051 Biogenic Aerosols-Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) Final Campaign ...

  9. Understanding Cost-Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-11-01

    Discusses the five standard tests used to assess the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency, how states use the tests, and how the tests can determine the cost-effectiveness of efficiency measures.

  10. Effect of Cusps in Time-Dependent Quantum Mechanics (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Cusps in Time-Dependent Quantum Mechanics Title: Effect of Cusps in Time-Dependent Quantum Mechanics Authors: Yang, Zeng-hui ; Maitra, Neepa T. ; Burke, Kieron ...

  11. A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence within the DOE Complex A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence within the DOE Complex A Study of...

  12. Effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on mechanical and elastic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on mechanical and elastic properties of Ti-36Nb-5Zr alloy Title: Effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on mechanical and elastic properties of ...

  13. Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard lattice model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard ...

  14. Effect of a synchrotron X-ray microtomography imaging experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of a synchrotron X-ray microtomography imaging experiment on the amino acid content of a CM chondrite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of a synchrotron ...

  15. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Lithium coatings on the ...

  16. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control You are accessing a ...

  17. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInerney, M.J.; Mouttaki, H.; Folmsbee, M.; Knapp, R.; Nagle, D.

    2003-01-24

    The overall goal of this research was to develop effective biosurfactant production for enhanced oil recovery in the United States.

  18. Soft Collinear Effective Theory (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Soft Collinear Effective Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soft Collinear Effective Theory In this talk I review soft collinear effective theory. After a discussion of the formalism and properties of the effective field theory, I turn to phenomenology. I present results on color-suppressed B {yields} D decays, and on the {upsilon} radiative decay spectrum. Authors: Fleming, Sean [1] + Show Author Affiliations Physics Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United

  19. The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Examines the effect of hydrothermal aging on the Nox reduction over a commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst.

  20. Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Analysis (CEQ, 2005) | Department of Energy on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis (CEQ, 2005) Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis (CEQ, 2005) In this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality provides guidance on the extent to which agencies of the Federal government are required to analyze the environmental effects of past actions when they describe the cumulative environmental effect of a proposed action. PDF

  1. Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Held in Hiroshima | Department of Energy Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima July 22, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima The third Board of Councilors (BOC) meeting was held on June 18-19 at the Hiroshima Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), a bi-national U.S.-Japan

  2. Effective safety communications | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effective safety ... Effective safety communications Posted: September 11, 2014 - 7:44pm CNS Communications Specialist Kathryn King spoke on effective safety communications at Safety Fest TN held this week at Y-12's New Hope Center. King was joined by two safety and health experts from Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Dr. Jeff Miller and Dr. David Duncan. The presentation included a case study of the Uranium Processing Facility Project, where the effectiveness of safety communications has

  3. Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

  4. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  5. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects 1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A

  6. EFFECT OF FAST NEUTRON IRRADIATION ON SINTERED ALUMINA AND MAGNESIA...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IRRADIATION; LATTICES; MAGNESIUM OXIDES; MONOCRYSTALS; NEUTRON FLUX; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION EFFECTS; SINTERED MATERIALS; TEMPERATURE; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY ALUMINUM OXIDES

  7. Market Effects of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Volume 5 | Department of Energy Market Effects of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 5 Market Effects of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 5 Final Report: Market Effects of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 5, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, June 2015. PDF icon Market Effects of BBNP, Final Evaluation Volume 5 More Documents & Publications Evaluation of the Better

  8. EECLP Webinar #1: Overview and Cost Effectiveness-- Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the webinar, EECLP Webinar 1: Overview and Cost Effectiveness, presented in December 2014.

  9. Radiation and transmutation effects relevant to solid nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, E.R.; Roy, R.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1981-03-15

    Radiation effects in insulating solids are discussed in a general way as an introduction to the quite sparse published work on radiation effects in candidate nuclear waste forms other than glasses. Likely effects of transmutation in crystals and the chemical mitigation strategy are discussed. It seems probable that radiation effects in solidified HLW will not be serious if the actinides can be wholly incorporated in such radiation-resistant phases as monazite or uraninite.

  10. Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaiman, A.; Zen, Freddy P.

    2015-04-16

    Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator is investigated. The systems are two coupled harmonic oscillator with the different masses. The dissipative effect is studied based on the quantum state diffusion formalism. The result show that the anharmonic effect increase the amplitude but the lifetime of the oscillation depend on the damping coefficient and do not depend on the temperature.

  11. Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ft007_sluder_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

  12. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations. Results: The magnetostimulation limits decreased with increasing pulse duration (T{sub pulse}). For T{sub pulse} < 18 ms, the thresholds were significantly higher than at the longest pulse durations (p < 0.01, paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test). The normalized magnetostimulation threshold (B{sub Norm}) vs duration curve at all three frequencies agreed almost identically, indicating that the observed effect is independent of the operating frequency. At the shortest pulse duration (T{sub pulse} ≈ 2 ms), the thresholds were approximately 24% higher than at the asymptotes. The thresholds decreased to within 4% of their asymptotic values for T{sub pulse} > 20 ms. These trends were well characterized (R{sup 2} = 0.78) by a stretched exponential function given by B{sub Norm}=1+αe{sup −(T{sub p}{sub u}{sub l}{sub s}{sub e}/β){sup γ}}, where the fitted parameters were α = 0.44, β = 4.32, and γ = 0.60. Conclusions: This work shows for the first time that the magnetostimulation thresholds decrease with increasing pulse duration, and that this effect is independent of the operating frequency. Normalized threshold vs duration trends are almost identical for a 20-fold range of frequencies: the thresholds are significantly higher at short pulse durations and settle to within 4% of their asymptotic values for durations longer than 20 ms. These results emphasize the importance of matching the human-subject experiments to the imaging conditions of a particular setup. Knowing the dependence of the safety limits to all contributing factors is critical for increasing the time-efficiency of imaging systems that utilize time-varying magnetic fields.

  13. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to see a three region response as the results from the smaller spot size Type C detonators are completed.

  14. Effects of Gain Changes on RPM Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lousteau, Angela L; York, Robbie Lynn; Livesay, Jake

    2012-03-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's (DOE/NNSA's) Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is to strengthen the capability of foreign governments to deter, detect, and interdict the illicit trafficking of special nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime shipping system. The goal of this mission is to reduce the probability of these materials being fashioned into a weapon of mass destruction or radiological dispersal device that could be used against the United States or its international partners. This goal is achieved primarily through the installation and operation of radiation detection equipment at border crossings, airports, seaports, and other strategic locations around the world. In order to effectively detect the movement of radioactive material, the response of these radiation detectors to various materials in various configurations must be well characterized. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated two aspects of Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) settings, based on a preliminary investigation done by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL): source-to-detector distance effect on amplifier gain and optimized discriminator settings. This report discusses this investigation. A number of conclusions can be drawn from the ORNL testing. First, for increased distance between the source and the detector, thus illuminating the entire detector rather than just the center of the detector (as is done during detector alignments), an increase in gain may provide a 5-15% increase in sensitivity (Fig. 4). However, increasing the gain without adjusting the discriminator settings is not recommended as this makes the monitor more sensitive to electronic noise and temperature-induced fluctuations. Furthermore, if the discriminators are adjusted in relation to the increase in gain, thus appropriately discriminating against electronic noise, the sensitivity gains are less than 5% (Fig. 6). ORNL does not consider this slight increase in sensitivity to be a worthwhile pursuit. Second, increasing the ULD will increase sensitivity a few percent (Fig. 7); however, it is not clear that the slight increase in sensitivity is worth the effort required to make the change (e.g., reliability, cost, etc.). Additionally, while the monitor would be more sensitive to HEU, it would also be more sensitive to NORM. Third, the sensitivity of the system remains approximately the same whether it is calibrated to a small source on contact or a large source far away (Fig. 6). This affirms that no changes to the existing calibration procedure are necessary.

  15. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wysocki, Matthew G; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    While the study of the quark-gluon plasma has been the primary focus of the RHIC experiments, much work has also been done to understand so-called cold nuclear matter (CNM) eects through d+Au collisions where no hot plasma is produced. Eects such as nuclear shadowing, Cronin enhancement, and initial-state parton energy loss, among others, are not only interesting in their own right, but have direct implications on QGP-related measurements in A+A collisions. Recently PHENIX has measured CNM eects at midrapidity in s_NN = 200 GeV d+Au collisions. Measurements of reconstructed jets reveal the centrality dependence of both jet suppression and broadening of the away-side jet. Meanwhile, single electrons from heavy flavor decays exhibit enhancement, increasing with centrality, over a broad p_T range. J/psi and psi' modification have also been measured and are quite dierent in magnitude, in contrast with our expectations. The above results are presented here and compared to our present understanding of CNM effects.

  16. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

  17. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  18. Effective Hamiltonians for phosphorene and silicene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Lopez-Bezanilla, A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Willatzen, M.

    2015-02-01

    We derived the effective Hamiltonians for silicene and phosphorene with strain, electric field and magnetic field using the method of invariants. Our paper extends the work of Geissler et al 2013 (New J. Phys. 15 085030) on silicene, and Li and Appelbaum 2014 (Phys. Rev. B 90, 115439) on phosphorene. Our Hamiltonians are compared to an equivalent one for graphene. For silicene, the expression for band warping is obtained analytically and found to be of different order than for graphene.We prove that a uniaxial strain does not open a gap, resolving contradictory numerical results in the literature. For phosphorene, it is shown that the bands near the Brillouin zone center only have terms in even powers of the wave vector.We predict that the energies change quadratically in the presence of a perpendicular external electric field but linearly in a perpendicular magnetic field, as opposed to those for silicene which vary linearly in both cases. Preliminary ab initio calculations for the intrinsic band structures have been carried out in order to evaluate some of the k · p parameters.

  19. Shell effects in fusion of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The spontaneous-fission properties of Fm isotopes undergo dramatic changes between {sup 256}Fm and {sup 258} Fm. The fission fragments of the former isotope are mass asymmetric with kinetic energies of about 200 MeV, whereas the fission fragments of the latter isotope are symmetric with kinetic energies of about 235 MeV. This rapid change occurs because the division into nearly doubly magic fragments near {sup 132}Sn becomes possible and opens up new valleys in the fission potential-energy surface. In the cold-fusion reactions leading to the heaviest elements, the nearly doubly magic targets and/or projectiles may give rise to important features associated with this magicity. Cold fusion is thought to favor heavy-element formation because it leads to low excitation energies of the compound nuclei. We investigate how near-magic targets and projectiles may lead to persistent survivability of the shells in the fusion valley as the ions merge, in addition to their effect on the compound-nucleus excitation energy.

  20. The effective field theory of dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Vernizzi, Filippo; Piazza, Federico E-mail: fpiazza@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-02-01

    We propose a universal description of dark energy and modified gravity that includes all single-field models. By extending a formalism previously applied to inflation, we consider the metric universally coupled to matter fields and we write in terms of it the most general unitary gauge action consistent with the residual unbroken symmetries of spatial diffeomorphisms. Our action is particularly suited for cosmological perturbation theory: the background evolution depends on only three operators. All other operators start at least at quadratic order in the perturbations and their effects can be studied independently and systematically. In particular, we focus on the properties of a few operators which appear in non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor gravity and galileon theories. In this context, we study the mixing between gravity and the scalar degree of freedom. We assess the quantum and classical stability, derive the speed of sound of fluctuations and the renormalization of the Newton constant. The scalar can always be de-mixed from gravity at quadratic order in the perturbations, but not necessarily through a conformal rescaling of the metric. We show how to express covariant field-operators in our formalism and give several explicit examples of dark energy and modified gravity models in our language. Finally, we discuss the relation with the covariant EFT methods recently appeared in the literature.

  1. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8?m), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  2. Computer modeling of the global warming effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, W.M.

    1993-12-31

    The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

  3. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElfresh, Michael; Lucas, Matthew; Silveira, Joseph P.; Groves, Scott E.

    2007-02-27

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  4. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  5. Effect of soiling in CPV systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivar, M.; Herrero, R.; Anton, I.; Martinez-Moreno, F.; Moreton, R.; Sala, G.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of soiling in flat PV modules has been already studied, causing a reduction of the electrical output of 4% on average. For CPV's, as far as soiling produces light scattering at the optical collector surface, the scattered rays should be definitively lost because they cannot be focused onto the receivers again. While the theoretical study becomes difficult because soiling is variable at different sites, it becomes easier to begin the monitoring of the real field performance of concentrators and then raise the following question: how much does the soiling affect to PV concentrators in comparison with flat panels?' The answers allow to predict the PV concentrator electrical performance and to establish a pattern of cleaning frequency. Some experiments have been conducted at the IES-UPM and CSES-ANU sites, consisting in linear reflective concentration systems, a point focus refractive concentrator and a flat module. All the systems have been measured when soiled and then after cleaning, achieving different increases of I{sub SC}. In general, results show that CPV systems are more sensitive to soiling than flat panels, accumulating losses in I{sub SC} of about 14% on average in three different tests conducted at IES-UPM and CSES-ANU test sites in Madrid (Spain) and Canberra (Australia). Some concentrators can reach losses up to 26% when the system is soiled for 4 months of exposure. (author)

  6. Effective Hamiltonians for phosphorene and silicene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Lopez-Bezanilla, A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Willatzen, M.

    2015-02-01

    We derived the effective Hamiltonians for silicene and phosphorene with strain, electric field and magnetic field using the method of invariants. Our paper extends the work of Geissler et al 2013 (New J. Phys. 15 085030) on silicene, and Li and Appelbaum 2014 (Phys. Rev. B 90, 115439) on phosphorene. Our Hamiltonians are compared to an equivalent one for graphene. For silicene, the expression for band warping is obtained analytically and found to be of different order than for graphene.We prove that a uniaxial strain does not open a gap, resolving contradictory numerical results in the literature. For phosphorene, itmore » is shown that the bands near the Brillouin zone center only have terms in even powers of the wave vector.We predict that the energies change quadratically in the presence of a perpendicular external electric field but linearly in a perpendicular magnetic field, as opposed to those for silicene which vary linearly in both cases. Preliminary ab initio calculations for the intrinsic band structures have been carried out in order to evaluate some of the k · p parameters.« less

  7. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  8. Using Cost-Effectiveness Tests to Design CHP Incentive Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, Rick

    2014-11-01

    This paper examines the structure of cost-effectiveness tests to illustrate how they can accurately reflect the costs and benefits of CHP systems. This paper begins with a general background discussion on cost-effectiveness analysis of DER and then describes how cost-effectiveness tests can be applied to CHP. Cost-effectiveness results are then calculated and analyzed for CHP projects in five states: Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, and North Carolina. Based on the results obtained for these five states, this paper offers four considerations to inform regulators in the application of cost-effectiveness tests in developing CHP programs.

  9. Molecular Control of the Nanoscale: Effect of PhosphineChalcogenide Reactivity on CdSCdSe Nanocrystal Composition and Morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Albright, Haley R.; Callis, Brandon; Ward, Brittney; Cisneros, Joana; Fan, Hua-Jun; Vela, Javier

    2012-04-22

    We demonstrate molecular control of nanoscale composition, alloying, and morphology (aspect ratio) in CdSCdSe nanocrystal dots and rods by modulating the chemical reactivity of phosphinechalcogenide precursors. Specific molecular precursors studied were sulfides and selenides of triphenylphosphite (TPP), diphenylpropylphosphine (DPP), tributylphosphine (TBP), trioctylphosphine (TOP), and hexaethylphosphorustriamide (HPT). Computational (DFT), NMR (31P and 77Se), and high-temperature crossover studies unambiguously confirm a chemical bonding interaction between phosphorus and chalcogen atoms in all precursors. Phosphinechalcogenide precursor reactivity increases in the order: TPPE < DPPE < TBPE < TOPE < HPTE (E = S, Se). For a given phosphine, the selenide is always more reactive than the sulfide. CdS1xSex quantum dots were synthesized via single injection of a R3PSR3PSe mixture to cadmium oleate at 250 C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV/Vis and PL optical spectroscopy reveal that relative R3PS and R3PSe reactivity dictates CdS1xSex dot chalcogen content and the extent of radial alloying (alloys vs core/shells). CdS, CdSe, and CdS1xSex quantum rods were synthesized by injection of a single R3PE (E = S or Se) precursor or a R3PSR3PSe mixture to cadmiumphosphonate at 320 or 250 C. XRD and TEM reveal that the length-to-diameter aspect ratio of CdS and CdSe nanorods is inversely proportional to R3PE precursor reactivity. Purposely matching or mismatching R3PSR3PSe precursor reactivity leads to CdS1xSex nanorods without or with axial composition gradients, respectively. We expect these observations will lead to scalable and highly predictable bottom-up programmed syntheses of finely heterostructured nanomaterials with well-defined architectures and properties that are tailored for precise applications.

  10. Observations of solute effects on bubble formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmeier, U.; Yaminsky, V.V.; Christenson, H.K.

    1995-09-01

    The authors have studied the effects of solute, in particular aqueous electrolyte, on bubble formation at capillary orifices and frits at varying gas flow rates. Using a stroboscope, video microscope, and rotating mirror, they have obtained pictures which show how bubble formation involves the interaction of bubbles at the orifice. These interactions depend on the value of the surface elasticity E due to positively (ethanol) or negatively (NaCl) adsorbed solute. At low flow rates consecutive bubbles do not interact. Each bubble detaches and leaves the orifice region before the next one starts forming. A intermediate flow rates the more closely spaced, consecutive bubbles begin to interact. In pure liquids there is no barrier to bubble coalescence and the detached bubble is fed by the subsequent bubble as this starts to grow. The process may be repeated several times before the original bubble has risen out of range. In solutions where E is large enough bubble coalescence is inhibited. Instead of feeding into the detached bubble the following bubble pushes it aside, and the bubbles appear to bounce off each other. Bouncing may give rise to a characteristic sequence of larger and smaller bubbles if the emerging bubbles break off prematurely from the orifice due to the inertia of the original bubble. The transition from feeding to bouncing depends critically on E of the solution and leads to a smaller average bubble size for large E values. At high flow rates detached bubbles are invariably fed by several subsequent ones. At very high flow rates the bubbling becomes chaotic, but the interaction of bubbles after leaving the orifice area produces smaller bubbles in solutions. Bouncing is more likely to occur with narrow and irregular capillaries. The dramatically different appearance of gas-sparged columns in salt water and freshwater has its origin in the difference between assemblies of pores showing mainly feeding (freshwater) or bouncing (salt water).

  11. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.

  12. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W; Li, Tingwen; Nicoletti, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  13. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed themore » statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.« less

  14. D= DOE/RG-0067

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Effects of d i rect el e c t r i c f i elds , n o i s e , sex and age on maz e learn ing ... n i neteen Mas s achusetts towns i n M i dd l esex , E s sex , and Worc ester Count i es . ...

  15. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Cline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut fr Physik, Fhringer Ring 6, 80805 Mnchen ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  16. Catalytic effects of minerals on NOx emission from coal combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, M.Y.; Che, D.F.

    2007-07-01

    The catalytic effects of inherent mineral matters on NOx emissions from coal combustion have been investigated by a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) equipped with a gas analyzer. The effect of demineralization and the individual effect of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe on the formation of NOx are studied as well as the combined catalytic effects of Ca + Na and Ca + Ti. Demineralization causes more Fuel-N to retain in the char, and reduction of NOx mostly. But the mechanistic effect on NOx formation varies from coal to coal. Ca and Mg promote NOx emission. Na, K, Fe suppress NOx formation to different extents. The effect of transition element Fe is the most obvious. The combination of Ca + Na and Ca + Ti can realize the simultaneous control of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emissions.

  17. CHP: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future, December 2008 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future, December 2008 CHP: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future, December 2008 Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its

  18. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (CEQ, 1997) | Department of Energy Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 1997) Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act (CEQ, 1997) This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the consideration of cumulative effects in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It introduces the NEPA practitioner and other interested

  19. Final report: Compiled MPI. Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect report: Compiled MPI. Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final report: Compiled MPI. Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development This is the final report on Compiled MPI: Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development, and summarizes the results under this project. The project investigated runtime enviroments that improve the performance of MPI (Message-Passing Interface) programs; work at

  20. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence. The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression

  1. Water Efficiency and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Water Measures? | Department of Energy and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating Innovative Water Measures? Water Efficiency and ESPCs: How Effective are ESPCs at Integrating Innovative Water Measures? The Federal Energy Management Program investigated how effective energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are at integrating innovative water efficiency measures and identified ways to improve the process. This fact sheet shares the results of this assessment. PDF icon

  2. Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions (CEQ, 1979) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions (CEQ, 1979) Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions (CEQ, 1979) On January 4, 1979, President Carter signed Executive Order 12114, entitled Environmental Effects of Major Federal Actions. The purpose of this Council on Environmental Quality memorandum is to initiate the consultation process required by this Executive Order. PDF icon 44 Fed Reg 18633: Council on Environmental Quality: Environmental

  3. NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Algae | Department of Energy Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae February 11, 2016 - 5:07pm Addthis A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has proven to be significantly more effective at

  4. The effects of charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) on galaxy shape

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurements (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The effects of charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) on galaxy shape measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The effects of charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) on galaxy shape measurements We examine the effects of charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) during CCD readout on the demanding galaxy shape measurements required by studies of weak gravitational lensing. We simulate a CCD

  5. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, June 26, 2014. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Trends in Multifamily Programs:

  6. DOE Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments DOE Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments The Center for Regulatory Effectiveness (CRE) is pleased to submit these comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on how DOE can best review its existing regulations and to identify whether any of its existing regulations should be modified, streamlined, expanded or repealed. PDF icon

  7. Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector - New SEE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Action Publication | Department of Energy Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector - New SEE Action Publication Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector - New SEE Action Publication March 24, 2014 - 12:56pm Addthis Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector provides state regulators, utilities, and other program administrators with an overview of U.S. industrial energy efficiency programs delivered by a

  8. Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fractured rocks (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for fractured rocks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for fractured rocks To represent a heterogeneous unsaturated fractured rock by its homogeneous equivalent, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain upscaled (effective) flow properties. In this study, we present a numerical

  9. Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Forcing through Deep Convection (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection Aerosol indirect effects, i.e., the interactions of aerosols with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN), constitute the largest

  10. Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions The transition between Kondo and Coulomb blockade effects in discontinuous double magnetic

  11. Effect of Resistivity on Hydromagnetic Instabilities in Multipolar Systems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effect of Resistivity on Hydromagnetic Instabilities in Multipolar Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Resistivity on Hydromagnetic Instabilities in Multipolar Systems The effect of electrical resistivity on hydromagnetic instabilities is studied with special emphasis on interchange instabilities. A stellarator expansion is utilized to reduce the stability problem to one of solving two coupled secondorder ordinary differential

  12. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    inorganic aerosols during haze events (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 30, 2016 Title: Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of

  13. Effect of nonaxisymmetric perturbations on the structure of a tokamak

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    poloidal divertor (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Effect of nonaxisymmetric perturbations on the structure of a tokamak poloidal divertor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of nonaxisymmetric perturbations on the structure of a tokamak poloidal divertor The effects of n = 1 nonaxisymmetric perturbations on a tokamak poloidal divertor are described. Despite the existence of a region of chaotic field line trajectories outside the last closed flux surface,

  14. Effect of nonaxisymmetric perturbations on the structure of a tokamak

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    poloidal divertor (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Effect of nonaxisymmetric perturbations on the structure of a tokamak poloidal divertor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of nonaxisymmetric perturbations on the structure of a tokamak poloidal divertor The effects of n = 1 nonaxisymmetric perturbations on a tokamak poloidal divertor are described. Despite the existence of a region of chaotic field line trajectories outside the last closed flux surface, the footprint of

  15. Effective theories and black hole production in warped compactifications

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effective theories and black hole production in warped compactifications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective theories and black hole production in warped compactifications We investigate aspects of the four-dimensional (4D) effective description of brane world scenarios based on warped compactification on anti-de Sitter space. The low-energy dynamics is described by visible matter gravitationally coupled to a ''dark'' conformal field

  16. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the consideration of cumulative effects in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It introduces the NEPA practitioner and other interested parties to the complex issue of cumulative effects, outlines general principles, presents useful steps, and provides information on methods of cumulative effects analysis and data sources.

  17. Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Utilizing Heavy Ion-Irradiation- | Department of Energy Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite Utilizing Heavy Ion-Irradiation- Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite Utilizing Heavy Ion-Irradiation- Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014. PDF icon Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite Utilizing Heavy Ion-Irradiation- More

  18. Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refineries | Department of Energy Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries This factsheet details a project to improve operating procedures, including physical and chemical methods and the use of high-temperature coatings, to allow refineries to operate equipment below threshold fouling conditions and use the most effective minimization techniques. PDF icon

  19. Hall effect measurements on InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloemers, Ch.; Grap, T.; Lepsa, M. I.; Moers, J.; Gruetzmacher, D.; Lueth, H.; Trellenkamp, St.; Schaepers, Th.

    2012-10-08

    We have processed Hall contacts on InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy using an electron beam lithography process with an extremely high alignment accuracy. The carrier concentrations determined from the Hall effect measurements on these nanowires are lower by a factor of about 4 in comparison with those measured by the common field-effect technique. The results are used to evaluate quantitatively the charging effect of the interface and surface states.

  20. Idaho Site Advances Recovery Act Cleanup after Inventing Effective Treatment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Wind Power | Department of Energy Idaho Power Develops Renewable Integration Tool for More Cost Effective Use of Wind Power Idaho Power Develops Renewable Integration Tool for More Cost Effective Use of Wind Power September 22, 2014 - 3:47pm Addthis Idaho Power Company (IPC) has developed a Renewables Integration Tool (RIT) that enables grid operators to use wind energy more cost-effectively to serve electricity customers in Idaho and Oregon. The tool was developed under a Smart Grid

  1. Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Participating in Utility Planning Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Working with Utilities Peer Exchange Call: Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, August 2, 2012. This Peer Exchange Call discussed effective strategies for participating in utility planning. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Do-It-Yourself Projects Using

  2. Effective White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Effective White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting Effective White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting Document details lighting technologies that provide low-maintenance alternatives to high-pressure sodium lighting. PDF icon white_light_parking_area..pdf More Documents & Publications LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at the NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report

  3. Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress) Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress) The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) and other federal agencies, including federal dam owners, has prepared a comprehensive assessment examining the effects of climate change on water available for hydropower at federal facilities and on the marketing of power from

  4. The effective field theory of dark matter direct detection (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect The effective field theory of dark matter direct detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The effective field theory of dark matter direct detection We extend and explore the general non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter (DM) direct detection. We describe the basic non-relativistic building blocks of operators and discuss their symmetry properties, writing down all Galilean-invariant operators up to quadratic order in momentum transfer

  5. CRC handbook of biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Postow, E. )

    1986-01-01

    This book presents current knowledge about the effects of electromagnetic fields on living matter. The three-part format covers: dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of biological materials; effects of direct current and low frequency fields; and effects of radio frequency (including microwave) fields. The parts are designed to be consulted independently or in sequence, depending upon the needs of the reader. Useful appendixes on measurement units and safety standards are also included.

  6. CRC handbook of biological effects of electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, C.; Postow, E.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the current knowledge about the effects of electromagnetic fields on living matter. The three-part format covers dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of biological materials; effects of direct current and low frequency fields; and effects of radio frequency (including microwave) fields. The parts are designed to be consulted independently or in sequence, depending upon the needs of the reader. Useful appendixes on measurement units and safety standards are also included.

  7. PSU CBEI: VOLTTRON Compatible and Cost-Effective Fault Diagnostic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of cost-effective fault detection and diagnosis strategies for air handling unit (AHU) ... control company, service company, fault diagnosis company 2 Purpose and Objectives Problem ...

  8. Thermosensitive gating effect and selective gas adsorption in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermosensitive gating effect and selective gas adsorption in a porous coordination nanocage Previous Next List Dan Zhao , Daqiang Yuan , Rajamani Krishna , Jasper M. van Baten and...

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Tests and Measuring Like a Utility | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications DOE Webinar: Translating Behavior Change Research Into Consumer Action Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused, and Contractor-Focused Data Tracking Systems ...

  10. Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Citation ...

  11. Microstructural Effects on Void Nucleation in Single-Phase Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Single-Phase Copper Polycrystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microstructural Effects on Void Nucleation in Single-Phase Copper Polycrystals You are ...

  12. Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion, and Emissions Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing ...

  13. Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4, 1979, President Carter signed Executive Order 12114, entitled Environmental Effects of Major Federal Actions. The purpose of this Council on Environmental Quality memorandum is...

  14. Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using ...

  15. Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes ... Keywords: Amphibian Coal combustion wastes Contaminants Trace elements Selenium a b s t r ...

  16. Characterizing the effects of ratchet growth on PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Darla Graff; Brown, Geoff W; Mang, Joseph T; De Luca, Racci; Patterson, Brian; Hagelberg, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Pressed composites of TATB (2,4,6-trinintro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine) undergo irreversible volume change when subjected to thermal cycling. Using micro x-ray computed tomography and ultra-small angle neutron scattering, we have characterized the micro-structure of as-pressed and ratchet grown specimens of PBX 9502, a TATB-based composite, thereby distinguishing the effects of ratchet growth from the effects of density alone. Porosity differences are shown to effect mechanical properties, presented here, with ongoing efforts to evaluate sensitivity and/or performance effects.

  17. Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3a. Natural Gas Consumption per Sq Ft Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas...

  18. The Effect of Changes in Diesel Exhaust Composition and After...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology on Lung Inflammation and Resistance to Viral Infection The Effect of Changes in Diesel Exhaust Composition and After-Treatment Technology on Lung Inflammation and ...

  19. Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    forces between silica nanoparticles in water. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between silica nanoparticles in water. ...

  20. Effects of Experimental Methods on the Measurements of a Nonlinear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Effects of Experimental Methods on the Measurements of a Nonlinear Structure. Abstract not provided. Authors: Catalfamo, Simone 1 ; Smith, Scott A ; Morlock, Florian 1 ; ...

  1. Controlling orbital-selective Kondo effects in a single molecule...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coordination chemistry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling orbital-selective Kondo effects in a single molecule through coordination chemistry Iron(II) ...

  2. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    117 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated February 2009 Prepared by Keith Knoll Brian West Wendy Clark...

  3. Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information, Final Rule DRAFT NEPA Guidance on Consideration of the Effects of Climate Change and Greenhouse Gas Emissions CEQ Guidance on the Application of NEPA to ...

  4. Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Fixed & Volatile Carbon Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) ...

  5. Effect of Machining Procedures on the Strength of Ceramics for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effect of Machining Procedures on the Strength of Ceramics for Advanced Diesel Engine Applications Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research ...

  6. The Effects of Fuel Composition and Compression Ratio on Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Effects of Fuel Composition and Compression Ratio on Thermal Efficiency in an HCCI Engine Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research ...

  7. Preliminary Analysis of the Nauru Island Effect Study Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the surrounding ocean) induces convection and cloud formation (Nordeen et al. 2001). ... relatively small effect on the radiation budget in the region, it may cause the radiation ...

  8. Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact, Light-Weight, and Scalable High Temperature Inverter for HEVs, PHEVs, and FCVs High Temperature Inverter Development, Test ...

  9. Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact, Light-Weight, and Scalable High Temperature Inverter for HEVs, PHEVs, and FCVs Development, Test and Demonstration ...

  10. Effective Energy Behavior Change for Low-Income Weatherization Clients

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the transcript for the Effective Energy Behavior Change for Low-Income Weatherization Clients webinar presented on May 31, 2012.

  11. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on solar reflectance Part I: Analysis of roofing product databases Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar ...

  12. Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Investment...

  13. NREL: State and Local Governments - The Effect of State Policy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    foundational policies and localized strategies can effectively drive solar photovoltaic (PV) installations in any state context. Report Highlights Both the number of solar policies...

  14. Low-effect HCP Screening Form | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HCP Screening FormLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  15. Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective, Occupied, and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b.Relative Standard Errors Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective Occupied, and Vacant Square Footage, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings (thousand) Total...

  16. Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Effectiveness of Shallow Temperatures Surveys to Target a Geothermal Reservoir at Previously Explored Site at Mcgee Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  17. Water chlorination: environmental impact and health effects. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolley, R.L.; Brungs, W.A.; Cumming, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The papers dealt with the major facets of chlorination and its associated effects. Each has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

  18. EFFECTS OF SEAT WIDTH ON DEVELOPMENT OF ADHESIONS IN STAINLESS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STEEL TRIM SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: EFFECTS OF SEAT WIDTH ON DEVELOPMENT OF ADHESIONS IN STAINLESS STEEL TRIM ...

  19. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect. We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2(110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    project to study climate change's effect on tropical forests Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues...

  1. Correlating Size and Composition-Dependent Effects with Magnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Correlating Size and Composition-Dependent Effects with Magnetic, Mssbauer, and Pair Distribution Function Measurements in a Family of Catalytically Active Ferrite Nanoparticles ...

  2. New Energy Efficiency Tax Credits Take Effect | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Credits Take Effect New Energy Efficiency Tax Credits Take Effect January 3, 2006 - 9:05am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The energy efficiency tax credits signed into law by President George W. Bush have gone into effect, making it easier for American families and businesses to reduce energy costs at home, work and on the road. The various tax credits designed to improve America's energy efficiency went into effect on January 1, 2006 and are available for the purchase and installation of energy

  3. Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Explores the effect of compression ratio and piston design on the practical load range of bio-fueled Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion. PDF icon ...

  4. EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline (DOE, 1981) Unified Procedures Applicable to Major Federal Actions Relating to Nuclear Activities ...

  5. 10 Questions with Special Effects Designer Doug Roble | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Special Effects Designer Doug Roble 10 Questions with Special Effects Designer Doug Roble April 29, 2015 - 3:10pm Addthis Doug Roble says math is the backbone of the special effects industry. | Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University. Doug Roble says math is the backbone of the special effects industry. | Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University. Pat Adams Pat Adams Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Follow along the Science bowl on our

  6. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #04 Setting Effective Date for New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy's (DOE) policy for setting effective dates for newly hired employees and to ensure uniform application among DOE Headquarters, Elements and Field Human Resources Offices. ...

  7. DOE Guidance-Setting Effective Date for New Hires

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MEMORANDUM FOR HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTORS FROM: SARA I. BONIL HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM4: SETTING EFFECTIVE DATE FOR NEW HIRES The purpose of this memorandum is to ...

  8. An effective field theory for collinear and soft gluons: Heavy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An effective field theory for collinear and soft gluons: Heavy to light decays Citation ... Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM ...

  9. Effect of silica nanoparticles on morphology of segmented polyurethane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atomic force microscopy revealed a strong effect of nanoparticles on the large-scale ... Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; FILLERS; GLASS; MELTING; MELTING ...

  10. Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics:...

  11. Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J.

    2010-02-01

    This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective.

  12. Improvement of Design Codes to Account for Accident Thermal Effects...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IMPROVEMENT OF DESIGN CODES TO ACCOUNT FOR ACCIDENT THERMAL EFFECTS ON SEISMIC PERFORMANCE Amit H. Varma, Kadir Sener, Saahas Bhardwaj Purdue University Andrew Whittaker: Univ. of...

  13. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Productionof Quantum-Well-Type Structures and Recovoery of Waste Heat from Heavy-Duty Trucks Thermoelectric Developments for Vehicular ...

  14. The Effects of Somatic Hypermutation on Neutralization and Binding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hypermutation on Neutralization and Binding in the PGT121 Family of Broadly Neutralizing HIV Antibodies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effects of Somatic...

  15. Hot Particle and Turbulent Transport Effects on Resistive Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2012-10-16

    This research project included two main thrusts; energetic particle effects on resistive MHD modes in tokamaks, and turbulence interactions with tearing modes in simplified geometry.

  16. Effective Loan Program Design and Integration with Contractors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Loan Program Design and Integration with Contractors Effective Loan Program Design and Integration with Contractors Better Buildings Residential Network Financing and Revenue Peer ...

  17. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: ...

  18. LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Area Lighting at the NAVFAC Engineering Service Center LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at the NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Document details ...

  19. Tunable electronic correlation effects in nanotube-light interactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in nanotube-light interactions This content will become publicly available on November 3, 2016 Title: Tunable electronic correlation effects in nanotube-light interactions ...

  20. Towards feasible and effective predictive wavefront control for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    predictive wavefront control for adaptive optics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards feasible and effective predictive wavefront control for adaptive optics We ...