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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help facility managers make sound decisions, FEMP provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments.

3

Life cycle cost report of VHLW cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Life Cycle Cost Report (LCCR) for the VHLW Cask, presents the life cycle costs for acquiring, using, and disposing of the VHLW casks. The VHLW cask consists of a ductile iron cask body, called the shielding insert, which is used for storage and transportation, and ultimately for disposal of Defense High Level Waste which has been vitrified and placed into VHLW canisters. Each ductile iron VHLW shielding insert holds one VHLW canister. For transportation, the shielding insert is placed into a containment overpack. The VHLW cask as configured for transportation is a legal weight truck cask which will be licensed by NRC. The purpose of this LCCR is to present the development of the life cycle costs for using the VHLW cask to transport VHLW canisters from the generating sites to a disposal site. Life cycle costs include the cost of acquiring, operating, maintaining, and ultimately dispositioning the VHLW cask and its associated hardware. This report summarizes costs associated with transportation of the VHLW casks. Costs are developed on the basis of expected usage, anticipated source and destination locations, and expected quantities of VHLW which must be transported. DOE overhead costs, such as the costs associated with source and destination facility handling of the VHLW, are not included. Also not included are costs exclusive to storage or disposal of the VHLW waste.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Life Cycle Cost Housing Need and Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Cost Housing Need and Sustainability Abstract: Jordan is actually facing a rapid urban became difficult to sustain especially concerning the slum areas and the environmental pollution due which could contribute to increase the productivity and sustainability taking into consideration

5

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life...

6

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Principal Investigator: Y.-X. Tao Florida International...

7

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

8

Comparison of Life Cycle Costs for LLRW Management in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a comparison of life-cycle costs of an assured isolation facility in Texas versus the life-cycle costs for a traditional belowground low-level radioactive waste disposal facility designed for the proposed site near Sierra Blanca, Texas.

Baird, R. D.; Rogers, B. C.; Chau, N.; Kerr, Thomas A

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Incorporating uncertainty in the Life Cycle Cost Analysis of pavements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an important tool to evaluate the economic performance of alternative investments for a given project. It considers the total cost to construct, maintain, and operate a pavement over its ...

Swei, Omar Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

LIFE CYCLE COST HANDBOOK Guidance for Life Cycle Cost Estimation and Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer SomersKnown ChallengesLES'LIFE CYCLE COST HANDBOOK

11

Life Cycle Cost Estimate - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requiremen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning. g4301-1chp23.pdf -- PDF Document, 52 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

12

Empirical Study of Life-Cycle Cost Analysis for Bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridge and the Golden Gate Bridge · Step three: Obtain data from highway bridges of different structuralEmpirical Study of Life-Cycle Cost Analysis for Bridges Progress Report Ahmad Hadavi, PhD, PE and their timing during the life of a bridge to achieve the 50- to 100-year service life that many bridge

13

Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems - Executive Summary Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems - Executive Summary This...

14

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Documents & Publications Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis -...

15

Geothermal completion technology life-cycle cost model (GEOCOM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GEOCOM is a model developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of alternative technologies used in the completion, production, and maintenance of geothermal wells. The model calculates the ratio of life-cycle cost to life-cycle production or injection and thus is appropriate for evaluating the cost effectiveness of a geothermal well even when the most economically profitable well completion strategies do not result in lowest capital costs. The project to develop the GEOCOM model included the establishment of a data base for studying geothermal completions and preliminary case/sensitivity studies. The code has the data base built into its structure as default parameters. These parameters include geothermal resource characteristics; costs of geothermal wells, workovers, and equipment; and other data. The GEOCOM model has been written in ANSI (American National Standard Institute) FORTRAN 1966 version.

Mansure, A.J.; Carson, C.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Handbook Final Version 9-30-14  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This handbook provides procedures, information, examples, and tools to develop consistent and defensible life-cycle cost estimates (LCCE) and perform appropriate life-cycle cost analyses (LCCA) for capital projects. LCC Handbook – Final, September 2014

17

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital...

18

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2014 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2014 Handbook describes the...

19

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

20

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification – a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Target topic: achieving sustainability, saving energy, and improving occupant comfort? Lead Author Wolfram Trinius, PhD, Ingenieurb?ro Trinius, Hamburg, Germany and University of Gavle, Sweden Co Authors Harry Hirsch, HH Consulting, Baden... Baden, Germany Simone Lakenbrink, DU Diederichs Project Management, Munich, Germany Title Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification ? a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing The move from...

Trinius, W.; Hirsch, H.

22

Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Public Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All facilities using public funds for construction or renovation must undergo a life cycle analysis, which will consider energy efficiency and on-site energy equipment using the sun, wind, oil,...

23

Impact of the 3Cs of Batteries on PHEV Value Proposition: Cost, Calendar Life, and Cycle Life (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battery cost, calendar life, and cycle life are three important challenges for those commercializing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; battery life is sensitive to temperature and solar loading.

Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.; Markel, T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing...

25

ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 3: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the six options described in Volume 1, Section 2: Option 1 -- Total removal clean closure; No subsequent use; Option 2 -- Risk-based clean closure; LLW fill; Option 3 -- Risk-based clean closure; CERCLA fill; Option 4 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; LLW fill; Option 5 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; CERCLA fill; and Option 6 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; Clean fill. This volume is divided into two portions. The first portion contains the cost and planning schedule estimates while the second portion contains life-cycle costs and yearly cash flow information for each option.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo FengBoulder, CO) JumpNRELEnergyGHGs NationalLife-Cycle

27

The development of a life cycle cost model for railroad tunnels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today, Life Cycle Costing is one of the most popular ways of assessing a project's or an investment's worth to a company. This method of assessment is often applied to all stages of a investment's lifecycle, starting from ...

Angeles, Jon Virgil V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NISTIR 85-3273-29 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2014 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Priya...

30

Alternative water sources: Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 8 Alternative water sourcees Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility platform and design standards as DESAL ECONOMICS?, but created to analyze con- ventional surface water treatment... to determine the economic and financial life-cycle costs of building and operating four water treatment facilities in South Texas. One facility was the Southmost Regional Water Authority Regional Desalination Plant near Brownsville. Sturdi- vant said...

Supercinski, Danielle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Minimization of Life Cycle Costs Through Optimization of the Validation Program A Test Sample Size and Warranty Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. 1 Validation cost usually includes engineering and capital expenses associated with full, where a validation engineer is expected to estimate validation cost based on the reliabilityMinimization of Life Cycle Costs Through Optimization of the Validation Program ­ A Test Sample

Sandborn, Peter

32

Hanford River Protection Project Life cycle Cost Modeling Tool to Enhance Mission Planning - 13396  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Life cycle Cost Model (LCM) Tool is an overall systems model that incorporates budget, and schedule impacts for the entire life cycle of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, and is replacing the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model as the foundation of the RPP system planning process. Currently, the DOE frequently requests HTWOS simulations of alternative technical and programmatic strategies for completing the RPP mission. Analysis of technical and programmatic changes can be performed with HTWOS; however, life cycle costs and schedules were previously generated by manual transfer of time-based data from HTWOS to Primavera P6. The LCM Tool automates the preparation of life cycle costs and schedules and is needed to provide timely turnaround capability for RPP mission alternative analyses. LCM is the simulation component of the LCM Tool. The simulation component is a replacement of the HTWOS model with new capability to support life cycle cost modeling. It is currently deployed in G22, but has been designed to work in any full object-oriented language with an extensive feature set focused on networking and cross-platform compatibility. The LCM retains existing HTWOS functionality needed to support system planning and alternatives studies going forward. In addition, it incorporates new functionality, coding improvements that streamline programming and model maintenance, and capability to input/export data to/from the LCM using the LCM Database (LCMDB). The LCM Cost/Schedule (LCMCS) contains cost and schedule data and logic. The LCMCS is used to generate life cycle costs and schedules for waste retrieval and processing scenarios. It uses time-based output data from the LCM to produce the logic ties in Primavera P6 necessary for shifting activities. The LCM Tool is evolving to address the needs of decision makers who want to understand the broad spectrum of risks facing complex organizations like DOE-RPP to understand how near-term programmatic decisions affect life cycle costs and commitments. (authors)

Dunford, Gary [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [AEM Consulting, LLC, 1201 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Williams, David [WIT, Inc., 11173 Oak Fern Court, San Diego, CA 92131 (United States)] [WIT, Inc., 11173 Oak Fern Court, San Diego, CA 92131 (United States); Smith, Rick [Knowledge Systems Design, Inc., 13595 Quaker Hill Cross Rd, Nevada City, CA 95959 (United States)] [Knowledge Systems Design, Inc., 13595 Quaker Hill Cross Rd, Nevada City, CA 95959 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Use of life-cycle costing in the development of standards. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis set out to determine how, and to what extent, life-cycle costing is used in the development of voluntary consensus standards. It explains how several organizations in the commercial sector develop voluntary standards. Among these organizations was ASHRAE, who is currently developing a standard based on life-cycle costing. Standard 90.2 Energy Efficient Design of New Low-Rise Residential Buildings prescribes the insulation values for the envelope of a building. The economic methodology was based on marginal analysis by considering an upgraded construction component and then determining the incremental energy-cost savings to the incremental modification costs over a specified life-cycle period. Questions arose concerning the economic assumptions used in developing the standard. It is recommended that an impact study be performed to evaluate the cost-estimating techniques and the basic economic assumptions.

Underwood, J.M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for reduced cost of lightweight materials while meeting national objectives for improved fuel economy * Specific technology improvements affecting major cost drivers detrimental...

35

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost

Michalek, Jeremy J.

36

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery technology now under options, excluding the metal/air batteries: zinc/life- Zinc--air batteries. Like the Al/air battery, the Zn/

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

curves for key cost components - Identification of economic, environmental, and efficiency benefits of IGCC-EGS configurations - Development of skills and capabilities in...

38

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supported by Materials Technology Program to meet national objectives for improved fuel economy * Identify specific technology improvements that affect major cost drivers *...

39

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm001das2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technical Cost...

40

Reducing Life Cycle Cost By Energy Saving in Pump Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% by the available NPSH. The system should provide the highest NPSHA that is cost effective. Losses in the pump suction line are therefore even more wasteful of energy than those on the discharge ? Suction pipes should avoid restrictions which can cause gas...

Bower, J. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

42

Study of Possible Applications of Currently Available Building Information Modeling Tools for the Analysis of Initial Costs and Energy Costs for Performing Life Cycle Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power to the manufacturing industry. The need to satisfy the environmental sustainability requirements, improve operational effectiveness of buildings and apply value engineering principles has increased the dependency on life cycle costing analysis...

Mukherji, Payal Tapandev

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Comparative life-cycle cost analysis for low-level mixed waste remediation alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is two-fold: (1) to develop a generic, life-cycle cost model for evaluating low-level, mixed waste remediation alternatives, and (2) to apply the model specifically, to estimate remediation costs for a site similar to the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, OH. Life-cycle costs for vitrification, cementation, and dry removal process technologies are estimated. Since vitrification is in a conceptual phase, computer simulation is used to help characterize the support infrastructure of a large scale vitrification plant. Cost estimating relationships obtained from the simulation data, previous cost estimates, available process data, engineering judgment, and expert opinion all provide input to an Excel based spreadsheet for generating cash flow streams. Crystal Ball, an Excel add-on, was used for discounting cash flows for net present value analysis. The resulting LCC data was then analyzed using multi-attribute decision analysis techniques with cost and remediation time as criteria. The analytical framework presented allows alternatives to be evaluated in the context of budgetary, social, and political considerations. In general, the longer the remediation takes, the lower the net present value of the process. This is true because of the time value of money and large percentage of the costs attributed to storage or disposal.

Jackson, J.A.; White, T.P.; Kloeber, J.M.; Toland, R.J.; Cain, J.P.; Buitrago, D.Y.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mauricio Sanchez-Silva Colleen Murphy Head of Department, David Rosowsky December 2007 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Effect of Cumulative Seismic Damage and Corrosion on Life-Cycle Cost.... Paolo Gardoni for his technical guidance and for helping with financial support during my study period. I thank Dr. Mauricio Sanchez-Silva for helping me at all stages with his promptness to clear my doubts anytime I approached him. I acknowledge...

Kumar, Ramesh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect from CO2 emission resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels in utility power plants and the use of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, which is currently thought to affect depletion of the ozone layer. The ban on fluorocarbon fluids has been...LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS OF WASTE HEAT OPERATED ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEMS FOR BUILDING HVAC APPLICATIONS V. Murugavel and R. Saravanan Refrigeration and Air conditioning Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Life-cycle cost analysis 200-West Weather Enclosure: Multi-function Waste Tank Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF)will provide environmentally safe and acceptable storage capacity for handling wastes resulting from the remediation of existing single-shell and double-shell tanks on the Hanford Site. The MWTF will construct two tank farm facilities at two separate locations. A four-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site; a two-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-West Area. This report documents the results of a life-cycle cost analysis performed by ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH) for the Weather Enclosure proposed to be constructed over the 200-West tanks. Currently, all tank farm operations on the Hanford Site are conducted in an open environment, with weather often affecting tank farm maintenance activities. The Weather Enclosure is being proposed to allow year-round tank farm operation and maintenance activities unconstrained by weather conditions. Elimination of weather-related delays at the MWTF and associated facilities will reduce operational costs. The life-cycle cost analysis contained in this report analyzes potential cost savings based on historical weather information, operational and maintenance costs, construction cost estimates, and other various assumptions.

Umphrey, M.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

The process of life-cycle cost analysis on the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estimating Services Department of the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) is formalizing the process of life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) for the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The LCCA process is based on the concepts, principles, and guidelines described by applicable Department of Energy`s (DOE) orders, pertinent published literature, and the National Bureau of Standards handbook 135. LCC analyses will be performed following a ten-step process on the FEMP at the earliest possible decision point to support the selection of the least-cost alternatives for achieving the FERMCO mission.

Chang, D.Y.; Jacoboski, J.A.; Fisher, L.A.; Beirne, P.J.

1993-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Accelerated quantification of critical parameters for predicting the service life and life cycle costs of chloride-laden reinforced concrete structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of corrosion resistant steels (instead of conventional carbon steels) and/or high performance concrete can increase the overall service life and can reduce the life cycle cost (LCC) of reinforced concrete (RC) structures exposed to chloride...

Pillai Gopalakrishnan, Radhakrishna

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: A life-cycle costing approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The study aims at assessing economic performance of alternative scenarios of MSW. > The approach is the life-cycle costing (LCC). > Waste technologies must be considered as complementary into an integrated strategy. - Abstract: A critical assumption of studies assessing comparatively waste management options concerns the constant average cost for selective collection regardless the source separation level (SSL) reached, and the neglect of the mass constraint. The present study compares alternative waste management scenarios through the development of a desktop model that tries to remove the above assumption. Several alternative scenarios based on different combinations of energy and materials recovery are applied to two imaginary areas modelled in order to represent a typical Northern Italian setting. External costs and benefits implied by scenarios are also considered. Scenarios are compared on the base of the full cost for treating the total waste generated in the area. The model investigates the factors that influence the relative convenience of alternative scenarios.

Massarutto, Antonio [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Carli, Alessandro de, E-mail: alessandro.decarli@unibocconi.it [IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Graffi, Matteo [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai�¢����i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Applications of life cycle assessment and cost analysis in health care waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three Health Care Waste (HCW) scenarios were assessed through environmental and cost analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCW treatment using microwave oven had the lowest environmental impacts and costs in comparison with autoclave and lime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lime had the worst environmental and economic results for HCW treatment, in comparison with autoclave and microwave. - Abstract: The establishment of rules to manage Health Care Waste (HCW) is a challenge for the public sector. Regulatory agencies must ensure the safety of waste management alternatives for two very different profiles of generators: (1) hospitals, which concentrate the production of HCW and (2) small establishments, such as clinics, pharmacies and other sources, that generate dispersed quantities of HCW and are scattered throughout the city. To assist in developing sector regulations for the small generators, we evaluated three management scenarios using decision-making tools. They consisted of a disinfection technique (microwave, autoclave and lime) followed by landfilling, where transportation was also included. The microwave, autoclave and lime techniques were tested at the laboratory to establish the operating parameters to ensure their efficiency in disinfection. Using a life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis, the decision-making tools aimed to determine the technique with the best environmental performance. This consisted of evaluating the eco-efficiency of each scenario. Based on the life cycle assessment, microwaving had the lowest environmental impact (12.64 Pt) followed by autoclaving (48.46 Pt). The cost analyses indicated values of US$ 0.12 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with microwaves, US$ 1.10 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated by the autoclave and US$ 1.53 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with lime. The microwave disinfection presented the best eco-efficiency performance among those studied and provided a feasible alternative to subsidize the formulation of the policy for small generators of HCW.

Soares, Sebastiao Roberto, E-mail: soares@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Finotti, Alexandra Rodrigues, E-mail: finotti@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Prudencio da Silva, Vamilson, E-mail: vamilson@epagri.sc.gov.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); EPAGRI, Rod. Admar Gonzaga 1347, Itacorubi, Florianopolis, Santa Catarina 88034-901 (Brazil); Alvarenga, Rodrigo A.F., E-mail: alvarenga.raf@gmail.com [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Ghent University, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Coupure Links 653/9000 Gent (Belgium)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results show how the savings vary among customers facing different electricity prices and other conditions. At 11.5 EER, at least 80% of the users achieve a positive LCC savings. At 12.0 EER, the maximum efficiency analyzed, mean LCC savings are lower but still positive. For the {ge} $65,000 Btu/h to <135,000 Btu/h equipment class, 59% of users achieve a positive LCC savings. For the $135,000 Btu/h to <240,000 Btu/h equipment class, 91% of users achieve a positive LCC savings.

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Life-Cycle Costs of Alternative Fuels: Is Biodiesel Cost Competitve for Urban Buses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceEfeedstocks and the climateLife in the

55

Life cycle costs for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projected constant dollar life cycle cost (LCC) estimates are presented for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition program being managed by the US Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD). The scope of the LCC estimate includes: design, construction, licensing, operation, and deactivation of a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility (FFF) that will be used to purify and convert weapons-derived plutonium oxides to MOX fuel pellets and fabricate MOX fuel bundles for use in commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWRs); fuel qualification activities and modification of facilities required for manufacture of lead assemblies that will be used to qualify and license this MOX fuel; and modification, licensing, and operation of commercial PWRs to allow irradiation of a partial core of MOX fuel in combination with low-enriched uranium fuel. The baseline cost elements used for this document are the same as those used for examination of the preferred sites described in the site-specific final environmental impact statement and in the DOE Record of Decision that will follow in late 1999. Cost data are separated by facilities, government accounting categories, contract phases, and expenditures anticipated by the various organizations who will participate in the program over a 20-year period. Total LCCs to DOE/MD are projected at approximately $1.4 billion for a 33-MT plutonium disposition mission.

Williams, K.A.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that could be powered entirely by electricity using plug- in vehicles. Thus, plug-in vehicles have assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas

Michalek, Jeremy J.

57

LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A light-emitting diode (LED) is a solid-state lighting source that switches on instantly, is readilyLED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis light fixtures in existing or new buildings across campus. Scope of Work On August 27, 2012, the six

Johnston, Daniel

58

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(say, a trip) and such factors are not fully captured in this dataset. 9. Older combined cycle units were a step change in lower operating costs due to cycling...

60

MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order 13123  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell VehicleEnergyGreensburgUMTRCA Title IGuidance on Life-Cycle

62

Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis Vasilis Fthenakis Center of Life Cycle Analysis Earth & Environmental Engineering Department Columbia University and National Photovoltaic (PV) EHS Research Center (air, water, solid) M, Q E PV array Photovoltaic modules Balance of System (BOS) (Inverters

63

Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by metal organic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to calculate the cost of producing high temperature superconducting wire by the Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) process. The technology status is reviewed from the literature and a plant conceptual design is assumed for the cost calculation. The critical issues discussed are the high cost of the metal organic precursors, the material utilization efficiency and the capability of the final product as measured by the critical current density achieved. Capital, operating and material costs are estimated and summed as the basis for calculating the cost per unit length of wire. Sensitivity analyses of key assumptions are examined to determine their effects on the final wire cost. Additionally, the cost of wire on the basis of cost per kiloampere per meter is calculated for operation at lower temperatures than the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature. It is concluded that this process should not be ruled out on the basis of high cost of precursors alone.

Chapman, J.N.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

64

Microelectronics Reliability, Vol. 47, No. 12, pp. 1857-1864, December 2007 Life Cycle Cost Impact of Using Prognostic Health Management (PHM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microelectronics Reliability, Vol. 47, No. 12, pp. 1857-1864, December 2007 1 Life Cycle Cost , S. Ghelamc , P. Sandbornb , M. Gladec , B. Fouchera a EADS Corporate Research Center, 12 rue Pasteur that assumed unscheduled maintenance and fixed-interval scheduled maintenance were compared to the costs

Sandborn, Peter

65

An Analysis of the Economic and Financial Life-Cycle Costs of Reverse-Osmosis Desalination in South Texas: A Case Study of the Southmost Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for $26.2 million, an implicit commitment for another $39.1 million (basis 2006 dollars) was also made for Continued and Capital Replacement costs. Investigation into life-cycle costs during the design and planning stages of a desalination facility can...

Sturdivant, A.; Rister, M.; Rogers, C.; Lacewell, R.; Norris, J.; Leal, J.; Garza, J.; Adams, J.

66

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery technology now under options, excluding the metal/air batteries: zinc/life- Zinc--air batteries. Like the Al/air battery, the Zn/

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Life Cycle Cost Discount Rates and Energy Price Projections | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001 Letter Report: IO1OP001DepartmentEnergy Life

70

Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by electron beam and pulsed laser deposition systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of this study establish a framework for evaluation of the cost impact of many performance parameters in coated conductor manufacturing systems. Since the cost and concepts are based on early developmental results and engineering judgment, the study should be updated periodically based on latest data to enhance its usefulness. The study should be expanded to include other promising processes under consideration or development for manufacture of coated conductors. Review of this study by as wide a group of experts from industry, national laboratories and universities as possible is desirable to facilitate improving accuracy of the estimates and communication on the issues involved. The results for the case of achieving the $10/kA-m goal at a J{sub c} of 10{sup 5} a/cm{sup 2} applicable to applications requiring a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of current flow may be viewed as somewhat discouraging. However, there is ample margin for improvement due to continued development and engineering that could enable meeting the goal of $10/kA-m.

Chapman, J.N.

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

71

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Analysis of environmental factors impacting the life cycle cost analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery-powered passenger vehicles. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the further developments and testing of the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Model previously developed by Engineering Systems Management, Inc. (ESM) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract No. DE-AC02-91CH10491. The Model incorporates specific analytical relationships and cost/performance data relevant to internal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles, battery powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and fuel cell/battery-powered electric vehicles (FCEVs).

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a technical, data-based and holistic approach to define and subsequently reduce the environmental burdens associated with a product, process, or activity by identifying and quantifying energy and material usage and waste discharges, assessing the impact of those wastes on the environment, and evaluating and implementing opportunities to effect environmental improvements. The assessment includes the entire life-cycle of the product, process or activity encompassing extraction and processing of raw materials, manufacturing, transportation and distribution, use/reuse, recycling and final disposal. LCA is a useful tool for evaluating the environmental consequences of a product, process, or activity, however, current applications of LCA have not been performed in consistent or easily understood ways. This inconsistency has caused increased criticism of LCA. The EPA recognized the need to develop an LCA framework which could be used to provide consistent use across the board. Also, additional research is needed to enhance the understanding about the steps in the performance of an LCA and its appropriate usage. This paper will present the research activities of the EPA leading toward the development of an acceptable method for conducting LCA`s. This research has resulted in the development of two guidance manuals. The first manual is intended to be a practical guide to conducting and interpreting the life-cycle inventory. A nine-step approach to performing a comprehensive inventory is presented along with the general issues to be addressed. The second manual addresses life-cycle design.

Curran, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

STATE-OF-THE-ART AND EMERGING TRUCK ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES FOR OPTIMIZED PERFORMANCE, EMISSIONS AND LIFE CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The challenge for truck engine product engineering is not only to fulfill increasingly stringent emission requirements, but also to improve the engine's economical viability in its role as the backbone of our global economy. While societal impact and therefore emission limit values are to be reduced in big steps, continuous improvement is not enough but technological quantum leaps are necessary. The introduction and refinement of electronic control of all major engine systems has already been a quantum leap forward. Maximizing the benefits of these technologies to customers and society requires full use of parameter optimization and other enabling technologies. The next big step forward will be widespread use of exhaust aftertreatment on all transportation related diesel engines. While exhaust gas aftertreatment has been successfully established on gasoline (Otto cycle) engines, the introduction of exhaust aftertreatment especially for heavy-duty diesel engines will be much mo re demanding. Implementing exhaust gas aftertreatment into commercial vehicle applications is a challenging task but the emission requirements to be met starting in Europe, the USA and Japan in the 2005-2007 timeframe require this step. The engine industry will be able to implement the new technology if all stakeholders support the necessary decisions. One decision has already been taken: the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel being comparable with the elimination of lead in gasoline as a prerequisite for the three-way catalyst. Now we have the chance to optimize ecology and economy of the Diesel engine simultaneously by taking the decision to provide an additional infrastructure for a NOx reduction agent needed for the introduction of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology that is already implemented in the electric power generation industry. This requires some effort, but the resulting societal benefits, fuel economy and vehicle life cycle costs are significantly better when compared to other competitive technologies. After long discussions this decision for SCR has been made in Europe and is supported by all truck and engine manufacturers. The necessary logistic support will be in place when it will be needed commercially in 2005. For the US the decision has to be taken this year in order to have the infrastructure available in 2007. It will enable the global engine industry to focus their R & D resources in one direction not only for 2007, but for the years beyond 2010 with the best benefit for the environment, the customers and the industry.

Schittler, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are shown. Keywords- Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Life Cycleindustry, and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is emerging as a

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

life-cycle energy requirements (e total ) and global warmingtotal life-cycle global warming impacts. Chapter 3 Life-cycle Energy and Global

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

82

Integrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycle Performance Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the integration of green manufacturing principles into LCP-Keywords Life cycle cost, green manufacturing, monitoring 1concept of LCP with green manufacturing. Various approaches

Niggeschmidt, Stephan; Helu, Moneer; Diaz, Nancy; Behmann, Benjamin; Lanza, Gisela; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Process system optimization for life cycle improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is an analytic tool for quantifying the environmental impacts of all processes used in converting raw materials into a final product. The LCA consists of three parts. Life cycle inventory quantifies all material and energy use, and environmental emissions for the entire product life cycle, while impact assessment evaluates actual and potential environmental and human health consequences of the activities identified in the inventory phase. Most importantly, life cycle improvement aims at reducing the risk of these consequences occurring to make the product more benign. when the LCA is performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic analysis, the total economic and environmental benefits and shortcomings of a product or process can be quantified. A methodology has been developed incorporating process performance, economics, and life cycle inventory data to synthesize process systems, which meet life cycle impact-improvement targets at least cost. The method relies on a systematic description of the product life cycle and utilizes successive Linear Programming to formulate and optimize the non-linear, constrained problem which results. The practicality and power of this approach have been demonstrated by examining options for the reduction of emissions of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} from petroleum-based fuels.

Marano, J.J.; Rogers, S.

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Life Cycle Asset Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

(The following directives are deleted or consolidated into this Order and shall be phased out as noted in Paragraph 2: DOE 1332.1A; DOE 4010.1A; DOE 4300.1C; DOE 4320.1B; DOE 4320.2A; DOE 4330.4B; DOE 4330.5; DOE 4540.1C; DOE 4700.1). This Order supersedes specific project management provisions within DOE O 430.1A, LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT. The specific paragraphs canceled by this Order are 6e(7); 7a(3); 7b(11) and (14); 7c(4),(6),(7),(11), and (16); 7d(4) and (8); 7e(3),(10), and (17); Attachment 1, Definitions (item 30 - Line Item Project, item 42 - Project, item 48 - Strategic System); and Attachment 2, Contractor Requirements Document (paragraph 1d regarding a project management system). The remainder of DOE O 430.1A remains in effect. Cancels DOE O 430.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.3.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reichl, H. “Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; “Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

yield. A hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) model is used;more accurate life-cycle assessment (LCA) of electronicthe purposes of life-cycle assessment (LCA). While it may be

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

2000-01-1556 Life-Cycle Cost Sensitivity to Battery-Pack Voltage of an HEV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

defined the peak power ratings for each HEV drive system's electric components: batteries, battery cables. This affects the material and manufacturing costs of the battery, electric motor, and controller. *Prepared performance, ratings, and cost study was conducted on series and parallel hybrid electric vehicle (HEV

Tolbert, Leon M.

91

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Life Cycle Asset Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order addresses stewardship of physical assets as valuable national resources in a cost-effective manner to meet the DOE mission using industry standards, a graded approach, and performance objective.

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Life cycle assessment of a rock crusher  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nordberg, Inc., a capital equipment manufacturer, performed a Life Cycle Assessment study on its rock crusher to aid in making decisions on product design and energy improvements. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a relatively new cutting edge environmental tool recently standardized by ISO that provides quantitative environmental and energy data on products or processes. This paper commences with a brief introduction to LCA and presents the system boundaries, modeling and assumptions for the rock crusher study. System boundaries include all life major cycle stages except manufacturing and assembly of the crusher. Results of the LCA show that over 99% of most of the flows into and out of the system may be attributed to the use phase of the rock crusher. Within the use phase itself, over 95% of each environmental inflow and outflow (with some exceptions) are attributed to electricity consumption, and not the replacement of spares/wears or lubricating oil over the lifetime of the crusher. Results tables and charts present selected environmental flows, including CO{sub 2} NOx, SOx, particulate matter, and energy consumption, for each of the rock crusher life cycle stages and the use phase. This paper aims to demonstrate the benefits of adopting a rigorous scientific approach to assess energy and environmental impacts over the life cycle of capital equipment. Nordberg has used these results to enhance its engineering efforts toward developing an even more energy efficient machine to further progress its vision of providing economic solutions to its customers by reducing the crusher operating (mainly electricity) costs.

Landfield, A.H.; Karra, V.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abatement Environmental impactLife-cycle Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . LCA of

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 1995 Ohio passed legislation requiring that all state agencies perform life-cycle cost analyses prior to the construction of new buildings, and energy consumption analyses prior to new leases. ...

98

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Several provisions of Missouri law govern energy efficiency in state facilities. In 1993 Missouri enacted legislation requiring life-cycle cost analysis for all new construction of state buildings...

99

Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human Ecologicalindicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human EcologicalI explore how life-cycle assessment (LCA) results can

Humbert, Sebastien

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Importance of life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) as a tool to assist the waste professional with integrated waste management. LCA can be the connection between the waste professional and designer/producer to permit the waste professional to encourage the design of products so material recovery is most efficient and markets can be better predicted. The waste professional can better monitor the involvement of the consumer in waste management by using LCA and looking upstream at how the consumer actually reacts to products and packaging. LCA can also help the waste professional better understand the waste stream.

Bridges, J.S.

1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Technology development life cycle processes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

Beck, David Franklin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The behavioral manipulation hypothesis Life cycle of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The behavioral manipulation hypothesis · No one knows how the parasite causes these Life cycle eat mostly hares · Linked cycles? Predator-Prey Cycles? · Think and then discuss: · Under the hypothesis that predators cause this cycle, what would you expect for the following when hare populations

Mitchell, Randall J.

103

A Computational Framework for Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines incorporating Structural Health Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Computational Framework for Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines incorporating Structural of wind turbines and reducing the life-cycle costs significantly. This paper presents a life-cycle management (LCM) framework for online monitoring and performance assessment of wind turbines, enabling

Stanford University

104

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

The principles of life-cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decisionmakers representing government agencies must balance competing objectives when deciding on the purchase and sale of assets. The goal in all cases should be to make prudent or financially {open_quotes}cost-effective{close_quotes} decisions. That is, the revenues from the purchase or sale of assets should exceed any out-of-pocket costs to obtain the revenues. However, effects external to these financial considerations such as promoting environmental quality, creating or maintaining jobs, and abiding by existing regulations should also be considered in the decisionmaking process. In this paper, we outline the principles of life-cycle analysis (LCA), a framework that allows decisionmakers to make informed, balanced choices over the period of time affected by the decision, taking into account important external effects. Specifically, LCA contains three levels of analysis for any option: (1) direct financial benefits (revenues) and out-of-pocket costs for a course of action; (2) environmental and health consequences of a decision; and (3) other economic and socio-institutional effects. Because some of the components of LCA are difficult to value in monetary terms, the outcome of the LCA process is not generally a yes-no answer. However, the framework allows the decisionmaker to at least qualitatively consider all relevant factors in analyzing options, promoting sound decisionmaking in the process.

Hill, L.J.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Curlee, T.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Life-cycle assessment of NAND flash memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this possibility, a life-cycle assessment (LCA) of NAND ?ashstudy presents a life-cycle assessment (LCA) of ?ash memoryInput- Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA), US 1997

Boyd, Sarah; Horvath, A; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Life cycle evolution and systematics of Campanulariid hydrozoans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to study campanulariid life cycle evolution and systematics. The Campanulariidae is a hydrozoan family with many life cycle variations, and provide an excellent model system to study life cycle ...

Govindarajan, Annette Frese, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas...

110

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle...

111

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy ConservationW.R. Coleman. 1990. “Heat Pump Life and Compressor LongevityC.C.. 1990. “Predicting Future Heat Pump Production Volume

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An Investigation of Window and Lighting Systems using Life Cycle Cost Analysis for the Purpose of Energy Conservation in Langford Building A at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Langford Building A forms part of the Langford Architectural Complex at Texas A & M University. Inefficient lighting fixtures and single pane windows in Langford Building A contribute to a considerable portion of the total cost of energy...

Hwang, Hea Yeon

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Gather and analyze independently the available technical, cost, financial incentive data on installed GSHP/HGSHP applications in residential, commercial and schools in hot and humid climate regions, and develop a calibrated baseline and performance period model of new construction and retrofitted buildings in conjunction with the energy simulation program.

114

Farinon microwave end of life cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering report evaluates alternatives for the replacement of the Farinon microwave radio system. The system is beyond its expected life cycle and has decreasing maintainability. Principal applications supported by the Farinon system are two electrical utility monitor and control systems, the Integrated Transfer Trip System (ITTS), and the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system.

Poe, R.C.

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Life Cycle Assessment of microalgal basedbiofuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antipolis Cedex, France Abstract Fossil fuel depletion and attempts of global warming mitigation have motivated the development of biofuels. Several feedstock and transformation pathways into biofuel have been, several Life Cycle Assessments have been realised to evaluate the energetic benefit and Global Warming

Boyer, Edmond

116

A model for life cycle records management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this paper is to update an old Records Management concept; the management of records according to the records life cycle. Accordingly, the authors are presenting a new version of the Records Management life cycle model and its associated elements. The basic concept is that every record progresses through three phases; a record is created, is used and maintained, and dispositioned. In this presentation, the authors update the very old straight line model and the more current circular model with a new model that essentially combines the two. The model portrays Records Management as having a distinct straight-line beginning, a circular use and maintenance phase, and a distinct straight-line end. The presentation maps Records Management Program elements and activities against the phases depicted in the model. The authors believe that this new records life cycle model is an enhanced physical representation of the process. This presentation is designed to help put all of the specialized Records Management topics that participants have heard about during the conference in the perspective of the records life cycle.

Tayfun, A.C.; Gibson, S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Life cycle analysis: Getting the total picture on vehicle engineering alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines how assessing energy impacts over a vehicle`s life cycle presents a different picture than traditional cost analysis. Life cycle assessment (LCA) aims to identify chances to improve the environmental behavior of the products or systems under consideration. To do this, it is necessary to collect and interpret material and energy flows for all affected processes systematically. With LCA, traditional engineering decision-making processes include environmental aspects. Life cycle engineering, on the other hand, adds environmental protection to the design and development process. The closed-loop nature of life cycle engineering is shown.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Enabling streamlined life cycle assessment : materials-classification derived structured underspecification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As environmental footprint considerations for companies gain greater importance, the need for quantitative impact assessment tools such as life cycle assessment (LCA) has become a higher priority. Currently, the cost and ...

Rampuria, Abhishek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher initial costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches. From scientific and technical point of view, the potential for wide applications of GSHP especially HGSHP in hot and humid climate is significant, especially towards building zero energy homes where the combined energy efficient GSHP and abundant solar energy production in hot climate can be an optimal solution. To address these challenges, this report presents gathering and analyzing data on the costs and benefits of GSHP/HGSHP systems utilized in southern states using a representative sample of building applications. The report outlines the detailed analysis to conclude that the application of GSHP in Florida (and hot and humid climate in general) shows a good potential.

Yong X. Tao; Yimin Zhu

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

120

Application of life cycle assessment methodology at Ontario Hydro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ontario Hydro is an electrical utility located in Ontario, Canada. In 1995, Ontario Hydro adopted Sustainable Energy Development Policy and Principles that include the governing principle: {open_quotes}Ontario Hydro will integrate environmental and social factors into its planning, decision-making, and business practices.{close_quotes} Life cycle assessment was identified as a useful tool for evaluating environmental impacts of products and processes in support of decision-making. Ontario Hydro has developed a methodology for life cycle assessment (LCA) that is consistent with generally accepted practices, practical, and suitable for application in Ontario Hydro Business Units. The methodology is based on that developed by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) but follows a pragmatic and somewhat simplified approach. In scoping an LCA, the breadth and depth of analysis are compatible with and sufficient to address the stated goal of the study. The depth of analysis is tied to (i) the dollar value of the commodity, process or activity being assessed, (ii) the degree of freedom available to the assessor to make meaningful choices among options, and (iii) the importance of the environmental or technological issues leading to the evaluation. A pilot study was completed to apply the methodology to an LCA of the light vehicle fleet (cars, vans and light pick-up trucks) at Ontario Hydro. The objective of the LCA was to compare the life cycle impacts of alternative vehicle fuel cycles: gasoline, diesel, natural gas, propane, and alcohol; with particular focus on life cycle emissions, efficiency and cost. The study concluded that for large vehicles (1/2 ton and 3/4 ton) that travel more than 35000 km/year, natural gas and propane fuelling offer both cost reduction and emissions reduction when compared to gasoline vehicles.

Reuber, B.; Khan, A. [Ontario Hydro, Ontario (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

-Successful Integration of Life Cycle Assessment in to Civil Engineering Course -CIVL 498C Life Cycle Analysis of UBC Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to teaching the science-based environmental impact assessment method of Life Cycle Analysis (LCA). Through, through being capable of; · Completing a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study in accordance with ISO 14040- Successful Integration of Life Cycle Assessment in to Civil Engineering Course - CIVL 498C Life

122

Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity of Photovoltaic Electricity #12;IEA-PVPS-TASK 12 Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SYSTEMS PROGRAMME Methodology

123

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems 2013 DOE...

124

[Page Intentionally Left Blank] Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................11 4.2 Conventional Jet Fuel from Crude Oil2 June #12;[Page Intentionally Left Blank] #12;Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Alternative .......................................5 3.1 Life cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Reuter, Martin

125

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

Deru, M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems A...

127

Discovering Life Cycle Assessment Trees from Impact Factor Databases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and degradation of the envi- ronment. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodol- ogy for quantifying multiple to quantifying broad envi- ronmental impacts is the method of life cycle assessment (LCA) (Baumann and TillmanDiscovering Life Cycle Assessment Trees from Impact Factor Databases Naren Sundaravaradan

128

Environmental assessment of electricity scenarios with Life Cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been assessed with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies [1], [2], [3] and [4]. However environmentalEnvironmental assessment of electricity scenarios with Life Cycle Assessment Touria Larbi1 impacts assessment of scenarios is very rarely evaluated through a life cycle perspective partly because

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

129

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dornfeld, Chair Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a powerful1 Introduction Life cycle assessment (LCA) aids consumers inDefinition Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic method

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result inexposure models; Life Cycle Assessment; LCA; intake fractionneglected in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Such an omission

Hellweg, Stefanie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

An Indigenous Application for Estimating Carbon footprint of academia library systems based on life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a thorough Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of all the componentsWarming Potential (GWP), Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Carbonbe calculated using a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method, or

Garg, Saurabh; David Dornfeld

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing process life cycle assessment (LCA) databases andfew years, life cycle assessment (LCA) has been increasinglyInput-Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA). http://

Krishnan, Nikhil; Boyd, Sarah; Somani, Ajay; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Embedded Temporal Difference in Life Cycle Assessment: Case Study on VW Golf A4 Car  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may alter Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) results that wereLife Cycle Impact Assessment,” International Journal of LCAsystem for life cycle assessment. The LCA temporal space

Yuan, Chris; Simon, Rachel; Natalie Mady; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sandia National Laboratories: life-cycle analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturinglife-cycle analysis Northrop-Grumman, GE

137

Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartmentJuneWhenJuly 28,The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI)

138

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential of plug-in vehicles remains small compared to ownership cost. As such, to offer a socially efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in vehicles mustValuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits Jeremy J

Michalek, Jeremy J.

139

Concepts associated with a unified life cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a risk associated with most things in the world, and all things have a life cycle unto themselves, even brownfields. Many components can be described by a''cycle of life.'' For example, five such components are life-form, chemical, process, activity, and idea, although many more may exist. Brownfields may touch upon several of these life cycles. Each life cycle can be represented as independent software; therefore, a software technology structure is being formulated to allow for the seamless linkage of software products, representing various life-cycle aspects. Because classes of these life cycles tend to be independent of each other, the current research programs and efforts do not have to be revamped; therefore, this unified life-cycle paradigm builds upon current technology and is backward compatible while embracing future technology. Only when two of these life cycles coincide and one impacts the other is there connectivity and a transfer of information at the interface. The current framework approaches (e.g., FRAMES, 3MRA, etc.) have a design that is amenable to capturing (1) many of these underlying philosophical concepts to assure backward compatibility of diverse independent assessment frameworks and (2) linkage communication to help transfer the needed information at the points of intersection. The key effort will be to identify (1) linkage points (i.e., portals) between life cycles, (2) the type and form of data passing between life cycles, and (3) conditions when life cycles interact and communicate. This paper discusses design aspects associated with a unified life-cycle analysis, which can support not only brownfields but also other types of assessments.

Whelan, Gene; Peffers, Melissa S.; Tolle, Duane A.; Brebbia, C. A.; Almorza Gomar, D.; Klapperich, H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Application of life cycle analysis: The case of green bullets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis (LCA) has been used to analyze the desirability of replacing lead with a composite of tungsten and tin in projectile slugs used in small arms ammunition at US Department of Energy (DOE) training facilities for security personnel. The analysis includes consideration of costs, performance, environmental and human health impacts, availability of raw materials, and stakeholder acceptance. The DOE expends approximately 10 million rounds of small-arms ammunition each year training security personnel. This deposits over 300,000 pounds of lead and copper annually into DOE firing ranges, contributing to lead migration in the surrounding environment. Human lead intake occurs by inhalation of contaminated indoor firing range air and air containing lead particles that are resuspended during regular maintenance and cleanup, and by skin absorption while cleaning weapons. Projectiles developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using a composite of tungsten and tin perform as well as, or better than, those fabricated using lead. A cost analysis shows that tungsten-tin is less costly to use than lead, since, for the current number of rounds used annually, the higher tungsten-tin purchase price is small compared with higher maintenance costs associated with lead. The tungsten-tin composite presents a much smaller potential for adverse human health and environmental impacts than lead. Only a small fraction of the world`s tungsten production occurs in the United States, however, and market-economy countries account for only around 15% of world tungsten production. Life cycle analysis clearly shows that advantages outweigh risks in replacing lead with tungsten-tin in small-caliber projectiles at DOE training facilities. Concerns about the availability of raw tungsten are mitigated by the ease of converting back to lead (if necessary) and the recyclability of tungsten-tin rounds.

Bogard, J.S.; Yuracko, K.L.; Murray, M.E.; Lowden, R.A.; Vaughn, N.L.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

gas (GHG) perspective? *How do those results compare with natural gas sourced from Russia and delivered to the same European and Asian markets via pipeline? Life Cycle GHG...

142

asexual life cycle: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

143

arabidopsis life cycle: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

144

IEEE Trans. on Components and Packaging Technologies, Dec. 2000, pp. 707-717 1 Electronic Part Life Cycle Concepts and Obsolescence Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Concepts and Obsolescence Forecasting Rajeev Solomon, Peter Sandborn, and Michael Pecht Abstract ­ Obsolescence of electronic parts is a major contributor to the life cycle cost of long- field life systems such as avionics. A methodology to forecast life cycles of electronic parts is presented, in which both years

Sandborn, Peter

145

The Role of Modeling in Clinical Information System Development Life-Cycle Mor Peleg, Department of Information Systems, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Role of Modeling in Clinical Information System Development Life-Cycle Mor Peleg, Department different stake holders. Conceptual modeling can play important roles in the development life-cycle. If these requirements are identified early in the development life-cycle then it is easier and more cost

Peleg, Mor

146

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY performance, energy rating, c-Si, cost reduction 1 INTRODUCTION Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) is a framework PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE Vasilis Fthenakis1,2 , Rick Betita2 , Mark Shields3 , Rob

147

Emerging approaches, challenges and opportunities in life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- rable. For instance, CO2 and CH4 emissions can both be expressed as CO2-equivalent emissions by using in the life cycle and sums them across the whole system. Typically, several hundreds of emissions and resources are quantified. In the third phase, life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA), emissions and resources

Napp, Nils

148

Life cycle assessment: A stewardship tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the chemical industry searches for tools to practice product stewardship. it is getting more involved in life cycle assessment (LCA) techniques, which examine the full environmental impact of a product or process over its lifetime and identify areas for improvement. The industry views LCA as a component of product stewardship,' says James P. Mieure, Monsanto's product safety director/chemicals group, who is the liaison between the Chemical manufacturers Association's (CMA; Washington) LCA and product stewardship work groups. Product stewardship includes examining energy used and waste produced as key parameters to consider when developing a new product or process or in modifying an existing one, Mieure says, which is part of what an LCA does. The work being done by the LCA group at CMA, cautions Mieure, doesn't lend itself to practical applications. The group hopes to help companies implement LCA when the time is right, he says. The time is not right yet, Mieure adds, mostly because of the slowness with which the impact analysis stage is progressing. Although the LCA concept has been around for more than 20 years, activity in applying it in industry has taken off since 1990.

Not Available

1992-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Application of life cycle analysis: The case of green bullets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis (LCA) provides a general framework for assessing and summarizing all of the information important to a decision. LCA has been used to analyze the desirability of replacing lead (Pb) with a composite of tungsten (W) and tin (Sn) in projectile slugs used in small arms ammunition at US Department of Energy (DOE) training facilities for security personnel. The analysis includes consideration of costs, performance, environmental and human health impacts, availability of raw materials, and stakeholder acceptance. The DOE expends approximately 10 million rounds of small-arms ammunition each year training security personnel. This deposits over 300,000 pounds of lead and copper annually into DOE firing ranges, contributing to lead migration in the surrounding environment. Human lead intake occurs by inhalation of contaminated indoor firing range air and air containing lead particles that are resuspended during regular maintenance and cleanup, and by skin absorption while cleaning weapons. Projectiles developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) using a composite of tungsten and tin perform as well as, or better than, those fabricated using lead. A cost analysis shows that tungsten-tin is less costly to use than lead, since, for the current number of rounds used annually, the higher tungsten-tin purchase price is small compared with higher maintenance costs associated with lead. The tungsten-tin composite presents a much smaller potential for adverse human health and environmental impacts than lead. Only a small fraction of the world`s tungsten production occurs in the US, however, and market-economy countries account for only around 15% of world tungsten production. Stakeholders would prefer tungsten-tin on the basis of total cost, performance, reduced environmental impact and lower human toxicity. Lead is preferable on the basis of material availability.

Bogard, J.S.; Yuracko, K.L.; Lowden, R.A.; Murray, M.E.; Vaughn, N.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evaluating trade-offs between sustainability, performance, and cost of green machining technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact assessments Life cycle assessment (LCA) has beenLife Cycle Cost Analysis and LCA, in: International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment,

Helu, Moneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Evaluating Trade-Offs Between Sustainability, Performance, and Cost of Green Machining Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact assessments Life cycle assessment (LCA) has beenLife Cycle Cost Analysis and LCA, in: International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment,

Helu, Moneer; Rühl, Jan; Dornfeld, David; Werner, Patrick; Lanza, Gisela

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Total cost analysis of process time reduction as a green machining strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the use of life cycle assessment (LCA) to quantifyLife Cycle Cost Analysis and LCA, in: International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment,

Helu, Moneer; Behmann, Benjamin; Meier, Harald; Dornfeld, David; Lanza, Gisela; Schulze, Volker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Life Cycle Modeling of Propulsion Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and emissions benefits * Downsized engine would also be the most cost-effective option. Cost per mpg fuel economy improvement is estimated to be 15.60 compared to 98 for...

154

Project Information Form Project Title Program for Vehicle Regulatory Reform: Assessing Life Cycle-Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,931.44 Total Project Cost $98,931.44 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End Dates November 1Project Information Form Project Title Program for Vehicle Regulatory Reform: Assessing Life Cycle, 2014 ­ October 31, 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Current greenhouse gas emissions

California at Davis, University of

155

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All but two Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies make nofuels. The term “life-cycle assessment” (LCA) is used toInput-Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA) US 2002 (428)

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard and the US Renew- able Fuel Standard use Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to estimate greenhouse gas analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.3. Life cycle assessmentLife Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications by Richard J

Kammen, Daniel M.

157

Life Cycle Assessment of Pavements: A Critical Review of Existing Literature and Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tools related to life- cycle assessment (LCA) applied toaccomplished using a life-cycle assessment (LCA) approach.EIO-LCA (Economic Input-Output Life-Cycle Assessment) model

Santero, Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and use of a new life-cycle assessment (LCA) model forknown as life-cycle assessment (LCA). An LCA employs dataliterature related to life-cycle assessment (LCA) applied to

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unfortunately, life cycle assessment (LCA) is as much art asFuel Standard use Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to estimatethat rely on life cycle assessment (LCA) to quantify the

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Consumer-oriented Life Cycle Assessment of Food, Goods and Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Product-level life cycle assessment (LCA) approaches canInput-Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO-LCA); Carnegieinput-output life cycle assessment (IO-LCA) tools present a

Jones, Christopher M; Kammen, Daniel M; McGrath, Daniel T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Green Engineering and Life Cycle Assessment at Virginia Tec ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green Engineering and Life Cycle Assessment at Virginia Tech Apr 10 2014 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM Sean McGinnis, VT Green Engineering, Oak Ridge Center for Bioenergy and Sustainability...

163

Improving the quality and transparency of building life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life cycle assessment, or LCA, is a powerful method for measuring and reducing a building's environmental impacts. Its widespread adoption among designers would allow the environmental component of sustainability to gain ...

Hsu, Sophia Lisbeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS Comparison of Life-Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-output life-cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) model; and SimaPro software equipped with the Franklin database. EIO-LCA model estimated for emis- sions of particulate matter less than 10 micrograms (PM10) resulting from wind

Illinois at Chicago, University of

165

BUILDING EFFECTIVENESS COMMUNICATION RATIOS FOR IMPROVED BUILDING LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING EFFECTIVENESS COMMUNICATION RATIOS FOR IMPROVED BUILDING LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT Elmer building energy performance assessment frameworks, quantifying and categorising buildings post occupancy a performance-based strategy utilising building effectiveness communication ratios stored in Building

166

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Predicting the life cycle of rice varieties in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

once it reaches the market. This study develops a regression model, which includes competition and the characteristics of a specific variety, to estimate the life cycle of new varieties and hybrids. In addition, simulation techniques are utilized...

Gambrell, Stefphanie Michelle

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Scope De?nition and Inventory Analysis; Internationalin life- cycle inventories using hybrid approaches. Environ.Reichl, H. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis and Identi?cation

Krishnan, Nikhil; Boyd, Sarah; Somani, Ajay; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of Life-Cycle Assessment Studies of Chinese Cement Production: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to understand theIntroduction Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is an important

Lu, Hongyou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Cost effectiveness of long life incandescent lamps and energy buttons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-life replacement lamps for the incandescent lamp have been evaluated with regard to their cost effectiveness. The replacements include the use of energy buttons that extend lamp life as well as an adaptive fluorescent circline lamp that will fit into existing incandescent lamp sockets. The initial, operating, and replacement costs for one million lumen hours are determined for each lamp system. It is found that the most important component lighting cost is the operating cost. Using lamps that are less efficient or devices that cause lamps to operate less efficiently are not cost-effective. The adaptive fluorescent circline lamp, even at an initial unit cost of $20.00, is the most cost-effective source of illumination compared to the incandescent lamp and lamp systems examined.

Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

1980-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

LIFE Materials: Fuel Cycle and Repository Volume 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fusion-fission LIFE engine concept provides a path to a sustainable energy future based on safe, carbon-free nuclear power with minimal nuclear waste. The LIFE design ultimately offers many advantages over current and proposed nuclear energy technologies, and could well lead to a true worldwide nuclear energy renaissance. When compared with existing and other proposed future nuclear reactor designs, the LIFE engine exceeds alternatives in the most important measures of proliferation resistance and waste minimization. The engine needs no refueling during its lifetime. It requires no removal of fuel or fissile material generated in the LIFE engine. It leaves no weapons-attractive material at the end of life. Although there is certainly a need for additional work, all indications are that the 'back end' of the fuel cycle does not to raise any 'showstopper' issues for LIFE. Indeed, the LIFE concept has numerous benefits: (1) Per unit of electricity generated, LIFE engines would generate 20-30 times less waste (in terms of mass of heavy metal) requiring disposal in a HLW repository than does the current once-through fuel cycle. (2) Although there may be advanced fuel cycles that can compete with LIFE's low mass flow of heavy metal, all such systems require reprocessing, with attendant proliferation concerns; LIFE engines can do this without enrichment or reprocessing. Moreover, none of the advanced fuel cycles can match the low transuranic content of LIFE waste. (3) The specific thermal power of LIFE waste is initially higher than that of spent LWR fuel. Nevertheless, this higher thermal load can be managed using appropriate engineering features during an interim storage period, and could be accommodated in a Yucca-Mountain-like repository by appropriate 'staging' of the emplacement of waste packages during the operational period of the repository. The planned ventilation rates for Yucca Mountain would be sufficient for LIFE waste to meet the thermal constraints of the repository design. (4) A simple, but arguably conservative, estimate for the dose from a repository containing 63,000 MT of spent LIFE fuel would have similar performance to the currently planned Yucca Mountain Repository. This indicates that a properly designed 'LIFE Repository' would almost certainly meet the proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards for dose to individuals, even though the waste in such a repository would have produced 20-30 times more generated electricity than the reference case for Yucca Mountain. The societal risk/benefit ratio for a LIFE repository would therefore be significantly better than for currently planned repositories for LWR fuel.

Shaw, H; Blink, J A

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Life-Cycle Civil Engineering Biondini & Frangopol (eds) 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, London, ISBN 978-0-415-46857-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total life cycle energy by 15% and 72%, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 32% and 37%, and costs by 40 US roads a grade of D (poor condition). This poor road condition costs US motorists an estimated $54, maintenance and rehabilitation are required to pro- vide a high level of safety and service (Huang 2004

Lepech, Michael D.

173

NREL: Energy Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLiz Torres Photo ofTravis LowderWesleyGeospatialLife

174

1 Copyright 2003 by ASME IMPROVING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT BY INCLUDING SPATIAL, DYNAMIC AND PLACE-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawing from the substantial body of literature on life cycle assessment / analysis (LCA), the article models is suggested as a means of improving the impact assessment phase of LCA. Keywords: Life Cycle Assessment, Life Cycle Analysis, Life Cycle Impact Assessment, LCA, Environmental Impact Assessment

175

Commissioning tools for life-cycle building performance assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses information systems for building life-cycle performance analysis and the use of computer-based commissioning tools within this context. There are many reasons why buildings do not perform in practice as well as intended at the design stage. One reason is the lack of commissioning. A second reason is that design intent is not well documented, and performance targets for building components and systems are not well specified. Thus, criteria for defining verification and functional tests is unclear. A third reason is that critical information is often lost throughout the building life-cycle, which causes problems such as misunderstanding of operational characteristics and sequences and reduced overall performance. The life-cycle building performance analysis tools project discussed in this paper are focused on chillers and cooling systems.

Piette, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development of the household sample for furnace and boilerlife-cycle cost analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated. The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, Jim

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Over the last thirty years, moreMineLand Rehabilitation · PowerGeneration · System/PlantOperation andMaintenance · AuxiliaryNaturalGas Combustion · Coal-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation could

178

Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Life Cycle Comparison of Algae to Other Bioenergy Feedstocks A N D R E S F . C L A R December 6, 2009. Accepted December 15, 2009. Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from

Clarens, Andres

179

Life Cycle Assessment Practices: Benchmarking Selected European Automobile Manufacturers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Assessment Practices: Benchmarking Selected European Automobile Manufacturers Jean in the automobile industry where vehicle manufacturers (OEMs) are launching several new or re- vamped models each year. The automobile industry is therefore a very emblematic sector for best practices of LCA

Boyer, Edmond

180

Design for, and Evaluation of Life Cycle Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?. DESIGN FOR, AND EVALUATION OF LIFE CYCLE PERFORMANCE David J. Ahner Eldon W. Hall GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK ABSTRACT EQUIPMENT DEGRADATION Project evaluation necessarily requires performance estimates over..., operating procedures, equipment availabilities, etc. This paper discusses the general nature, and the ther mal interaction of power plant components as individual equipment degradation occurs, describing overall plant performance trends and quant...

Ahner, D. J.; Hall, E. W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics Over the last thirty years, hundreds and utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. ~40 g CO2

182

Environmental life cycle assessment as a decision making tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Bi-objective optimization to consider environmental and economic metrics · Steam and Power Plant and Heijungs (2002). Handbook on Life Cycle Assessment. Kluwer Academic Publ. #12;PASI 2011 Potential #12;PASI 2011 Steam and power plant #12;PASI 2011 Steam and power demands #12;Martínez P. and Eliceche

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

183

A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Petroleum and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Petroleum and Soybean-Based Lubricants S H E L I E A . M I L assessment examining soybean and petroleum-based lubricants is compiled using Monte Carlo analysis to assess in this paper suggests that such potential exists. Over two billion gallons (7.5 billion liters) of petroleum

Illinois at Chicago, University of

184

Life Cycle of the Corn-Soybean Agroecosystem for Biobased  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as fertilizer production, energy production, and on- farm chemical and equipment use. Agroecosystem material increasingly important with the growth of biofuels (i.e., biodiesel, ethanol) and biobased products (eLife Cycle of the Corn-Soybean Agroecosystem for Biobased Production A M Y E . L A N D I S , * S H

Illinois at Chicago, University of

185

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Lorie Hamelin, Marianne Wesnæs and Henrik AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario A) 28 2.2.2 Biogas from raw pig slurry and fibre fraction from chemical- mechanical separation (Scenario F) 29 2.2.3 Biogas from raw cow slurry and fibre

186

Framework for Modeling the Uncertainty of Future Events in Life Cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a leadingLife Cycle Assessment by including predictable disruptions to the life cycle, thereby increasing the meaningfulness of LCALife Cycle Assessment is a very important factor to consider in order to ensure the accuracy of estimated emissions and meaningfulness of LCA

Chen, Yi-Fen; Simon, Rachel; Dornfeld, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Comparison of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Life Across Geographies and Drive-Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a laboratory environment, it is cost prohibitive to run automotive battery aging experiments across a wide range of possible ambient environment, drive cycle and charging scenarios. Since worst-case scenarios drive the conservative sizing of electric-drive vehicle batteries, it is useful to understand how and why those scenarios arise and what design or control actions might be taken to mitigate them. In an effort to explore this problem, this paper applies a semi-empirical life model of the graphite/nickel-cobalt-aluminum lithium-ion chemistry to investigate impacts of geographic environments under storage and simplified cycling conditions. The model is then applied to analyze complex cycling conditions, using battery charge/discharge profiles generated from simulations of PHEV10 and PHEV40 vehicles across 782 single-day driving cycles taken from Texas travel survey data.

Smith, K.; Warleywine, M.; Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Design and life-cycle considerations for unconventional-reservoir wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of design and life-cycle considerations for certain unconventional-reservoir wells. An overview of unconventional-reservoir definitions is provided. Well design and life-cycle considerations are addressed from three aspects: upfront reservoir development, initial well completion, and well-life and long-term considerations. Upfront-reservoir-development issues discussed include well spacing, well orientation, reservoir stress orientations, and tubular metallurgy. Initial-well-completion issues include maximum treatment pressures and rates, treatment diversion, treatment staging, flowback and cleanup, and dewatering needs. Well-life and long-term discussions include liquid loading, corrosion, refracturing and associated fracture reorientation, and the cost of abandonment. These design considerations are evaluated with case studies for five unconventional-reservoir types: shale gas (Barnett shale), tight gas (Jonah feld), tight oil (Bakken play), coalbed methane (CBM) (San Juan basin), and tight heavy oil (Lost Hills field). In evaluating the life cycle and design of unconventional-reservoir wells, 'one size' does not fit all and valuable knowledge and a shortening of the learning curve can be achieved for new developments by studying similar, more-mature fields.

Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

190

Environmental life-cycle assessment of highway construction projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finland (Junnila et al 2003). The energy use and emissions from the life-cycle of the office building was assessed assuming fifty years as its service life. This study conducted an inventory as well as impact assessment on the office building as given... of office buildings in Finland. The practical aspects of this study are that more environmentally-conscious design can be made but further studies have to be conducted to standardize the results of this study in countries in a different geographic...

Rajagopalan, Neethi

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Process integrated modelling for steelmaking Life Cycle Inventory analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During recent years, strict environmental regulations have been implemented by governments for the steelmaking industry in order to reduce their environmental impact. In the frame of the ULCOS project, we have developed a new methodological framework which combines the process integrated modelling approach with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method in order to carry out the Life Cycle Inventory of steelmaking. In the current paper, this new concept has been applied to the sinter plant which is the most polluting steelmaking process. It has been shown that this approach is a powerful tool to make the collection of data easier, to save time and to provide reliable information concerning the environmental diagnostic of the steelmaking processes.

Iosif, Ana-Maria [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: ana-maria.iosif@arcelormittal.com; Hanrot, Francois [Arcelor Research, Voie Romaine, BP30320, Maizieres-les-Metz, 57283 (France)], E-mail: francois.hanrot@arcelormittal.com; Ablitzer, Denis [LSG2M, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy cedex (France)], E-mail: denis.ablitzer@mines.inpl-nancy.fr

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Design study of long-life PWR using thorium cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design study of long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle has been performed. Thorium cycle in general has higher conversion ratio in the thermal spectrum domain than uranium cycle. Cell calculation, Burn-up and multigroup diffusion calculation was performed by PIJ-CITATION-SRAC code using libraries based on JENDL 3.2. The neutronic analysis result of infinite cell calculation shows that {sup 231}Pa better than {sup 237}Np as burnable poisons in thorium fuel system. Thorium oxide system with 8%{sup 233}U enrichment and 7.6{approx} 8%{sup 231}Pa is the most suitable fuel for small-long life PWR core because it gives reactivity swing less than 1%{Delta}k/k and longer burn up period (more than 20 year). By using this result, small long-life PWR core can be designed for long time operation with reduced excess reactivity as low as 0.53%{Delta}k/k and reduced power peaking during its operation.

Subkhi, Moh. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul [Physics.Dept., Bandung Institute of Technology.Ganesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

195

MARVEL: A PC-based interactive software package for life-cycle evaluations of hybrid/electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a life-cycle analysis tool, MARVEL has been developed for the evaluation of hybrid/electric vehicle systems. It can identify the optimal combination of battery and heat engine characteristics for different vehicle types and performance requirements, on the basis of either life-cycle cost or fuel efficiency. Battery models that allow trade-offs between specific power and specific energy, between cycle life and depth of discharge, between peak power and depth of discharge, and between other parameters, are included in the software. A parallel hybrid configuration, using an internal combustion engine and a battery as the power sources, can be simulated with a user-specified energy management strategy. The PC-based software package can also be used for cost or fuel efficiency comparisons among conventional, electric, and hybrid vehicles.

Marr, W.W.; He, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Life Cycle Assessment goes to Washington : lessons from a new regulatory design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a quantitative tool that measures the bundled impact of an individual product over its entire life cycle, from "cradle-to-grave." LCA has been developed over many decades to improve industry's ...

Edwards, Jennifer Lynn, M. C. P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The effect of carbonation after demolition on the life cycle assessment of pavements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high contribution of CO? emissions associated with pavements has driven research to assess the life cycle of concrete versus asphalt structures and to develop a strategy to reduce the carbon footprint. The life cycle ...

Rossick, Katelyn M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Life cycle assessment of materials and construction in commercial structures : variability and limitations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life cycle assessment has become an important tool for determining the environmental impact of materials and products. It is also useful in analyzing the impact a structure has over the course of its life cycle. The ...

Hsu, Sophia Lisbeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Area, Chicago, and New York City  are  evaluated  capturing  passenger  transportation  life?cycle  energy Area, Chicago, and New York City are evaluated capturing passenger trans- portation life-cycle energy

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evaluation of Life-Cycle Assessment Studies of Chinese Cement Production: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system boundary, data sources, data quality assessment, data disaggregation and other elements. The Development of Life Cycle

Lu, Hongyou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Life Cycle Assessments Confirm the Need for Hydropower and Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of life cycle assessments to confirm the need for hydropower and nuclear energy.

Gagnon, L.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

202

U.S. LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e #12;Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project. Vision Statement The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database will be the recognized source of U.S.-based, quality, transparent life cycle inventory data and will become an integral part of the rapidly expanding

203

Virtual Community Life Cycle: a Model to Develop Systems with Fluid Requirements Christo El Morr1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Virtual Community Life Cycle: a Model to Develop Systems with Fluid Requirements Christo El Morr1 into the life cycle model needed to develop information systems for group of people with fluid requirements development life cycles can be followed when developing any virtual community. Though, in a fluid environment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental performance of the University at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2013 CIVL498 C Ian Eddy LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF THE FOREST SCIENCE CENTER

205

Towards prospective Life Cycle Assessment: how to identify key parameters inducing most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) have been undertaken, attempting to give a quantitative assessmentTowards prospective Life Cycle Assessment: how to identify key parameters inducing most Blanc1 MINES ParisTech, O.I.E. center, Sophia Antipolis, France Abstract. Prospective Life Cycle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

206

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

purposes. A life cycle assessment (LCA) was carried out on two of the event arenas built for the 2010UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle AssessmentC: Life Cycle Assessment Report Thunderbird Old Arena Group Members: Dennis Fan, Sean Geyer, Hillary

207

A Life-Cycle Energy and Inventory Analysis of FinFET Integrated Circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used to assess environmental implicationsA Life-Cycle Energy and Inventory Analysis of FinFET Integrated Circuits Yanzhi Wang, Ying Zhang as the next-generation semiconductor technology. This paper is the first attempt in reporting the life-cycle

Pedram, Massoud

208

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT -CENTER FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findingsUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report JIAN SUN LIFE CYCLE which has one of the largest life cycle inventory database in North America. Assumptions and According

209

Ris-R-1130(EN) Life cycle inventory and risk assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and approach 6 3 Methods 7 3.1 Life cycle assessment (LCA) 7 3.2 Technological risks 8 3.3 Technology foresightRisø-R-1130(EN) Life cycle inventory and risk assessment of genetic modified perennial ryegrass (TF) 9 3.4 Social theories 10 3.5 Life cycle inventory and risk assessment in a technology foresight

210

RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel method for soil quality in life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to minimise impacts of land use on soil quality. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been proven to be a suitableRESEARCH ARTICLE A novel method for soil quality in life cycle assessment using several soil- ods of life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) do not include any soil quality indicators other than soil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

211

An algorithm for a decomposition of weighted digraphs --with applications to life cycle analysis in ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecology L. Sun M. Wang § Abstract In the analysis of organism life cycles in ecology, comparisons of life the decomposition was formalized by Wardle [Ecology 79(7), 2539-2549 (1998)]. However there are difficulties no such simple cycles are obtainable. When applied to life cycle analysis in ecology, the proposed method

Wang, Mei

212

Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels and access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver on-spec biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”, which densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The harvesting, preprocessing, and logistics (HPL) of biomass commodity supply chains thus could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn stover logisticsHPL within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the HPL gate-to-gate sequence. The results show that the transport of densified biomass introduces the highest variability and contribution to the carbon footprint of the logistics HPL supply chain (0.2-13 g CO2e/MJ). Moreover, depending upon the biomass availability and its spatial density and surrounding transportation infrastructure (road and rail), logistics HPL processes can increase the variability in life cycle environmental impacts for lignocellulosic biofuels. Within Kansas, life cycle GHG emissions could range from 24 to 41 g CO2e/MJ depending upon the location, size and number of preprocessing depots constructed. However, this range can be minimized through optimizing the siting of preprocessing depots where ample rail infrastructure exists to supply biomass commodity to a regional biorefinery supply system

Kara G. Cafferty; Erin M. Searcy; Long Nguyen; Sabrina Spatari

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls |NavyNuclearLife Cycle | National

214

Background and Reflections on the Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the ever-growing body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature on electricity generation technologies, inconsistent methods and assumptions hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Synthesis of the body of previous research is necessary to generate robust results to assess and compare environmental performance of different energy technologies for the benefit of policy makers, managers, investors, and citizens. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory initiated the LCA Harmonization Project in an effort to rigorously leverage the numerous individual studies to develop collective insights. The goals of this project were to: (1) understand the range of published results of LCAs of electricity generation technologies, (2) reduce the variability in published results that stem from inconsistent methods and assumptions, and (3) clarify the central tendency of published estimates to make the collective results of LCAs available to decision makers in the near term. The LCA Harmonization Project's initial focus was evaluating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity generation technologies. Six articles from this first phase of the project are presented in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology on Meta-Analysis of LCA: coal (Whitaker et al. 2012), concentrating solar power (Burkhardt et al. 2012), crystalline silicon photovoltaics (PVs) (Hsu et al. 2012), thin-film PVs (Kim et al. 2012), nuclear (Warner and Heath 2012), and wind (Dolan and Heath 2012). Harmonization is a meta-analytical approach that addresses inconsistency in methods and assumptions of previously published life cycle impact estimates. It has been applied in a rigorous manner to estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from many categories of electricity generation technologies in articles that appear in this special supplemental supplemental issue, reducing the variability and clarifying the central tendency of those estimates in ways useful for decision makers and analysts. Each article took a slightly different approach, demonstrating the flexibility of the harmonization approach. Each article also discusses limitations of the current research, and the state of knowledge and of harmonization, pointing toward a path of extending and improving the meta-analysis of LCAs.

Heath, G. A.; Mann, M. K.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Life-Cycle Analysis of Geothermal Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001 Letter Report:Life-Cycle Analysis of Geothermal

216

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Cost Effective Waste Heat Organic Rankine Cycle Applications and Systems Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptually, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power cycle has been well known to the engineering community for many years. Despite the rapid escalation of energy costs during the past decade, and a concerted, though somewhat belated, effort towards...

Rohrer, J. W.; Bronicki, L. Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (CED), life cycle based, for industrial waste management decision making  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We developed a methodology useful to environmentally compare industrial waste management options. • The methodology uses a Net Energy Demand indicator which is life cycle based. • The method was simplified to be widely used, thus avoiding cost driven decisions. • This methodology is useful for governments to promote the best environmental options. • This methodology can be widely used by other countries or regions around the world. - Abstract: Life cycle thinking is a good approach to be used for environmental decision-support, although the complexity of the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies sometimes prevents their wide use. The purpose of this paper is to show how LCA methodology can be simplified to be more useful for certain applications. In order to improve waste management in Catalonia (Spain), a Cumulative Energy Demand indicator (LCA-based) has been used to obtain four mathematical models to help the government in the decision of preventing or allowing a specific waste from going out of the borders. The conceptual equations and all the subsequent developments and assumptions made to obtain the simplified models are presented. One of the four models is discussed in detail, presenting the final simplified equation to be subsequently used by the government in decision making. The resulting model has been found to be scientifically robust, simple to implement and, above all, fulfilling its purpose: the limitation of waste transport out of Catalonia unless the waste recovery operations are significantly better and justify this transport.

Puig, Rita, E-mail: rita.puig@eei.upc.edu [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Grau; Riba, Jordi-Roger [Escola d’Enginyeria d’Igualada (EEI), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), Plaça del Rei, 15, 08700 Igualada (Spain); Bala, Alba [UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change, Escola Superior de Comerç Internacional, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), c/Passeig Pujades, 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Life Cycle Analysis for the Walter H. Gage Residence The life cycle analysis (LCA) being carried out for this project is one of thirteen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The life cycle analysis (LCA) being carried out for this project is one of thirteen others that are being1 Life Cycle Analysis for the Walter H. Gage Residence Civl 498c Jack Liu #12;Liu 2 Abstract by the UBC Records Department to perform takeoffs for the EIE inputs. The EIE presented the impact assessment

220

Do Gasoline Prices Resond Asymmetrically to Cost Shocks? The Confounding Effect of Edgeworth Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atkinson, B . (2006) "Retail Gasoline Price Cycles: Evidenceof Adjustment of U K Retail Gasoline Prices to Cost Changes"1993) "Gas Wars: Retail Gasoline Price Fluctuations", of and

Noel, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Do Gasoline Prices Resond Asymmetrically to Cost Shocks? The Confounding Effect of Edgeworth Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atkinson, B . (2006) "Retail Gasoline Price Cycles: EvidenceEvidence on Asymmetric Gasoline Price Re­ and Statistics "of Adjustment of U K Retail Gasoline Prices to Cost Changes"

Noel, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative.

Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Wongsuchoto, Porntip [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: prasert.p@chula.ac.th

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Life-Cycle Assessment of Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part ofthe Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials' Phase I life-cycle assessments ofbiofuels, lifecycle inventory burdens from the production of bio-oil were developed and compared with measures for residual fuel oil. Bio-oil feedstock was produced using whole southern pine (Pinus taeda) trees, chipped, and converted into bio-oil by fast pyrolysis. Input parameters and mass and energy balances were derived with Aspen. Mass and energy balances were input to SimaPro to determine the environmental performance of bio-oil compared with residual fuel oil as a heating fuel. Equivalent functional units of 1 MJ were used for demonstrating environmental preference in impact categories, such as fossil fuel use and global warming potential. Results showed near carbon neutrality of the bio-oil. Substituting bio-oil for residual fuel oil, based on the relative carbon emissions of the two fuels, estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions by 0.075 kg CO2 per MJ of fuel combustion or a 70 percent reduction in emission over residual fuel oil. The bio-oil production life-cycle stage consumed 92 percent of the total cradle-to-grave energy requirements, while feedstock collection, preparation, and transportation consumed 4 percent each. This model provides a framework to better understand the major factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions related to bio-oil production and conversion to boiler fuel during fast pyrolysis.

Steele, Philp; Puettmann, Maureen E.; Penmetsa, Venkata Kanthi; Cooper, Jerome E.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

LIFE vs. LWR: End of the Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The worldwide energy consumption in 2003 was 421 quadrillion Btu (Quads), and included 162 quads for oil, 99 quads for natural gas, 100 quads for coal, 27 quads for nuclear energy, and 33 quads for renewable sources. The projected worldwide energy consumption for 2030 is 722 quads, corresponding to an increase of 71% over the consumption in 2003. The projected consumption for 2030 includes 239 quads for oil, 190 quads for natural gas, 196 quads for coal, 35 quads for nuclear energy, and 62 quads for renewable sources [International Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0484, Table D1 (2006) p. 133]. The current fleet of light water reactors (LRWs) provides about 20% of current U.S. electricity, and about 16% of current world electricity. The demand for electricity is expected to grow steeply in this century, as the developing world increases its standard of living. With the increasing price for oil and gasoline within the United States, as well as fear that our CO2 production may be driving intolerable global warming, there is growing pressure to move away from oil, natural gas, and coal towards nuclear energy. Although there is a clear need for nuclear energy, issues facing waste disposal have not been adequately dealt with, either domestically or internationally. Better technological approaches, with better public acceptance, are needed. Nuclear power has been criticized on both safety and waste disposal bases. The safety issues are based on the potential for plant damage and environmental effects due to either nuclear criticality excursions or loss of cooling. Redundant safety systems are used to reduce the probability and consequences of these risks for LWRs. LIFE engines are inherently subcritical, reducing the need for systems to control the fission reactivity. LIFE engines also have a fuel type that tolerates much higher temperatures than LWR fuel, and has two safety systems to remove decay heat in the event of loss of coolant or loss of coolant flow. These features of LIFE are expected to result in a more straightforward licensing process and are also expected to improve the public perception of risk from nuclear power generation, transportation of nuclear materials, and nuclear waste disposal. Waste disposal is an ongoing issue for LWRs. The conventional (once-through) LWR fuel cycle treats unburned fuel as waste, and results in the current fleet of LWRs producing about twice as much waste in their 60 years of operation as is legally permitted to be disposed of in Yucca Mountain. Advanced LWR fuel cycles would recycle the unused fuel, such that each GWe-yr of electricity generation would produce only a small waste volume compared to the conventional fuel cycle. However, the advanced LWR fuel cycle requires chemical reprocessing plants for the fuel, multiple handling of radioactive materials, and an extensive transportation network for the fuel and waste. In contrast, the LIFE engine requires only one fueling for the plant lifetime, has no chemical reprocessing, and has a single shipment of a small amount of waste per GWe-yr of electricity generation. Public perception of the nuclear option will be improved by the reduction, for LIFE engines, of the number of shipments of radioactive material per GWe-yr and the need to build multiple repositories. In addition, LIFE fuel requires neither enrichment nor reprocessing, eliminating the two most significant pathways to proliferation from commercial nuclear fuel to weapons programs.

Farmer, J C; Blink, J A; Shaw, H F

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Life cycle analysis of energy systems: Methods and experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel-cycle analysis if not the same as life-cycle analysis, although the focus on defining a comprehensive system for analysis leads toward the same path. This approach was the basis of the Brookhaven Reference Energy System. It provided a framework for summing total effects over an explicitly defined fuel cycle. This concept was computerized and coupled with an extensive data base in ESNS -- the Energy Systems Network Simulator. As an example, ESNS was the analytical basis for a comparison of health and environmental effects of several coal conversion technologies. With advances in computer systems and methods, however, ESNS has not been maintained at Brookhaven. The RES approach was one of the bases of the OECD COMPASS Project and the UNEP comparative assessment of environmental impacts of energy sources. An RES model alone has limitations in analyzing complex energy systems, e.g., it is difficult to handle feedback in the network. The most recent version of a series of optimization models is MARKAL, a dynamic linear programming model now used to assess strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy system. MARKAL creates an optimal set of reference energy systems over multiple time periods, automatically incorporating dynamic feedback and allowing fuel switching and end-use conservation to meet useful energy demands.

Morris, S.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Life cycle analysis of energy systems: Methods and experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel-cycle analysis if not the same as life-cycle analysis, although the focus on defining a comprehensive system for analysis leads toward the same path. This approach was the basis of the Brookhaven Reference Energy System. It provided a framework for summing total effects over an explicitly defined fuel cycle. This concept was computerized and coupled with an extensive data base in ESNS -- the Energy Systems Network Simulator. As an example, ESNS was the analytical basis for a comparison of health and environmental effects of several coal conversion technologies. With advances in computer systems and methods, however, ESNS has not been maintained at Brookhaven. The RES approach was one of the bases of the OECD COMPASS Project and the UNEP comparative assessment of environmental impacts of energy sources. An RES model alone has limitations in analyzing complex energy systems, e.g., it is difficult to handle feedback in the network. The most recent version of a series of optimization models is MARKAL, a dynamic linear programming model now used to assess strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy system. MARKAL creates an optimal set of reference energy systems over multiple time periods, automatically incorporating dynamic feedback and allowing fuel switching and end-use conservation to meet useful energy demands.

Morris, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Life Cycle Assessment of Vanier Residence in University of British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted on the Vanier Residence. The LCA conducted looks into the lifeLife Cycle Assessment of Vanier Residence in University of British Columbia Building PerformanceOff were used to create an LC model of the Vanier Residence. For this case study, a cradle-to-gate life

228

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: To create the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) comprised of a core and distributed network of databases and data sites that will comprise a federated system for acquisition, management, maintenance, and dissemination of geothermal and related data.

229

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1600 1800 Baseline 50% Body and Chassis Wt. Redn. Scenario Weight (kg) Other PolymerComposite Magnesium Aluminum Low Carbon Steel HiMed Steel 1180 1525 8 Managed by UT-Battelle...

230

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of ably moreefficient--up to 98%,if a long charging seals and casings is not a problem,and the lithium

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Life cycle cost modeling of automotive paint systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle coating is an important component of automotive manufacturing. The paint shop constitutes the plurality of initial investment in an automotive assembly plant, consumes the majority of energy used in the plant's ...

Leitz, Christopher W. (Christopher William), 1976-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

www.fiu.edu Partner 1 Florida Power and Lights Partner 2 ClimateMaster, Inc Partner 3 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000116 DOE Funding...

234

Application of life cycle costing method to a renovation project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, we have examined the application of Lee analysis method to the construction and renovation stages of a building project. The application of the Lee analysis is currently limited to the very early stages of ...

Taneda, Makoto

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sauga, Canada. metal/air batteries--then EVswould becomemuchis shown Table 1. in metal-air batteries have the potentialexcluding the metal/air batteries: zinc/bro- development.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with an XML file format. The user's guide is part of the BLCC Help system. BLCC version 5.3-13 contains the following modules: FEMP Analysis; Energy Project Federal Analysis;...

237

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesign &Report TechnicalSHARING

238

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesign &Report TechnicalSHARINGDepartment of

239

Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesign &Report TechnicalSHARINGDepartment

240

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruaryResistanceBuilding Energy UseIntegrated Heat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs File Saving Troubleshooting | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev nextInvestigationof Energy File Saving

242

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Software Installation Troubleshooting |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev nextInvestigationof Energy File

243

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperiments | OpenThe Tomoves Active Seismic Experimentof

244

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslie Pezzullo: ...theDepartment

245

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Running head: Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block CIVL 498 ­ Life Cycle Assess Life Cycle Assessment of Chemistry Building North Block Minge Weng November 18

246

Comparative Life-cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparative Life-cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity from the LNG life-cycle. Notice that local distribution of natural gas falls outside our analysis boundary. Figure 1S: Domestic Natural Gas Life-cycle. Figure 2S: LNG Life-cycle. Processing Transmission

Jaramillo, Paulina

247

A Simulation Model for the Waterfall Software Development Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Software development life cycle or SDLC for short is a methodology for designing, building, and maintaining information and industrial systems. So far, there exist many SDLC models, one of which is the Waterfall model which comprises five phases to be completed sequentially in order to develop a software solution. However, SDLC of software systems has always encountered problems and limitations that resulted in significant budget overruns, late or suspended deliveries, and dissatisfied clients. The major reason for these deficiencies is that project directors are not wisely assigning the required number of workers and resources on the various activities of the SDLC. Consequently, some SDLC phases with insufficient resources may be delayed; while, others with excess resources may be idled, leading to a bottleneck between the arrival and delivery of projects and to a failure in delivering an operational product on time and within budget. This paper proposes a simulation model for the Waterfall development proce...

Bassil, Youssef

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Life Cycle Assessment of a Magnesium Automotive Front End  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project under the sponsorship of Canada, China and USA aims to develop key technologies and a knowledge base for increased use of magnesium in automobile. The goal of this life cycle assessment (LCA) study is to compare the energy and potential environmental impacts of advanced magnesium based front end parts of a North America built 2007 GM-Cadillac CTS with the standard carbon steel based design. This LCA uses the 'cradle-to-grave' approach by including primary material production, semi-fabrication production, autoparts manufacturing and assembly, transportation, use phase and end-of-life processing of autoparts. This LCA study was done in compliance with international standards ISO 14040:2006 and ISO 14044:2006. Furthermore, the LCA results for aluminum based front end autopart are presented. While weight savings result in reductions in energy use and carbon dioxide emissions during the use of the car, the impacts of fabrication and recycling of lightweight materials are substantial in regard to steel. Pathways for improving sustainability of magnesium use in automobiles through material management and technology improvements including recycling are also discussed.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Dubreuil, Alain [Natural Resources Canada; Bushi, Lindita [GreenhouseGasMeasurement.com; Tharumarajah, Ambalavanar [CSIRO/CAST-CRC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Life?Cycle  Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches.  EEA 2006] Emission Inventory Guidebook; Activities 080501?I: National Lighting Inventory and  Energy Consumption 

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

251

Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text-alternative version of the "Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products" webcast, held March 28, 2013.

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive life cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STATIONARY AND AUTOMOTIVE PARTICIPANTS Summary: , life cycle efficiency Standards for air path, electric path and fuel path Corporate goals... AND AUTOMOTIVE PARTICIPANTS...

253

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle impacts and costs of photovoltaic systems: currentcosts: 2004early 2005 status. Progress in Photovoltaicphotovoltaic systems often do not consider panel installation, even though it is a major component of their financial cost.

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Life Cycle Analysis System to Support D and D, Pollution Prevention, and Asset Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a life cycle analysis system (LCAS) developed to support US Department of Energy (DOE) decision-making regarding deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), pollution prevention (P2), and asset recovery, and its deployment to analyze the disposition of facilities and capital assets. Originally developed for use at the Oak Ridge East Tennessee Technology Park, this approach has been refined through application at Ohio Operations Office sites and is now being deployed at a number of DOE sites. Programs such as National Metals Recycle, the D and D Focus Area, P2, and Asset Utilization are successfully using the system to make better decisions resulting in lower cost to the taxpayer and improved environmental quality. The LCAS consists of a user-friendly, cost-effective, and analytically-sound decision-aiding process and a complementary suite of automated tools to handle data administration and multiple criteria life cycle analysis (LCA). LCA is a systematic and comprehensive process for identifying, assessing, and comparing alternatives for D and D, P2, and asset recovery at government sites, and for selecting and documenting a preferred alternative. An LCA includes all of the impacts (benefits and costs) that result from a course of action over the entire period of time affected by the action. The system also includes visualizations that aid communication and help make decision-making transparent. The LCAS has three major components related to data collection, decision alternative assessment, and making the decisions. Each component is discussed in-depth using the example of deployment of the LCAS to support asset recovery.

Bishop, L.; Tonn, B.E.; Yuracko, K.L.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Coal - Small Sub-Critical 2 Coal - Large Sub-Critical 3 Coal - Super Critical 4 Gas - Combined Cycle 5 Gas - Large-Frame Combustion Turbine 6 Gas - Aero-Derivative Combustion...

256

Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System by Michael Supervisory Committee Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System and regional product criteria within the LEED Green Building rating system are not based on comprehensive

Victoria, University of

257

A Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Monitoring and Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Monitoring and Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines Kay Abstract. Integrating structural health monitoring into life-cycle management strategies for wind turbines data) can effectively be used to capture the operational and structural behavior of wind turbines

Stanford University

258

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Renou, 2006) and wastewater sanitation systems (Doka, 2007). ApplicationLife Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

259

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

260

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

262

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Low Cost Solar Energy Conversion (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ramamoorthy Ramesh from LBNL's Materials Science Division speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 2, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Cycle Augmentation Algorithm for Minimum Cost Multicommodity Flows on a Ring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cycle Augmentation Algorithm for Minimum Cost Multicommodity Flows on a Ring Bruce Shepherd bshep of Ford and Fulkerson [5]. We mention that a similar state of affairs held for generalized

Shepherd, Bruce

267

Simplified thermoeconomic approach to cost allocation in acombined cycle cogeneration and district energy system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1997 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering SIMPLIFIED THERMOECONOMIC APPROACH TO COST ALLOCATION IN A COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION AND DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEM A Thesis By JASON GRAHAM FLEMING... (Member) Jerald Caton (Head of Department) May 1997 lviajor Sui&ject: lviechanical Engineering ABSTRACT Simplified Thermoeconomic Approach to Cost Allocation in a Combined Cycle Cogeneration and District Energy System. (May 1997) Jason Graham...

Fleming, Jason Graham

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Avery, K.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

COST EFFECTIVENESS OF LONG LIFE INCANDESCENT LAMPS AND ENERGY BUTTONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as any 1ong-li incandescent lamp or system evaluated in thisEFFECTIVENESS OF LONG LIFE INCANDESCENT LAMPS AND ENERGYEFFECTIVENESS OF LONG LIFE INCANDESCENT LAMPS AND ENERGY

Verderber, Rudy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Costs of Reproduction in an Intertidal Kelp: Patterns of Allocation and Life History Consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs of Reproduction in an Intertidal Kelp: Patterns of Allocation and Life History Consequences IN AN INTERTIDAL KELP: PATTERNS OF ALLOCATION AND LIFE HISTORY CONSEQUENCES' CATHERINE A. PFISTER Department ofthe intertidal kelp A/aria nana was manipulated experimentally to investigate costs of reproduction

272

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0 #12;Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0 Texas A...............................................................................................................................24 #12;Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0 Texas

274

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The informationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2 | P a g e Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building CIVL 498E

275

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Farbod Ahmadi Diba Derek Pope 4/16/2010 Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn corn as well as corn stover in comparision to petroleum fuels. A Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) using the Ga

276

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

277

Accepted for publication in the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment on 13 March 2013 Stochastic and epistemic uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 #12;4 1. Introduction Life cycle assessment (LCA) aims at modelling complex systems that usually1 Accepted for publication in the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment on 13 March 2013 of Life Cycle Assessment (2013) 1-10" DOI : 10.1007/s11367-013-0572-6 #12;2 Abstract Purpose: When

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

278

The 6th International Conference on Life Cycle Management in Gothenburg 2013 TOWARD A STRUCTURED FUNCTIONAL UNIT DEFINITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chatenay-Malabry, France. *E-mail: francois.cluzel@ecp.fr Keywords: Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Goal of comparable product quantities to provide reliable Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) results. Although definition framework. INTRODUCTION Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is performed in product design to measure

Boyer, Edmond

279

Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European rapeseed and Brazilian soybeans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European determinants of life cycle emissions of greenhouse gases linked to the life cycle of biodiesel from European rapeseed and Brazilian soybeans. For biodiesel from European rapeseed and for biodiesel from Brazilian

280

Expeditious Data Center Sustainability, Flow, and Temperature Modeling: Life-Cycle Exergy Consumption Combined with a Potential Flow Based, Rankine Vortex Superposed, Predictive Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology iii Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) . . . . . . .Results 6.1 Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) . . . . . 6.1.1Analysis (LCEA) 4. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) 5. Exergetic

Lettieri, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life-cycle Assessment (LCA)comprehensive life-cycle assessment (LCA) models to quantifyUCB-ITS-VWP-2007-7 Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) The vehicles,

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boyd et al. : “Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boyd et al. : “Life-cycle energy demand and global warmingLife-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-to assess the life-cycle energy demand of its products for

Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy  and  GHG performance of Chicago and New York is the Chicago and New York systems where energy and  emissions CO 2 e).  For New York, life?cycle energy and GHG emissions 

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Evaluation of probabilistic underspecification as a method for incorporating uncertainty into comparative life cycle assessments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life cycle assessments are quickly becoming a crucial method through which the environmental impacts of products or processes are evaluated. A concern with current practice, however, is that the use of deterministic values ...

Wildnauer, Margaret T. (Margaret Thea)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

287

Hazard/Risk Assessment MULTIPLE STRESSORS AND COMPLEX LIFE CYCLES: INSIGHTS FROM A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USA kUniversity of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina, USA #Department to the habitat type (aquatic, terrestrial) and that operate at different times in the life cycle. We investigated

Hopkins, William A.

288

Methods for managing uncertainly in material selection decisions : robustness of early stage life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing alternative materials is an important tactic to improve the environmental performance of products. Currently a growing array of materials candidates confronts today's product designer. While life-cycle assessment ...

Nicholson, Anna L. (Anna Louise)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

System strategies in the management of transit systems towards the end of their life cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores and evaluates essential strategies needed for the transit authority/operator to deal with end of life cycle challenges of Rapid Transit Systems (RTS) systems. RTS systems are elaborate systems consisting ...

Kairon, Ajmer Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Quantifying Variability in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Inventories of Alternative Middle Distillate Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of variability in life cycle analysis (LCA) is inherent due to both inexact LCA procedures and variation of numerical inputs. Variability in LCA needs to be clearly distinguished from uncertainty. This paper ...

Stratton, Russell William

291

Construction of a classification hierarchy for process underspecification to streamline life-cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concerns over global warming potential and environmental degradation have created a demand for accurate assessment of the impact of various products and processes. Life cycle assessment (LCA), a quantitative assessment ...

Cary, Victor E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

144 Figure 63: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Life-Cycle157 Figure 64: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Water68 Table 14: Hydroelectricity-Related FWSE (Data Source: (

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Iterative uncertainty reduction via Monte Carlo simulation : a streamlined life cycle assessment case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is one methodology for assessing a product's impact on the environment. LCA has grown in popularity recently as consumers and governments request more information concerning the environmental ...

Bolin, Christopher E. (Christopher Eric)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Life cycle assessment of UK pig production systems: the impact of dietary protein source   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was developed to evaluate the environmental impacts of producing 1 kg pig live weight. A comparison was made between dietary protein sources, i.e. imported soybean meal with the UK protein ...

Stephen, Katie Louise

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

An exploration of materials taxonomies to support streamlined life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As life cycle assessment (LCA) gains prominence as a reliable method of environmental evaluation, concerns about data availability and quality have become more important. LCA is a resource intensive methodology, and thus ...

Reis, Lynn (Lynn Diana)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This March 28, 2013 webcast reviewed DOE's recently completed three-part study of the life-cycle energy and environmental impacts of LED lighting products relative to incandescent and CFL...

298

Product Life Cycle, and Market Entry and Exit Decisions Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A key characteristic of the product life cycle (PLC) is the depletion of the product’s market potential due to technological obsolescence. Based on this concept, we develop a stochastic model for evaluating market entry and exit decisions during...

Chi, Tailan; Liu, John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Total Quality Commissioning for HVAC Systems to Assure High Performance Throughout the Whole Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL QUALITY COMMISSIONING FOR HVAC SYSTEMS TO ASSURE HIGH PERFORMANCE THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE LIFE CYCLE By: Grahame E. Maisey, P.E., and Beverly Milestone, LEED AP Building Services Consultants INTRODUCTION Current HVAC systems... are not coming close to approaching life cycle performance expectations for energy, operation and maintenance, occupant comfort and productivity and longevity. HVAC systems in buildings claiming to be sustainable, with integrated, energy conscious design...

Maisey, G.; Milestone, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Life-Cycle Analysis of Transportation Fuels and Vehicle Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cycle modeling for light-duty vehicles GREET CCLUB CCLUB: Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels, and black carbon (in a new release) CO2e of the three (with their global warming potentials) Criteria

Bustamante, Fabián E.

303

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life-cycle Assessment (LCA)..comprehensive life-cycle assessment (LCA) models to quantifyat each stage. Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) The vehicles,

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Life Cycle Assessment and Grid Electricity: What Do We Know and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explore the limits of current knowledge about grid electricity in LCA and carbon footprinting for the U cycle assessment and policy analyses in a world with incomplete and uncertain information. Introduction drivers in regional greenhouse gas intensity and in region-specific life cycle inventories (4). However

Jaramillo, Paulina

305

Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas the single-family detached homes ana- lyzed. Figure A shows that the energy used on-site during the construction phase of a single story 1,500 ft2 home corresponds to 5.10% the total energy used in the life

Hall, Sharon J.

306

Supporting the Full BPM Life-Cycle Using Process Mining and Intelligent Redesign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting the Full BPM Life-Cycle Using Process Mining and Intelligent Redesign Wil M.P. van der.aalst,m.netjes,h.a.reijers@tm.tue.nl Abstract. Business Process Management (BPM) systems provide a broad range of facilities to enact and manage operational business processes. Ideally, these systems should provide support for the complete BPM life

van der Aalst, Wil

307

Life Cycle Assessment of Biochar Systems: Estimating the Energetic,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 30, 2009. Accepted November 17, 2009. Biomass pyrolysis with biochar returned to soil dependent on the costs of feedstock production, pyrolysis, and the value of C offsets. Biomass sources-3). Biochar is the stable, carbon- rich charcoal that results from pyrolysis of biomass materials. Used

Lehmann, Johannes

308

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle Carolina State University ABSTRACT Gasification is a globally emerging technology in commercial markets for the conversion of a variety of feedstocks, including coal, heavy residue oil, biomass, solid waste, and others

Frey, H. Christopher

309

Prediction of Reliability and Cost for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and maintenance strategies on reliability prediction for ECLSS. A brief investigation of the system cost will alsoPrediction of Reliability and Cost for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems Haibei Jiang and David Kortenkamp§ NASA-Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, 77058, USA Francisco Capristan¶ Georgia

Kortenkamp, David

310

Multiobjective Design Optimization of Real-life Devices in Electrical Engineering: a Cost-effective Evolutionary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The optimal shape design of a shielded reactor, based on the optimization of both cost and performanceMultiobjective Design Optimization of Real-life Devices in Electrical Engineering: a Cost optimization of a device in electrical engineering, the exhaustive sampling of Pareto optimal front implies

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

311

Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability of Chemical Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20-23, 2014 Number of cLCAs 19 19 10 17 13 4 2 Overall abatement potential Subcategory • Automotive weight reduction • Lubricants • Lower friction • Engine efficiency • Aviation weight reduction • Marine fuel reduction • Building insulation... Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Products in our daily lives Plastics Packaging - Protects and extends shelf life Building & Construction – Insulation, design, flooring Plastics in Automotive Applications - Light weighting...

Sahnoune, A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Life-cycle framework for assessment of site remediation options: Method and generic survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address burdens associated with contaminated sites and issuing from remediation activities, a life-cycle framework (LCF) was developed, including an approach based on life-cycle management (LCM) and an adaptation of life-cycle assessment (LCA). Intended for application to a wide range of remediation options, the objective of the LCF is to broaden consideration of potential impacts beyond the contaminated site and over a prolonged time frame. The LCM approach is a qualitative method for investigating remediation activities from a life-cycle perspective. This adaptation of the more rigorous, quantitative LCA method has involved specifying appropriate life-cycle stages, a long-term time horizon, a spatial boundary encompassing the contaminated site and other affected locations, a process boundary containing the contaminated soil, and an impact assessment method that considers site- and process-related metrics. To assess the suitability of LCM as a decision-making tool, six generic site remediation options were investigated: no action, encapsulation, excavation and disposal, vapor extraction, in situ bioremediation, and soil washing. The analysis exemplified tradeoffs between the streamlined LCM, and comprehensive, quantitative LCA approaches, and highlighted potential environmental and human health impacts arising from the six technologies investigated.

Diamond, M.L.; Page, C.A. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Campbell, M. [Toronto Public Health, North York, Ontario (Canada); McKenna, S. [City of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Community and Neighbourhood Services; Lall, R. [R. Addison Lall and Associates, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Life-cycle assessments: Linking energy, economics, and the environment. Paper No. 571  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been involved in a number of life-cycle assessment (LCA) projects that assess the complete lifetime energy, economic, and environmental impacts of alternative technology options. Life-cycle assessments offer one-stop shopping answers to the total energy and environmental implications of alternative technologies, as well as providing employment and income consequences. In one recently completed study, the lifetime impacts of scenarios involving the production and use of biomass ethanol transportation fuels were assessed. In an ongoing study, the lifetime impacts of electric-powered vehicles versus conventional fuels are being assessed. In a proposed study, the impacts of recycled office paper versus office paper from virgin sources would be assessed. A LCA proceeds by developing mass and energy inventories during all phases of the life-cycle. Special attention is given to energy consumption and environmental releases. Economics are incorporated by evaluating the macroeconomic impacts of the alternative policies, such as employment, wages, and output. Economics can also be incorporated by attempting to place values on the damages imposed by the environmental releases associated with alternative scenarios. This paper discusses life-cycle assessment techniques and their application to building energy issues. Life-cycle assessments show great promise for analysis of buildings energy policy questions.

Shankle, S.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Cycle-Life Characterization of Automotive Lithium-Ion Batteries with LiNiO2 Cathode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle-Life Characterization of Automotive Lithium-Ion Batteries with LiNiO2 Cathode Yancheng Zhang of lithium- ion batteries for electric vehicles EVs and hybrid EVs HEVs . Substantial research has been- face, which is critical to the cycle life and calendar life of lithium- ion batteries.1,2 Unfortunately

316

CBE UFAD cost analysis tool: Life cycle cost model, issues and assumptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diffusers, underfloor fan coil units (FCU), etc. that arepurposes: VAV boxes and Fan Coil Units (FCU). Furthermore,

Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne; Bauman, Fred

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

FEMP Offers New eTraining Core Course on Fundamentals of Life...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New eTraining Core Course on Fundamentals of Life Cycle Costing for Energy Conservation FEMP Offers New eTraining Core Course on Fundamentals of Life Cycle Costing for Energy...

318

The role of waste-to-energy in integrated waste management: A life cycle assessment perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management has become a major issue in terms of environmental impacts. It has become the focus of local, state and federal regulations, which generally tend to promote the reduce/re-use/recycle/incinerate/landfill environmental hierarchy. At the same time, the Waste Industry capital requirements have increased in order of magnitude since the beginning of the 80`s. The driving forces of further capital requirements for the Waste Management Industry will be the impact of public policies set today and goals set by politicians. Therefore, it appears extremely important for the Waste Industry to correctly analyze and forecast the real environmental and financial costs of waste management practices in order to: discuss with the local, state and federal agencies on more rational grounds; forecast the right investments in new technologies (recycling networks and plants, incinerators with heat recovery, modern landfill). The aim of this paper is to provide an example of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) project in the waste management field that raised surprising issues on otherwise unchallenged waste management practices.

Besnainou, J. [Ecobalance, Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Comparative analysis of the life cycle impact assessment of available cement inventories in the EU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is one of basic steps in life cycle assessment methodology (LCA). This paper presents a comparative study of the LCIA of different life cycle inventories (LCI) for EU cements. The analysis unit used is the manufacture of 1 kg of cement, from 'cradle to gate'. The impact categories considered are those resulting from the manufacture of cement and include greenhouse effects, acidification, eutrophication and summer and winter smog, amongst others. The results of the study highlighted some inconsistencies in existing inventories. As for the LCIA, the main environmental interventions related to cement manufacture were classified and characterised and their effect on different impact categories analysed. Differences observed in evaluation of the impact of cement type were essentially related to their clinker content.

Josa, Alejandro [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), School of Civil Engineering (ETSECCPB), C/Jordi Girona 1-3 Modul D2/C1, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)]. E-mail: alejandro.josa@upc.edu; Aguado, Antonio [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), School of Civil Engineering (ETSECCPB), C/Jordi Girona 1-3 Modul D2/C1, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Cardim, Arnaldo [Civil Engineering Department, Polytechnic School of Penambuco University, Rua Benfica, 455-Madalena, CEP 50.750-410 (Brazil); Byars, Ewan [Centre for Cement and Concrete, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Life-cycle energy analyses of electric vehicle storage batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of several life-cycle energy analyses of prospective electric vehicle batteries are presented. The batteries analyzed were: Nickel-zinc; Lead-acid; Nickel-iron; Zinc-chlorine; Sodium-sulfur (glass electrolyte); Sodium-sulfur (ceramic electrolyte); Lithium-metal sulfide; and Aluminum-air. A life-cycle energy analysis consists of evaluating the energy use of all phases of the battery's life, including the energy to build it, operate it, and any credits that may result from recycling of the materials in it. The analysis is based on the determination of three major energy components in the battery life cycle: Investment energy, i.e., The energy used to produce raw materials and to manufacture the battery; operational energy i.e., The energy consumed by the battery during its operational life. In the case of an electric vehicle battery, this energy is the energy required (as delivered to the vehicle's charging circuit) to power the vehicle for 100,000 miles; and recycling credit, i.e., The energy that could be saved from the recycling of battery materials into new raw materials. The value of the life-cycle analysis approach is that it includes the various penalties and credits associated with battery production and recycling, which enables a more accurate determination of the system's ability to reduce the consumption of scarce fuels. The analysis of the life-cycle energy requirements consists of identifying the materials from which each battery is made, evaluating the energy needed to produce these materials, evaluating the operational energy requirements, and evaluating the amount of materials that could be recycled and the energy that would be saved through recycling. Detailed descriptions of battery component materials, the energy requirements for battery production, and credits for recycling, and the operational energy for an electric vehicle, and the procedures used to determine it are discussed.

Sullivan, D; Morse, T; Patel, P; Patel, S; Bondar, J; Taylor, L

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

System dynamics based models for selecting HVAC systems for office buildings: a life cycle assessment from carbon emissions perspective.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study aims to explore the life cycle environmental impacts of typical heating ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems including variable air volume (VAV) system,… (more)

Chen, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Comparison of Battery Life Across Real-World Automotive Drive-Cycles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratories run around-the-clock aging tests to try to understand as quickly as possible how long new Li-ion battery designs will last under certain duty cycles. These tests may include factors such as duty cycles, climate, battery power profiles, and battery stress statistics. Such tests are generally accelerated and do not consider possible dwell time at high temperatures and states-of-charge. Battery life-predictive models provide guidance as to how long Li-ion batteries may last under real-world electric-drive vehicle applications. Worst-case aging scenarios are extracted from hundreds of real-world duty cycles developed from vehicle travel surveys. Vehicles examined included PHEV10 and PHEV40 EDVs under fixed (28 degrees C), limited cooling (forced ambient temperature), and aggressive cooling (20 degrees C chilled liquid) scenarios using either nightly charging or opportunity charging. The results show that battery life expectancy is 7.8 - 13.2 years for the PHEV10 using a nightly charge in Phoenix, AZ (hot climate), and that the 'aggressive' cooling scenario can extend battery life by 1-3 years, while the 'limited' cooling scenario shortens battery life by 1-2 years. Frequent (opportunity) charging can reduce battery life by 1 year for the PHEV10, while frequent charging can extend battery life by one-half year.

Smith, K.; Earleywine, M.; Wood, E.; Pesaran, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland, E-mail: Roland.Hischier@empa.ch; Hilty, Lorenz M.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Chicago Center for Green Technology: life-cycle assessment of a brownfield redevelopment project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online at stacks.iop.org/ERL/8/015038 Abstract The sustainable development of brownfields reflects and photovoltaic) on-site and the use of more sustainable building products resulted in 72 terajoules (TJ: sustainable brownfield development, life-cycle assessment, built environment, embodied energy, cumulative

Illinois at Chicago, University of

328

CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX Life-Cycle Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEC-500-2010-FS-XXX Life-Cycle Energy Assessment of Smart Growth Strategies TRANSPORTATION ENERGY growth strategies at reducing energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and criteria pollutants remains. · An analysis of local planning and policy options for reducing embedded energy in the transport system

329

Life Cycle Inventory of CO2 in an Enhanced Oil Recovery System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Inventory of CO2 in an Enhanced Oil Recovery System P A U L I N A J A R A M I L L O manuscript received August 27, 2009. Accepted September 14, 2009. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been into an oil reservoir to reduce oil viscosity,reduceinterfacialtension,andcauseoilswellingwhich improves oil

Jaramillo, Paulina

330

A review of life-cycle analysis studies on liquid biofuel systems for the transport sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Advanced" (or second generation) biofuels · Bioethanol (E100, E85, E10, ETBE) from lignocellu- losicA review of life-cycle analysis studies on liquid biofuel systems for the transport sector Eric D interest in biofuels for climate change mitigation. This article reviews the rich literature of published

331

Uncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses involving coal. Greenhouse gas emissions from fuel use and methane releases at coal mines, fuel.5 million metric tons of methane emissions. Close to 95% of domestic coal was consumed by the electricityUncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal Aranya Venkatesh

Jaramillo, Paulina

332

Is otolith strontium a useful scalar of life cycles in estuarine shes?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is otolith strontium a useful scalar of life cycles in estuarine ®shes? David H. Secor* , Jay R. In this paper, we review investigations that used otolith strontium (Sr) to chart estuarine movements of ®shes microchemistry; Strontium 1. Introduction Estuaries serve as important and productive nur- series for many marine

Rooker, Jay R.

333

Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU- sponsored EnerGEO project, aiming, and its use for the evaluation of environmental impacts of wind energy. The effects of offshore wind farms

Boyer, Edmond

334

Use of Life Cycle Assessment in Evaluating Solvent Recovery Alternatives in Pharmaceutical Manufacture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was evaluated based on its ability to efficiently separate and purify isopropyl alcohol (IPA) from an aqueous the wastes and to recycle IPA back into the process. The recovery of the spent IPA avoids its incineration and also reduces the inventory of fresh IPA required to operate the celecoxib process. Life cycle

Savelski, Mariano J.

335

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING K. Smarsly1) strategies can enable wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators to precisely schedule maintenance behavior of wind turbines and to reduce (epistemic) uncertainty. Both the resistance parameters

Stanford University

336

Propagating Uncertainty in Solar Panel Performance for Life Cycle Modeling in Early Stage Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propagating Uncertainty in Solar Panel Performance for Life Cycle Modeling in Early Stage Design. This work is conducted in the context of an amorphous photovoltaic (PV) panel, using data gathered from the National Solar Radiation Database, as well as realistic data collected from an experimental hardware setup

Yang, Maria

337

OPTIMIZATION WITH ENERGY MANAGEMENT OF PV BATTERY STAND-ALONE SYSTEMS OVER THE ENTIRE LIFE CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of both the installed PV power and storage capacity (lead-acid battery technology for purposes). Keywords: Battery storage and control, Lifetime simulation, PV system. 1. INTRODUCTION Given the sizableOPTIMIZATION WITH ENERGY MANAGEMENT OF PV BATTERY STAND-ALONE SYSTEMS OVER THE ENTIRE LIFE CYCLE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Porous Doped Silicon Nanowires for Lithium Ion Battery Anode with Long Cycle Life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in energy storage has stimulated significant interest in lithium ion battery research. The lithium ion battery is one of the most promising systems which is efficient in delivering energy, light in weightPorous Doped Silicon Nanowires for Lithium Ion Battery Anode with Long Cycle Life Mingyuan Ge

Zhou, Chongwu

339

Cycle Life Modeling of Lithium-Ion Batteries Gang Ning* and Branko N. Popov**,z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Life Modeling of Lithium-Ion Batteries Gang Ning* and Branko N. Popov**,z Department and Newman4 made a first attempt to model the parasitic reactions in lithium-ion batteries by incorporating a solvent oxidation into a lithium-ion battery model. Spotnitz5 developed polynomial expressions

Popov, Branko N.

340

BUILDINGPI: A FUTURE TOOL FOR BUILDING LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS James O'Donnell1&2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) programs. Using IFC as a standard for data storage, building geometric data can be seamlessly transferredBUILDINGPI: A FUTURE TOOL FOR BUILDING LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS James O'Donnell1&2 , Elmer Morrissey1 National Laboratory, Berkeley, 94720 ­ U.S.A. ABSTRACT Traditionally building simulation models are used

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via natural gas steam reforming was performed to examine the net emissions of greenhouse gases as well as other major environmental consequences. LCA is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes.

Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

LA SOSTENIBILIT DEI PRODOTTI ATTRAVERSO IL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT (LCA) E  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LA SOSTENIBILITÀ DEI PRODOTTI ATTRAVERSO IL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT (LCA) E LA RIDUZIONE DELL Università degli studi di Bari "LCA e Carbon Foot Print ­ metodologie ed opportunità per l'efficientamento e aziende comunicano il percorso di analisi LCA e calcolo della CFP, le opportunità ed i vantaggi CISA S

Malerba, Donato

343

Comparative evaluation of life cycle assessment models for solid waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication compares a selection of six different models developed in Europe and America by research organisations, industry associations and governmental institutions. The comparison of the models reveals the variations in the results and the differences in the conclusions of an LCA study done with these models. The models are compared by modelling a specific case - the waste management system of Dresden, Germany - with each model and an in-detail comparison of the life cycle inventory results. Moreover, a life cycle impact assessment shows if the LCA results of each model allows for comparable and consecutive conclusions, which do not contradict the conclusions derived from the other models' results. Furthermore, the influence of different level of detail in the life cycle inventory of the life cycle assessment is demonstrated. The model comparison revealed that the variations in the LCA results calculated by the models for the case show high variations and are not negligible. In some cases the high variations in results lead to contradictory conclusions concerning the environmental performance of the waste management processes. The static, linear modelling approach chosen by all models analysed is inappropriate for reflecting actual conditions. Moreover, it was found that although the models' approach to LCA is comparable on a general level, the level of detail implemented in the software tools is very different.

Winkler, Joerg [Institute for Waste Management and Contaminated Sites Treatment, TU Dresden Faculty of Forestry, Geo and Hydro Sciences, Pratzschwitzer Str. 15, 01796 Pirna (Germany); Bilitewski, Bernd [Institute for Waste Management and Contaminated Sites Treatment, TU Dresden Faculty of Forestry, Geo and Hydro Sciences, Pratzschwitzer Str. 15, 01796 Pirna (Germany)], E-mail: abfall@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Life cycle assessment of buildings technologies: High-efficiency commercial lighting and residential water heaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the life cycle emissions and energy use are estimated for two types of energy technologies. The first technology evaluated is the sulfur lamp, a high-efficiency lighting system under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Fusion Lighting, the inventor of the technology. The sulfur lamp is compared with conventional metal halide high-intensity discharge lighting systems. The second technology comparison is between standard-efficiency and high-efficiency gas and electric water heaters. In both cases the life cycle energy use and emissions are presented for the production of an equivalent level of service by each of the technologies. For both analyses, the energy use and emissions from the operation of the equipment are found to dominate the life cycle profile. The life cycle emissions for the water heating systems are much more complicated. The four systems compared include standard- and high-efficiency gas water heaters, standard electric resistance water heaters, and heat pump water heaters.

Freeman, S.L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

SPECIFICATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF IFC BASED PERFORMANCE METRICS TO SUPPORT BUILDING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the introduction of tighter building codes have done little to stem the poor energy performance in commercial on owners to quantify the energy usage of their buildings against benchmarks set by government energy (LBNL), Berkeley, CA, USA ABSTRACT Minimising building life cycle energy consumption is becoming

346

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that makes great strides in clarifying inconsistent and conflicting GHG emission estimates in the published literature while providing more precise estimates of GHG emissions from utility-scale CSP systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Electrochimica Acta 51 (2006) 20122022 A generalized cycle life model of rechargeable Li-ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­discharge model to simulate the cycle life behavior of rechargeable Li-ion batteries has been developed. The model and Newman [4] made a first attempt to model the parasitic reaction in Li-ion batteries by assuming a solvent and reversible capacity loss due to the growth and dissolution of SEI film in Li-ion batteries. Ramadass et al

Popov, Branko N.

348

LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING. Sylvie PRETOT, this study concerns the LCA of an environmentally friendly material used for building construction, hemp construction materials, hemp concrete has a low impact on environment. Moreover, hemp concrete contributes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

A Life Cycle for the Development of Autonomic Systems: The e-Mobility Showcase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concepts and their semantics, ASCENS wraps this into a holistic ensemble development life cycle (EDLC a practitioner's approach and demon- strate the application of the EDLC on the development of one of the key is structured as follows: Section II describes the e-Mobility case study and Section III outlines the EDLC

350

WATER USE IN LCA Life cycle consumptive water use for oil shale development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER USE IN LCA Life cycle consumptive water use for oil shale development and implications Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Purpose Oil shale is an unconventional petroleum source that can be produced domestically in the USA. Oil shale resources are primarily located in Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado, within

Jaramillo, Paulina

351

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information 1. GHG Emissions Estimation for Production of Marcellus Shale Gas 1.1 Preparation of Well Pad estimate from Columbia University shows the size of a multi-well pad of Marcellus Shale averages 20

Jaramillo, Paulina

352

Framework for the Monitoring of Functional Requirements Along the Product Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rotor blades and engine housing (or stator) of the turbine will be quite different at assembly which vary along its life cycle. These variations are inducing elastic deformations which in turn can and in operation due to the high temperature and rotation velocity to which the rotor is subjected in service

Boyer, Edmond

353

Managing the Life Cycle of Access Rules in CEOSIS Stefanie Rinderle-Ma, Manfred Reichert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and business func- tions) is an important task within any enterprise informa- tion systems (EIS). Many EIS framework for the con- trolled evolution of access rules in EIS. Specifically, we de- fine change operations contributes to comprehensive life cycle support for access rules in (adaptive) EIS. 1 Introduction

Ulm, Universität

354

Transport and mixing of chemical air masses in idealized baroclinic life cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with stratospheric air is larger for LC2, owing to the presence of the deep cyclonic vortices that entrain and mixTransport and mixing of chemical air masses in idealized baroclinic life cycles L. M. Polvani1 December 2007. [1] The transport, mixing, and three-dimensional evolution of chemically distinct air masses

Esler, Gavin

355

International Exergy, Life Cycle Assessment, and Sustainability Workshop & Symposium (ELCAS3) 07 -09 July, 2013, NISYROS -GREECE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from CAPSIS are included in a "soil to power" model under Aspen Plus®, a process-oriented software3rd International Exergy, Life Cycle Assessment, and Sustainability Workshop & Symposium (ELCAS3 hal-00858490,version1-6Sep2013 Author manuscript, published in "3rd International Exergy, Life Cycle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

World Conference on Photovoltaic Conversion, Hawaii, May 8-12, 2006 QUANTIFYING THE LIFE-CYCLE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE 4 th World Conference on Photovoltaic Conversion, Hawaii, May 8-12, 2006 QUANTIFYING THE LIFE-CYCLE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS AND COMPARISONS WITH OTHER ELECTRICITY-GENERATING TECHNOLOGIES V and Australian studies portrayed photovoltaic systems as causing significant life-cycle environmental and health

357

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of Near-Term Coal Power Plant Retirement for SO2 and NOX and Life Cycle GHG Emissions emissions in the U.S. will likely result in coal plant retirement in the near-term. Life cycle assessment for electricity generation, by comparing systems that consist of individual natural gas and coal power plants

Jaramillo, Paulina

358

Subject no.: 1.4 – Policies and Programmes LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT FOR WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: Tech-wise A/S has conducted a life cycle assessment of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. A life cycle assessment (LCA), also known as a cradle to grave analysis, is an inventory of all environmental impact of a product, process or service within its complete lifecycle. An LCA includes a recovery of the resources used in the production through the utilisation to the dismantling and disposal of the product. As sample wind turbine a 2 MW offshore wind turbine placed at Horns Rev in the North Sea has been used, since this project is under development and Tech-wise A/S is the main consultant to this project. In this LCA assumptions have been made where there is information about certain materials. The assessment revealed- as expected- that the environmental impact is concentrated in the production and disposal phase. Mainly the use of normal and high-strength steel are contributors. This means that the main impact is found to come from the nacelle and the foundation. Keywords: Environmental Aspects, Off-shore, Materials, Life Cycle Assessment, EDIP-method The results of this LCA will be used to identify the most essential environmental impact in all life phases of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. This project is the first step in an examination of the possible improvement of the environmental performance of that particular wind turbine and was finalised in spring 2001. The plan is to finalise the next project by the end of 2001.

Henriette Hassing; Søren Varming

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Life Cycle Energy and Environmental Assessment of Aluminum-Intensive Vehicle Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced lightweight materials are increasingly being incorporated into new vehicle designs by automakers to enhance performance and assist in complying with increasing requirements of corporate average fuel economy standards. To assess the primary energy and carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) implications of vehicle designs utilizing these materials, this study examines the potential life cycle impacts of two lightweight material alternative vehicle designs, i.e., steel and aluminum of a typical passenger vehicle operated today in North America. LCA for three common alternative lightweight vehicle designs are evaluated: current production ( Baseline ), an advanced high strength steel and aluminum design ( LWSV ), and an aluminum-intensive design (AIV). This study focuses on body-in-white and closures since these are the largest automotive systems by weight accounting for approximately 40% of total curb weight of a typical passenger vehicle. Secondary mass savings resulting from body lightweighting are considered for the vehicles engine, driveline and suspension. A cradle-to-cradle life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for these three vehicle material alternatives. LCA methodology for this study included material production, mill semi-fabrication, vehicle use phase operation, and end-of-life recycling. This study followed international standards ISO 14040:2006 [1] and ISO 14044:2006 [2], consistent with the automotive LCA guidance document currently being developed [3]. Vehicle use phase mass reduction was found to account for over 90% of total vehicle life cycle energy and CO2e emissions. The AIV design achieved mass reduction of 25% (versus baseline) resulting in reductions in total life cycle primary energy consumption by 20% and CO2e emissions by 17%. Overall, the AIV design showed the best breakeven vehicle mileage from both primary energy consumption and climate change perspectives.

Das, Sujit [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Methodology of CO{sub 2} emission evaluation in the life cycle of office building facades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction industry is one of the greatest sources of pollution because of the high level of energy consumption during its life cycle. In addition to using energy while constructing a building, several systems also use power while the building is operating, especially the air-conditioning system. Energy consumption for this system is related, among other issues, to external air temperature and the required internal temperature of the building. The facades are elements which present the highest level of ambient heat transfer from the outside to the inside of tall buildings. Thus, the type of facade has an influence on energy consumption during the building life cycle and, consequently, contributes to buildings' CO{sub 2} emissions, because these emissions are directly connected to energy consumption. Therefore, the aim is to help develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. The results, based on the parameters used in this study, show that facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle, followed by brick facades covered with compound aluminum panels or ACM (Aluminum Composite Material), facades using structural glazing and reflective glass and brick facades with plaster coating. On the other hand, the typology of facade that emits less CO{sub 2} is brickwork and mortar because its thermal barrier is better than structural glazing facade and materials used to produce this facade are better than brickwork and ACM. Finally, an uncertainty analysis was conducted to verify the accuracy of the results attained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This methodology is based in LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use an uncertainty analysis to verify the accuracy of the results attained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study three typologies of facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle.

Taborianski, Vanessa Montoro; Prado, Racine T.A., E-mail: racine.prado@poli.usp.br

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications. 26 refs., 3 figs., 25 tabs.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY ANALYSIS IN THE PRODUCTION OF METALS USED IN PHOTOVOLTAICS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Material flows and emissions in all the stages of production of zinc, copper, aluminum, cadmium, indium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, and molybdenum were investigated. These metals are used selectively in the manufacture of solar cells, and emission and energy factors in their production are used in the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaics. Significant changes have occurred in the production and associated emissions for these metals over the last 10 years, which are not described in the LCA databases. Furthermore, emission and energy factors for several of the by-products of the base metal production were lacking. This report aims in updating the life-cycle inventories associated with the production of the base metals (Zn, Cu, Al, Mo) and in defining the emission and energy allocations for the minor metals (Cd, In, Ge, Se, Te and Ga) used in photovoltaics.

FTHENAKIS,V.M.; KIM, H.C.; WANG, W.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Wind load and life-cycle testing of second generation heliostats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As technical manager of the Second Generation Heliostat development contracts for the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories has evaluated four heliostat designs. The evaluation of the heliostats included the life-cycling and simulated wind load testing of prototype heliostats and foundations. All of the heliostats had minor problems during this testing; as a result, specific design improvements were identified for each drive mechanism and for two of the four foundations.

Rorke, W.S. Jr.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration David Luke Oates, and SO2 emissions as well as for the profitability of coal plants, as calculated by our dispatch model

Jaramillo, Paulina

365

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A review of battery life-cycle analysis : state of knowledge and critical needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review and evaluation has been conducted on cradle-to-gate life-cycle inventory studies of lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, and lithium-ion battery technologies. Data were sought that represent the production of battery constituent materials and battery manufacture and assembly. Life-cycle production data for many battery materials are available and usable, though some need updating. For the remaining battery materials, lifecycle data either are nonexistent or, in some cases, in need of updating. Although battery manufacturing processes have occasionally been well described, detailed quantitative information on energy and material flows is missing. For all but the lithium-ion batteries, enough constituent material production energy data are available to approximate material production energies for the batteries, though improved input data for some materials are needed. Due to the potential benefit of battery recycling and a scarcity of associated data, there is a critical need for life-cycle data on battery material recycling. Either on a per kilogram or per watt-hour capacity basis, lead-acid batteries have the lowest production energy, carbon dioxide emissions, and criteria pollutant emissions. Some process-related emissions are also reviewed in this report.

Sullivan, J. L.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dose-Response Modeling for Life Cycle Impact Assessment: Findingsof the Portland Review Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative aims at putting life cycle thinking into practice and at improving the supporting tools for this process through better data and indicators. The initiative has thus launched three programs with associated working groups (see http://www.uneptie.org/pc/sustain/lcinitiative/). The Task Force on Toxic Impacts was established under the Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) program to establish recommended practice and guidance for use in human toxicity, ecosystem toxicity, and related categories with direct effects on human health and ecosystem health. The workshop consisted of three elements. (A) presentations summarizing (1) the goals of the LCIA Task Force (2) historical approaches to exposure and toxic impacts in LCIA (3) current alternative proposals for addressing human health impacts. Viewgraphs from two of these presentations are provided in Appendix B to this report. (B) Discussion among a panel of experts about the scientific defensibility of these historical and proposed approaches in the context of the goals of the LCIA Task Force 3 on toxicity impacts. (C) Development of the recommendations to the LCIA program and working group for optimum short- and long-term strategies for addressing human health impacts in LCA.

McKone, Thomas E.; Kyle, Amy D.; Jolliet, Olivier; Olsen, StigIrving; Hauschild, Michael

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used...

Burlatsky, S F; O'Neill, J; Atrazhev, V V; Varyukhin, A N; Dmitriev, D V; Erikhman, N S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast characteristics summary. Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past six years, a waste volume forecast has been collected annually from onsite and offsite generators that currently ship or are planning to ship solid waste to the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Central Waste Complex (CWC). This document provides a description of the physical waste forms, hazardous waste constituents, and radionuclides of the waste expected to be shipped to the CWC from 1996 through the remaining life cycle of the Hanford Site (assumed to extend to 2070). In previous years, forecast data has been reported for a 30-year time period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted this year to maintain consistency with FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans. This document is a companion report to two previous reports: the more detailed report on waste volumes, WHC-EP-0900, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Volume Summary and the report on expected containers, WHC-EP-0903, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Container Summary. All three documents are based on data gathered during the FY 1995 data call and verified as of January, 1996. These documents are intended to be used in conjunction with other solid waste planning documents as references for short and long-term planning of the WHC Solid Waste Disposal Division`s treatment, storage, and disposal activities over the next several decades. This document focuses on two main characteristics: the physical waste forms and hazardous waste constituents of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). The major generators for each waste category and waste characteristic are also discussed. The characteristics of low-level waste (LLW) are described in Appendix A. In addition, information on radionuclides present in the waste is provided in Appendix B. The FY 1996 forecast data indicate that about 100,900 cubic meters of LLMW and TRU(M) waste is expected to be received at the CWC over the remaining life cycle of the site. Based on ranges provided by the waste generators, this baseline volume could fluctuate between a minimum of about 59,720 cubic meters and a maximum of about 152,170 cubic meters. The range is primarily due to uncertainties associated with the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program, including uncertainties regarding retrieval of long-length equipment, scheduling, and tank retrieval technologies.

Templeton, K.J.

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

370

Beloin-Saint-Pierre, D., Blanc, I., New spatiotemporally resolved LCI applied to photovoltaic electricity , In Proceedings of the Life Cycle Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that will need to be considered for improving the representativeness of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) modelling [1 potential assessment. hal-00711925,version1-26Jun2012 Author manuscript, published in "LCM 2011 - Life Cycle electricity », In Proceedings of the Life Cycle Management Conference, 28-31 October 2011, Berlin, Germany

Boyer, Edmond

371

8th International Conference on LCA in the Agri-Food Sector, Rennes, France, 2-4 October 2012 Life Cycle Assessment at the regional scale: innovative insights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in groundwater irrigated areas worldwide are manifold and the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is very relevant and decision making is carried out, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be applied at regional scale, which Life Cycle Assessment at the regional scale: innovative insights based on the Systems Approach used

Boyer, Edmond

372

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

Stratton, Russell William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

USA National Phenology Network: Plant and Animal Life-Cycle Data Related to Climate Change  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Phenology refers to recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, such as leafing and flowering, maturation of agricultural plants, emergence of insects, and migration of birds. It is also the study of these recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, especially their timing and relationships with weather and climate. Phenology affects nearly all aspects of the environment, including the abundance and diversity of organisms, their interactions with one another, their functions in food webs, and their seasonable behavior, and global-scale cycles of water, carbon, and other chemical elements. Phenology records can help us understand plant and animal responses to climate change; it is a key indicator. The USA-NPN brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators, and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.[Extracts copied from the USA-NPN home page and from http://www.usanpn.org/about].

375

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

Sullivan, John

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

378

Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

Sullivan, John

379

Hardware In The Loop Simulator in UAV Rapid Development Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field trial is very critical and high risk in autonomous UAV development life cycle. Hardware in the loop (HIL) simulation is a computer simulation that has the ability to simulate UAV flight characteristic, sensor modeling and actuator modeling while communicating in real time with the UAV autopilot hardware. HIL simulation can be used to test the UAV autopilot hardware reliability, test the closed loop performance of the overall system and tuning the control parameter. By rigorous testing in the HIL simulator, the risk in the field trial can be minimized.

Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Environmental Life Cycle Implications of Fuel Oxygenate Production from California Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, more than 90% of the excess agricultural residue produced in California (approximately 10 million dry metric tons per year) has been disposed through open-field burning. Concerns about air quality have prompted federal, state, and local air quality agencies to tighten regulations related to this burning and to look at disposal alternatives. One use of this biomass is as an oxygenated fuel. This report focuses on quantifying and comparing the comprehensive environmental flows over the life cycles of two disposal scenarios: (1) burning the biomass, plus producing and using MTBE; and (2) converting and using ETBE.

Kadam, K. L. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Camobreco, V. J.; Glazebrook, B. E. (Ecobalance Inc.); Forrest, L. H.; Jacobson, W. A. (TSS Consultants); Simeroth, D. C. (California Air Resources Board); Blackburn, W. J. (California Energy Commission); Nehoda, K. C. (California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection)

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Global warming implications of facade parameters: A life cycle assessment of residential buildings in Bahrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On a global scale, the Gulf Corporation Council Countries (GCCC), including Bahrain, are amongst the top countries in terms of carbon dioxide emissions per capita. Building authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of electricity consumption and associated CO{sub 2} emissions to be achieved by using facade parameters. This work evaluates how the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of buildings are affected by facade parameters. The main focus is placed on direct and indirect CO{sub 2} emissions from three contributors, namely, chemical reactions during production processes (Pco{sub 2}), embodied energy (Eco{sub 2}) and operational energy (OPco{sub 2}). By means of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, it has been possible to show that the greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase (80-90%). However, embodied CO{sub 2} emissions are an important factor that needs to be brought into the systems used for appraisal of projects, and hence into the design decisions made in developing projects. The assessment shows that masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO{sub 2} emissions of facade construction, mainly due to their physical characteristics. The highest Pco{sub 2} emissions factors are those of window elements, particularly aluminium frames. However, their contribution of CO{sub 2} emissions depends largely on the number and size of windows. Each square metre of glazing is able to increase the total CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 30% when compared with the same areas of opaque walls. The use of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) walls reduces the total life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 5.2% when compared with ordinary walls, while the use of thermal insulation with concrete wall reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.2%. The outcome of this work offers to the building industry a reliable indicator of the environmental impact of residential facade parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle carbon assessment of facade parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO2 emissions of facade construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Window contribution of CO2 emissions depends on the number and size of windows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without insulation, AAC walls offer more savings in CO2 emissions.

Radhi, Hassan, E-mail: h_alradhi@yahoo.com [Global Engineering Bureau, P.O Box 33130, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain (Bahrain); Sharples, Stephen, E-mail: steve.sharples@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Architecture, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Green Engineering and Life Cycle Assessment at Virginia Tec | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermalGoGreen Engineering and Life Cycle

383

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast container summary volume 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past six years, a waste volume forecast has been collected annually from onsite and offsite generators that currently ship or are planning to ship solid waste to the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Central Waste Complex (CWC). This document provides a description of the containers expected to be used for these waste shipments from 1996 through the remaining life cycle of the Hanford Site. In previous years, forecast data have been reported for a 30-year time period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted this year to maintain consistency with FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans. This document is a companion report to the more detailed report on waste volumes: WHC-EP0900, FY 1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Volume Summary. Both of these documents are based on data gathered during the FY 1995 data call and verified as of January, 1996. These documents are intended to be used in conjunction with other solid waste planning documents as references for short and long-term planning of the WHC Solid Waste Disposal Division`s treatment, storage, and disposal activities over the next several decades. This document focuses on the types of containers that will be used for packaging low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). The major waste generators for each waste category and container type are also discussed. Containers used for low-level waste (LLW) are described in Appendix A, since LLW requires minimal treatment and storage prior to onsite disposal in the LLW burial grounds. The FY 1996 forecast data indicate that about 100,900 cubic meters of LLMW and TRU(M) waste are expected to be received at the CWC over the remaining life cycle of the site. Based on ranges provided by the waste generators, this baseline volume could fluctuate between a minimum of about 59,720 cubic meters and a maximum of about 152,170 cubic meters.

Valero, O.J.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

384

Service Engineering Life-cycles Jean-Luc Garnier Jean-Philippe Auzelle Claude Pourcel Marc Peyrichon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/15 Service Engineering Life-cycles Jean-Luc Garnier Jean-Philippe Auzelle Claude Pourcel Marc, this paper provides foundation principles of service engineering with description of terms and concepts; life this period, as no real engineering process and business logic were foreseen, "SOA (service-oriented approach

Boyer, Edmond

385

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750 tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management.

Banar, Mufide [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)], E-mail: mbanar@anadolu.edu.tr; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Life cycle assessment of a national policy proposal - The case of a Swedish waste incineration tax  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the core of EU and Swedish waste policy is the so-called waste hierarchy, according to which waste should first be prevented, but should otherwise be treated in the following order of prioritisation: reuse, recycling when environmentally motivated, energy recovery, and last landfilling. Some recent policy decisions in Sweden aim to influence waste management in the direction of the waste hierarchy. In 2001 a governmental commission assessed the economic and environmental impacts of introducing a weight-based tax on waste incineration, the purpose of which would be to encourage waste reduction and increase materials recycling and biological treatment. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the waste incineration tax proposal. It was done in the context of a larger research project concerning the development and testing of a framework for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The aim of this paper is to assess the life cycle environmental impacts of the waste incineration tax proposal, and to investigate whether there are any possibilities of more optimal design of such a tax. The proposed design of the waste incineration tax results in increased recycling, but only in small environmental improvements. A more elaborate tax design is suggested, in which the tax level would partly be related to the fossil carbon content of the waste.

Bjoerklund, Anna E. [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: annab@infra.kth.se; Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air v.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Life-Cycle Model of an Automobile, Environmental Science &Cycle Assessment of Automobile/Fuel Options, EnvironmentalCycle Energy Analysis for Automobiles, Society of Automotive

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used for lifetime prediction of a GORE-SELECT membrane.

S. F. Burlatsky; M. Gummalla; J. O'Neill; V. V. Atrazhev; A. N. Varyukhin; D. V. Dmitriev; N. S. Erikhman

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-37), January 2004. A Cost-Effective Usability Evaluation Progression for Novel Interactive Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a goal the development of methodological techniques that reduce the total life cycle cost to a product's development life cycle. In fact, usability engineering can reduce development costs over to be applied at any stage of the development life cycle, and its various activities are generalizable

Hollerer, Tobias

393

Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

Kadam, K. L.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

394

Integrating a life-cycle assessment with NEPA: Does it make sense?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides the basic national charter for protection of the environment in the US. Today NEPA has provided an environmental policy model which has been emulated by nations around the world. Recently, questions have been raised regarding the appropriateness and under what conditions it makes sense to combine the preparation of a NEPA analysis with the International Organization for Stnadardization (ISO) - 14000 Standards for Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). This paper advantages a decision making tool consisting of six discrete criteria which can be employed by a user in reaching a decision regarding the integration of NEPA analysis and LCA. Properly applied, this tool should reduce the risk that a LCA may be inappropriately prepared and integrated with a NEPA analysis.

ECCLESTON, C.H.

1998-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

395

Analyzing the Life Cycle Energy Savings of DOE Supported Buildings Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the factors that would potentially help determine an appropriate analytical timeframe for measuring the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technology (BT) benefits and presents a summary-level analysis of the life cycle savings for BT’s Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) R&D program. The energy savings for three hypothetical building designs are projected over a 100-year period using Building Energy Analysis and Modeling System (BEAMS) to illustrate the resulting energy and carbon savings associated with the hypothetical aging buildings. The report identifies the tasks required to develop a long-term analytical and modeling framework, and discusses the potential analytical gains and losses by extending an analysis into the “long-term.”

Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Life-Cycle Assessment of the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in Indian Locomotives (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With India's transportation sector relying heavily on imported petroleum-based fuels, the Planning Commission of India and the Indian government recommended the increased use of blended biodiesel in transportation fleets, identifying Jatropha as a potentially important biomass feedstock. The Indian Oil Corporation and Indian Railways are collaborating to increase the use of biodiesel blends in Indian locomotives with blends of up to B20, aiming to reduce GHG emissions and decrease petroleum consumption. To help evaluate the potential for Jatropha-based biodiesel in achieving sustainability and energy security goals, this study examines the life cycle, net GHG emission, net energy ratio, and petroleum displacement impacts of integrating Jatropha-based biodiesel into locomotive operations in India. In addition, this study identifies the parameters that have the greatest impact on the sustainability of the system.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Environmental Impacts, Health and Safety Impacts, and Financial Costs of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FEFC processes, unlike many of the proposed fuel cycles and technologies under consideration, involve mature operational processes presently in use at a number of facilities worldwide. This report identifies significant impacts resulting from these current FEFC processes and activities. Impacts considered to be significant are those that may be helpful in differentiating between fuel cycle performance and for which the FEFC impact is not negligible relative to those from the remainder of the full fuel cycle. This report: • Defines ‘representative’ processes that typify impacts associated with each step of the FEFC, • Establishes a framework and architecture for rolling up impacts into normalized measures that can be scaled to quantify their contribution to the total impacts associated with various fuel cycles, and • Develops and documents the bases for estimates of the impacts and costs associated with each of the representative FEFC processes.

Brett W Carlsen; Urairisa Phathanapirom; Eric Schneider; John S. Collins; Roderick G. Eggert; Brett Jordan; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. Ault; Alan G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn; William G. Halsey; Mark Sutton; Clay E. Easterly; Ryan P. Manger; C. Wilson McGinn; Stephen E. Fisher; Brent W. Dixon; Latif Yacout

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Life and stability testing of packaged low-cost energy storage materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-cost laminated plastic film which is used to contain a Glauber's salt-based phase change thermal energy storage material in sausage-like containers called Chubs is discussed. The results of tests performed on the Chub packages themselves and on the thermal energy storage capacity of the packaged phase change material are described. From the test results, a set of specifications have been drawn up for a film material which will satisfactorily contain the phase change material under anticipated operating conditions. Calorimetric testing of the phase change material with thermal cycling indicates that a design capacity of 45 to 50 Btu/lb for a ..delta..T of 30/sup 0/F can be used for the packaged material.

Frysinger, G.R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Life Cycle Assessment of Pavements: A Critical Review of Existing Literature and Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a critical review of existing literature and modeling tools related to life-cycle assessment (LCA) applied to pavements. The review finds that pavement LCA is an expanding but still limited research topic in the literature, and that the existing body of work exhibits methodological deficiencies and incompatibilities that serve as barriers to the widespread utilization of LCA by pavement engineers and policy makers. This review identifies five key issues in the current body of work: inconsistent functional units, improper system boundaries, imbalanced data for asphalt and cement, use of limited inventory and impact assessment categories, and poor overall utility. This review also identifies common data and modeling gaps in pavement LCAs that should be addressed in future work. These gaps include: the use phase (rolling resistance, albedo, carbonation, lighting, leachate, and tire wear and emissions), asphalt fumes, feedstock energy of bitumen, traffic delay, the maintenance phase, and the end-of-life phase. This review concludes with a comprehensive list of recommendations for future research, which shed light on where improvements in knowledge can be made that will benefit the accuracy and comprehensiveness of pavement LCAs moving forward.

Santero, Nicholas; Masanet, Eric; Horvath, Arpad

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PREDICTION OF LOW-CYCLE FATIGUE-LIFE BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION. PART 1: 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOY PART 2: ALCLAD 7075-T6/ ALUMINUM ALLOY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

low-cycle fatigue life of Aluminum sheet alloys by acoustictoughness of structural aluminum alloys. Fracture . Fracturetoughness of structural aluminum alloys, Eng. Fracture Mech.

Baram, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Life-Cycle Model of an Automobile, Environmental Science &Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail,

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School  Buses, Electric for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Life?cycle Model of an Automobile.  Environmental Science & 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Life Cost Based FMEA Manual: A Step by Step Guide to Carrying Out a Cost-based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Failure occurs when one or more of the intended functions of a product are no longer fulfilled to the customer's satisfaction. The most critical product failures are those that escape design reviews and in-house quality inspection and are found by the customer. The product may work for a while until its performance degrades to an unacceptable level or it may have not worked even before customer took possession of the product. The end results of failures which may lead to unsafe conditions or major losses of the main function are rated high in severity. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a tool widely used in the automotive, aerospace, and electronics industries to identify, prioritize, and eliminate known potential failures, problems, and errors from systems under design, before the product is released (Stamatis, 1997). Several industrial FMEA standards such as those published by the Society of Automotive Engineers, US Department of Defense, and the Automotive Industry Action Group employ the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to measure risk and severity of failures. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) is a product of 3 indices: Occurrence (O), Severity (S), and Detection (D). In a traditional FMEA process design engineers typically analyze the 'root cause' and 'end-effects' of potential failures in a sub-system or component and assign penalty points through the O, S, D values to each failure. The analysis is organized around categories called failure modes, which link the causes and effects of failures. A few actions are taken upon completing the FMEA worksheet. The RPN column generally will identify the high-risk areas. The idea of performing FMEA is to eliminate or reduce known and potential failures before they reach the customers. Thus, a plan of action must be in place for the next task. Not all failures can be resolved during the product development cycle, thus prioritization of actions must be made within the design group. One definition of detection difficulty (D) is how well the organization controls the development process. Another definition relates to the detectability of a particular failure in the product when it is in the hands of the customer. The former asks 'What is the chance of catching the problem before we give it to the customer'? The latter asks 'What is the chance of the customer catching the problem before the problem results in a catastrophic failure?' (Palady, 1995) These differing definitions confuse the FMEA users when one tries to determine detection difficulty. Are we trying to measure how easy it is to detect where a failure has occurred or when it has occurred? Or are we trying to measure how easy or difficult it is to prevent failures? Ordinal scale variables are used to rank-order industries such as, hotels, restaurants, and movies (Note that a 4 star hotel is not necessarily twice as good as a 2 star hotel). Ordinal values preserve rank in a group of items, but the distance between the values cannot be measured since a distance function does not exist. Thus, the product or sum of ordinal variables loses its rank since each parameter has different scales. The RPN is a product of 3 independent ordinal variables, it can indicate that some failure types are 'worse' than others, but give no quantitative indication of their relative effects. To resolve the ambiguity of measuring detection difficulty and the irrational logic of multiplying 3 ordinal indices, a new methodology was created to overcome these shortcomings, Life Cost-Based FMEA. Life Cost-Based FMEA measures failure/risk in terms of monetary cost. Cost is a universal parameter that can be easily related to severity by engineers and others. Thus, failure cost can be estimated using the following simplest form: Expected Failure Cost = {sup n}{Sigma}{sub i=1}p{sub i}c{sub i}, p: Probability of a particular failure occurring; c: Monetary cost associated with that particular failure; and n: Total number of failure scenarios. FMEA is most effective when there are inputs into it from all concerned disciplines of the product development t

Rhee, Seung; Spencer, Cherrill; /Stanford U. /SLAC

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

406

Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO and life cycle GHG emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the choice of coal over natural gas. External incentives such as low natural gas prices compared to coalImplications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO 2 , NO X of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG

Jaramillo, Paulina

407

Neuron, Vol. 33, 439452, January 31, 2002, Copyright 2002 by Cell Press The Life Cycle of Ca2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neuron, Vol. 33, 439­452, January 31, 2002, Copyright 2002 by Cell Press The Life Cycle of Ca2 Ions. Oertner, sional exchange of signaling molecules, including Ca2 ,and Karel Svoboda1 between spine heads plasticity (Andersen et al., 1980). Spine [Ca2 ] signals are shaped by the dynamics of Ca2 sources

Oertner, Thomas

408

A Life-Cycle Approach To Technology, Infrastructure, And Climate Policy Decision Making: Transitioning To Plug-In  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in hybrids. After the options and uncertainties are framed, engineering economic analysis is used to evaluate) and energy security (petroleum displacement) benefits. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), which use decades. This thesis investigates the life cycle engineering, economic, and policy decisions involved

409

TROPICAL CLOUD LIFE CYCLE AND OVERLAP STRUCTURE A. M. Vogelmann, M. P. Jensen, P. Kollias, and E. Luke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TROPICAL CLOUD LIFE CYCLE AND OVERLAP STRUCTURE A. M. Vogelmann, M. P. Jensen, P. Kollias, and E.bnl.gov ABSTRACT The profile of cloud microphysical properties and how the clouds are overlapped within a vertical simulations. We will present how cloud microphysical properties and overlap structure retrieved at the ARM

410

The Energy Return on Energy Investment (EROI) of Photovoltaics: Methodology and Comparisons with Fossil Fuel Life Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Energy Return on Energy Investment (EROI) of Photovoltaics: Methodology and Comparisons National Photovoltaic Environmental Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA higher than those of renewable energy life-cycles, and specifically of photovoltaics (PVs). We show

411

Simplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based on Monte-Carlo simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the literature. In the special case of greenhouses gases (GHG) from wind power electricity, the LCA resultsSimplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based performed by the IPCC [1]. Such result might lead policy makers to consider LCA as an inconclusive method [2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

Paper waste - Recycling, incineration or landfilling? A review of existing life cycle assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of existing life cycle assessments (LCAs) on paper and cardboard waste has been undertaken. The objectives of the review were threefold. Firstly, to see whether a consistent message comes out of published LCA literature on optimum disposal or recycling solutions for this waste type. Such message has implications for current policy formulation on material recycling and disposal in the EU. Secondly, to identify key methodological issues of paper waste management LCAs, and enlighten the influence of such issues on the conclusions of the LCA studies. Thirdly, in light of the analysis made, to discuss whether it is at all valid to use the LCA methodology in its current development state to guide policy decisions on paper waste. A total of nine LCA studies containing altogether 73 scenarios were selected from a thorough, international literature search. The selected studies are LCAs including comparisons of different management options for waste paper. Despite claims of inconsistency, the LCAs reviewed illustrate the environmental benefits in recycling over incineration or landfill options, for paper and cardboard waste. This broad consensus was found despite differences in geographic location and definitions of the paper recycling/disposal systems studied. A systematic exploration of the LCA studies showed, however, important methodological pitfalls and sources of error, mainly concerning differences in the definition of the system boundaries. Fifteen key assumptions were identified that cover the three paper cycle system areas: raw materials and forestry, paper production, and disposal/recovery. It was found that the outcome of the individual LCA studies largely depended on the choices made in some of these assumptions, most specifically the ones concerning energy use and generation, and forestry.

Villanueva, A. [European Topic Centre on Resource and Waste Management, Hojbro Plads 4, DK-1200 Copenhagen K (Denmark)], E-mail: alejandro@villanueva.dk; Wenzel, H. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Life-Cycle Cost Reduction for High Speed Turbomachinery Utilizing Aerothermal - Mechanical Conditioning Monitoring Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1\\.?rrOTm,lllll' M\\'..... IITfllWlll 1\\1111\\ \\1:11nkll:llh"~' \\dlllJl ;-":11 I \\LlIJ11\\'l1.llh-l' ..\\dIIJlI ,\\" ~. linl\\" Figure 15 Trend Line 2. Technical~proach Most process plants have some type of tech nical support organization...

Boyce, M. P.; Meher-Homji, C.; Bowman, J. C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy conservation standard in terms of the Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) descriptor at a minimum

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Optimal Life Cycle Cost Design for an Energy Efficient Manufacturing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past twelve years, Texas Instruments has developed extensive energy management programs that have enabled them to reduce energy usage by 42%. Typically, these reductions have been a result of the application of microprocessor based energy...

Thompson, C. T.; Beach, W. P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The development of a Life Cycle Cost model for an offshore wind farm.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Not until recently most people have realised the severity of what all emissions are doing to mother earth. Today most countries are eco-friendly and see… (more)

Nordahl, Marcus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of ably moreefficient--up to 98%,if a long charging seals and casings is not a problem,and the lithium

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sauga, Canada. metal/air batteries--then EVswould becomemuchis shown Table 1. in metal-air batteries have the potentialexcluding the metal/air batteries: zinc/bro- development.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

2014-05-05 Ceiling Fan Engineering Data and Life-cycle Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of its rulemaking analysis, DOE develops and makes public certain engineering and economic data. The attached data are a portion of that analysis. DOE will make the entire analysis available to the public as the data are ready.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Hot-Water Oil Boiler LCC Analysis-Efficiency Levels and10 Hot-Water Gas Boiler LCC Analysis-Efficiency Levels andfurnace and boiler energy-efficiency standards. Determining

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

ORNL/TM-2006/138 Comparing Life-Cycle Costs of ESPCs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

423

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order 13123 |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of EnergyGeothermalGoing OffGreenServices »ExDepartment of

424

Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol. 79,Department of Energy

425

Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Handbook Final Version 9-30-14 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJared Temanson -of Energy 1procedures, information,

426

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of EnergyOrganization (dollars in5Statistical Table

427

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life Cycle Cost Analysis,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoThese Web sitesEERECommercial

428

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoThese Web sitesEERECommercial2010 | Department of

429

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoThese Web sitesEERECommercial2010 | Department of2012

430

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE:2009 DOEDeploymentHenry C.FebruaryVerDatePolicy|

431

FEMP Offers New eTraining Core Course on Fundamentals of Life Cycle Costing  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review:Department of Energyand Review ofSafety OfficerAdvanced eTraining onfor Energy

432

Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems: Executive Summary  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartment of Energy 0Commercial andStrength Superplastic2PUMP

433

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyTheDepartmentFeed Families"ofTravisD.of theArea

434

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope Change #1Impacts | Department of Energyof Contractand

435

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplains a4 Climate Zone Subtype A.EssexApproach

436

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baseline Efficient Air Conditioners . . . . . . 28 AverageEfficient Air Conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Btu/h Commercial Air Conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis for Offshore Wind Farms:Reliability and Maintenance.O&M Cost Drivers Analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Operations and maintenance (O&M) activities represent a significant share of the expenses during the lifetime of offshore wind farms. When compared to onshore wind… (more)

Trevino Cantu, Hector

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

IEEE Computer Society Press, p. 213 (1992) A GraphBased Approach to the Construction of Tools for the Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Life Cycle Integration between Software Documents Bernhard Westfechtel Lehrstuhl für Informatik III of the documents they are op- erating on. 2. They have to be integrated, i.e. the tools must under- stand and maintaining inter­document relationships. In particular, integration across the software life cycle has

Westfechtel, Bernhard

439

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas This article has been downloaded from.1088/1748-9326/6/3/034014 Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of Marcellus shale gas Mohan Jiang1 , W Michael Griffin2,3 , Chris greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the production of Marcellus shale natural gas and compares its emissions

Jaramillo, Paulina

440

Supporting the BPM life-cycle with FileNet Mariska Netjes, Hajo A. Reijers, Wil M.P. van der Aalst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting the BPM life-cycle with FileNet Mariska Netjes, Hajo A. Reijers, Wil M.P. van der Aalst, The Netherlands m.netjes@tm.tue.nl Abstract. Business Process Management (BPM) systems provide a broad range for the complete BPM life-cycle: (re)design, configuration, execution, control, and diagnosis of processes

van der Aalst, Wil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Tool for Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) Based Design of Residential Air Source Heat Pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tool for the design of air source heat pumps (ASHP) based on their life cycle climate performance (LCCP) analysis is presented. The LCCP model includes direct and indirect emissions of the ASHP. The annual energy consumption of the ASHP is determined based on AHRI Standard 210/240. The tool can be used as an evaluation tool when the user inputs the required performance data based on the ASHP type selected. In addition, this tool has system design capability where the user inputs the design parameters of the different components of the heat pump and the tool runs the system simulation software to calculate the performance data. Additional features available in the tool include the capability to perform parametric analysis and sensitivity study on the system. The tool has 14 refrigerants, and 47 cities built-in with the option for the user to add more refrigerants, based on NIST REFPROP, and cities, using TMY-3 database. The underlying LCCP calculation framework is open source and can be easily customized for various applications. The tool can be used with any system simulation software, load calculation tool, and weather and emissions data type.

Beshr, Mohamed [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

Hsu, D. D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

Rodriguez-Garcia, G., E-mail: gonzalo.rodriguez.garcia@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hospido, A., E-mail: almudena.hospido@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bagley, D.M., E-mail: bagley@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 82072 Laramie, WY (United States); Moreira, M.T., E-mail: maite.moreira@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G., E-mail: gumersindo.feijoo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Life cycle assessment of the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past ten years, environmental issues have become an increasing priority for both government and industry alike. In the U.S. as well as in Europe, the emphasis has gradually shifted from a site specific focus to a product specific focus. For this reason, tools are needed to scientifically assess the overall environmental performance of products and/or industrial systems. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) belongs to that category of tools, and is used to perform this study. In numerous industrial countries, LCA is now recognized, and is rapidly becoming the tool of preference, to successfully provide quantitative and scientific analyses of the environmental impacts of industrial systems. By providing an unbiased analysis of entire systems, LCA has shown that the reality behind widely held beliefs regarding {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} issues, such as reusable vs. one way products, and {open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} vs. synthetic products, were far more complex than expected, and sometimes not as {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} as assumed. This paper describes the modeling and assumptions of an LCA, commissioned by the Integrated Waste Services Association (IWSA), that summarizes the environmental emissions of waste-to-energy facilities, and compares them to the environmental emissions generated by major combustible energy sources of the northeast part of the United States (NE). The geographical boundary for this study is, therefore, the NE US.

Besnainou, J.; Landfield, A. [Ecobalance, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Model for cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment of clinker production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for input- and technology-dependent cradle-to-gate life cycle assessments (LCA) was constructed to quantify emissions and resource consumption of various clinker production options. The model was compiled using data of more than 100 clinker production lines and complemented with literature data and best judgment from experts. It can be applied by the cement industry for the selection of alternative fuels and raw materials (AFR) and by authorities for decision-support regarding the permission of waste co-processing in cement kilns. In the field of sustainable construction, the model can be used to compare clinker production options. Two case studies are presented. First, co-processing of four different types of waste is analyzed at a modern precalciner kiln system. Second, clinker production is compared between five kiln systems. Results show that the use of waste (tires, prepared industrial waste, dried sewage sludge, blast furnace slag) led to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, decreased resource consumption, and mostly to reduced aggregated environmental impacts. Regarding the different kiln systems, the environmental impact generally increased with decreasing energy efficiency. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Michael Elias Boesch; Annette Koehler; Stefanie Hellweg [ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland). Institute of Environmental Engineering

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

What life-cycle assessment does and does not do in assessments of waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In assessments of the environmental impacts of waste management, life-cycle assessment (LCA) helps expanding the perspective beyond the waste management system. This is important, since the indirect environmental impacts caused by surrounding systems, such as energy and material production, often override the direct impacts of the waste management system itself. However, the applicability of LCA for waste management planning and policy-making is restricted by certain limitations, some of which are characteristics inherent to LCA methodology as such, and some of which are relevant specifically in the context of waste management. Several of them are relevant also for other types of systems analysis. We have identified and discussed such characteristics with regard to how they may restrict the applicability of LCA in the context of waste management. Efforts to improve LCA with regard to these aspects are also described. We also identify what other tools are available for investigating issues that cannot be adequately dealt with by traditional LCA models, and discuss whether LCA methodology should be expanded rather than complemented by other tools to increase its scope and applicability.

Ekvall, Tomas [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, P.O. Box 5302, SE-400 14 Goeteborg (Sweden)], E-mail: tomas.ekvall@ivl.se; Assefa, Getachew [Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Bjoerklund, Anna [Environmental Strategies Research - FMS, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Ola [Technology and Built Environment, University of Gaevle, SE-801 76 Gaevle (Sweden); Finnveden, Goeran [Environmental Strategies Research - FMS, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Evaluation of Life-Cycle Assessment Studies of Chinese Cement Production: Challenges and Opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to understand the embodied energy, environmental impacts, and potential energy-savings of manufactured products has become more widespread among researchers in recent years. This paper reviews recent LCA studies in the cement industry in China and in other countries and provides an assessment of the methodology used by the researchers compared to ISO LCA standards (ISO 14040:2006, ISO 14044:2006, and ISO/TR 14048:2002). We evaluate whether the authors provide information on the intended application, targeted audience, functional unit, system boundary, data sources, data quality assessment, data disaggregation and other elements, and draw conclusions regarding the level of adherence to ISO standards for the papers reviewed. We found that China researchers have gained much experience during last decade, but still have room for improvement in establishing boundaries, assessing data quality, identifying data sources, and explaining limitations. The paper concludes with a discussion of directions for future LCA research in China.

Lu, Hongyou; Masanet, Eric; Price, Lynn

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

Life cycle assessment of four municipal solid waste management scenarios in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of municipal solid waste. Four scenarios mostly used in China were compared to assess the influence of various technologies on environment: (1) landfill, (2) incineration, (3) composting plus landfill, and (4) composting plus incineration. In all scenarios, the technologies significantly contribute to global warming and increase the adverse impact of non-carcinogens on the environment. The technologies played only a small role in the impact of carcinogens, respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, and non-renewable energy. Similarly, the influence of the technologies on the way other elements affect the environment was ignorable. Specifically, the direct emissions from the operation processes involved played an important role in most scenarios except for incineration, while potential impact generated from transport, infrastructure and energy consumption were quite small. In addition, in the global warming category, highest potential impact was observed in landfill because of the direct methane gas emissions. Electricity recovery from methane gas was the key factor for reducing the potential impact of global warming. Therefore, increasing the use of methane gas to recover electricity is highly recommended to reduce the adverse impact of landfills on the environment.

Hong Jinglan, E-mail: hongjing@sdu.edu.c [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xiangzhi [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhaojie Cui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in the Indian Road and Rail Sectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel production and use evaluates the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (not considering land-use change), net energy value (NEV), and net petroleum consumption impacts of substituting Jatropha biodiesel for conventional petroleum diesel in India. Several blends of biodiesel with petroleum diesel are evaluated for the rail freight, rail passenger, road freight, and road-passenger transport sectors that currently rely heavily on petroleum diesel. For the base case, Jatropha cultivation, processing, and use conditions that were analyzed, the use of B20 results in a net reduction in GHG emissions and petroleum consumption of 14% and 17%, respectively, and a NEV increase of 58% compared with the use of 100% petroleum diesel. While the road-passenger transport sector provides the greatest sustainability benefits per 1000 gross tonne kilometers, the road freight sector eventually provides the greatest absolute benefits owing to substantially higher projected utilization by year 2020. Nevertheless, introduction of biodiesel to the rail sector might present the fewest logistic and capital expenditure challenges in the near term. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that the sustainability benefits are maintained under multiple plausible cultivation, processing, and distribution scenarios. However, the sustainability of any individual Jatropha plantation will depend on site-specific conditions.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Life cycle assessment of ship-generated waste management of Luka Koper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sea ports and the related maritime activities (e.g. shipping, shipbuilding, etc.) are one of the main driver of Europe's growth, jobs, competitiveness and prosperity. The continuously growth of shipping sectors has however introduced some environmental concerns, particularly with respect to ship-generated waste management. The port of Koper, one of the major ports on the northern Adriatic Coast, is the focus of this study. In this paper, a life cycle assessment was performed to identify and quantify the environmental impacts caused by the ship-generated waste management of port of Koper. Carcinogens substance (e.g. dioxins) and inorganic emissions, especially heavy metals, resulted to be the most critical environmental issues, while the fossil fuels consumption is reduced by recovery of ship-generated oils. Moreover, the final treatment of ship waste was found to be critical phase of the management, and the landfill have a significant contribute to the overall environmental load. These results can be useful in the identification of the best practices and in the implementation of waste management plans in ports.

Zuin, Stefano, E-mail: sz.cvr@vegapark.ve.i [Consorzio Venezia Ricerche, Via della Liberta 12, c/o PST VEGA, 30175 Venice (Italy); Belac, Elvis; Marzi, Boris [Luka Koper d.d., Vojkovo nabrezje 38, SI - 6501 Koper (Slovenia)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Gauss-Vanicek Spectral Analysis of the Sepkoski Compendium: No New Life Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New periods can emerge from data as a byproduct of incorrect processing or even the method applied. In one such recent instance, a new life cycle with a 62+-3 Myr period was reportedly found (about trend) in genus variations from the Sepkoski compendium, the world most complete fossil record. The approach that led to reporting this period was based on Fourier method of spectral analysis. I show here that no such period is found when the original data set is considered rigorously and processed in the Gauss-Vanicek spectral analysis. I also demonstrate that data altering can boost spectral power up to a nearly 100 percent increase in the signal range, thus introducing artificial, "99 percent significant" periods as seen in the corresponding variance-spectra of noise. Besides geology and paleontology, virtually all science and engineering disciplines could benefit from the approach described here. The main general advantages of the Gauss-Vanicek spectral analysis lay in period detection from gapped records and in straightforward testing of statistical null hypothesis. The main advantage of the method for physical sciences is its use as a field descriptor for accurate simultaneous detection of eigenfrequencies and relative dynamics. Besides analyzing incomplete records, researchers might also want to remove less-trustworthy data from any time series before analyzing it with the Gauss-Vanicek method. This could increase both the accuracy and reliability of spectral analyses in general.

M. Omerbashich

2007-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

452

Life cycle inventory of biodiesel and petroleum diesel for use in an urban bus. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings from a study of the life cycle inventories for petroleum diesel and biodiesel. It presents information on raw materials extracted from the environment, energy resources consumed, and air, water, and solid waste emissions generated. Biodiesel is a renewable diesel fuel substitute. It can be made from a variety of natural oils and fats. Biodiesel is made by chemically combining any natural oil or fat with an alcohol such as methanol or ethanol. Methanol has been the most commonly used alcohol in the commercial production of biodiesel. In Europe, biodiesel is widely available in both its neat form (100% biodiesel, also known as B1OO) and in blends with petroleum diesel. European biodiesel is made predominantly from rapeseed oil (a cousin of canola oil). In the United States, initial interest in producing and using biodiesel has focused on the use of soybean oil as the primary feedstock mainly because the United States is the largest producer of soybean oil in the world. 170 figs., 148 tabs.

Sheehan, J.; Camobreco, V.; Duffield, J.; Graboski, M.; Shapouri, H.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discounting and the social cost of carbon: a closer look atmost notably the social cost of carbon) and model choiceemissions and the social cost of carbon are uncertain (and

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A cost and benefit analysis of future end-of-life vehicle glazing recycling in France: a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and aluminum, and not minor wastes such as glazing (Gerrard and Kandlikar 2007). The new recycling target (95 and polluted with organic material. The treatment and recycling of glass does however become difficult1 A cost and benefit analysis of future end-of- life vehicle glazing recycling in France

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

455

What does a negawatt really cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Progress in Photovoltaics Research and Applications, 14:179-190, 2006 Energy Pay-Back and Life Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an Optimized 3.5 MW PV Installation J.M. Mason1 , V.M. Fthenakis2 , T-cycle greenhouse gas emissions are 29 kg CO2-eq. /m2 . From field measurements, the energy payback time (EPT, energy payback, greenhouse gas emissions #12;INTRODUCTION This study is a life-cycle analysis

457

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Water Consumption for WECC NERC Region ElectricityCycle Water Withdrawals for WECC NERC Region ElectricityTRE TS&D USDA USGS VC W WECC WSI International Organization

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Life Cycle Assessment of the MBT plant in Ano Liossia, Athens, Greece  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the operation of an MBT plant in Greece based on LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare four different MBT operating scenarios (among them and with landfilling). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Even the current operation of the MBT plant is preferable to landfilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilization of the MBT compost and metals generates the most environmental gains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal exploitation of RDF improves further the environmental performance of the plant. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the application of Life Cycle Assessment to the operation of the MBT facility of Ano Liossia in the region of Attica in Greece. The region of Attica is home to almost half the population of Greece and the management of its waste is a major issue. In order to explicitly analyze the operation of the MBT plant, five scenarios were generated. Actual operation data of the MBT plant for the year 2008 were provided by the region of Attica and the LCA modeling was performed via the SimaPro 5.1 software while impact assessment was performed utilizing the Eco-indicator'99 method. The results of our analysis indicate that even the current operation of the MBT plant is preferable to landfilling. Among the scenarios of MBT operation, the one with complete utilization of the MBT outputs, i.e. compost, RDF, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, is the one that generates the most environmental gains. Our analysis indicates that the exploitation of RDF via incineration is the key factor towards improving the environmental performance of the MBT plant. Our findings provide a quantitative understanding of the MBT plant. Interpretation of results showed that proper operation of the modern waste management systems can lead to substantial reduction of environmental impacts and savings of resources.

Abeliotis, Konstadinos, E-mail: kabeli@hua.gr [Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece); Kalogeropoulos, Alexandros [Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece); Lasaridi, Katia [Department of Geography, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Comparative life cycle assessments: The case of paper and digital media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The consumption of the written word is changing, as media transitions from paper products to digital alternatives. We reviewed the life cycle assessment (LCA) research literature that compared the environmental footprint of digital and paper media. To validate the role of context in influencing LCA results, we assessed LCAs that did not compare paper and print, but focused on a product or component that is part of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector. Using a framework that identifies problems in LCA conduct, we assessed whether the comparative LCAs were accurate expressions of the environmental footprints of paper and print. We hypothesized that the differences between the product systems that produce paper and digital media weaken LCA's ability to compare environmental footprints. We also hypothesized that the characteristics of ICT as an industrial sector weaken LCA as an environmental assessment methodology. We found that existing comparative LCAs offered problematic comparisons of paper and digital media for two reasons — the stark material differences between ICT products and paper products, and the unique characteristics of the ICT sector. We suggested that the context of the ICT sector, best captured by the concept of “Moore's Law”, will continuously impede the ability of the LCA methodology to measure ICT products. -- Highlights: • We review the LCA research that compares paper and digital media. • We contrast the comparative LCAs with LCAs that examine only digital products. • Stark differences between paper and digital media weakens LCA findings. • Digital products in general challenge the LCA method's reliability. • Continuous innovation and global nature of digital products impedes LCA methodology.

Bull, Justin G., E-mail: jgbull@gmail.com; Kozak, Robert A., E-mail: rob.kozak@ubc.ca

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF ABRASIVE TOOLS AND EFFECTS ON SUSTAINABLE GRINDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

important enablers for green manufacturing manufacturing. Aenhance green g p life. Moreover, p y g manufacturing itself

Linke, Barbara

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Carbon Cycle 2.0: Ramamoorthy Ramesh: Low-cost Solar  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

Ramamoorthy Ramesh:

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Improvement actions in waste management systems at the provincial scale based on a life cycle assessment evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • LCA was used for evaluating the performance of four provincial waste management systems. • Milano, Bergamo, Pavia and Mantova (Italy) are the provinces selected for the analysis. • Most of the data used to model the systems are primary. • Significant differences were found among the provinces located in the same Region. • LCA was used as a decision-supporting tool by Regione Lombardia. - Abstract: This paper reports some of the findings of the ‘GERLA’ project: GEstione Rifiuti in Lombardia – Analisi del ciclo di vita (Waste management in Lombardia – Life cycle assessment). The project was devoted to support Lombardia Region in the drafting of the new waste management plan by applying a life cycle thinking perspective. The present paper mainly focuses on four Provinces in the Region, which were selected based on their peculiarities. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was adopted as the methodology to assess the current performance of the integrated waste management systems, to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each of them and to design their perspective evolution as of year 2020. Results show that despite a usual business approach that is beneficial to all the provinces, the introduction of technological and management improvements to the system provides in general additional energy and environmental benefits for all four provinces. The same improvements can be easily extended to the whole Region, leading to increased environmental benefits from the waste management sector, in line with the targets set by the European Union for 2020.

Rigamonti, L., E-mail: lucia.rigamonti@polimi.it; Falbo, A.; Grosso, M.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union?s Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

465

C O V E R F E A T U R E Life Cycle Aware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the macroeconomic impact of this energy cost, Japan's semiconductor industry is expected to con sume 1.7 percent crystal growth to dicing to packaging. Total energy cost can be expressed as Emanufacturing = Edie of the · manufacturing energy cost, including the creation of silicon wafers, the chemical and lithography processes

Chong, Frederic T.

466

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative forcing from bio- fuel and gasoline GHG emissions,directly to additional bio- fuel feedstocks. The averagelife cycle GHGs from bio- fuels highlights the limitations

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system functional life, and energy mix consumed duringlocation influences the energy mix consumed duringlocation influences the energy mix offset by the output of

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Life cycle assessment of TV sets in China: A case study of the impacts of CRT monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Along with the rapid increase in both production and use of TV sets in China, there is an increasing awareness of the environmental impacts related to the accelerating mass production, electricity use, and waste management of these sets. This paper aims to describe the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate the environmental performance of Chinese TV sets. An assessment of the TV set device (focusing on the Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitor) was carried out using a detailed modular LCA based on the international standards of the ISO 14040 series. The LCA was constructed using SimaPro software version 7.2 and expressed with the Eco-indicator' 99 life cycle impact assessment method. For a sensitivity analysis of the overall LCA results, the CML method was used in order to estimate the influence of the choice of the assessment method on the results. Life cycle inventory information was compiled by Ecoinvent 2.2 databases, combined with literature and field investigations on the current Chinese situation. The established LCA study shows that the use stage of such devices has the highest environmental impact, followed by the manufacturing stage. In the manufacturing stage, the CRT and the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) are those components contributing the most environmental impacts. During the use phase, the environmental impacts are due entirely to the methods of electricity generation used to run them, since no other aspects were taken into account for this phase. The final processing step-the end-of-life stage-can lead to a clear environmental benefit when the TV sets are processed through the formal dismantling enterprises in China.

Song Qingbin [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau (Macao); Wang Zhishi, E-mail: zswang@umac.mo [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau (Macao); Li Jinhui; Zeng Xianlai [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Progress on Internet-Based Educational Material Development for Electronic Products and Systems Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on this project are the Computer Aided Life Cycle Engineering (CALCE) Electronic Products and Systems Center Laboratory (ESCML) develops modeling methodologies and tools that address all aspects of the life cycle cost of electronic system from hardware fabrication and software development through sustainment and end of life

Sandborn, Peter

471

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pomper, S.D. , Life Cycle Inventory of a Generic U.S. Family2007. [EEA 2006] Emission Inventory Guidebook, ActivitiesVolume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii 3.4. Co-products of biofuels . . . . . .CYCLE GHG EMISSION ESTIMATES FOR BIOFUELS 3.1. Purpose and10.3.1. Low-GWI biofuels required to meet a 12-state

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Monitoring and Evaluation: Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing mission of this project is the development of statistical tools for analyzing fisheries tagging data in the most precise and appropriate manner possible. This mission also includes providing statistical guidance on the best ways to design large-scale tagging studies. This mission continues because the technologies for conducting fish tagging studies continuously evolve. In just the last decade, fisheries biologists have seen the evolution from freeze-brands and coded wire tags (CWT) to passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, balloon-tags, radiotelemetry, and now, acoustic-tags. With each advance, the technology holds the promise of more detailed and precise information. However, the technology for analyzing and interpreting the data also becomes more complex as the tagging techniques become more sophisticated. The goal of the project is to develop the analytical tools in parallel with the technical advances in tagging studies, so that maximum information can be extracted on a timely basis. Associated with this mission is the transfer of these analytical capabilities to the field investigators to assure consistency and the highest levels of design and analysis throughout the fisheries community. Consequently, this project provides detailed technical assistance on the design and analysis of tagging studies to groups requesting assistance throughout the fisheries community. Ideally, each project and each investigator would invest in the statistical support needed for the successful completion of their study. However, this is an ideal that is rarely if every attained. Furthermore, there is only a small pool of highly trained scientists in this specialized area of tag analysis here in the Northwest. Project 198910700 provides the financial support to sustain this local expertise on the statistical theory of tag analysis at the University of Washington and make it available to the fisheries community. Piecemeal and fragmented support from various agencies and organizations would be incapable of maintaining a center of expertise. The mission of the project is to help assure tagging studies are designed and analyzed from the onset to extract the best available information using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The overarching goals of the project is to assure statistically sound survival studies so that fish managers can focus on the management implications of their findings and not be distracted by concerns whether the studies are statistically reliable or not. Specific goals and objectives of the study include the following: (1) Provide consistent application of statistical methodologies for survival estimation across all salmon life cycle stages to assure comparable performance measures and assessment of results through time, to maximize learning and adaptive management opportunities, and to improve and maintain the ability to responsibly evaluate the success of implemented Columbia River FWP salmonid mitigation programs and identify future mitigation options. (2) Improve analytical capabilities to conduct research on survival processes of wild and hatchery chinook and steelhead during smolt outmigration, to improve monitoring and evaluation capabilities and assist in-season river management to optimize operational and fish passage strategies to maximize survival. (3) Extend statistical support to estimate ocean survival and in-river survival of returning adults. Provide statistical guidance in implementing a river-wide adult PIT-tag detection capability. (4) Develop statistical methods for survival estimation for all potential users and make this information available through peer-reviewed publications, statistical software, and technology transfers to organizations such as NOAA Fisheries, the Fish Passage Center, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey (USGS), US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Public Utility Districts (PUDs), the Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), and other members of the Northwest fisheries community. (5) Provide and maintain statistical software for tag analysis

Skalski, John

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Toward a more rigorous application of margins and uncertainties within the nuclear weapons life cycle : a Sandia perspective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the conceptual framework that is being used to define quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) for application in the nuclear weapons (NW) work conducted at Sandia National Laboratories. The conceptual framework addresses the margins and uncertainties throughout the NW life cycle and includes the definition of terms related to QMU and to figures of merit. Potential applications of QMU consist of analyses based on physical data and on modeling and simulation. Appendix A provides general guidelines for addressing cases in which significant and relevant physical data are available for QMU analysis. Appendix B gives the specific guidance that was used to conduct QMU analyses in cycle 12 of the annual assessment process. Appendix C offers general guidelines for addressing cases in which appropriate models are available for use in QMU analysis. Appendix D contains an example that highlights the consequences of different treatments of uncertainty in model-based QMU analyses.

Klenke, Scott Edward; Novotny, George Charles; Paulsen Robert A., Jr.; Diegert, Kathleen V.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Ecology of Neoschongastia americana (Hirst): laboratory life cycle, developmental period in the field and influence of selected external factors.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

date of sperm production Sept. 18 Nov. 20 Feb. 20 Jan. 26 Nov. 11 Nov. 30 Oct. 10 Sept. 11 March 2 Dec. 29 March 2 Feb. 23 Oct. 10 Oct. 17 Oct. 31 March 2 Dec. 29 Feb. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 22 Dec. 14 Total days sperm product&. on 79...): Laboratory Life Cycle, Developmental Period in the Field and Influence of Selected External Factors (August 1974 ) Jerry Real Cunningham, B. S. , Texas A8cw University Chairman of Advisory Committees Prof. Manning AD Price In the summers of 1971 and 1972...

Cunningham, Jerry Real

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gille-MAE 124/ESYS 103, Spring 2010 1 Paper 2: Life Cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-efficiency furnaces, and solar hot water heaters. What are the benefits of these energy efficient products? Do they pay for themselves financially? When embedded energy costs are taken into account, do they benefit

Gille, Sarah T.

478

Low cycle fatigue crack initiation life assessment of HY-100 undermatched weld  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation is conducted of several approaches to the prediction of low cycle fatigue crack initiation in HY-100 welds of an undermatched weldment. FEM analyses and experiments using various types of low cycle fatigue specimens were conducted and their results were compared with the results of such theoretical algorithms as Neuber's rule. A two-surface cyclic plasticity algorithm was implanted in a FEM code's user subroutine in order to simulate the material's cyclic stress-strain behavior under cyclic loading conditions; fatigue tests ranging from small, standard smooth specimens to notched cylindrical specimens with notch constraint were conducted for HY-100. 11 refs.

Wang, K.; Shah, R.; Yuan, D.; Kleinosky, M.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Design of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries for Long Life and Low Cost: Robustness to Geographic and Consumer-Usage Variation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes a battery optimization and trade-off analysis for Li-ion batteries used in EVs and PHEVs to extend their life and/or reduce cost.

Smith, K.; Markel, T.; Kim, G. H.; Pesaran, A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Amphiphilic Surface Modification of Hollow Carbon Nanofibers for Improved Cycle Life of Lithium Sulfur Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lithium sulfur batteries, due to their high specific energy and relatively low cost. Despite recent progress in addressing the various problems of sulfur cathodes, lithium sulfur batteries still exhibit at C/2. KEYWORDS: Lithium sulfur batteries; energy storage; surface modification Increasing the energy

Cui, Yi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

Integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) authorized studies on alternative systems for treating contact-handled DOE mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW). The on-going Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems` (ITTS) and the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems` (INTS) studies satisfy this request. EM-50 further authorized supporting studies including this technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis. This analysis identifies areas where technology development could have the greatest impact on total life cycle system costs. These areas are determined by evaluating the sensitivity of system life cycle costs relative to changes in life cycle component or phase costs, subsystem costs, contingency allowance, facility capacity, operating life, and disposal costs. For all treatment systems, the most cost sensitive life cycle phase is the operations and maintenance phase and the most cost sensitive subsystem is the receiving and inspection/preparation subsystem. These conclusions were unchanged when the sensitivity analysis was repeated on a present value basis. Opportunity exists for technology development to reduce waste receiving and inspection/preparation costs by effectively minimizing labor costs, the major cost driver, within the maintenance and operations phase of the life cycle.

Harvego, L.A.; Schafer, J.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Observations concerning the life cycle and biology of Myobia musculi (Schrank) and Myocoptes musculinus (Koch)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OHSRRVATTGRS CGRCERR1RC TRE I IPP. CYCLE ARU R'OLO(:Y OP MYOBIA RUSCIII. T (SC!!ge IK) Allg NYOCO"!'RS ?USCUI, IRUS (!IGCII) A Thcaiu Robert Nalco)m L. tachcr Submit ten to the Craouate College of Texas A 6 I' University in partial fulfillment... oi the requirement for the degree o PASTER OP SCLRRCR January (mo n t' h ) x'~n (y ar) Najor Subject Laboratory Anie!. i R clicine G?SL'm'ATtGNS CGNCLR11NC TU! 1ZRS CVCLR AND HTGLG;. y Gi YYCBTA ~tUSCIJl, J (SCHRANR) AN. ) 1'. ". YGCGPl'1...

Letscher, Robert Malcolm

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Geothermal power plant R and D: an analysis of cost-performance tradeoffs and the Heber Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of advancements in power plant designs for use at geothermal resources in the low to moderate (300 to 400F) temperature range is reported. In 3 case studies, the benefits of R and D to achieve these advancements are evaluated in terms of expected increases in installed geothermal generating capacity over the next 2 decades. A parametric sensitivity study is discussed which analyzes differential power development for combinations of power plant efficiency and capitol cost. Affordable tradeoffs between plant performance and capital costs are illustrated. The independent review and analysis of the expected costs of construction, operation and maintenance of the Heber Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Demonstration Plant are described. Included in this assessment is an analysis of each of the major cost components of the project, including (1) construction cost, (2) well field development costs, (3) fluid purchase costs, and (4) well field and power plant operation and maintenance costs. The total cost of power generated from the Heber Plant (in terms of mills per kWh) is then compared to the cost of power from alternative fossil-fueled base load units. Also evaluated are the provisions of both: (a) the Cooperative Agreement between the federal government and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E); and (b) the Geothermal Heat Sales Contract with Union Oil Company.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Amundsen, C.B.; Blair, P.D.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Renewable Energy Planning: Multiparametric Cost Optimization; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for determining the combination of renewable energy technologies that minimize life-cycle cost at a facility, often with a specified goal regarding percent of energy use from renewable sources. Technologies include: photovoltaics (PV); wind; solar thermal heat and electric; solar ventilation air preheating; solar water heating; biomass heat and electric (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion); and daylighting. The method rests upon the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) capabilities in characterization of technology cost and performance, geographic information systems (GIS) resource assessment, and life-cycle cost analysis. The paper discusses how to account for the way candidate technologies interact with each other, and the solver routine used to determine the combination that minimizes life-cycle cost. Results include optimal sizes of each technology, initial cost, operating cost, and life-cycle cost, including incentives from utilities or governments. Results inform early planning to identify and prioritize projects at a site for subsequent engineering and economic feasibility study.

Walker, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

487

Lithium / Sulfur Cells with Long Cycle Life and High Specific Energy -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011Liisa O'NeillFuels MarketLisa L.LifeEnergy

488

Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORT TOJaredKansas1 - EnergyMarketingLidijaLifePower

489

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle/Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost SavingsEnergy GETEMGolden Field Office 1617 Cole-

490

Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Commercial Refrigeration Systems Using Life Cycle Climate Performance Analysis: From System Design to Refrigerant Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) analysis is used to estimate lifetime direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent gas emissions of various refrigerant options and commercial refrigeration system designs, including the multiplex DX system with various hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, the HFC/R744 cascade system incorporating a medium-temperature R744 secondary loop, and the transcritical R744 booster system. The results of the LCCP analysis are presented, including the direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for each refrigeration system and refrigerant option. Based on the results of the LCCP analysis, recommendations are given for the selection of low GWP replacement refrigerants for use in existing commercial refrigeration systems, as well as for the selection of commercial refrigeration system designs with low carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, suitable for new installations.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Case study of verification, validation, and testing in the Automated Data Processing (ADP) system development life cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Division of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) studies the role played by the organizational participants in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) that conduct verification, validation, and testing (VV T) activities at various stages in the automated data processing (ADP) system development life cycle (SDLC). A case-study methodology was used to assess the effectiveness of VV T activities (tasks) and products (inputs and outputs). The case selected for the study was a project designed to interface the compensation and pension (C P) benefits systems with the centralized accounts receivable system (CARS). Argonne developed an organizational SDLC VV T model and checklists to help collect information from C P/CARS participants on VV T procedures and activities, and these were then evaluated against VV T standards.

Riemer, C.A.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Integrating life-cycle impact assessment with environmental assessment techniques to satisfy the needs of ISO 14000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After three years of negotiations, the ISO 14000 standards on Environmental Management Tools are now making rapid progress toward completion and international adoption. At the outset of this standardization effort, one methodological tool--life-cycle assessment (LCA)--was singled out for standardization, while the remaining standards were focused on management frameworks and applications--environmental management systems, environmental performance evaluation, environmental labeling and environmental auditing. The reason for singling out LCA was the belief that it could serve as a tool for evaluating the environmental impacts associated with competing production technologies, alternative materials, product options and packaging choices, and for supporting environmental claims in the marketplace. Of particular importance was LCA`s system-wide, cradle-to-grave, scope, which was considered essential for accurate and fair assessments and comparisons. This presentation examines the evolution of LCA standardization within the ISO-14000 process, describes the LCSEA framework and methodology, and explores the role of environmental professionals in this context.

Rhodes, S.P.; Brown, L. [Scientific Certification Systems, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

What Can Meta-Analyses Tell Us About the Reliability of Life Cycle Assessment for Decision Support?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature is vast and has grown over the last decade at a dauntingly rapid rate. Many LCAs have been published on the same or very similar technologies or products, in some cases leading to hundreds of publications. One result is the impression among decision makers that LCAs are inconclusive, owing to perceived and real variability in published estimates of life cycle impacts. Despite the extensive available literature and policy need formore conclusive assessments, only modest attempts have been made to synthesize previous research. A significant challenge to doing so are differences in characteristics of the considered technologies and inconsistencies in methodological choices (e.g., system boundaries, coproduct allocation, and impact assessment methods) among the studies that hamper easy comparisons and related decision support. An emerging trend is meta-analysis of a set of results from LCAs, which has the potential to clarify the impacts of a particular technology, process, product, or material and produce more robust and policy-relevant results. Meta-analysis in this context is defined here as an analysis of a set of published LCA results to estimate a single or multiple impacts for a single technology or a technology category, either in a statistical sense (e.g., following the practice in the biomedical sciences) or by quantitative adjustment of the underlying studies to make them more methodologically consistent. One example of the latter approach was published in Science by Farrell and colleagues (2006) clarifying the net energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ethanol, in which adjustments included the addition of coproduct credit, the addition and subtraction of processes within the system boundary, and a reconciliation of differences in the definition of net energy metrics. Such adjustments therefore provide an even playing field on which all studies can be considered and at the same time specify the conditions of the playing field itself. Understanding the conditions under which a meta-analysis was conducted is important for proper interpretation of both the magnitude and variability in results. This special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology includes 12 high-quality metaanalyses and critical reviews of LCAs that advance understanding of the life cycle environmental impacts of different technologies, processes, products, and materials. Also published are three contributions on methodology and related discussions of the role of meta-analysis in LCA. The goal of this special supplemental issue is to contribute to the state of the science in LCA beyond the core practice of producing independent studies on specific products or technologies by highlighting the ability of meta-analysis of LCAs to advance understanding in areas of extensive existing literature. The inspiration for the issue came from a series of meta-analyses of life cycle GHG emissions from electricity generation technologies based on research from the LCA Harmonization Project of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, which also provided financial support for this special supplemental issue. (See the editorial from this special supplemental issue [Lifset 2012], which introduces this supplemental issue and discusses the origins, funding, peer review, and other aspects.) The first article on reporting considerations for meta-analyses/critical reviews for LCA is from Heath and Mann (2012), who describe the methods used and experience gained in NREL's LCA Harmonization Project, which produced six of the studies in this special supplemental issue. Their harmonization approach adapts key features of systematic review to identify and screen published LCAs followed by a meta-analytical procedure to adjust published estimates to ones based on a consistent set of methods and assumptions to allow interstudy comparisons and conclusions to be made. In a second study on methods, Zumsteg and colleagues (2012) propose a checklist for a sta

Brandao, M.; Heath, G.; Cooper, J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts