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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Life Cycle Asset Management - Quality Assurance -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17 17 Quality Assurance March 1996 Department of Energy Office of Field Management Office of Project and Fixed Asset Management Contents GPG-FM-017 March 1996 iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Graded Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2. PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Goals, Principles and Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1.1 Quality Assurance Goals and Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1.2 Quality Assurance Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 Quality Assurance and Project Phases . . . . .

2

Plan for a Nuclear Power Industry Life Cycle Management and Nuclear Asset Management Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database development plan in this report is the first phase of providing plants with a useful computerized compendium of existing worldwide equipment reliability, aging, and other life cycle management (LCM) and nuclear asset management (NAM) data for risk-based nuclear asset and project evaluation.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-024 Site-Selection Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIFE LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT Good Practice Guide GPG-FM-024 Site-Selection Process March 1996 Department of Energy Office of Field Management Office of Project and Fixed Asset Management This page intentionally left blank. Contents GPG-FM-024 March 1996 iii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Site Selection, NEPA, and Comprehensive Land-Use Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2. PRINCIPLES AND PROCESSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1 Formal (Program Directed or Competed) Site Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.1 The Site-Selection Official . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.2 Site-Selection Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1.3 Determining Task Scope

4

2005 EDF/EPRI Collaboration on Life Cycle Management and Nuclear Asset Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the age of Electricit de Frances (EDFs) nuclear fleet grows and the European energy market evolves closer to being competitive, EDFs attention to life cycle management (LCM) and nuclear asset management (NAM) continues to increase. Optimizing operations and maintenance (OM) and capital expenditures at the plant and fleet level and selecting the most appropriate lifespan for plants are complex issues. This report of the 2005 EDF/EPRI workshop on LCM and NAM describes progress and plans for supporting t...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Life Cycle Engineering Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for green manufacturing and construction applications; conduct life cycle engineering assessments for energy efficiency and environmental ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

Life Cycle Analysis: Power Studies Compilation Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour LC Life Cycle LCA Life Cycle Analysis LCC Life Cycle Costing LCI Life Cycle Inventory LCOE Levelized Cost of Delivered Electricity LNB Low NO x Burner LNG Liquefied...

7

Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Inventory Database to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Life...

8

Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reichl, H. “Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; “Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NETL Life Cycle Analysis Fact Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis Fact Sheets Life Cycle Analysis Role of Alternative Energy Sources - Wind Technology Assessment PDF-372KB (Sept 2012) Role of Alternative Energy Sources -...

11

The principles of life-cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect

Decisionmakers representing government agencies must balance competing objectives when deciding on the purchase and sale of assets. The goal in all cases should be to make prudent or financially {open_quotes}cost-effective{close_quotes} decisions. That is, the revenues from the purchase or sale of assets should exceed any out-of-pocket costs to obtain the revenues. However, effects external to these financial considerations such as promoting environmental quality, creating or maintaining jobs, and abiding by existing regulations should also be considered in the decisionmaking process. In this paper, we outline the principles of life-cycle analysis (LCA), a framework that allows decisionmakers to make informed, balanced choices over the period of time affected by the decision, taking into account important external effects. Specifically, LCA contains three levels of analysis for any option: (1) direct financial benefits (revenues) and out-of-pocket costs for a course of action; (2) environmental and health consequences of a decision; and (3) other economic and socio-institutional effects. Because some of the components of LCA are difficult to value in monetary terms, the outcome of the LCA process is not generally a yes-no answer. However, the framework allows the decisionmaker to at least qualitatively consider all relevant factors in analyzing options, promoting sound decisionmaking in the process.

Hill, L.J.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Curlee, T.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Technology development life cycle processes.  

SciTech Connect

This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

Beck, David Franklin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation factsheet Download the Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy enlisted NREL to review and "harmonize" life cycle assessments (LCA) of electricity generation technologies. Hundreds of assessments have been published, often with considerable variability in results. These variations in approach, while usually legitimate, hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Learn more about life cycle assessments of energy technologies. By harmonizing this data, NREL seeks to reduce the uncertainty around estimates for environmental impacts of renewables and increase the value of

15

Green Building- Efficient Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy saving does not just apply to traffic, production or agriculture. Buildings are also contributing to the climate change. The focus here is on the energy they use and on their CO2 emissions. Each year, Siemens invests more than two billion euros in the appropriate research and development. For customers, this means that Siemens is already providing them with energy efficient solutions that save resources and reduce emissions. Siemens Real Estate (SRE) has taken on the task of ensuring that Siemens AG will become 20 percent more energy efficient by 2011, and it has turned an efficiency program for existing real estate, which has been in existence since 2005, into an integrated green building initiative. This initiative comprises the components “Sustainable Building Design”, “Life Cycle Cost Analysis”, “Green Building Certification” and “Natural Resources Management”. These components are deliberately arranged around the life cycle of the real estate concerned. This allows a different emphasis to be placed on the different questions in each project phase and each phase of a building’s life and for them to be answered in a targeted manner. “Sustainable Building Design” comes into effect during the tasking and preliminary planning phase of a building project; and, by providing a specially developed sustainability manual, it helps with the definition of target values and the drawing up of efficiency strategies for the planning of the building. The manual epitomizes, and sets out clearly, the attitude of SRE to all building-specific sustainability matters. In addition, it is used in the offering of rewards for project competitions. As a result, through a selection of different energy-efficiency measures that have been roughly conceived beforehand, the primary energy consumption can already be restricted in the project definition phase. “Life Cycle Cost Analysis” comes into effect when the blueprint for buildings is being drawn up. Up to now, when components and systems were being chosen, the main focus was usually on the investment costs involved. By using a cost tool developed specifically to meet the needs of the company, SRE will in future be able to estimate the component-specific utilization costs – such as cleaning, maintenance, and the use of energy – at an early planning stage. “Green Building Certification” is used in building projects during the planning and implementation phase, and it thus ensures the quality of the new real estate over the long term. Siemens is implementing the Green Building Program of the European Commission in new building projects and renovation work in EU countries. In all other countries that are not taking part in the EU Green Building Program, SRE uses certification in accordance with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). In the LEED certification, a transparent and easy-to-use catalog of criteria is employed to make an assessment of the use of energy and other aspects of sustainability, such as the selection of the plot of land, the efficient use of water, the quality of air within buildings, and the selection of materials. This ensures that a neutral and independent assessment is made of all new building and large-scale renovation projects. The action program “Natural Resources Management” rounds off the range of measures in the area of existing real estate. The aim of the program is to identify and highlight all latent efficiency potential in existing buildings. This includes, for instance, modernizing the control equipment used for the heating and ventilation systems. This entails replacing electrical power units with more efficient models, and retrofitting fans and pumps with frequency converters. Sixty buildings have now been inspected, and savings of almost eight million Euros have been achieved. The average payback period is less than two years. One example of this is an old Siemens building from the 1970s at the Munich-Perlach site. Through energy optimization, it has been possible to cu

Kohns, R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

17

Automotive Magnesium Applications and Life Cycle Environmental ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 22, 2008 ... Life cycle energies and emissions are compared for steel, aluminum and ... 3rd International Conference on SF6 and the Environment, 2004.

18

DOE O 430.1B Chg 2, Real Property and Asset Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The directive establishes an integrated corporate-level, performance based approach to the life-cycle management of our real property assets. It links real ...

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

NREL: Energy Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life cycle assessment (LCA) harmonization helps lenders, utility executives, and lawmakers get the best, most precise information on greenhouse gas emissions from various sources of energy. LCA has been used to estimate and compare GHG emissions from utility-scale power systems for three decades, often with considerable variability in results. Harmonization provides more exact estimates of greenhouse-gas emissions for renewable and conventional electricity generation technologies, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature and reducing uncertainty. Highlights of Recent Studies Chart that compares published and harmonized lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster.

20

Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the environmental impact of an item over its entire lifespan. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the database in 2003 with input from a variety of partners. NREL maintains and updates the database with support from the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Life Cycle of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the life cycle of the background (nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosol. The authors assume the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation near the tropical tropopause and are carried aloft into the stratosphere. The ...

Patrick Hamill; Eric J. Jensen; P. B. Russell; Jill J. Bauman

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Life Cycles of Moist Baroclinic Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between moisture and baroclinic eddies was examined through eddy life-cycle experiments using a global, primitive equation model. How condensation affects the structural evolution of eddies, their fluxes of heat, moisture, and ...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Lee E. Branscome; Douglas A. Stewart

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

life cycle inventory | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

life cycle inventory life cycle inventory Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system for eGrid regions (AKGD, AKMS, AZNM, CAMX, ERCT, FRCC, HIMS, HIOA, MROE, MROW, NEWE, NWPP, NYCW, NYLI, NYUP, RFCE, RFCM, RFCW, RMPA, SPNO, SPSO, SRMV, SRMW, SRSO, SRTV, SRVC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory forms (xls and xml) . A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included.Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the eGrid regions. It is representative of the year 2008 mix of fuels used for utility generations for each of the eGrid regions Source USLCI Database Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords eGrid Electricity grid LCI life cycle inventory US Data application/zip icon egrid_electricity_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 7 MiB)

25

Life cycle evolution and systematics of Campanulariid hydrozoans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to study campanulariid life cycle evolution and systematics. The Campanulariidae is a hydrozoan family with many life cycle variations, and provide an excellent model system to study life cycle ...

Govindarajan, Annette Frese, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links Below are links to life cycle inventory (LCI) databases, life cycle assessment (LCA) information, LCA tools, research institutes utilizing LCA, labeling initiatives and organizations, international LCA initiatives, LCA online forums. Life Cycle Inventory Data Ecoinvent: Swiss Centre for Life Cycle Inventories IVAM LCA Data 4: Dutch LCA Database KITECH (Korea Institute of Industrial Technology): Korea National Cleaner Production Center LCI Database Life Cycle Assessment Information IERE (The Institute for Environmental Research and Education): The American Center for Life Cycle Assessment SETAC (Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry): SETAC Life Cycle Assessment SPOLD (Society for Promotion of Life-cycle Assessment Development): 2.0 LCA Consultants homepage

27

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Basics

28

Vehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions of future transportation modes. These resultsVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycleVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Name NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005...

30

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Life Cycle Inventory Home About the Project Database Publications Life Cycle Assessments Related Links...

31

Life Cycle Management Economic Tools Demonstration: Risk-Informed Long-Term Planning for Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, the EPRI Life Cycle Management (LCM) process and economic evaluation software tools have used point-value deterministic calculations to identify the economically optimum long-term plan for a system, structure, or component (SSC). This collaborative project demonstrates the unique capabilities of four tools that use probabilistic techniques to risk-inform LCM planning (i.e., accounting for risk and uncertainty in long-term asset management resource allocation decisions).

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

33

Program on Technology Innovation: An Optimization Approach for Life-Cycle Management Applied to Large Power Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results and insights from a study of the life-cycle management (LCM) of main transformers at Constellation Energy Nuclear Group's (CENG's) five nuclear power plants. The study used two asset management (AM) tools developed by Electricit de France (EDF).

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

Life cycle support for sensor network applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing applications for sensor networks is a challenging task. Most programming systems narrowly focus on programming issues while ignoring that programming represents only a tiny fraction of the typical life cycle of an application. Furthermore, ... Keywords: assessment, middleware, sensor networks, separation of concerns, software engineering

Urs Bischoff; Gerd Kortuem

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

TYLER ALGEO i Life Cycle Analysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building envelope would recover the energy invested in additional insulation within less than two yearsTYLER ALGEO i Life Cycle Analysis of The Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building University envelope of the Civil and Mechanical Engineering (CEME) Building at the University of British Columbia (UBC

36

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Life Cycle Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impacts of products, processes, and services. Its quality depends on the life cycle inventory (LCI) data it uses. "In principle, all decisions that affect or are meant to improve...

37

Life-Cycle Analysis Process Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Example of a life-cycle inventory for an unspecified product...70 Nontoxic chemicals 2,000 Water effluents, mg COD 1,000 BOD 150 Acid, as H + 75 Nitrates 5 Metals 300 Ammonium ions 5 Chloride ions 120 Dissolved organics 20 Suspended solids 400 Oil 100 Hydrocarbons 100 Phenol 1 Dissolved solids 400 Phosphate 5 Other nitrogen 10 Sulfate ions 10 COD, chemical...

38

Nuclear Plant Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The day-to-day pressures of operation, limited budgets, and regulatory scrutiny of nuclear power plants focus on the present or short term, and may preempt cost-beneficial activities with long-term pay-off. This guide to implementing life-cycle management (LCM) fosters long-range thinking and decision making focused on profitability in the new competitive era of electricity production.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycle Performance Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycleenables the integration of green manufacturing principlesKeywords Life cycle cost, green manufacturing, monitoring 1

Niggeschmidt, Stephan; Helu, Moneer; Diaz, Nancy; Behmann, Benjamin; Lanza, Gisela; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Life Cycle of Steel (LCA/LCI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008 ... A life cycle inventory (LCI) looks at the resources, energy and emissions from the steel production to the end of its life. The International Iron ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

42

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Planning Documents U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap, February 2009 U.S. Life Cycle Inventory User Survey, February 2009 U.S. LCI Database Factsheet, March...

43

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

Deru, M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Transport of Passive Tracers in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of passive tracers in idealized baroclinic wave life cycles is studied using output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). Two life cycles, LCn and LCs, are simulated, starting with ...

Elizabeth M. Stone; William J. Randel; John L. Stanford

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Life Cycle Assessment of Copper Metallurgical Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Estimation of Waste Packaging Containers Generated by Households in Taiwan · The Life Cycle Assessment of Copper Metallurgical Processes.

46

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Dataset Additions - November...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Inventory Database Dataset Additions - Type Category Dataset Name Chemical Manufacturing Polylactide Biopolymer Resin, at plant Chemical Manufacturing Recycled...

47

Business-Cycle Pattern of Asset Returns: A General Equilibrium Explanation ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I develop an analytical general-equilibrium model to explain economic sources of businesscycle pattern of aggregate stock market returns. With concave production functions and capital accumulation, a technology shock has a pro-cyclical direct effect and a counter-cyclical indirect effect on expected returns. The indirect effect, reflecting the “feedback ” effect of consumers’ behavior on asset returns, dominates the direct effect and causes counter-cyclical variations of expected returns. I show that the conditional mean, volatility, and Sharpe ratios of asset returns all vary counter-cyclically and they are persistent and predictable, and that stock market behavior has forecasting power for real economic activity.

Qiang Kang; Lixin Huang; Urban Jermann; José-víctor Ríos-rull; Amir Yaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Learn about how NREL research analysts are evaluating various LCA studies in the Life Cycle Analysis Harmonization Project. NREL is a leader in the field of life cycle assessment (LCA) of energy technologies, both renewable and conventional. Life cycle assessment is a standardized technique that tracks all material, energy, and pollutant flows of a system-from raw material extraction, manufacturing, transport, and construction to operation and end-of-life disposal. Life cycle assessment can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate comparisons of energy technologies. Life cycle assessments provide a well-established and comprehensive framework to compare renewable energy technologies with fossil-based and

50

GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Li Li 收件人 School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology Battery Recycling: How to Make It Happen Analysis can help identify a clear path for battery production and recycling  Purpose is to clear the road for mass-market introduction of battery-powered vehicles by identifying any roadblocks on the way  Life cycle analysis (LCA) is used to identify significant environmental issues  Availability of recycling processes can:  Assure against major waste problems at end-of-life  Reduce environmental impacts  Reduce raw material supply issues  Reduce net material costs  Create viable business opportunities  Economic and institutional constraints must also be accounted for

51

The role of life cycle analysis in considering product change  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle analysis is an important tool for determining the environmental impacts of products and packaging. A complete life cycle analysis consists of three phases: life cycle inventory, impact analysis, and improvement analysis. Life cycle inventory examines the energy and resource usage and environmental releases associated with a product system from cradle to grave, that is, from the extraction of raw materials through raw material processing; manufacture, transportation, and use of the product; and, finally, disposal, reuse, or recycling of the product. Life cycle inventory results can be used to identify areas for improving product and packaging systems in terms of reducing energy usage, resource usage, and environmental releases.

Rethmeyer, D.A. (Franklin Associates, Ltd., Prairie Village, KS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

53

NREL: Energy Analysis - Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Factsheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Download the Factsheet Flowchart that shows the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power systems. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Figure 1. Process flow diagram illustrating the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The yellow box defined by the grey line shows the systems boundaries assumed in harmonization. Enlarge image NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review literature on life cycle assessments of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, identify

54

Nuclear Asset Management Database: Phase 2: Prototype Long-term Asset Management Database (LAMDA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI members engaged in nuclear asset management (NAM) and life cycle management (LCM) view quality equipment reliability and cost data as one of the highest priority needs in a market-driven industry, but less data are available for equipment important to generation than for safety equipment addressed in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This interim report describes the second phase of development of the Long-term Asset Management Database (LAMDA).

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Life Cycle Nitrogen Trifluoride Emissions from Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous- and nanocrystalline-silicon thin-film photovoltaic modules are made in high-throughput manufacturing lines that necessitate quickly cleaning the reactor. Using NF{sub 3}, a potent greenhouse gas, as the cleaning agent triggered concerns as recent reports reveal that the atmospheric concentrations of this gas have increased significantly. We quantified the life-cycle emissions of NF{sub 3} in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, on the basis of actual measurements at the facilities of a major producer of NF{sub 3} and of a manufacturer of PV end-use equipment. From these, we defined the best practices and technologies that are the most likely to keep worldwide atmospheric concentrations of NF{sub 3} at very low radiative forcing levels. For the average U.S. insolation and electricity-grid conditions, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from manufacturing and using NF{sub 3} in current PV a-Si and tandem a-Si/nc-Si facilities add 2 and 7 g CO{sub 2eq}/kWh, which can be displaced within the first 1-4 months of the PV system life.

Fthenakis, V.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

56

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings October 4, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis To help facility managers make sound decisions, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials assume discount rates and energy price projections determined

57

NREL: Energy Analysis - Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, analysts have conducted life cycle assessments on the environmental impacts associated with a variety of nuclear power technologies and systems. These life cycle assessments have had wide-ranging results. To better understand greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from nuclear power systems, NREL completed a comprehensive review and analysis of life cycle assessments focused on light water reactors (LWRs)-including both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs)-published between 1980 and 2010. NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions

58

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project ID: 143 Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Brief Description: Examines the social, environmental and economic impacts of hydrogen fuel cell and gasoline vehicles. Purpose This project aims to investigate fuel cell vehicles through environmental impact, life cycle assessment, sustainability, and thermodynamic analyses. The project will assist in the development of highly qualified personnel in such areas as system analysis, modeling, methodology development, and applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Organization: University of Ontario Institute of Technology

59

Life cycle assessment parameters adaptation for Brazilian electricity production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity is a major concern in the life cycle assessment (LCA) of most products since it is a required input for production of almost all… (more)

Coelho, Carla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Integrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycle Performance Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manufacturing and Sustainability, University of CaliforniaIntegrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life CycleManufacturing and Sustainability, University of California

Niggeschmidt, Stephan; Helu, Moneer; Diaz, Nancy; Behmann, Benjamin; Lanza, Gisela; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both of NREL, lent their expertise in life cycle assessment modeling and Jatropha production, and Dr. Mark Pitterle of Symbiotic Engineering aided in the literature survey...

62

NREL: Energy Analysis - Hydropower Results - Life Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Hydropower OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas...

63

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biopower Results - Life Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biopower Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Bioenergy OpenEI: Data,...

64

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.) How will future transportation energy production impact water resource availability in the US? b.)...

65

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Life Cycle ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... This report was prepared by Pricewaterhouse Coopers, LLP/Ecobalance for Nickel Industry LCA Group. The report describes the life cycle ...

66

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Life Cycle ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 30, 2008 ... This document provides the most comprehensive life-cycle information for the North American aluminum industry. Carried out for the calendar ...

67

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project * Maintain data quality and transparency. * Cover commonly used materials, products, and...

68

Life Cycle Inventory Report for the North American Aluminum ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 30, 2008 ... This document provides the most comprehensive life-cycle information for the North American aluminum industry. Carried out for the calendar ...

69

Global Primary Aluminium Industry 2010 Life Cycle Inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within this framework, the Primary Aluminium Industry has established a global Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) data set. Inventory flows include inputs of raw materials  ...

70

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

image Published Results The published life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) estimates for hydropower, ocean, geothermal, biopower, solar (crystalline silicon photovoltaic, thin...

71

An Integrated Life Cycle Engineering Model: Energy and Greenhouse...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Life Cycle Engineering Model: Energy and Greenhouse Gas Performance of Residential Heritage Buildings, and the Influence of Retrofit Strategies and Appliance...

72

Order Module--DOE O 430.1B, REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30.1B, REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT 30.1B, REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT Order Module--DOE O 430.1B, REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT "The objective of DOE O 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, is to establish a corporate, holistic, and performance-based approach to real property life-cycle asset management that links real property asset planning, programming, budgeting, and evaluation to program mission projections and performance outcomes. To accomplish the objective, this Order identifies requirements and establishes reporting mechanisms and responsibilities for real property asset management. This Order implements DOE P 580.1, Management Policy for Planning, Programming, Budgeting, Operation, Maintenance and Disposal of Real Property, dated 5/20/02. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 430.1B Real Property Asset Management

73

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from geothermal electricity production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis (LCA) is presented for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fossil energy use associated with geothermal electricity production with a special focus on operational GHG emissions from hydrothermal flash and dry steam plants. The analysis includes results for both the plant and fuel cycle components of the total life cycle. The impact of recent changes to California's GHG reporting protocol for GHG emissions are discussed by comparing emission rate metrics derived from post and pre revision data sets. These metrics are running capacity weighted average GHG emission rates (g/kWh) and emission rate cumulative distribution functions. To complete our life cycle analysis plant cycle results were extracted from our previous work and added to fuel cycle results. The resulting life cycle fossil energy and greenhouse gas emissions values are compared among a range of fossil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Life-cycle of Operons  

SciTech Connect

Operons are a major feature of all prokaryotic genomes, but how and why operon structures vary is not well understood. To elucidate the life-cycle of operons, we compared gene order between Escherichia coli K12 and its relatives and identified the recently formed and destroyed operons in E. coli. This allowed us to determine how operons form, how they become closely spaced, and how they die. Our findings suggest that operon evolution is driven by selection on gene expression patterns. First, both operon creation and operon destruction lead to large changes in gene expression patterns. For example, the removal of lysA and ruvA from ancestral operons that contained essential genes allowed their expression to respond to lysine levels and DNA damage, respectively. Second, some operons have undergone accelerated evolution, with multiple new genes being added during a brief period. Third, although most operons are closely spaced because of a neutral bias towards deletion and because of selection against large overlaps, highly expressed operons tend to be widely spaced because of regulatory fine-tuning by intervening sequences. Although operon evolution seems to be adaptive, it need not be optimal: new operons often comprise functionally unrelated genes that were already in proximity before the operon formed.

Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings To help facility managers make sound decisions, FEMP provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials provided here assume discount rates and energy price projections (TXT 17 KB) determined annually by FEMP and the Energy Information Administration. Building Life Cycle Cost Software FEMP's Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) software can help you calculate life cycle costs, net savings, savings-to-investment ratio, internal rate of return, and payback period for Federal energy and water conservation projects funded by agencies or alternatively financed. BLCC also estimates emissions and emission reductions. An energy escalation rate calculator (EERC) computes an average escalation rate for energy savings performance contracts when payments are based on energy cost savings.

76

Life Cycle Management of Chemicals: Conceptual Design for Information Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking the acquisition, use, and disposition of chemicals allows companies to reduce costs; manage risks to health, safety, and the environment; and improve compliance and reporting efficiency. This report provides a means of identifying and evaluating chemical life cycle information management needs. The conceptual design presented here will guide utilities through development of a custom system for managing chemical life cycle data.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Comparison of Life Cycle Costs for LLRW Management in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a comparison of life-cycle costs of an assured isolation facility in Texas versus the life-cycle costs for a traditional belowground low-level radioactive waste disposal facility designed for the proposed site near Sierra Blanca, Texas.

Baird, R. D.; Rogers, B. C.; Chau, N.; Kerr, Thomas A

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Life-Cycle Decision Making: Volume 1: Getting Started  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Decision Making (LCDM) 2.0 is a suite of integrated tools for making a wide range of decisions based on life-cycle costs and revenues. LCDM puts powerful methods and tools at the fingertips of employees, empowering them to quickly make better day-to-day business decisions based on the true costs and benefits to the company.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Semantic modelling of dependency relations between life cycle analysis processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. This methodology relies on the decomposition of a studied system into interdependent processes. Several organisations provide processes ... Keywords: environmental information management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Marian Scuturici; Jean-Marie Pinon; Emmanuel Risler

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Life Cycle Management Sourcebooks — Volume 10: Feedwater Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for feedwater heaters.

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and module manufacturing. · System/Plant Decommissioning · Disposal · PowerPlant Decommissioning · Waste life cycle GHG emissions from solar PV systems are similar to other renewables and nuclear energy.nrel.gov/harmonization. · Life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si and TF PV technologies appear broadly similar; the small number

82

Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, Volume 5: Main Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of "Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks," each containing a compilation of industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for main generators.

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

Plant Support Engineering: Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks - Chillers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience information and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). In addition, this sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost8212effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for chillers.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

84

Life Extension Guidelines Knowledge Asset (LEG-KA) Technical Content and Best Practices Update - 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the aging of the electric power transmission system, the topics of life assessment and life extension have become predominant concerns. At the same time, cost pressures have increased the desire to minimize maintenance. The goals of minimum maintenance and extended life are often diametrically opposed. However, with knowledge of the interaction of transformer condition, maintenance, and service life, a reasonable balance can be reached that minimizes yearly maintenance expenditures and maximizes the...

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the

86

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Institute of Standards and Technology Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/information/download_blcc.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Building Life-Cycle Cost, BLCC References: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs[1] Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC[2]

87

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

Distributed Control System Life Cycle Management: Guidelines for Planning and Managing the Life Cycle of Distributed Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power producers are often not concerned with the life cycle of a control system until they receive a notification from the manufacturer that the system is no longer supported. This situation results in a reactive effort to gain information, develop a plan, obtain funding, and execute an upgrade project. Effectively managing the life cycle of a control system requires a proactive approach, including gaining information about the installed system and its expected life span and the available ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Title Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Masanet, Eric R., Yuan Chang, Anand R. Gopal, Peter H. Larsen, William R. Morrow, Roger Sathre, Arman Shehabi, and Pei Zhai Journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources Volume 38 Date Published 2013 Keywords electricity, energy policy, environmental analysis, life-cycle impact, life-cycle inventory Abstract The application of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to electric power (EP) technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts. While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use, LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life-cycle energy, GHG emissions, air pollutant emissions, and water use implications of EP technologies. With continued progress, LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically-thorough and environmentally-holistic manner for more robust deployment decisions. This article summarizes: (1) major challenges in applying LCA to EP technologies thus far, (2) LCA results to date on the various impacts of EP technologies, and (3) opportunities for improving LCAs as applied to EP technologies moving forward.

91

NREL: Energy Analysis - Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Geothermal Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for geothermal technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from geothermal power generation Credit: Goldstein, B., G. Hiriart, R. Bertani, C. Bromley, L. Gutiérrez-Negrín, E. Huenges, H. Muraoka, A. Ragnarsson, J. Tester, V. Zui, 2011: Geothermal Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 4.6 Enlarge image

92

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Impacts of Innovative Technologies Speaker(s): Oliver Jolliet Date: July 15, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone This seminar starts by providing a short introduction to the field of Environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) through a practical example of packaging. It will then develop the case of the Life Cycle Benefits and Impacts of the Internet; raising the different scientific challenges that LCA faces to provide relevant results for innovative technologies.--The rapid development of the Internet and the related potential impacts on and benefits for the environment deserves attention. The infrastructure that supports a university's use of the Internet has been comprehensively

93

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

94

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles Powered by a Fuel Cell and by Internal Combustion Engine for Canada Project ID: 117 Principal Investigator: Xianguo Li Purpose In this study, a full life cycle analysis of an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) and a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) has been carried out. The impact of the material and fuel used in the vehicle on energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions is analyzed for Canada. Four different methods of obtaining hydrogen were analyzed; using coal and nuclear power to produce electricity and extraction of hydrogen through electrolysis and via steam reforming of natural gas in a natural gas plant and in a hydrogen refueling station.

95

title Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources volume year month abstract p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy GHG emissions air pollutant emissions and water use implications of EP technologies With continued progress LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically thorough and environmentally holistic manner for more robust deployment

96

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Barbara Adams In this presentation we describe the prospective life-cycle modeling of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), a novel type of material with the potential for efficiently capturing CO2. Life-cycle modeling of emerging technologies, conducted early in the innovation process, can generate knowledge that can feed back to inform scientific discovery and development. We discuss the challenges of credibly modeling a system that does not yet exist, and describe methodological approaches including parametric system modeling (quantifying relations between system elements), scenario projections (defining plausible pathways for system scale-up),

97

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Institutional Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Ohio State Architect's Office In 1995 Ohio passed legislation requiring that all state agencies perform life-cycle cost analyses prior to the construction of new buildings, and energy consumption analyses prior to new leases. Both analyses are to be primary considerations in either building design or leasing decisions. The

98

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs October 8, 2013 - 2:14pm Addthis The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings. BLCC5 Program Register and download. BLCC 5.3-13 (for Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux). BLCC is programmed in Java with an XML file format. The user's guide is part of the BLCC Help system. BLCC version 5.3-13 contains the following modules: FEMP Analysis; Energy Project Federal Analysis; Financed Project Office of Management and Budget Analysis MILCON Analysis; Energy Project MILCON Analysis; Energy Conservation Investment Program Project MILCON Analysis; Non-Energy Project

99

Incorporating uncertainty in the Life Cycle Cost Analysis of pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an important tool to evaluate the economic performance of alternative investments for a given project. It considers the total cost to construct, maintain, and operate a pavement over its ...

Swei, Omar Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Life cycle analysis of shea butter biodiesel using GREET software.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study, life cycle analysis (LCA) of shea butter biodiesel from Well-to-Pump (WTP) is considered utilizing information gathered from Anuanom Industrial Bio Products Ltd.… (more)

Quansah, Solomon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Public Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All facilities using public funds for construction or renovation must undergo a life cycle analysis, which will consider energy efficiency and on-site energy equipment using the sun, wind, oil,...

102

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Impacts of Innovative Technologies Speaker(s): Oliver Jolliet Date: July 15, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90...

103

The Mesoscale Kinetic Energy Spectrum of a Baroclinic Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum is investigated through numerical simulations of an idealized baroclinic wave life cycle, from linear instability to mature nonlinear evolution and with high horizontal and vertical resolution (?x ...

Michael L. Waite; Chris Snyder

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Life Cycle and Mesoscale Frontal Structure of an Intermountain Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution analyses and MesoWest surface observations are used to examine the life cycle and mesoscale frontal structure of the “Tax Day Storm,” an intermountain cyclone that produced the second lowest sea level pressure observed in Utah ...

Gregory L. West; W. James Steenburgh

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Response of Baroclinic Life Cycles to Barotropic Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclonic barotropic shear of incrementally increasing magnitude is imposed on an idealized midlatitude jet, and the life cycles of baroclinically unstable wavenumber 6 perturbations growing on these jets are studied. When the barotropic shear ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; Peter Zuercher

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Life Cycle of the South American Monsoon System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South American monsoon system (SAMS) life cycle plays an important role in the distribution and duration of the rainy season mainly over southwestern Amazonia, and the central west and southeast Brazil regions, affecting the economy through ...

Adma Raia; Iracema Fonsecade Albuquerque Cavalcanti

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Life Cycle of the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite life cycle of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) is constructed from the cross covariance between outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), wind, and temperature. To focus on the role of convection, the composite is based on episodes when a ...

Harry H. Hendon; Murry L. Salby

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Improving the quality and transparency of building life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment, or LCA, is a powerful method for measuring and reducing a building's environmental impacts. Its widespread adoption among designers would allow the environmental component of sustainability to gain ...

Hsu, Sophia Lisbeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

An Overview of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Life Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings from a study of the life cycle inventories for petroleum diesel and biodiesel. It presents information on raw materials extracted from the environment, energy resources consumed, and air, water, and solid waste emissions generated.

Sheehan, J. (NREL); Camobreco, V. (Ecobalance); Duffield, J. (USDA); Shapouri, H. (USDA); Graboski, M. (CIFER); Tyson, K. S. (NREL Project Manager)

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Anita...

112

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Role of Recycling in the Life Cycle of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES J.L. Sullivan, L. Gaines, and A. Burnham Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division Keywords: battery, materials, recycling, energy Abstract Over the last few decades, rechargeable battery production has increased substantially. Applications including phones, computers, power tools, power storage, and electric-drive vehicles are either commonplace or will be in the next decade or so. Because advanced rechargeable batteries, like those

114

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project * Maintain data quality and transparency. * Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data. * Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making tool. * Maintain compatibility with international LCI databases. * Provide exceptional data accessibility.

115

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

116

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Scope De?nition and Inventory Analysis; Internationalin life- cycle inventories using hybrid approaches. Environ.Reichl, H. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis and Identi?cation

Krishnan, Nikhil; Boyd, Sarah; Somani, Ajay; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Technology Analysis - Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis diagram of the battery recycling life cycle Several types of recycling processes are available, recovering materials usable at different stages of the production cycle- from metallic elements to materials that can be reused directly in new batteries. Recovery closer to final usable form avoids more impact-intensive process steps. Portions courtesy of Umicore, Inc. To identify the potential impacts of the growing market for automotive lithium-ion batteries, Argonne researchers are examining the material demand and recycling issues related to lithium-ion batteries. Research includes: Conducting studies to identify the greenest, most economical recycling processes, Investigating recycling practices to determine how much of which

118

Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites  

SciTech Connect

Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites is gaining momentum with the pressure to lightweight vehicles, however energy-intensity and cost remain some of the major barriers before this material could be used in large-scale automotive applications. A representative automotive part, i.e., a 30.8 kg steel floor pan having a 17% weight reduction potential with stringent cash performance requirements has been considered for the life cycle energy and emissions analysis based on the latest developments occurring in the precursor type (conventional textile-based PAN vs. renewable-based lignin), part manufacturing (conventional SMC vs. P4) and fiber recycling technologies. Carbon fiber production is estimated to be about 14 times more energy-intensive than conventional steel production, however life cycle primary energy use is estimated to be quite similar to the conventional part, i.e., 18,500 MJ/part, especially when considering the uncertainty in LCI data that exists from using numerous sources in the literature. Lignin P4 technology offers the most life cycle energy and CO2 emissions benefits compared to a conventional stamped steel technology. With a 20% reduction in energy use in the lignin conversion to carbon fiber and free availability of lignin as a by-product of ethanol and wood production, a 30% reduction in life cycle energy use could be obtained. A similar level of life cycle energy savings could also be obtained with a higher part weight reduction potential of 43%.

Das, Sujit [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

LIFE Materials: Fuel Cycle and Repository Volume 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fusion-fission LIFE engine concept provides a path to a sustainable energy future based on safe, carbon-free nuclear power with minimal nuclear waste. The LIFE design ultimately offers many advantages over current and proposed nuclear energy technologies, and could well lead to a true worldwide nuclear energy renaissance. When compared with existing and other proposed future nuclear reactor designs, the LIFE engine exceeds alternatives in the most important measures of proliferation resistance and waste minimization. The engine needs no refueling during its lifetime. It requires no removal of fuel or fissile material generated in the LIFE engine. It leaves no weapons-attractive material at the end of life. Although there is certainly a need for additional work, all indications are that the 'back end' of the fuel cycle does not to raise any 'showstopper' issues for LIFE. Indeed, the LIFE concept has numerous benefits: (1) Per unit of electricity generated, LIFE engines would generate 20-30 times less waste (in terms of mass of heavy metal) requiring disposal in a HLW repository than does the current once-through fuel cycle. (2) Although there may be advanced fuel cycles that can compete with LIFE's low mass flow of heavy metal, all such systems require reprocessing, with attendant proliferation concerns; LIFE engines can do this without enrichment or reprocessing. Moreover, none of the advanced fuel cycles can match the low transuranic content of LIFE waste. (3) The specific thermal power of LIFE waste is initially higher than that of spent LWR fuel. Nevertheless, this higher thermal load can be managed using appropriate engineering features during an interim storage period, and could be accommodated in a Yucca-Mountain-like repository by appropriate 'staging' of the emplacement of waste packages during the operational period of the repository. The planned ventilation rates for Yucca Mountain would be sufficient for LIFE waste to meet the thermal constraints of the repository design. (4) A simple, but arguably conservative, estimate for the dose from a repository containing 63,000 MT of spent LIFE fuel would have similar performance to the currently planned Yucca Mountain Repository. This indicates that a properly designed 'LIFE Repository' would almost certainly meet the proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards for dose to individuals, even though the waste in such a repository would have produced 20-30 times more generated electricity than the reference case for Yucca Mountain. The societal risk/benefit ratio for a LIFE repository would therefore be significantly better than for currently planned repositories for LWR fuel.

Shaw, H; Blink, J A

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map Photo of a green field with an ocean in the background. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database NREL and its partners created the U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database to help life cycle assessment (LCA) practitioners answer questions about environmental impact. This database provides individual gate-to-gate, cradle-to-gate and cradle-to-grave accounting of the energy and material flows into and out of the environment that are associated with producing a material, component, or assembly in the U.S. The goals of the U.S. LCI Database project are: Maintain data quality and transparency Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

122

NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Cover of the LWind LCA Harmonization Fact Sheet Download the Fact Sheet Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization To better understand the state of knowledge of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from utility-scale wind power systems, NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a meta-analytical process called "harmonization." Over the last 30 years, several hundred life cycle assessments have been conducted for wind power technologies with wide-ranging results. Harmonization for onshore and offshore wind power systems was performed by adjusting published greenhouse gas estimates to achieve:

123

Dynamic life-cycle costing in asset management of production equipments with emphasis om maintenance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the contemporary industry, companies need to make investments to grow their business volume. However each investment comes with its own risk. Cost of… (more)

Chaudhary, Osman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Information Resources: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products This March 28, 2013 webcast reviewed DOE's recently completed three-part study of the life-cycle energy and environmental impacts of LED lighting products relative to incandescent and CFL alternatives. The reports for Parts 1 and 2 were published in February 2012 and June 2012, respectively, providing a literature review and life-cycle assessment (LCA) for lamps utilizing these three light source technologies. Presenters Jason Tuenge of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Brad Hollomon of Compa Industries focused on findings from Part 3, which augments the LCA results with chemical analysis of a variety of lamps using standard testing procedures from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of California. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different lamps, were tested to ascertain whether potentially toxic elements are present in concentrations that exceed regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste.

125

Sustainable NREL: Laboratory Life Cycle Assessment of Environmental Footprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has used life cycle assessment to create a carbon dioxide (CO2) environmental footprint. Transportation, water, natural gas and electricity, and solid waste disposal are the major CO2 emission contributors at the Laboratory. In FY 2003 (October 2002-September 2003), these categories yielded a total of 29 million kg CO2 -equivalent. The major components were electricity, 22.3 million kg CO2-equivalent.; and natural gas, 3.275 million kg CO2 (these yield 77% and 11%, respectively, to the CO2 footprint). Other contributors were domestic air travel and commuter travel, both of which came in at 5%, and international air travel at 2%. Solid waste disposal, water, and fleet vehicle emissions were negligible in relation to the other components. NREL is enacting several measures to reduce emissions at the front end of the material life cycle. Green purchasing, reducing water use, reducing the need for travel, and purchasing alternative fuel fleet vehicles are all ways to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions. In addition, recycling helps reduce CO2 emissions in the final stage of the waste disposal life cycle. The large area of interest is obviously the electricity and natural gas consumed at the Laboratory. The Laboratory has implemented almost all life cycle cost effective energy efficiency measures and all new construction is state of the practice. The Laboratory continues to examine ways of simultaneously reducing energy use and maintaining the integrity of its research and development activities.

Huffnagle, S.; Westby, R.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Lorie Hamelin, Marianne Wesnæs and Henrik AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario A) 28 2.2.2 Biogas from raw pig slurry and fibre fraction from chemical- mechanical separation (Scenario F) 29 2.2.3 Biogas from raw cow slurry and fibre

127

Life Cycle Human Capital Formation, Search Intensity, and Wage Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents and estimates a unified model where both human capital investment and job search are endogenized. This unification not only enables me to quantify the relative contributions of each mechanism to life cycle wage dynamics, but also to investigate potential interactions between human capital investment and job search. Within the unified framework, the expectation of rising rental rates of human capital through searching in the future gives workers more incentive to invest in human capital. In the meantime, unemployed workers reduce their reservation rates to leave unemployment quickly to take advantage of human capital accumulation on the job. The results show that these interactions are well supported by data. Allowing for these interactions as well as heterogeneity in search technology, the unified model predicts that both human capital accumulation and job search contribute significantly to the wage growth over the life cycle with human capital accumulation accounting for 40 % of total wage growth and job search accounting for 50%. The remaining 10 % is due to the interactions of the two forces. Furthermore, job search dominates wage growth earlier in the life cycle while human capital accumulation dominates later in the life cycle. ?This paper is one of the chapters in my Ph.D. thesis. I thank my committee members, Audra Bowlus, Hiroyuki Kasahara, and Lance Lochner for their continuous guidance and support. I would also like to thank Chris Robinson, Fabien Postel-Vinay, Todd Stinebrickner, Ben Lester as well as

Huju Liu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ambient Intelligence in Product Life-cycle Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfil the increasing demands today the short innovation time and the high quality of production itself is not enough in production of goods, but all phases of a product (from idea to recycling) should be managed by advanced tools and means. Nowadays ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Product Life-cycle Management, Service engineering

G. Kovács; S. Kopácsi; G. Haidegger; R. Michelini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Weakly Nonlinear Primitive Equation Baroclinic Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A weakly nonlinear baroclinic life cycle is examined with a spherical, multilevel, primitive equation model. The structure of the initial zonal jet is chosen so that the disturbance grows very slowly, that is, linear growth rate less than 0.1 day?...

Steven B. Feldstein

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wave Activity Diagnostics Applied to Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave activity diagnostics are calculated for four different baroclinic wave life cycles, including the LC1 and LC2 cases studied by Thorncroft, Hoskins, and McIntyre. The wave activity is a measure of the disturbance relative to some zonally ...

Gudrun Magnusdottir; Peter H. Haynes

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Life Cycle Variations of Mesoscale Convective Systems over the Americas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using GOES-7 ISCCP-B3 satellite data for 1987–88, the authors studied the evolution of the morphological and radiative properties of clouds over the life cycles of deep convective systems (CS) over the Americas at both tropical and middle ...

L. A. T. Machado; W. B. Rossow; R. L. Guedes; A. W. Walker

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Life-cycle cost analysis project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to demonstrate the impact of life-cycle costing in Ohio's residential building sector. Typical single-family, townhouse, and multifamily housing units were modeled using sophisticated computer programs to predict annual energy comsumption. Energy conservation techniques were applied to the typical units and the resulting utility savings were computed. Installed costs were estimated for each energy conservation technique.

Davies, G.R.; Temming, S.J.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modelling life cycle and population dynamics of Nostocales (cyanobacteria)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyanobacteria of the order Nostocales found in lakes in temperate regions are generally assumed to benefit from climate change. To predict their future development under varying environmental conditions, we developed a mathematical model that simulates ... Keywords: Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, Hasse diagram, Life cycle, Nostocales, Population dynamics, Shallow lake

K. D. Jöhnk; R. Brüggemann; J. Rücker; B. Luther; U. Simon; B. Nixdorf; C. Wiedner

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for Environmentally Adapted Metalworking to significantly influence the environmental burdens of all fluids, energy consumption was relatively constant and consumed without long-distance transportation. MWF Production Each MWF is composed of lubricant oil

Clarens, Andres

136

Impact of the 3Cs of Batteries on PHEV Value Proposition: Cost, Calendar Life, and Cycle Life (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery cost, calendar life, and cycle life are three important challenges for those commercializing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; battery life is sensitive to temperature and solar loading.

Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.; Markel, T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Novel electrolyte additives to enhance zinc electrode cycle life  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical power sources that utilize zinc electrodes possess many advantages. Zinc is abundantly available, benign, inexpensive, stable over a wide operating temperature range, and has a high oxidation potential. In spite of these advantageous characteristics, rechargeable electrochemical systems based on zinc chemistry have not found widespread use. The major disadvantages of zinc electrodes are that they have limited cycle life due to zinc slumping and zinc electrode shape changes in alkaline solutions resulting from the solubility of zincate (Zn(OH){sub 4}{sup 2-}) in these solutions. As a result, premature cell failure often results due to cell shorting caused by dendritic growth as well as zinc slumping. In this paper we describe the chemical and physical characteristics of electrolyte solutions employing additives, particularly for zinc based electrochemical systems. These electrolytes are prepared using the alkali metal salts of 1,3,5-phenyltrisulfonic acid in combination with potassium hydroxide. The alkali metal salts of the acid possess good thermal stability, good ionic conductivity, and have a wide electrochemical voltage window in aqueous systems. With these electrolyte solutions improved cycle life was achieved in Zn/NiOOH and Zn/AgO. Improved cycle life with this additive is attributed to decreased zincate solubility, resulting in reduced zinc slumping and electrode shape changes. In addition, increased shelf-life and reduced self-discharge were also observed in many alkaline power sources.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Velocity of Money in a Life-Cycle Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The determinants of the velocity of money have been examined based on life-cycle hypothesis. The velocity of money can be expressed by reciprocal of the average value of holding time which is defined as interval between participating exchanges for one unit of money. This expression indicates that the velocity is governed by behavior patterns of economic agents and open a way to constructing micro-foundation of it. It is found that time pattern of income and expense for a representative individual can be obtained from a simple version of life-cycle model, and average holding time of money resulted from the individual's optimal choice depends on the expected length of relevant planning periods.

Wang, Y; Wang, Yougui; Qiu, Hanqing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Eric Masanet, 1 Yuan Chang, 1 Anand R. Gopal, 2 Peter Larsen, 2,3 William R. Morrow III, 2 Roger Sathre, 2 Arman Shehabi, 2 and Pei Zhai 2 1 McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208; email: eric.masanet@northwestern.edu, yuan.chang@northwestern.edu 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720; email: argopal@lbl.gov, wrmorrow@lbl.gov, rsathre@lbl.gov, ashehabi@lbl.gov, pzhai@lbl.gov 3 Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; email: phlarsen@lbl.gov Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 2013. 38:107-36 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 7, 2013 The Annual Review of Environment and Resources is online at http://environ.annualreviews.org

140

Frostbite Theater - Monarch Butterflies - Life Cycle of the Monarch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measure the Diameter of the Sun! Measure the Diameter of the Sun! Previous Video (Let's Measure the Diameter of the Sun!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Monarch Butterfly Pupation) Monarch Butterfly Pupation Life Cycle of the Monarch Butterfly Follow the life cycle of the Monarch butterfly from egg to adult! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a field that used to house a bunch of ugly trailers that were used for office space. A couple of years ago the Lab tore them down and in an effort to cut the cost of lawn maintanence, they planted a bunch of wild flowers in their place. Steve: Last year Joanna and I planted this plant. This is milkweed. It's a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Metracker version 1.5: Life-cycle performance metricstracking  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage, nor even as measured during commissioning and maintenance operations. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. A key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended and actual performance of a building. This deficiency leads to several shortcomings in the life-cycle management of building information. Planners have no means of clearly specifying their expectations. Designers do not concisely document their design intent. Commissioning personnel have no standardized method for documenting the results of performance testing. Post-occupancy building performance cannot readily be compared to expectations in an attempt to evaluate and improve design and operation decisions. Lastly, without quantification of the magnitude of performance problems it is difficult to motivate building process participants to alter their current practice. This document describes an information management concept and a prototype tool based on this concept that has been developed to address this situation. The Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) has been designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. Metracker is a prototype implementation of BLISS based on the International Alliance for Interoperability's (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). The IFC is an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations (IAI, 2001). Metracker has been developed to demonstrate and explore the process of tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle.

Hitchcock, Robert J.

2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Life Cycle Assessment of Amonix 7700 HCPV Systems  

SciTech Connect

We estimated the energy payback time (EPBT) and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the life cycle of the Amonix high-concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) system with III-V solar cells. For a location in the southwest United States, the Amonix 7700 has an EPBT of only 0.86 yrs and GHG emissions of 24g CO{sub 2}-eq./kWh we expect further decreases in both by 2011.

Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher first costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches.

144

Design study of long-life PWR using thorium cycle  

SciTech Connect

Design study of long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle has been performed. Thorium cycle in general has higher conversion ratio in the thermal spectrum domain than uranium cycle. Cell calculation, Burn-up and multigroup diffusion calculation was performed by PIJ-CITATION-SRAC code using libraries based on JENDL 3.2. The neutronic analysis result of infinite cell calculation shows that {sup 231}Pa better than {sup 237}Np as burnable poisons in thorium fuel system. Thorium oxide system with 8%{sup 233}U enrichment and 7.6{approx} 8%{sup 231}Pa is the most suitable fuel for small-long life PWR core because it gives reactivity swing less than 1%{Delta}k/k and longer burn up period (more than 20 year). By using this result, small long-life PWR core can be designed for long time operation with reduced excess reactivity as low as 0.53%{Delta}k/k and reduced power peaking during its operation.

Subkhi, Moh. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul [Physics.Dept., Bandung Institute of Technology.Ganesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Life Cycle Assessment goes to Washington : lessons from a new regulatory design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a quantitative tool that measures the bundled impact of an individual product over its entire life cycle, from "cradle-to-grave." LCA has been developed over many decades to improve industry's ...

Edwards, Jennifer Lynn, M. C. P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Inertia–Gravity Waves Spontaneously Generated by Jets and Fronts. Part I: Different Baroclinic Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spontaneous generation of inertia–gravity waves in idealized life cycles of baroclinic instability is investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. Two substantially different life cycles of baroclinic instability are ...

Riwal Plougonven; Chris Snyder

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Two Types of Baroclinic Life Cycles during the Southern Hemisphere Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic eddy life cycles of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) summer are investigated with NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data. A composite analysis is performed for the years 1980 through 2004. Individual life cycles are identified by local maxima in ...

Woosok Moon; Steven B. Feldstein

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Life cycle assessment of materials and construction in commercial structures : variability and limitations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment has become an important tool for determining the environmental impact of materials and products. It is also useful in analyzing the impact a structure has over the course of its life cycle. The ...

Hsu, Sophia Lisbeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmenta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and...

151

Life Cycle Assessments Confirm the Need for Hydropower and Nuclear Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of life cycle assessments to confirm the need for hydropower and nuclear energy.

Gagnon, L.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Background and Reflections on the Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the ever-growing body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature on electricity generation technologies, inconsistent methods and assumptions hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Synthesis of the body of previous research is necessary to generate robust results to assess and compare environmental performance of different energy technologies for the benefit of policy makers, managers, investors, and citizens. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory initiated the LCA Harmonization Project in an effort to rigorously leverage the numerous individual studies to develop collective insights. The goals of this project were to: (1) understand the range of published results of LCAs of electricity generation technologies, (2) reduce the variability in published results that stem from inconsistent methods and assumptions, and (3) clarify the central tendency of published estimates to make the collective results of LCAs available to decision makers in the near term. The LCA Harmonization Project's initial focus was evaluating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity generation technologies. Six articles from this first phase of the project are presented in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology on Meta-Analysis of LCA: coal (Whitaker et al. 2012), concentrating solar power (Burkhardt et al. 2012), crystalline silicon photovoltaics (PVs) (Hsu et al. 2012), thin-film PVs (Kim et al. 2012), nuclear (Warner and Heath 2012), and wind (Dolan and Heath 2012). Harmonization is a meta-analytical approach that addresses inconsistency in methods and assumptions of previously published life cycle impact estimates. It has been applied in a rigorous manner to estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from many categories of electricity generation technologies in articles that appear in this special supplemental supplemental issue, reducing the variability and clarifying the central tendency of those estimates in ways useful for decision makers and analysts. Each article took a slightly different approach, demonstrating the flexibility of the harmonization approach. Each article also discusses limitations of the current research, and the state of knowledge and of harmonization, pointing toward a path of extending and improving the meta-analysis of LCAs.

Heath, G. A.; Mann, M. K.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

End-of-life flows of multiple cycle consumer products  

SciTech Connect

Explicit expressions for the end-of-life flows (EOL) of single and multiple cycle products (MCPs) are presented, including deterministic and stochastic EOL exit. The expressions are given in terms of the physical parameters (maximum lifetime, T, annual cycling frequency, f, number of cycles, N, and early discard or usage loss). EOL flows are also obtained for hi-tech products, which are rapidly renewed and thus may not attain steady state (e.g. electronic products, passenger cars). A ten-step recursive procedure for obtaining the dynamic EOL flow evolution is proposed. Applications of the EOL expressions and the ten-step procedure are given for electric household appliances, industrial machinery, tyres, vehicles and buildings, both for deterministic and stochastic EOL exit, (normal, Weibull and uniform exit distributions). The effect of the physical parameters and the stochastic characteristics on the EOL flow is investigated in the examples: it is shown that the EOL flow profile is determined primarily by the early discard dynamics; it also depends strongly on longevity and cycling frequency: higher lifetime or early discard/loss imply lower dynamic and steady state EOL flows. The stochastic exit shapes the overall EOL dynamic profile: Under symmetric EOL exit distribution, as the variance of the distribution increases (uniform to normal to deterministic) the initial EOL flow rise becomes steeper but the steady state or maximum EOL flow level is lower. The steepest EOL flow profile, featuring the highest steady state or maximum level, as well, corresponds to skew, earlier shifted EOL exit (e.g. Weibull). Since the EOL flow of returned products consists the sink of the reuse/remanufacturing cycle (sink to recycle) the results may be used in closed loop product lifecycle management operations for scheduling and sizing reverse manufacturing and for planning recycle logistics. Decoupling and quantification of both the full age EOL and of the early discard flows is useful, the latter being the target of enacted legislation aiming at increasing reuse.

Tsiliyannis, C.A., E-mail: anion@otenet.gr [ANION Environmental Ltd., 26 Lykoudi Str., Athens, GR 11141 (Greece)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative.

Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Wongsuchoto, Porntip [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: prasert.p@chula.ac.th

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy life cycle cost analysis: Guidelines for public agencies  

SciTech Connect

The State of Washington encourages energy-efficient building designs for public agencies. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) supports this goal by identifying advances in building technology and sharing this information with the design community and public administrators responsible for major construction projects. Many proven technologies can reduce operating costs-and save energy-to an extent that justifies some increases in construction costs. WSEO prepared these Energy Life Cycle Cost Analysis (ELCCA) guidelines for the individuals who are responsible for preparing ELCCA submittals for public buildings. Key terms and abbreviations are provided in Appendix A. Chapters 1 and 2 serve as an overview-providing background, defining energy life cycle cost analysis, explaining which agencies and projects are affected by the ELCCA requirements, and identifying changes to the guidelines that have been made since 1990. They explain {open_quotes}what needs to happen{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}why it needs to happen.{close_quotes} Chapters 3 to 7 provide the {open_quotes}how to,{close_quotes} the instructions and forms needed to prepare ELCCA submittals.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

LIFE vs. LWR: End of the Fuel Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide energy consumption in 2003 was 421 quadrillion Btu (Quads), and included 162 quads for oil, 99 quads for natural gas, 100 quads for coal, 27 quads for nuclear energy, and 33 quads for renewable sources. The projected worldwide energy consumption for 2030 is 722 quads, corresponding to an increase of 71% over the consumption in 2003. The projected consumption for 2030 includes 239 quads for oil, 190 quads for natural gas, 196 quads for coal, 35 quads for nuclear energy, and 62 quads for renewable sources [International Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0484, Table D1 (2006) p. 133]. The current fleet of light water reactors (LRWs) provides about 20% of current U.S. electricity, and about 16% of current world electricity. The demand for electricity is expected to grow steeply in this century, as the developing world increases its standard of living. With the increasing price for oil and gasoline within the United States, as well as fear that our CO2 production may be driving intolerable global warming, there is growing pressure to move away from oil, natural gas, and coal towards nuclear energy. Although there is a clear need for nuclear energy, issues facing waste disposal have not been adequately dealt with, either domestically or internationally. Better technological approaches, with better public acceptance, are needed. Nuclear power has been criticized on both safety and waste disposal bases. The safety issues are based on the potential for plant damage and environmental effects due to either nuclear criticality excursions or loss of cooling. Redundant safety systems are used to reduce the probability and consequences of these risks for LWRs. LIFE engines are inherently subcritical, reducing the need for systems to control the fission reactivity. LIFE engines also have a fuel type that tolerates much higher temperatures than LWR fuel, and has two safety systems to remove decay heat in the event of loss of coolant or loss of coolant flow. These features of LIFE are expected to result in a more straightforward licensing process and are also expected to improve the public perception of risk from nuclear power generation, transportation of nuclear materials, and nuclear waste disposal. Waste disposal is an ongoing issue for LWRs. The conventional (once-through) LWR fuel cycle treats unburned fuel as waste, and results in the current fleet of LWRs producing about twice as much waste in their 60 years of operation as is legally permitted to be disposed of in Yucca Mountain. Advanced LWR fuel cycles would recycle the unused fuel, such that each GWe-yr of electricity generation would produce only a small waste volume compared to the conventional fuel cycle. However, the advanced LWR fuel cycle requires chemical reprocessing plants for the fuel, multiple handling of radioactive materials, and an extensive transportation network for the fuel and waste. In contrast, the LIFE engine requires only one fueling for the plant lifetime, has no chemical reprocessing, and has a single shipment of a small amount of waste per GWe-yr of electricity generation. Public perception of the nuclear option will be improved by the reduction, for LIFE engines, of the number of shipments of radioactive material per GWe-yr and the need to build multiple repositories. In addition, LIFE fuel requires neither enrichment nor reprocessing, eliminating the two most significant pathways to proliferation from commercial nuclear fuel to weapons programs.

Farmer, J C; Blink, J A; Shaw, H F

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

159

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model [1] NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model This model calculates the 2005 national average life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for petroleum-based fuels sold or distributed in the United

162

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricit...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 -...

163

The estimation and management of cost over the life cycle of metallurgical research projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study is to determine whether all costs over the life cycle of metallurgical research projects are included in the initial… (more)

Odendaal, Maria Magdalena

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Life Cycle Assessment of a Pilot Scale Farm-Based Biodiesel Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study used environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate waste vegetable oil (WVO) biodiesel production at the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus, Centre for… (more)

Wasserman, Eli Shawn Jordan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Title Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Publication Type...

167

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Life?Cycle  Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches.  EEA 2006] Emission Inventory Guidebook; Activities 080501?I: National Lighting Inventory and  Energy Consumption 

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle Analysis Electric Vehicles and the Environment...

169

Life Cycle Analysis Study of the Hennings Building at the University of British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Life Cycle Analysis Study of the Hennings Building at the University of British Columbia #12 .................................................................................................................9 Building Model............................................................................................................................19 Rockwool Insulation

170

Optimal savings and health spending over the life cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

has gradually contributed to the increase in human life span. In 1840, life expectancy ... show that higher longevity promotes human capital .... the standard error.

171

A semantic approach to life cycle assessment applied on energy environmental impact data management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment of goods and services is nowadays a major challenge for both economic and ethical reasons. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. One stage ... Keywords: energy impact data management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Vasile-Marian Scuturici; Emmanuel Risler; Jean-Marie Pinon

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Key Role of Lower-Level Meridional Shear in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of idealized nonlinear life cycle experiments is performed to compare changes in life cycle behavior caused by upper-level and near-surface meridional shear of the initial zonal wind. It is shown that both the eddy kinetic energy and the ...

Dennis L. Hartmann

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Life Cycle of Numerically Simulated Shallow Cumulus Clouds. Part I: Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first in a two-part series in which the life cycles of numerically simulated shallow cumulus clouds are systematically examined. The life cycle data for six clouds with a range of cloud-top heights are isolated from an ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Life Cycle Management Sourcebooks — Volume 9: Main Turbine Electro-Hydraulic Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each compiling industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for main turbine electro-hydraulic control (EHC) and overspeed protection systems.

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

Measuring testing as a distributed component of the software life cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study software testing as a distributed component of the software life cycle, developing a technique for estimating testing validity. The goal of this paper is to build measures for testing result estimation, to find how tested properties influence ... Keywords: Software quality, diagnostics, estimation, software life cycle, testing, validation

M. Burgin; N. Debnath; H. K. Lee

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Experiences with early life-cycle performance modeling for architecture assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe our preliminary experiences of a performance modeling "Blending" approach for early life-cycle architecture assessment and risk mitigation in a large enterprise integration project. The goal was to use performance modeling to ... Keywords: blended performance modeling, early life-cycle risk mitigation

Paul C. Brebner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Integrating fuzzy multicriteria analysis and uncertainty evaluation in life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interpretation phase of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies is often hampered by the number and the heterogeneity of impact assessment results as well as by the uncertainties arising from data, models and practitioner's choices. While decision-aiding ... Keywords: Electricity, Fuzzy sets, LCA, Life cycle assessment, Multicriteria analysis, NAIADE, Noise

Enrico Benetto; Christiane Dujet; Patrick Rousseaux

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Short communication: Application of symmetric fuzzy linear programming in life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is known to entail multiple objective decision-making in the analysis of tradeoffs between different environmental impacts. The work of Azapagic and Clift in the late 1990s illustrates the use of multiple objective linear ... Keywords: Fuzzy linear programming, Life cycle assessment

Raymond R. Tan

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Asset Health Workshop Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the initial findings and expectations from member asset managers with regard to asset health. Principal objectives were expressed at an asset health workshop hosted by BC Hydro July 7th, 2007. Participants shared experiences in asset health and aligned on an approach to capture and use asset health information. Asset health will be a key component of EPRI's asset and risk management program. The notes of the meeting will be utilized as a starting point for framing out the asset hea...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a t echnoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet One barrier to the full support and deployment of alternative energy systems and the development of a sustainable energy policy is the lack of robust conclusions about the life cycle environmental impacts of energy technologies. A significant number of life cycle assessments (LCA) of energy technologies have been published, far greater than many are aware. However, there is a view held by many decision-makers that the state of the science in LCA of energy technologies is inconclusive because of perceived and real variability and uncertainty in published estimates of life cycle

184

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

185

Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Avery, K.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

187

Enabling Sustainability through Life Cycle Management, LCA and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... While installed PV systems are generating emission free electricity, it is also important that the production and end-of-life recycling of solar cells ...

188

LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis. #12;LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break,812 Maintenance Cost $620 $0 $97 $0 Life Cycle Cost $1,787 $1,693 $2,980 $2,980 #12;LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC

Hofmann, Hans A.

189

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Water Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of Administration Several provisions of Missouri law govern energy efficiency in state facilities. In 1993 Missouri enacted legislation requiring life-cycle cost analysis for all new construction of state buildings and substantial

190

Interannual Seesaw between the Aleutian and Icelandic Lows. Part I: Seasonal Dependence and Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal dependence and life cycle of the well-known interannual seesawlike oscillation between the intensities of the surface Aleutian and Icelandic lows (AL and IL, respectively) are investigated, based on the National Meteorological Center ...

Meiji Honda; Hisashi Nakamura; Jinro Ukita; Izumi Kousaka; Kensuke Takeuchi

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Life Cycle of Baroclinic Eddies in a Storm Track Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of baroclinic eddies in a controlled storm track environment has been examined by means of long model integrations on a hemisphere. A time-lagged regression that captures disturbances with large meridional velocities has been ...

Isidoro Orlanski; Brian Gross

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

193

The development of a life cycle cost model for railroad tunnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, Life Cycle Costing is one of the most popular ways of assessing a project's or an investment's worth to a company. This method of assessment is often applied to all stages of a investment's lifecycle, starting from ...

Angeles, Jon Virgil V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Overhead Transmission Lines (LCCA) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LCCA software is a tool to assist transmission line designers in selecting the optimized design for an overhead line by comparing the life-cycle cost of various design options. Windows2000, XP, and Vista Excel 2003 and 2007

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Composite Life Cycle of Maritime Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems in Scatterometer and Microwave Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines scatterometer-observed surface wind divergence and vorticity, along with precipitable water (PW), across the life cycle of tropical maritime mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) as resolved in 0.5° data. Simple composites were ...

Brian Mapes; Ralph Milliff; Jan Morzel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Methods for managing uncertainly in material selection decisions : robustness of early stage life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing alternative materials is an important tactic to improve the environmental performance of products. Currently a growing array of materials candidates confronts today's product designer. While life-cycle assessment ...

Nicholson, Anna L. (Anna Louise)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

144 Figure 63: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Life-Cycle157 Figure 64: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Water68 Table 14: Hydroelectricity-Related FWSE (Data Source: (

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Prediction of the Life Cycle of a Supertyphoon with a High-Resolution Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Supertyphoon Hope (1979) from a tropical depression stage to intensification and its eventual weakening after land-fall, some 6 days later, is followed in a real-data numerical prediction experiment. The predictions are carried ...

T. N. Krishnamurti; D. Oosterhof

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Life Cycle of Thunderstorm Gust Fronts as Viewed with Doppler Radar and Rawinsonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the time-dependent analysis of the thunderstorm gust front with the use of Project NIMROD data. RHI cross sections of reflectivity and Doppler velocity are constructed to determine the entire vertical structure. The life cycle ...

Roger M. Wakimoto

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Life Cycle of a Simulated Marine Cyclone: Energetics and PV Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of an intense marine cyclone is documented in this paper. The departure of the moist dynamics from the dry baroclinic dynamics is explored from an energetics point of view. The contributions of various physical processes through ...

G. Balasubramanian; M. K. Yau

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Life Cycle of Northern Hemisphere Downward Wave Coupling between the Stratosphere and Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Northern Hemisphere downward wave coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere via wave reflection is analyzed. Downward wave coupling events are defined by extreme negative values of a wave coupling index based on the ...

Tiffany A. Shaw; Judith Perlwitz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Effect of Storm Life Cycle on Satellite Rainfall Estimation Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study uses storm tracking information to evaluate error statistics of satellite rain estimation at different maturity stages of storm life cycles. Two satellite rain retrieval products are used for this purpose: (i) NASA’s Multisatellite ...

Alemu Tadesse; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Response of Idealized Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles to Stratospheric Flow Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamical stratosphere–troposphere coupling through a response of baroclinic waves to lower stratospheric flow conditions is investigated from an initial value approach. A series of adiabatic and frictionless nonlinear baroclinic wave life cycles ...

Torben Kunz; Klaus Fraedrich; Frank Lunkeit

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Life Cycle and Internal Structure of a Mesoscale Convective Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the life cycle and precipitation structure of a Mesoscale Convective Complex (MCC) that passed through the data-collecting network of the Texas portion of the High Plains Cooperative Program (HIPLEX) on 8 June 1980. The MCC ...

Colleen A. Leary; Edward N. Rappaport

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Local Energetics Analysis of the Life Cycle Differences between Consecutive, Explosively Deepening, Continental Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local energetics diagnostics of the life cycles of consecutive, explosively deepening, extratropical cyclones that migrated across central North America in April 2001 are presented. Both storms developed rapidly and followed nearly identical ...

Steven G. Decker; Jonathan E. Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Finite-Amplitude Lagrangian-Mean Wave Activity Diagnostics Applied to the Baroclinic Eddy Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian-mean wave activity diagnostics are applied to the nonlinear baroclinic eddy life cycle in a simple general circulation model of the atmosphere. The growth of these instabilities through baroclinic conversion of potential temperature ...

Abraham Solomon; Gang Chen; Jian Lu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

209

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................................................20 3 Transportation biofuels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alternative 2. Federal Life-Cycle Cost Criteria (a) Discount rate (b) DOE energy price escalation rates (c) Use of constant dollars (d) Study period (e) Presumption of cost...

211

Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative...

212

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S....

213

Comparison of life cycle impact assessment tools in the case of biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) tools exist, each with different methodologies. These tools often provide different results, thus making it difficult for the LCA practitioner to determine which results yield the best or most likely estimate ...

Amy E. Landis; Thomas L. Theis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing life-cycle cost analyses of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects in federal facilities.

215

Life Cycles of Persistent Anomalies. Part I: Evolution of 500 mb Height Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have conducted observational analysts to identify systematic aspects of the life cycles of persistent anomalies of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation. In the present study, we focus on the typical characteristics of ...

Randall M. Dole

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Deducing Anomalous Wave Source Regions during the Life Cycles of Persistent Flow Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalous wave source regions are identified during the life cycles of persistent flow anomalies occurring over the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans during boreal winter. These cases project strongly upon the Pacific–North American and ...

Robert X. Black

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Enabling streamlined life cycle assessment : materials-classification derived structured underspecification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As environmental footprint considerations for companies gain greater importance, the need for quantitative impact assessment tools such as life cycle assessment (LCA) has become a higher priority. Currently, the cost and ...

Rampuria, Abhishek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

System strategies in the management of transit systems towards the end of their life cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores and evaluates essential strategies needed for the transit authority/operator to deal with end of life cycle challenges of Rapid Transit Systems (RTS) systems. RTS systems are elaborate systems consisting ...

Kairon, Ajmer Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluation of probabilistic underspecification as a method for incorporating uncertainty into comparative life cycle assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle assessments are quickly becoming a crucial method through which the environmental impacts of products or processes are evaluated. A concern with current practice, however, is that the use of deterministic values ...

Wildnauer, Margaret T. (Margaret Thea)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D....

222

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 (Rev. 510) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special...

223

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle analysis study of solar pv systems: an example ofa 2.7 kwp distributed solar pv system in singapore. Solarcycle analysis of solar pv based electricity generation: a

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Literature Review and Sensitivity Analysis of Biopower Life-Cycle Assessments and Greenhouse Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolios for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower’s life-cycle GHG emissions has been published.Phase A of this project performed an exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielding 117 references that ...

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Impacts of the Manufacturing and Recycling Stages on Battery Life Cycles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPACTS OF THE MANUFACTURING AND RECYCLING STAGES ON BATTERY IMPACTS OF THE MANUFACTURING AND RECYCLING STAGES ON BATTERY LIFE CYCLES J. B. Dunn 1 , L. Gaines 1 , M. Barnes 2 , and J.L. Sullivan 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 362 Argonne, IL 60439-4815, USA 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering The Pennsylvania State University 157E Hammond Building University Park, PA 16802 Keywords: battery, materials, manufacturing, life cycle, recycling Abstract

227

Plant Engineering: Users Guide for the Development of Life Cycle Management Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides direction for the user in the development, implementation, and maintenance of life cycle management plans (LCMPs).  The guide includes an appendix containing a template that users can employ in the development of their plant-specific LCMPs.BackgroundEPRI report TR-106109, Nuclear Plant Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide, was issued in November 1998. Since the publication of that report, the industry has gained much ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Survey of life-cycle measures and metrics for concurrent product and process design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concurrent Engineering needs a series of measures (or measurement criteria) that are distinct to each process, and a set of metrics to check (and validate) the outcome when two or more of the life-cycle processes are overlapped or required to be executed ... Keywords: Concurrent Engineering, Knowledge-based Systems, Life-cycle Measures and Metrics, Rule-based Optimization, Rule-based Simulation

Biren Prasad

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

State of the Science of Biopower Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolio for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower's life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has been published. An exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielded 117 references that passed quality and relevance screening criteria. ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge design should take into account not only safety and functionality, but also the cost effectiveness of investments throughout a bridge life-cycle. This work presents a probabilistic approach to compute the life-cycle cost (LCC) of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue analysis. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is computed based on Fick’s second law of diffusion. The proposed methodology accounts for the uncertainties in the ground motion parameters, the distance from source, the seismic demand on the bridge, and the corrosion initiation time. The statistics of the accumulated damage and the cost of repairs throughout the bridge life-cycle are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation. As an illustration of the proposed approach, the effect of design parameters on the life-cycle cost of an example RC bridge is studied. The results are shown to be valuable in better estimating the condition of existing bridges (i.e., total accumulated damage at any given time) and, therefore, can help schedule inspection and maintenance programs. In addition, by taking into consideration the deterioration process over a bridge life-cycle, it is possible to make an estimate of the optimum design parameters by minimizing, for example, the expected cost throughout the life of the structure.

Kumar, Ramesh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Exploring decisions' influence on life-cycle performance to aid “design for Multi-X”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem addressed in this paper is that design decisions can have a propagation effect spanning multiple life-phases influencing life-cycle metrics such as cost, time, and quality. It introduces a computational framework of a “Knowledge of ... Keywords: Concurrent Synthesis, DFX, KICAD, Knowledge Modelling, Providence

Jonathan C. Borg; Xiu-Tian Yan; Neal P. Juster

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Petroleum and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,eutrophicationimpactsaremuchgreaterduetonon- point nutrient emissions. Fundamental tradeoffs in the carbon and nitrogen cycles are addressed sector produces approximately two and a half billion gallons of vegetable oils annually, with 2). Recent chemical modifications improve the oxidative stability of vegetable oils, demonstrat- ing

Illinois at Chicago, University of

235

A long-life deep cycle, tubular lead-acid battery  

SciTech Connect

The lead-acid battery is used in a variety of applications to provide primary and stand-by power. Because the battery significantly impacts the system cost, it behooves the designer to select a battery having the minimum life-cycle cost. Tubular batteries generally enjoy a longer life than equivalent flat plate batteries. This is because the frequency and severity of the most prevalent modes of failure are much reduced. Since the specific capacity of a tubular battery is comparable to that of a flat plate battery, the use of a tubular battery can result in a reduced system life-cycle cost.

Eggers, M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Metrics-Based Feedback Cycles for Software Life-Cycle Management and Process Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a global organizational feedback cycle, composed of four component feedback cycles, by which the COCOMO II cost estimation model [Boehm et al., 2000] can be used for (1) project or product line scoping; (2) project or product line management; (3) model recalibration to changing circumstances; and (4) evaluation project, product line, or organizational continuous process improvement initiatives

Barry Boehm

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description In pursuit of the goal of reducing EGS costs, this project will facilitate the following: - A clear understanding of the current cost structure - Its dependence on markets - The benefits of innovation - The impact of synergistic process configurations, and - Widespread dissemination of the findings for use by the geothermal community

239

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

240

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - About the LCI Database Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the LCI Database Project About the LCI Database Project The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database is a publicly available database that allows users to objectively review and compare analysis results that are based on similar data collection and analysis methods. Finding consistent and transparent LCI data for life cycle assessments (LCAs) is difficult. NREL works with LCA experts to solve this problem by providing a central source of critically reviewed LCI data through its LCI Database Project. NREL's High-Performance Buildings research group is working closely with government stakeholders, and industry partners to develop and maintain the database. The 2009 U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Data Stakeholder meeting was an important step in the ongoing improvement of the database. Prior to that event, NREL conducted a poll of current and

242

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 (Rev. 5/10) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 May 2010 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

243

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2005 April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-26 (Rev. 9/11) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program September 2011 NISTIR 85-3273-26 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

244

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Life-cycle energy analyses of electric vehicle storage batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of several life-cycle energy analyses of prospective electric vehicle batteries are presented. The batteries analyzed were: Nickel-zinc; Lead-acid; Nickel-iron; Zinc-chlorine; Sodium-sulfur (glass electrolyte); Sodium-sulfur (ceramic electrolyte); Lithium-metal sulfide; and Aluminum-air. A life-cycle energy analysis consists of evaluating the energy use of all phases of the battery's life, including the energy to build it, operate it, and any credits that may result from recycling of the materials in it. The analysis is based on the determination of three major energy components in the battery life cycle: Investment energy, i.e., The energy used to produce raw materials and to manufacture the battery; operational energy i.e., The energy consumed by the battery during its operational life. In the case of an electric vehicle battery, this energy is the energy required (as delivered to the vehicle's charging circuit) to power the vehicle for 100,000 miles; and recycling credit, i.e., The energy that could be saved from the recycling of battery materials into new raw materials. The value of the life-cycle analysis approach is that it includes the various penalties and credits associated with battery production and recycling, which enables a more accurate determination of the system's ability to reduce the consumption of scarce fuels. The analysis of the life-cycle energy requirements consists of identifying the materials from which each battery is made, evaluating the energy needed to produce these materials, evaluating the operational energy requirements, and evaluating the amount of materials that could be recycled and the energy that would be saved through recycling. Detailed descriptions of battery component materials, the energy requirements for battery production, and credits for recycling, and the operational energy for an electric vehicle, and the procedures used to determine it are discussed.

Sullivan, D; Morse, T; Patel, P; Patel, S; Bondar, J; Taylor, L

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The effect of lighting system components on lighting quality, energy use, and life-cycle cost  

SciTech Connect

A computational method was developed to examine the effect of lamp, ballast, and fixture selection on the quality and quantity of illumination, energy consumption, and life-cycle cost of lighting systems. Applying this analysis to lighting layouts using different lamp/ballast/fixture combinations suggested that combinations with higher lumen outputs reduced the uniformity of the illuminance distribution at the workplace but did not reduce visibility levels. The use of higher lumen output lamp/ballast/fixture systems and higher efficiency components tended to reduce life-cycle costs as long as the premium cost of the components was not too high.

Rubinstein, F.; Clark, T.; Siminovitch, M.; Verderber, R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

TY JOUR T1 Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources A1 Eric R Masanet A1 Yuan Chang A1 Anand R Gopal A1 Peter H Larsen A1 William R Morrow A1 Roger Sathre A1 Arman Shehabi A1 Pei Zhai KW electricity KW energy policy KW environmental analysis KW life cycle impact KW life cycle inventory AB p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy

248

Comparison of Battery Life Across Real-World Automotive Drive-Cycles (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratories run around-the-clock aging tests to try to understand as quickly as possible how long new Li-ion battery designs will last under certain duty cycles. These tests may include factors such as duty cycles, climate, battery power profiles, and battery stress statistics. Such tests are generally accelerated and do not consider possible dwell time at high temperatures and states-of-charge. Battery life-predictive models provide guidance as to how long Li-ion batteries may last under real-world electric-drive vehicle applications. Worst-case aging scenarios are extracted from hundreds of real-world duty cycles developed from vehicle travel surveys. Vehicles examined included PHEV10 and PHEV40 EDVs under fixed (28 degrees C), limited cooling (forced ambient temperature), and aggressive cooling (20 degrees C chilled liquid) scenarios using either nightly charging or opportunity charging. The results show that battery life expectancy is 7.8 - 13.2 years for the PHEV10 using a nightly charge in Phoenix, AZ (hot climate), and that the 'aggressive' cooling scenario can extend battery life by 1-3 years, while the 'limited' cooling scenario shortens battery life by 1-2 years. Frequent (opportunity) charging can reduce battery life by 1 year for the PHEV10, while frequent charging can extend battery life by one-half year.

Smith, K.; Earleywine, M.; Wood, E.; Pesaran, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Asset Management Best Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has conducted a series of surveys on the status of the implementation of power delivery asset management and the maintenance of key substation components. The results will assist utilities in determining how to best adapt or adopt the principles of asset management in their organizations. This technical update presents the results of surveys covering organizational and technical aspects of asset management, including detailed questions on the management of pow...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

250

System dynamics based models for selecting HVAC systems for office buildings: a life cycle assessment from carbon emissions perspective.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study aims to explore the life cycle environmental impacts of typical heating ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems including variable air volume (VAV) system,… (more)

Chen, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of British Columbia wood pellet life cycle inventory and its utilization in the evaluation of domestic pellet applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An in-house life cycle inventory (LCI) database for British Columbia (BC) wood pellets is established. The LCI database is used to compare the performance of… (more)

Pa, Ann An

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Asset Revitalization Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementing the U.S. Department of Energy Asset Revitalization Initiative Sustainability * Efficiency * Community ( ARI ) ARI is a DOE-wide effort to advance the...

253

Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland, E-mail: Roland.Hischier@empa.ch; Hilty, Lorenz M.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Utility Activities for Nuclear Power Plant Life Cycle Management and License Renewal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to nuclear utilities on steps to take, industry activities undertaken, and products developed for life cycle management and license renewal (LCM/LR) activities. It provides information for establishing LCM/LR programs and may be useful to those underway.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium. Mainly due to the growing demand for lightweight and powerful batteries, lithium has become such a metal. While supplies of lithium have historically been mined from pegmatites, brine extraction from salars

256

Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering University of Maryland AC Autoclave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALCE® Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering CB Citizens Band CBGA Ceramic Ball Grid Array CCA Circuit Card Assembly CCD Charge Coupled Device CCGA Ceramic Column Grid Array CDM Charged Device Model Industry Association ELD Electroluminiscent Displays EMC Electromagnetic Compatibility EMC Encapsulated

Shapiro, Benjamin

257

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

System dynamics modelling of product carbon footprint life cycles for collaborative green supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governments, environmental groups and industry associations are reducing greenhouse gas emissions to insure environmental sustainability. Manufacturing plays an important role in economic development but is a main cause of global warming since production ... Keywords: economic input–output life cycle assessment, mass customisation, product carbon footprint, system dynamics

AmyJ. C. Trappey; CharlesV. Trappey; Chih-Tung Hsiao; JerryJ. R. Ou; Chin-Tsung Chang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING K. Smarsly1) strategies can enable wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators to precisely schedule maintenance behavior of wind turbines and to reduce (epistemic) uncertainty. Both the resistance parameters

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A generalized multistage optimization modeling framework for life cycle assessment-based integrated solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is an integral component of civil infrastructure and the global economy, and is a growing concern due to increases in population, urbanization, and economic development. In 2011, 1.3 billion metric tons of municipal solid ... Keywords: Decision support, Life cycle assessment, Multi-stage, Optimization, Solid waste

James W. Levis, Morton A. Barlaz, Joseph F. Decarolis, S. Ranji Ranjithan

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Proceedings of 2001 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and plant value. Results of applying life-cycle management (LCM) at four plants are summarized.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Security Evaluation for Software System with Vulnerability Life Cycle and User Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the definition of a security criterion and security assessment based on the criterion. More precisely, we present a stochastic model with a vulnerability life-cycle model and a user profile using continuous-time Markov chains. The ... Keywords: vulnerability, security evaluation, user profile

Hiroyuki Okamura; Masataka Tokuzane; Tadashi Dohi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Climatology of Cyclone Size Characteristics and Their Changes during the Cyclone Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatology of the atmospheric cyclone sizes and their change over the cyclone life cycle is analyzed on the basis of tracking 57 yr of NCEP–NCAR reanalysis sea level pressure data over the Northern Hemisphere. To quantify the atmospheric cyclone ...

Irina Rudeva; Sergey K. Gulev

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Simple Model for the Baroclinic Life Cycle of Meridionally Elongated Eddies in Uniform Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly simplified model for the wave–mean flow interaction in a baroclinic wave life cycle is derived from the quasigeostrophic two-layer system. The simplification is based on a sheared disturbance embedded in a zonal mean flow with uniform ...

Thomas Frisius

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hurricane Juan (2003). Part I: A Diagnostic and Compositing Life Cycle Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of the complex life cycle of Hurricane Juan (in 2003) is undertaken to elucidate the structures and forcings that prevailed over the period leading up to the hurricane’s landfall in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Despite the ...

Ron McTaggart-Cowan; Eyad H. Atallah; John R. Gyakum; Lance F. Bosart

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Life Cycle of Numerically Simulated Shallow Cumulus Clouds. Part II: Mixing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a two-part series in which life cycles of six numerically simulated shallow cumulus clouds are systematically examined. The six clouds, selected from a single realization of a large-eddy simulation, grow as a series of ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that makes great strides in clarifying inconsistent and conflicting GHG emission estimates in the published literature while providing more precise estimates of GHG emissions from utility-scale CSP systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital investment projects for federal facilities. It also provides energy price indices based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts from 2012 to 2042.

270

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Wolf Creek Generating Station: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corp. with an optimized LCM plan for the main generators and exciters at Wolf Creek Power Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Callaway Nuclear Plant: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides Ameren UE with an optimized LCM plan for the main generator and exciter at Callaway Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Surface Pressure and Precipitation Life Cycle Characteristics of PRE-STORM Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive observations of the May–June 1985 Oklahoma–Kansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (OK PRE-STORM) are used to examine the life cycle characteristics of 16 mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). The primary focus is on the ...

Scot M. Loehrer; Richard H. Johnson

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via natural gas steam reforming was performed to examine the net emissions of greenhouse gases as well as other major environmental consequences. LCA is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes.

Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE H.R. MACMILLAN BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The current insulation of the building was compared to improved insulation to meet the ResidentialLIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE H.R. MACMILLAN BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ivan Yip.R. MacMillan building at the University of British Columbia (UBC). This study, completed in conjunction

275

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at South Texas Project: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides an optimized LCM plan for the main generators and exciters at the South Texas Project Power Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Temperature effects on sealed lead acid batteries and charging techniques to prolong cycle life.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sealed lead acid cells are used in many projects in Sandia National Laboratories Department 2660 Telemetry and Instrumentation systems. The importance of these cells in battery packs for powering electronics to remotely conduct tests is significant. Since many tests are carried out in flight or launched, temperature is a major factor. It is also important that the battery packs are properly charged so that the test is completed before the pack cannot supply sufficient power. Department 2665 conducted research and studies to determine the effects of temperature on cycle time as well as charging techniques to maximize cycle life and cycle times on sealed lead acid cells. The studies proved that both temperature and charging techniques are very important for battery life to support successful field testing and expensive flight and launched tests. This report demonstrates the effects of temperature on cycle time for SLA cells as well as proper charging techniques to get the most life and cycle time out of SLA cells in battery packs.

Hutchinson, Ronda

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Design and life-cycle considerations for unconventional-reservoir wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of design and life-cycle considerations for certain unconventional-reservoir wells. An overview of unconventional-reservoir definitions is provided. Well design and life-cycle considerations are addressed from three aspects: upfront reservoir development, initial well completion, and well-life and long-term considerations. Upfront-reservoir-development issues discussed include well spacing, well orientation, reservoir stress orientations, and tubular metallurgy. Initial-well-completion issues include maximum treatment pressures and rates, treatment diversion, treatment staging, flowback and cleanup, and dewatering needs. Well-life and long-term discussions include liquid loading, corrosion, refracturing and associated fracture reorientation, and the cost of abandonment. These design considerations are evaluated with case studies for five unconventional-reservoir types: shale gas (Barnett shale), tight gas (Jonah feld), tight oil (Bakken play), coalbed methane (CBM) (San Juan basin), and tight heavy oil (Lost Hills field). In evaluating the life cycle and design of unconventional-reservoir wells, 'one size' does not fit all and valuable knowledge and a shortening of the learning curve can be achieved for new developments by studying similar, more-mature fields.

Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

279

Comparison of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Life Across Geographies and Drive-Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a laboratory environment, it is cost prohibitive to run automotive battery aging experiments across a wide range of possible ambient environment, drive cycle and charging scenarios. Since worst-case scenarios drive the conservative sizing of electric-drive vehicle batteries, it is useful to understand how and why those scenarios arise and what design or control actions might be taken to mitigate them. In an effort to explore this problem, this paper applies a semi-empirical life model of the graphite/nickel-cobalt-aluminum lithium-ion chemistry to investigate impacts of geographic environments under storage and simplified cycling conditions. The model is then applied to analyze complex cycling conditions, using battery charge/discharge profiles generated from simulations of PHEV10 and PHEV40 vehicles across 782 single-day driving cycles taken from Texas travel survey data.

Smith, K.; Warleywine, M.; Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Subject no.: 1.4 – Policies and Programmes LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT FOR WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Tech-wise A/S has conducted a life cycle assessment of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. A life cycle assessment (LCA), also known as a cradle to grave analysis, is an inventory of all environmental impact of a product, process or service within its complete lifecycle. An LCA includes a recovery of the resources used in the production through the utilisation to the dismantling and disposal of the product. As sample wind turbine a 2 MW offshore wind turbine placed at Horns Rev in the North Sea has been used, since this project is under development and Tech-wise A/S is the main consultant to this project. In this LCA assumptions have been made where there is information about certain materials. The assessment revealed- as expected- that the environmental impact is concentrated in the production and disposal phase. Mainly the use of normal and high-strength steel are contributors. This means that the main impact is found to come from the nacelle and the foundation. Keywords: Environmental Aspects, Off-shore, Materials, Life Cycle Assessment, EDIP-method The results of this LCA will be used to identify the most essential environmental impact in all life phases of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. This project is the first step in an examination of the possible improvement of the environmental performance of that particular wind turbine and was finalised in spring 2001. The plan is to finalise the next project by the end of 2001.

Henriette Hassing; Søren Varming

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Methodology of CO{sub 2} emission evaluation in the life cycle of office building facades  

SciTech Connect

The construction industry is one of the greatest sources of pollution because of the high level of energy consumption during its life cycle. In addition to using energy while constructing a building, several systems also use power while the building is operating, especially the air-conditioning system. Energy consumption for this system is related, among other issues, to external air temperature and the required internal temperature of the building. The facades are elements which present the highest level of ambient heat transfer from the outside to the inside of tall buildings. Thus, the type of facade has an influence on energy consumption during the building life cycle and, consequently, contributes to buildings' CO{sub 2} emissions, because these emissions are directly connected to energy consumption. Therefore, the aim is to help develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. The results, based on the parameters used in this study, show that facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle, followed by brick facades covered with compound aluminum panels or ACM (Aluminum Composite Material), facades using structural glazing and reflective glass and brick facades with plaster coating. On the other hand, the typology of facade that emits less CO{sub 2} is brickwork and mortar because its thermal barrier is better than structural glazing facade and materials used to produce this facade are better than brickwork and ACM. Finally, an uncertainty analysis was conducted to verify the accuracy of the results attained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This methodology is based in LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use an uncertainty analysis to verify the accuracy of the results attained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study three typologies of facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle.

Taborianski, Vanessa Montoro; Prado, Racine T.A., E-mail: racine.prado@poli.usp.br

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28

283

A Review of Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs ANL/ESD/10-7 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express

284

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-27 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27

285

LBNL-54244 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44 44 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Greg Rosenquist, Katie Coughlin, Larry Dale, James McMahon, Steve Meyers Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 March 2004 This work was supported by the Office of Building Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ii iii ABSTRACT This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results

286

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY ANALYSIS IN THE PRODUCTION OF METALS USED IN PHOTOVOLTAICS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material flows and emissions in all the stages of production of zinc, copper, aluminum, cadmium, indium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, and molybdenum were investigated. These metals are used selectively in the manufacture of solar cells, and emission and energy factors in their production are used in the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaics. Significant changes have occurred in the production and associated emissions for these metals over the last 10 years, which are not described in the LCA databases. Furthermore, emission and energy factors for several of the by-products of the base metal production were lacking. This report aims in updating the life-cycle inventories associated with the production of the base metals (Zn, Cu, Al, Mo) and in defining the emission and energy allocations for the minor metals (Cd, In, Ge, Se, Te and Ga) used in photovoltaics.

FTHENAKIS,V.M.; KIM, H.C.; WANG, W.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate life-cycle cost for a standard (2 in. {times} 2 in. {times} 1 in.) glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA filter in the complex is $4,753.

Moore, P.; Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gilbert, H. [Gilbert (Humphrey), McLean, VA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An Analysis of the Economic and Financial Life-Cycle Costs of Reverse-Osmosis Desalination in South Texas: A Case Study of the Southmost Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desalination provides a supply alternative for potable water for many communities, along with possible defenses against security threats potentially affecting clean water supplies. The economic and financial life-cycle costs associated with building and operating the Southmost desalination facility (near Brownsville, TX) in South Texas are investigated using the spreadsheet model DESAL ECONOMICS©. Primary data key to this analysis include actual initial construction costs, annual continued costs (i.e., for source-water acquisition and transport, pretreatment, purification, and delivery), capital replacement expenses, and desalination-process parameters. The input data used reflect the unique location and quality of source water, process-flow design, asset selection and configuration, management structure, local cost rates, and employed operational methods unique to the Southmost facility. Thus, the specific results are only applicable to the Southmost facility for a specific time, but do provide useful information and insight into life-cycle costs for public and commercial desalination facilities in a more general sense. Annuity equivalent costs are reported (on both a $/acre-foot (ac-ft) and $/1,000 gallons of finished water basis, f.o.b. (free on board) municipal delivery point) for seven individual operational/expense areas, as well as for the entire desalination facility. Results are also presented across different cost types, categories, and items. The baseline results are deterministic, but are expanded to include sensitivity analyses of useful life, initial construction costs, annual energy costs, and production efficiency rate, amongst others. The current estimated total annual life-cycle costs (in 2006 dollars) to produce and deliver desalinated water to a point in the municipal delivery-system infrastructure for the Southmost facility are $769.62/ac-ft {$2.3619/1,000 gal.}. These baseline estimates apply to the Southmost facility and are sensitive to changes in the production efficiency level, and costs incurred for energy, chemicals, initial construction, etc. Also, results indicate significant outlays, beyond those of Initial Construction, are involved with desalination. For the Southmost facility, when a commitment was made to build a facility for $26.2 million, an implicit commitment for another $39.1 million (basis 2006 dollars) was also made for Continued and Capital Replacement costs. Investigation into life-cycle costs during the design and planning stages of a desalination facility can assist with determining the least-cost asset configuration to adopt and operational methods to employ. Also included are modifications to certain key data-input parameters that provide ‘modified results’ which facilitate a more fair basis of comparing facilities and/or technologies. The modified results, which are considered appropriate to use when comparing to similarlycalculated values (for other facilities or technologies), are $615.01/ac-ft/yr {$1.8874/1,000 gal./yr} (basis 2006 dollars).

Sturdivant, A.; Rister, M.; Rogers, C.; Lacewell, R.; Norris, J.; Leal, J.; Garza, J.; Adams, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Westinghouse Full-Length Rod Control System - Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sourcebook provides the technical information necessary to develop a comprehensive plant-specific life cycle management plan for the Westinghouse solid-state full-length rod control system. The technical information includes operating experience, industry bench-marking performance survey results, recommended preventive and predictive maintenance, industry "good practices," obsolescence issues, and OEM component upgrades and design enhancements. The component upgrades/enhancements will improve the sy...

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Costs on Plant Life Cycle Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities implementing Life Cycle Management (LCM) Programs and facing run-relicense-retire decisions need to evaluate the financial cost/benefit of such decisions. Decommissioning costs are one element of these evaluations. This report includes a decommissioning cost estimate for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) that can be used as a reference source by nuclear utilities involved in LCM and license renewal (LR) decisions.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Life Cycle Management Value Planning Tool (LcmVALUE) Code, Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important aspect of equipment aging or life cycle management (LCM) planning is the comparison of the long term economics of alternative plans, all of which satisfy safety and reliability requirements. These economic evaluations must be performed on a net present value basis, and must include factors such as failure rates, value of lost production, consequential costs of potential regulatory sanctions and adverse public relations, and the costs of planned preventive maintenance (PM) and unplanned corre...

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Main Generator and Exciter Life Cycle Management Plans at STARS Nuclear Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This CD is a compilation of six optimum LCM plans for the main generators and exciters at the six STARS plants and also contains a generic LCM information "sourcebook" for generators.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cycle life testing of lithium-ion batteries for small satellite LEO space missions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, Sony corporation announced their intention to manufacture a rechargeable lithium ion battery, based on the intercalation of lithium ions into a carbonaceous anode. The cells were first introduced for portable telephone use in June, 1991. (1) A 3.6V average cell voltage (4.1-2.75V range); (2) Excellent cycle life (1200 @ 100% DOD); (3) Good capacity retention (70% after 6 months); (4) Wide temperature range performance ({minus}20 to +60{degrees}C); (5) Excellent Discharge rate (82% capacity at 30 min. discharge rate); (6) Excellent Charge rate (100% Charge in <3 hrs); and (7) High energy density (264 W*hr/1 and 120 Whr/kg for ``D`` size cell. These specifications show significant promise for application of these batteries in low earth orbit (LEO) small satellites, particularly when compared to existing NiH{sub 2} and NiCd technology. The very high energy density and specific energy will reduce power system volume and weight. The wide temperature range enables simpler thermal design, particularly for new, small, high power satellites. The materials used in the lithium ion batteries are relatively inexpensive and benign, so that we expect costs to come down substantially in the future. The specified cycle life at 100% DOD is also 50% longer than most NiCds, so low DOD (depth of discharge) performance could be substantial. This study was undertaken to: (a) assess the feasibility for using lithium ion cells on small satellite LEO missions and (b) verify the claims of the manufacturer. This was accomplished by performing a detailed autopsy and various depth of discharge and rate tests on the cells. Of special interest was the cycle life performance of these cell at various depths of discharge DOD`s, to get an initial measure of the reduction in capacity fade with cycle conditions. Low DOD`s are used to extend the life of all batteries used in a space application.

Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Rating batteries for initial capacity, charging parameters and cycle life in the photovoltaic application  

SciTech Connect

Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) systems typically depend on battery storage to supply power to the load when there is cloudy weather or no sun. Reliable operation of the load is often dependent on battery performance. This paper presents test procedures for lead-acid batteries which identify initial battery preparation, battery capacity after preparation, charge regulation set-points, and cycle life based on the operational characteristics of PV systems.

Harrington, S.R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

An expandable software model for collaborative decision making during the whole building life cycle  

SciTech Connect

Decisions throughout the life cycle of a building, from design through construction and commissioning to operation and demolition, require the involvement of multiple interested parties (e.g., architects, engineers, owners, occupants and facility managers). The performance of alternative designs and courses of action must be assessed with respect to multiple performance criteria, such as comfort, aesthetics, energy, cost and environmental impact. Several stand-alone computer tools are currently available that address specific performance issues during various stages of a building's life cycle. Some of these tools support collaboration by providing means for synchronous and asynchronous communications, performance simulations, and monitoring of a variety of performance parameters involved in decisions about a building during building operation. However, these tools are not linked in any way, so significant work is required to maintain and distribute information to all parties. In this paper we describe a software model that provides the data management and process control required for collaborative decision making throughout a building's life cycle. The requirements for the model are delineated addressing data and process needs for decision making at different stages of a building's life cycle. The software model meets these requirements and allows addition of any number of processes and support databases over time. What makes the model infinitely expandable is that it is a very generic conceptualization (or abstraction) of processes as relations among data. The software model supports multiple concurrent users, and facilitates discussion and debate leading to decision making. The software allows users to define rules and functions for automating tasks and alerting all participants to issues that need attention. It supports management of simulated as well as real data and continuously generates information useful for improving performance prediction and understanding of the effects of proposed technologies and strategies.

Papamichael, K.; Pal, V.; Bourassa, N.; Loffeld, J.; Capeluto, G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Published scientific literature contains many studies estimating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of residential and utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PVs). Despite the volume of published work, variability in results hinders generalized conclusions. Most variance between studies can be attributed to differences in methods and assumptions. To clarify the published results for use in decision making and other analyses, we conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies, harmonizing key performance characteristics to produce more comparable and consistently derived results. Screening 397 life cycle assessments (LCAs) relevant to PVs yielded 13 studies on crystalline silicon (c-Si) that met minimum standards of quality, transparency, and relevance. Prior to harmonization, the median of 42 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from those 13 LCAs was 57 grams carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with an interquartile range (IQR) of 44 to 73. After harmonizing key performance characteristics, irradiation of 1,700 kilowatt-hours per square meter per year (kWh/m{sup 2}/yr); system lifetime of 30 years; module efficiency of 13.2% or 14.0%, depending on module type; and a performance ratio of 0.75 or 0.80, depending on installation, the median estimate decreased to 45 and the IQR tightened to 39 to 49. The median estimate and variability were reduced compared to published estimates mainly because of higher average assumptions for irradiation and system lifetime. For the sample of studies evaluated, harmonization effectively reduced variability, providing a clearer synopsis of the life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si PVs. The literature used in this harmonization neither covers all possible c-Si installations nor represents the distribution of deployed or manufactured c-Si PVs.

Hsu, D. D.; O'Donoughue, P.; Fthenakis, V.; Heath, G. A.; Kim, H. C.; Sawyer, P.; Choi, J. K.; Turney, D. E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a structured, comprehensive method of quantifying materialand energy-flows and their associated emissions in the life cycles of products (i.e., goods and services). The ISO 14040 and 14044 standards provide a framework for an LCA. However, this framework leaves the individual practitioner with a range of choices that can affect the validity and reliability of the results of such a study. The current IEA guidelines were developed to provide guidance on assuring consistency, balance, and quality to enhance the credibility and reliability of the results from photovoltaic (PV) LCAs. The guidelines represent a consensus among the authors, PV LCA experts in North America, Europe, and Asia, for assumptions made on PV performance, process input and emissions allocation, methods of analysis, and reporting of the results. Guidance is given on photovoltaic-specific parameters used as inputs in LCA and on choices and assumptions in life cycle inventory (LCI) data analysis and on implementation of modeling approaches. A consistent approach towards system modeling, the functional unit, the system boundaries and the allocation aspects enhances the credibility of PV LCA studies

Vasilis Fthenakis; Rolf Frischknecht; Marco Raugei; Hyung Chul Kim; Erik Alsema; Michael Held; Contributors Annick Anctil; Didier Beloin-saint-pierre; Karin Flury; Daniel Fraile; Masakazu Ito; Werner Pölz; Parikhit Sinha; Pieterjan Vanbuggenhout

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A review of battery life-cycle analysis : state of knowledge and critical needs.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature review and evaluation has been conducted on cradle-to-gate life-cycle inventory studies of lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, and lithium-ion battery technologies. Data were sought that represent the production of battery constituent materials and battery manufacture and assembly. Life-cycle production data for many battery materials are available and usable, though some need updating. For the remaining battery materials, lifecycle data either are nonexistent or, in some cases, in need of updating. Although battery manufacturing processes have occasionally been well described, detailed quantitative information on energy and material flows is missing. For all but the lithium-ion batteries, enough constituent material production energy data are available to approximate material production energies for the batteries, though improved input data for some materials are needed. Due to the potential benefit of battery recycling and a scarcity of associated data, there is a critical need for life-cycle data on battery material recycling. Either on a per kilogram or per watt-hour capacity basis, lead-acid batteries have the lowest production energy, carbon dioxide emissions, and criteria pollutant emissions. Some process-related emissions are also reviewed in this report.

Sullivan, J. L.; Gaines, L.; Energy Systems

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

Performance metrics and life-cycle information management for building performance assurance  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for over $85 billion per year in energy costs, which is far more energy than technically necessary. One of the primary reasons buildings do not perform as well as intended is that critical information is lost, through ineffective documentation and communication, leading to building systems that are often improperly installed and operated. A life-cycle perspective on the management of building information provides a framework for improving commercial building energy performance. This paper describes a project to develop strategies and techniques to provide decision-makers with information needed to assure the desired building performance across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element in this effort is the development of explicit performance metrics that quantitatively represent performance objectives of interest to various building stakeholders. The paper begins with a discussion of key problems identified in current building industry practice, and ongoing work to address these problems. The paper then focuses on the concept of performance metrics and their use in improving building performance during design, commissioning, and on-going operations. The design of a Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) is presented. BLISS is intended to provide an information infrastructure capable of integrating a variety of building information technologies that support performance assurance. The use of performance metrics in case study building projects is explored to illustrate current best practice. The application of integrated information technology for improving current practice is discussed.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A building life-cycle information system for tracking building performance metrics  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. One key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended performance of a building. This paper describes the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS); designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. BLISS is based on the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability. A BLISS extension to th e IFC that adds classes for building performance metrics is described. Metracker, a prototype tool for tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle, is presented.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Stochastic Life-cycle Analysis of Deteriorating Infrastructure Systems and an Application to Reinforced Concrete Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure systems are critical to a country’s prosperity. It is extremely important to manage the infrastructure systems efficiently in order to avoid wastage and to maximize benefits. Deterioration of infrastructure systems is one of the primary issues in civil engineering today. This problem has been widely acknowledged by engineering community in numerous studies. We need to evolve efficient strategies to tackle the problem of infrastructure deterioration and to efficiently operate infrastructure. In this research, we propose stochastic models to predict the process of deterioration in engineering systems and to perform life-cycle analysis (LCA) of deteriorating engineering systems. LCA has been recognized, over the years, as a highly informative tool for helping the decision making process in infrastructure management. In this research, we propose a stochastic model, SSA, to accurately predict the effect of deterioration processes in engineering systems. The SSA model addresses some of the important and ignored areas in the existing models such as the effect of deterioration on both capacity and demands of systems and accounting for different types of failures in assessing the life-span of a deteriorating system. Furthermore, this research proposes RTLCA, a renewal theory based LCA model, to predict the life-cycle performance of deteriorating systems taking into account not only the life-time reliability but also the costs associated with operating a system. In addition, this research investigates the effect of seismic degradation on the reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges. For this purpose, we model the seismic degradation process in the RC bridge columns which are the primary lateral load resisting system in a bridge. Thereafter, the RTLCA model along with SSA model is used to study the life-cycle of an example RC bridge located in seismic regions accounting for seismic degradation. It is expected that the models proposed in this research will be helpful in better managing our infrastructure systems.

Ramesh Kumar, - 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used...

Burlatsky, S F; O'Neill, J; Atrazhev, V V; Varyukhin, A N; Dmitriev, D V; Erikhman, N S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Argonne TDC: Asset Environmental Services  

Small business teams with Argonne for urban revitalization effort. Asset Environmental Services Chicago, IL

305

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast characteristics summary. Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the past six years, a waste volume forecast has been collected annually from onsite and offsite generators that currently ship or are planning to ship solid waste to the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Central Waste Complex (CWC). This document provides a description of the physical waste forms, hazardous waste constituents, and radionuclides of the waste expected to be shipped to the CWC from 1996 through the remaining life cycle of the Hanford Site (assumed to extend to 2070). In previous years, forecast data has been reported for a 30-year time period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted this year to maintain consistency with FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans. This document is a companion report to two previous reports: the more detailed report on waste volumes, WHC-EP-0900, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Volume Summary and the report on expected containers, WHC-EP-0903, FY1996 Solid Waste Integrated Life-Cycle Forecast Container Summary. All three documents are based on data gathered during the FY 1995 data call and verified as of January, 1996. These documents are intended to be used in conjunction with other solid waste planning documents as references for short and long-term planning of the WHC Solid Waste Disposal Division`s treatment, storage, and disposal activities over the next several decades. This document focuses on two main characteristics: the physical waste forms and hazardous waste constituents of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). The major generators for each waste category and waste characteristic are also discussed. The characteristics of low-level waste (LLW) are described in Appendix A. In addition, information on radionuclides present in the waste is provided in Appendix B. The FY 1996 forecast data indicate that about 100,900 cubic meters of LLMW and TRU(M) waste is expected to be received at the CWC over the remaining life cycle of the site. Based on ranges provided by the waste generators, this baseline volume could fluctuate between a minimum of about 59,720 cubic meters and a maximum of about 152,170 cubic meters. The range is primarily due to uncertainties associated with the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program, including uncertainties regarding retrieval of long-length equipment, scheduling, and tank retrieval technologies.

Templeton, K.J.

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

Calendar and PHEV Cycle Life Aging of High-Energy, Lithium-Ion Cells Containing Blended Spinel and Layered-Oxide Cathodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One hundred seven commercially available, off-the-shelf, 1.2-Ah cells were tested for calendar life and CS cycle- and CD cycle-life using the new USABC PHEV Battery Test Manual. Here, the effects of temperature on calendar life, on CS cycle life, and on CD cycle life; the effects of SOC on calendar life and on CS cycle life; and the effects of rest time on CD cycle life were investigated. The results indicated that the test procedures caused performance decline in the cells in an expected manner, calendar < CS cycling < CD cycling. In some cases, the kinetic law changed with test type, from linear-with-time to about t2. Additionally, temperature was found to stress the cells more than SOC, causing increased changes in performance with increasing temperature.

Jeffrey R. Belt; I. Bloom

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Calendar and PHEV Cycle Life Aging of High-Energy, Lithium-Ion Cells Containing Blended Spinel and Layered Oxide Cathodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One hundred seven commercially available, off-the-shelf, 1.2-Ah cells were tested for calendar life and CS cycle- and CD cycle-life using the new USABC PHEV Battery Test Manual. Here, the effects of temperature on calendar life, on CS cycle life, and on CD cycle life; the effects of SOC on calendar life and on CS cycle life; and the effects of rest time on CD cycle life were investigated. The results indicated that the test procedures caused performance decline in the cells in an expected manner, calendar < CS cycling < CD cycling. In some cases, the kinetic law changed with test type, from linear-with-time to about t2. Additionally, temperature was found to stress the cells more than SOC, causing increased changes in performance with increasing temperature.

J. Belt

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Composition and cycle life of multicomponent AB{sub 5} hydride electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multicomponent AB{sub 5} hydrides are attractive replacements for the cadmium electrode in nickel -- cadmium batteries. The archetype compound of the AB{sub 5} alloy class is LaNi{sub 5}, but in a typical battery electrode mischmetal is substituted for La and Ni is substituted in part by variety of metals. While the effects of Ni substitution have been widely studied, relatively little effort has focused on the effect of La substitution. This paper deals with the effect on cycle life due to the increasing presence of Ce in the alloy series La{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}Ni{sub 3.55}Co{sub .75}Mn{sub .4}Al{sub .3}. Alloys were characterized by the determination of pressure-composition relationships, molar volume of H and electrode cycle life. The effects due to lattice expansion are taken into account. It was concluded that the rate of loss of electrochemical capacity per charge/discharge cycle was significantly decreased due to the presence of Ce.

Adzic, G.D.; Johnson, J.R.; Reilly, J.J.; McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kumar, M.P.S.; Zhang, W.; Srinivasan, S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Center for Electrochemical Systems and Hydrogen Research

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

USA National Phenology Network: Plant and Animal Life-Cycle Data Related to Climate Change  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Phenology refers to recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, such as leafing and flowering, maturation of agricultural plants, emergence of insects, and migration of birds. It is also the study of these recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, especially their timing and relationships with weather and climate. Phenology affects nearly all aspects of the environment, including the abundance and diversity of organisms, their interactions with one another, their functions in food webs, and their seasonable behavior, and global-scale cycles of water, carbon, and other chemical elements. Phenology records can help us understand plant and animal responses to climate change; it is a key indicator. The USA-NPN brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators, and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.[Extracts copied from the USA-NPN home page and from http://www.usanpn.org/about].

311

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

SciTech Connect

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Temporal Behavior of Numerically Simulated Multicell-Type Storms. Part II: The Convective Cell Life Cycle and Cell Regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study herein the convective cell life cycle and the cell generation process in mature, multicellular squall-line storms possessing well-developed subcloud cold pools using two- and three-dimensional models. The multicellular storm ...

Robert G. Fovell; Pei-Hua Tan

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7] U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. eGRID. [Online]cleanenergy/energy-resources/egrid/index.html [Accessed:obtained from the U.S. EPA eGrid database [7]. Life-cycle

Lu, Alison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Logistics 1: closed-loop, simulation-based, systems engineering approach to life cycle management of defense systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the life-cycle impacts of operations and maintenance decisions made for new or aging systems requires an accurate ability to measure and respond to uncertainty. Maintenance and parts requirements forecasts for fielded military systems are traditionally ...

Sean Connors; Julie Gauldin; Marshall Smith

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

ENSO Warm (El Niño) and Cold (La Niña) Event Life Cycles: Ocean Surface Anomaly Patterns, Their Symmetries, Asymmetries, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies by the authors have described the composite global marine surface anomalies of ENSO warm (El Niño) events and cold (La Niña) events. Here the similarities and differences in these life cycles are examined. Qualitatively different ...

Narasimhan K. Larkin; D. E. Harrison

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Baroclinic Instability of a Zero-PVE Jet: Enhanced Effects of Moisture on the Life Cycle of Midlatitude Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments that compare the life cycles of baroclinic cyclones in either a dry or a saturated atmosphere in Cartesian geometry are performed starting from a jetlike mean initial state designed to maximize the effects of latent heat ...

Maurizio Fantini

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Life Cycle Characteristics of Deep Cloud Systems over the Indian Region Using INSAT-1B Pixel Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed study of deep cloud systems (denoted by CSs) over the Indian region using INSAT-1B pixel data is presented. The life cycle characteristics of CSs are examined, including their preferred regions of formation and dissipation, frequency ...

Arvind V. Gambheer; G. S. Bhat

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Statistical Analysis of the Life Cycle of Isolated Tropical Cold Cloud Systems Using MTSAT-1R and TRMM Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from the Multifunctional Transport Satellite-1R (MTSAT-1R) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites are analyzed to show the universal view of the cloud life cycle, including the changes of vertical structure of ...

Keiji Imaoka; Kenji Nakamura

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Life Cycle of an Extratropical Marine Cyclone. Part I: Frontal-Cyclone Evolution and Thermodynamic Air-Sea Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic was carried out over the western North Atlantic Ocean to provide temporally continuous comprehensive datasets from which to document the life cycle of extratropical marine ...

Paul J. Neiman; M. A. Shapiro

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

Stratton, Russell William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Structure and Nonlinear Evolution of Synoptic Scale Cyclones: Life Cycle Simulations with a Cloud-Scale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High resolution simulations of idealized baroclinic wave life cycles on both the f-plane and the ?-plane are performed. The anelastic, nonhydrostatic equations are employed in these analyses and motions are assumed dry adiabatic and inviscid, ...

S. M. Polavarapu; W. R. Peltier

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Life Cycles of Persistent Anomalies. Part II: The Development of Persistent Negative Height Anomalies over the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study extends our previous work on the life cycles of persistent anomalies by providing more comprehensive analyses of the synoptic and dynamical characteristics associated with the developments of the anomalies. We focus here on the ...

Randall M. Dole; Robert X. Black

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Plant Support Engineering: Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks: Medium-Voltage (MV) Cables and Accessories (Terminations and Splices)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience information and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for medium-voltage (MV) cables and accessories (terminations and field splices)

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Documenting performance metrics in a building life-cycle information system  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a new generation of green buildings, it will be necessary to clearly identify their performance requirements, and to assure that these requirements are met. A long-term goal is to provide building decision-makers with the information and tools needed to cost-effectively assure the desired performance of buildings, as specified by stakeholders, across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element required in achieving this goal is a method for explicitly documenting the building performance objectives that are of importance to stakeholders. Such a method should clearly define each objective (e.g., cost, energy use, and comfort) and its desired level of performance. This information is intended to provide quantitative benchmarks useful in evaluating alternative design solutions, commissioning the newly constructed building, and tracking and maintaining the actual performance of the occupied building over time. These quantitative benchmarks are referred to as performance metrics, and they are a principal element of information captured in the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS). An initial implementation of BLISS is based on the International Alliance for Interoperability`s (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations. Within BLISS, the IFC data model has been extended to include performance metrics and a structure for archiving changing versions of the building information over time. This paper defines performance metrics, discusses the manner in which BLISS is envisioned to support a variety of activities related to assuring the desired performance of a building across its life cycle, and describes a performance metric tracking tool, called Metracker, that is based on BLISS.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

Valero, O.J.

1996-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

326

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Asset Revitalization Initiative ARI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Asset Revitalization Initiative Asset Revitalization Initiative ( ARI ) Mission * Community * Reuse ARI is a DOE-wide effort to advance the beneficial reuse of the agency's unique and diverse mix of assets, including land, facilities, infrastructure, equipment, technologies, natural resources, and highly skilled workforce. ARI promotes an efficient business environment to encourage collaboration between public and private resources. ARI integrates DOE missions with community interests. ARI is... Our Vision By 2020: Operations are conducted in a sustainable manner; facilities and transit are powered by clean energy. Site infrastructure is modern, adaptable, and efficient. Public-private partnerships thrive and are creating new jobs while helping meet future workforce needs. Local communities are connected to the site, and site activities

328

Life Cycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use in an Urban Bus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SR-580-24089 UC Category 1503 SR-580-24089 UC Category 1503 Life Cycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use in an Urban Bus A Joint Study Sponsored by: U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Energy Final Report May 1998 NOTICE NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees,

329

BuildingPI: A future tool for building life cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally building simulation models are used at the design phase of a building project. These models are used to optimize various design alternatives, reduce energy consumption and cost. Building performance assessment for the operational phase of a buildings life cycle is sporadic, typically working from historical metered data and focusing on bulk energy assessment. Building Management Systems (BMS) do not explicitly incorporate feedback to the design phase or account for any changes, which have been made to building layout or fabric during construction. This paper discusses a proposal to develop an Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) compliant data visualization tool Building Performance Indicator (BuildingPI) for performance metric and performance effectiveness ratio evaluation.

O' Donnell, James; Morrissey, Elmer; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac,Vladimir

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

330

Environmental Life Cycle Implications of Fuel Oxygenate Production from California Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Historically, more than 90% of the excess agricultural residue produced in California (approximately 10 million dry metric tons per year) has been disposed through open-field burning. Concerns about air quality have prompted federal, state, and local air quality agencies to tighten regulations related to this burning and to look at disposal alternatives. One use of this biomass is as an oxygenated fuel. This report focuses on quantifying and comparing the comprehensive environmental flows over the life cycles of two disposal scenarios: (1) burning the biomass, plus producing and using MTBE; and (2) converting and using ETBE.

Kadam, K. L. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Camobreco, V. J.; Glazebrook, B. E. (Ecobalance Inc.); Forrest, L. H.; Jacobson, W. A. (TSS Consultants); Simeroth, D. C. (California Air Resources Board); Blackburn, W. J. (California Energy Commission); Nehoda, K. C. (California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection)

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of ballast life-cycle cost and payback period  

SciTech Connect

The paper introduces an innovative methodology for evaluating the relative significance of energy-efficient technologies applied to fluorescent lamp ballasts. The method involves replacing the point estimates of life cycle cost of the ballasts with uncertainty distributions reflecting the whole spectrum of possible costs, and the assessed probability associated with each value. The results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses will help analysts reduce effort in data collection and carry on analysis more efficiently. These methods also enable policy makers to gain an insightful understanding of which efficient technology alternatives benefit or cost what fraction of consumers, given the explicit assumptions of the analysis.

McMahon, James E.; Liu, Xiaomin; Turiel, Ike; Hakim, Sajid; Fisher, Diane

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750 tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management.

Banar, Mufide [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)], E-mail: mbanar@anadolu.edu.tr; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

337

Interoperable, life-cycle tools for assuring building performance: An overview of a commercial building initiative  

SciTech Connect

A key impediment to improving the energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of buildings is the complexity and cost of managing information over the life cycle of a building. A surprisingly large fraction of the total cost of buildings is embodied in the decision making and information management process due to the structure of the building industry, the numerous people and companies involved in the process, the current nature of the building acquisition process, and the long time periods over which buildings operate once design and construction are completed. The authors suggest that new interoperable software tools could greatly facilitate and rationalize this complex process, thereby reducing time and cost, and greatly improving the habitability and environmental impact of these buildings. They describe a series of projects in which they are building and testing several prototype toolkits as part of a building life-cycle information system that will allow interoperable software tools to function more effectively throughout the design, construction, commissioning, and operations phases.

Selkowitz, S.; Piette, M.A.; Papamichael, K.; Sartor, D.; Hitchcock, R.; Olken, F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Asset Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asset Carbon Place United Kingdom Product UK-based startup looking to invest in CDMJI projects. References Asset Carbon1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

339

Comparing Life-Cycle Costs of ESPCs and Appropriations-Funded Energy Projects: An Update to the 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect

A study was sponsored by FEMP in 2001 - 2002 to develop methods to compare life-cycle costs of federal energy conservation projects carried out through energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) and projects that are directly funded by appropriations. The study described in this report follows up on the original work, taking advantage of new pricing data on equipment and on $500 million worth of Super ESPC projects awarded since the end of FY 2001. The methods developed to compare life-cycle costs of ESPCs and directly funded energy projects are based on the following tasks: (1) Verify the parity of equipment prices in ESPC vs. directly funded projects; (2) Develop a representative energy conservation project; (3) Determine representative cycle times for both ESPCs and appropriations-funded projects; (4) Model the representative energy project implemented through an ESPC and through appropriations funding; and (5) Calculate the life-cycle costs for each project.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used for lifetime prediction of a GORE-SELECT membrane.

S. F. Burlatsky; M. Gummalla; J. O'Neill; V. V. Atrazhev; A. N. Varyukhin; D. V. Dmitriev; N. S. Erikhman

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Building Energy Performance Certificate. Asset Rating.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: LCEA029636 Keywords: Energy Performance Certificate ...

342

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol; NGCC = natural gas combined-cycle; BIGCC =gasification combined-cycle. P ART III U NCERTAINTY Aaverage, (ii) natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC), (iii) coal

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant.Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fifth Power Delivery Asset Management Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research (EPRI) Asset Management Conference is part of EPRI's Power Delivery Asset Management program. The Asset Management Conference helps members manage their corporate culture by incorporating asset management best practices and aligning organizational processes around asset management goals. This report details EPRI's fifth Power Delivery Asset Management (PDAM) Conference.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

347

2012 SG Peer Review - Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor & Faulted Circuit Indicator System for Underground Assets - Jason Wilson, On-Ramp Wireless  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor for Underground Assets Jason Wilson On-Ramp Wireless June 7, 2012 December 2008 Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor for Underground Assets Objective Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Prior to FY 12 FY12, authorized FY13, requested Out-year(s) $1,046 $580 $39 $0 Technical Scope Develop and demonstrate a wireless network solution for distribution automation, including fault circuit indicators and transformer monitoring, capable of secure and reliable communication with below ground and hard to reach utility assets at a TCO that is commercially viable for utilities to deploy at large scale. Enable utilities throughout the US to improve critical grid reliability metrics including SAIDI. * Conceptual design and trade studies including sensor system interfaces, augmenting FCI with

348

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant withAnalysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ARI Asset Revitalization Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

( ( ARI ) Asset Revitalization Initiative Mission * Community * Reuse Highlights continue on Page 2 The Business Incubator Center Wins the NBIA Dinah Atkins Incubator of the Year Award april �, ���� - One of 7,000 incubators in the world and located on the Department of Energy's Grand Junction campus, The Business Incubator Center won the National Business Incubator Association Dinah Atkins Incubator of the Year award in the General and Special Focus category. For

350

Life-Cycle Assessment of the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in Indian Locomotives (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

With India's transportation sector relying heavily on imported petroleum-based fuels, the Planning Commission of India and the Indian government recommended the increased use of blended biodiesel in transportation fleets, identifying Jatropha as a potentially important biomass feedstock. The Indian Oil Corporation and Indian Railways are collaborating to increase the use of biodiesel blends in Indian locomotives with blends of up to B20, aiming to reduce GHG emissions and decrease petroleum consumption. To help evaluate the potential for Jatropha-based biodiesel in achieving sustainability and energy security goals, this study examines the life cycle, net GHG emission, net energy ratio, and petroleum displacement impacts of integrating Jatropha-based biodiesel into locomotive operations in India. In addition, this study identifies the parameters that have the greatest impact on the sustainability of the system.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The role of twitter in the life cycle of a scientific publication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Twitter is a micro-blogging social media platform for short messages that can have a long-term impact on how scientists create and publish ideas. We investigate the usefulness of twitter in the development and distribution of scientific knowledge. At the start of the life cycle of a scientific publication, twitter provides a large virtual department of colleagues that can help to rapidly generate, share and refine new ideas. As ideas become manuscripts, twitter can be used as an informal arena for the pre-review of works in progress. Finally, tweeting published findings can communicate research to a broad audience of other researchers, decision makers, journalists and the general public that can amplify the scientific and social impact of publications. However, there are limitations, largely surrounding issues of intellectual property and ownership, inclusiveness and misrepresentations of science sound bites. Nevertheless, we believe twitter is a useful social media tool that can provide a valuable contributi...

Darling1, Emily S; Côté, Isabelle M; Drew, Joshua A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

To Recycle or Not to Recycle: That Is the Question - Insights from Life-Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRS BULLETIN MRS BULLETIN * VOLUME 37 * APRIL 2012 * www.mrs.org/bulletin © 2012 Materials Research Society MANUFACTURING * RECYCLING Why recycle? The most commonly stated reason for recycling is to reduce burdens associated with the disposal of our never-ending stream of wastes. Waste disposal potentially causes air and water pollution and is costly; moreover, landfi lls compete with other land uses. In addition, recycling can extend our supply of materials to alleviate scarcity and to moderate rising prices of raw materials. Furthermore, recycling is often more environmentally benign than using virgin raw materials and can reduce energy use and emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Life-cycle analysis Despite these positive attributes, not all recycling processes

353

From Protoplanetary Disks to Extrasolar Planets: Understanding the Life Cycle of Circumstellar Gas with Ultraviolet Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Few scientific discoveries have captured the public imagination like the explosion of exoplanetary science during the past two decades. This work has fundamentally changed our picture of Earth's place in the Universe and led NASA to make significant investments towards understanding the demographics of exoplanetary systems and the conditions that lead to their formation. The story of the formation and evolution of exoplanetary systems is essentially the story of the circumstellar gas and dust that are initially present in the protostellar environment; in order to understand the variety of planetary systems observed, we need to understand the life cycle of circumstellar gas from its initial conditions in protoplanetary disks to its endpoint as planets and their atmospheres. In this white paper response to NASA's Request for Information "Science Objectives and Requirements for the Next NASA UV/Visible Astrophysics Mission Concepts (NNH12ZDA008L)", we describe scientific programs that would use the unique capabi...

France, Kevin; Ardila, David R; Bergin, Edwin A; Brown, Alexander; Burgh, Eric B; Calvet, Nuria; Chiang, Eugene; Cook, Timothy A; Désert, Jean-Michel; Ebbets, Dennis; Froning, Cynthia S; Green, James C; Hillenbrand, Lynne A; Johns-Krull, Christopher M; Koskinen, Tommi T; Linsky, Jeffrey L; Redfield, Seth; Roberge, Aki; Schindhelm, Eric R; Scowen, Paul A; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Tumlinson, Jason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Life-Cycle Assessment of the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in Indian Locomotives (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With India's transportation sector relying heavily on imported petroleum-based fuels, the Planning Commission of India and the Indian government recommended the increased use of blended biodiesel in transportation fleets, identifying Jatropha as a potentially important biomass feedstock. The Indian Oil Corporation and Indian Railways are collaborating to increase the use of biodiesel blends in Indian locomotives with blends of up to B20, aiming to reduce GHG emissions and decrease petroleum consumption. To help evaluate the potential for Jatropha-based biodiesel in achieving sustainability and energy security goals, this study examines the life cycle, net GHG emission, net energy ratio, and petroleum displacement impacts of integrating Jatropha-based biodiesel into locomotive operations in India. In addition, this study identifies the parameters that have the greatest impact on the sustainability of the system.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Analyzing the Life Cycle Energy Savings of DOE Supported Buildings Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the factors that would potentially help determine an appropriate analytical timeframe for measuring the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technology (BT) benefits and presents a summary-level analysis of the life cycle savings for BT’s Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) R&D program. The energy savings for three hypothetical building designs are projected over a 100-year period using Building Energy Analysis and Modeling System (BEAMS) to illustrate the resulting energy and carbon savings associated with the hypothetical aging buildings. The report identifies the tasks required to develop a long-term analytical and modeling framework, and discusses the potential analytical gains and losses by extending an analysis into the “long-term.”

Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers of possible revisions to energy-efficiency standards. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. DOE's preferred approach involves comparing the total life-cycle cost (LCC) of owning and operating a more efficient appliance with the LCC for a baseline design. This study describes the method used to conduct the LCC analysis and presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design can reduce the LCC in each of the product classes considered.

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers,Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Analyzing the Life Cycle Energy Savings of DOE Supported Buildings Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the factors that would potentially help determine an appropriate analytical timeframe for measuring the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technology (BT) benefits and presents a summary-level analysis of the life cycle savings for BT’s Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) R&D program. The energy savings for three hypothetical building designs are projected over a 100-year period using Building Energy Analysis and Modeling System (BEAMS) to illustrate the resulting energy and carbon savings associated with the hypothetical aging buildings. The report identifies the tasks required to develop a long-term analytical and modeling framework, and discusses the potential analytical gains and losses by extending an analysis into the “long-term.”

Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

OPTIMIZATION FOR COGENERATION SYSTEMS IN BUILDINGS BASED ON LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY: This paper presents a model that is developed to optimize the selection and operation of energy systems in commercial buildings based on their environmental performance. The model can be used for decision support regarding infrastructure in both design and operation of building energy systems. The approach is composed of energy simulation to generate building’s energy demand, life cycle assessment (LCA) to model different energy systems, and optimization model to optimize the selection and operation of these energy systems. The energy systems that are discussed in this paper are cogeneration systems, average electric grid, gas boilers, and absorption and electric chillers. The performance criteria presented in this paper are primary energy consumption (PEC) and tropospheric ozone precursor potential (TOPP).

J. Vanier; Ayat E. Osman; Phd C; Robert Ries; Assistant Professor

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results show how the savings vary among customers facing different electricity prices and other conditions. At 11.5 EER, at least 80% of the users achieve a positive LCC savings. At 12.0 EER, the maximum efficiency analyzed, mean LCC savings are lower but still positive. For the {ge} $65,000 Btu/h to <135,000 Btu/h equipment class, 59% of users achieve a positive LCC savings. For the $135,000 Btu/h to <240,000 Btu/h equipment class, 91% of users achieve a positive LCC savings.

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

Kadam, K. L.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reduction of Electric Vehicle Life-Cycle Impacts through Battery Recycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction of Electric Vehicle Life-Cycle Impacts through Battery Recycling 29 th International Battery Seminar and Exhibit Ft. Lauderdale, FL March 15, 2012 The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on behalf of the Government. Why think about recycling?  Material scarcity alleviated

362

MARVEL: A PC-based interactive software package for life-cycle evaluations of hybrid/electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

As a life-cycle analysis tool, MARVEL has been developed for the evaluation of hybrid/electric vehicle systems. It can identify the optimal combination of battery and heat engine characteristics for different vehicle types and performance requirements, on the basis of either life-cycle cost or fuel efficiency. Battery models that allow trade-offs between specific power and specific energy, between cycle life and depth of discharge, between peak power and depth of discharge, and between other parameters, are included in the software. A parallel hybrid configuration, using an internal combustion engine and a battery as the power sources, can be simulated with a user-specified energy management strategy. The PC-based software package can also be used for cost or fuel efficiency comparisons among conventional, electric, and hybrid vehicles.

Marr, W.W.; He, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

364

Life Cycle Assessment of Pavements: A Critical Review of Existing Literature and Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a critical review of existing literature and modeling tools related to life-cycle assessment (LCA) applied to pavements. The review finds that pavement LCA is an expanding but still limited research topic in the literature, and that the existing body of work exhibits methodological deficiencies and incompatibilities that serve as barriers to the widespread utilization of LCA by pavement engineers and policy makers. This review identifies five key issues in the current body of work: inconsistent functional units, improper system boundaries, imbalanced data for asphalt and cement, use of limited inventory and impact assessment categories, and poor overall utility. This review also identifies common data and modeling gaps in pavement LCAs that should be addressed in future work. These gaps include: the use phase (rolling resistance, albedo, carbonation, lighting, leachate, and tire wear and emissions), asphalt fumes, feedstock energy of bitumen, traffic delay, the maintenance phase, and the end-of-life phase. This review concludes with a comprehensive list of recommendations for future research, which shed light on where improvements in knowledge can be made that will benefit the accuracy and comprehensiveness of pavement LCAs moving forward.

Santero, Nicholas; Masanet, Eric; Horvath, Arpad

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

EM Capital Asset Project List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Read the EM Capital Asset Project List, which includes the project's name, site, current critical decision and current total project cost.

367

Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung Chul Kim and Vasilis Fthenakis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Bakshi (2011) in terms of life-cycle impacts, fossil energy usage, and exergy. Their estimates of fossil degree to the high energy usage. Other environmental-impact profiles were consistent with these energy to Healey s study wherein electricity usage for the CVD process dominates energy demand (99%). In the same

368

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

An Observational Study of the South China Sea Monsoon during the 1979 Summer: Onset and Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The onset and life cycle of the 1979 South China Sea summer monsoon were examined in the context of the 30–60- and 12–24-day monsoon modes. The former intraseasonal mode formed the northward-migrating monsoon trough/ridge, while the latter ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Jau-Ming Chen

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY and other countries. Higher efficiencies are produced by innovative cell designs and material and energy% more electricity than average efficiency (i.e., 14%) c-Si PV modules. Keywords: Photovoltaic, energy

371

Life Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins, Dr. Alissa Kendall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displacement. The cost of wastewater treatment using the ATS was estimated to be $1.23 per m3 wastewater Wastewater Processing Algae Processing Biogas Processing Equipment and Material Data Sources Fixed filmLife Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins

California at Davis, University of

372

Towards Standardization of Life-Cycle Metrics for Biofuels: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Mitigation and Net Energy Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite a rapid worldwide expansion of the biofuel industry, there is a lack of consensus within the scientific community about the potential of biofuels to reduce reliance on petroleum and decrease greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Although life cycle assessment provides a means to quantify Delivered by Ingenta to:

Biobased Materials; Adam J. Liska; Kenneth G. Cassman; Donna Michel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides an optimized LCM plan for the main generators and exciters at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS).

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT:1 A LIFE-CYCLE ENERGY CASE STUDY AND ANALYSIS2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models for petroleum use (from driving) and26 residential and commercial power and natural gas use infrastructure) made up 44 to 47% of the life-cycle energy demands34 tallied. Energy elasticity calculations across the neighborhoods suggest that increased population35 density and reduced residential unit size

Kockelman, Kara M.

375

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting energy demand from gasoline to electricity. GHG benefits. HEVs are optimal or near-optimal for minimum cost in most scenarios. High gas prices and low

Michalek, Jeremy J.

376

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas, 2009­04­11). Plug-in vehicles, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric

Michalek, Jeremy J.

377

Development of novel strategies for enhancing the cycle life of lithium solid polymer electrolyte batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Lithium/solid polymer electrolyte (Li/SPE) secondary batteries are under intense development as power sources for portable electronic devices as well as electric vehicles. These batteries offer high specific energy, high energy density, very low self-discharge rates, and flexibility in packaging; however, problems have inhibited their introduction into the marketplace. This report summarizes findings to examine processes that occur with Li/SPE secondary batteries upon cyclic charging/discharging. The report includes a detailed analysis of the impedance measured on the Li/SPE/IC and IC/SPE/IC systems. The SPE was a derivative of methoxyethoxyethoxyphosphazene (MEEP) with lithium triflate salt as the electrolyte, while the intercalated cathodes (IC) comprised mixtures of manganese dioxide, carbon powder, and MEEP as a binder. Studies on symmetrical Li/SPE/Li laminates show that cycling results in a significant expansion of the structure over the first few tens of cycles; however, no corresponding increase in the impedance was noted. The cycle life of the intercalation cathode was found to be very sensitive to the method of fabrication. Results indicate that the cycle life is due to the failure of the IC, not to the failure of the lithium/SPE interface. A pattern recognition neural network was developed to predict the cycle life of a battery from the charge/discharge characteristics.

Macdonald, Digby D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Allcock, Harry; Engelhard, George; Bomberger, N.; Gao, L.; Olmeijer, D.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Asset Locator - A Framework for Enterprise Software Asset Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces the Enterprise Software Asset Management (ESAM) paradigm, which defines an approach to doing automated software asset management. ESAM is a comprehensive integrated solution supporting search and reuse, collaboration, knowledge sharing, impact analysis, and other enterprise-centric services. We describe Asset Locator, a low-cost, scalable and extensible solution that realizes ESAM. Asset Locator uses a set of autonomous scheduled crawlers that scan enterprise repositories to discover development resources. A set of domain-specific analyzers process the discovered resources by identifying and extracting semantic features. Powerful search and navigation engines enable clients to explore the analyzed information. The design of Asset Locator as an extensible framework has enabled its easy integration into several IBM product offerings. 1

Avi Yaeli; Alex Akilov; Sara Porat; Iftach Ragoler; Shlomit Shachor-ifergan; Gabi Zodik

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in the Indian Road and Rail Sectors  

SciTech Connect

This life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel production and use evaluates the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (not considering land-use change), net energy value (NEV), and net petroleum consumption impacts of substituting Jatropha biodiesel for conventional petroleum diesel in India. Several blends of biodiesel with petroleum diesel are evaluated for the rail freight, rail passenger, road freight, and road-passenger transport sectors that currently rely heavily on petroleum diesel. For the base case, Jatropha cultivation, processing, and use conditions that were analyzed, the use of B20 results in a net reduction in GHG emissions and petroleum consumption of 14% and 17%, respectively, and a NEV increase of 58% compared with the use of 100% petroleum diesel. While the road-passenger transport sector provides the greatest sustainability benefits per 1000 gross tonne kilometers, the road freight sector eventually provides the greatest absolute benefits owing to substantially higher projected utilization by year 2020. Nevertheless, introduction of biodiesel to the rail sector might present the fewest logistic and capital expenditure challenges in the near term. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that the sustainability benefits are maintained under multiple plausible cultivation, processing, and distribution scenarios. However, the sustainability of any individual Jatropha plantation will depend on site-specific conditions.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Life cycle assessment of four municipal solid waste management scenarios in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of municipal solid waste. Four scenarios mostly used in China were compared to assess the influence of various technologies on environment: (1) landfill, (2) incineration, (3) composting plus landfill, and (4) composting plus incineration. In all scenarios, the technologies significantly contribute to global warming and increase the adverse impact of non-carcinogens on the environment. The technologies played only a small role in the impact of carcinogens, respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, and non-renewable energy. Similarly, the influence of the technologies on the way other elements affect the environment was ignorable. Specifically, the direct emissions from the operation processes involved played an important role in most scenarios except for incineration, while potential impact generated from transport, infrastructure and energy consumption were quite small. In addition, in the global warming category, highest potential impact was observed in landfill because of the direct methane gas emissions. Electricity recovery from methane gas was the key factor for reducing the potential impact of global warming. Therefore, increasing the use of methane gas to recover electricity is highly recommended to reduce the adverse impact of landfills on the environment.

Hong Jinglan, E-mail: hongjing@sdu.edu.c [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xiangzhi [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhaojie Cui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

Rodriguez-Garcia, G., E-mail: gonzalo.rodriguez.garcia@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hospido, A., E-mail: almudena.hospido@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bagley, D.M., E-mail: bagley@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 82072 Laramie, WY (United States); Moreira, M.T., E-mail: maite.moreira@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G., E-mail: gumersindo.feijoo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Market disruption, cascading effects, and economic recovery:a life-cycle hypothesis model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper builds upon previous work [Sprigg and Ehlen, 2004] by introducing a bond market into a model of production and employment. The previous paper described an economy in which households choose whether to enter the labor and product markets based on wages and prices. Firms experiment with prices and employment levels to maximize their profits. We developed agent-based simulations using Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate that multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment, but also suffer from market noise stemming from consumer churn. In this paper we introduce a bond market as a mechanism for household savings. We simulate an economy of continuous overlapping generations in which each household grows older in the course of the simulation and continually revises its target level of savings according to a life-cycle hypothesis. Households can seek employment, earn income, purchase goods, and contribute to savings until they reach the mandatory retirement age; upon retirement households must draw from savings in order to purchase goods. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous convergence of product, labor, and savings markets to their calculated equilibria, and simulates how a disruption to a productive sector will create cascading effects in all markets. Subsequent work will use similar models to simulate how disruptions, such as terrorist attacks, would interplay with consumer confidence to affect financial markets and the broader economy.

Sprigg, James A.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Life cycle inventory of biodiesel and petroleum diesel for use in an urban bus. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings from a study of the life cycle inventories for petroleum diesel and biodiesel. It presents information on raw materials extracted from the environment, energy resources consumed, and air, water, and solid waste emissions generated. Biodiesel is a renewable diesel fuel substitute. It can be made from a variety of natural oils and fats. Biodiesel is made by chemically combining any natural oil or fat with an alcohol such as methanol or ethanol. Methanol has been the most commonly used alcohol in the commercial production of biodiesel. In Europe, biodiesel is widely available in both its neat form (100% biodiesel, also known as B1OO) and in blends with petroleum diesel. European biodiesel is made predominantly from rapeseed oil (a cousin of canola oil). In the United States, initial interest in producing and using biodiesel has focused on the use of soybean oil as the primary feedstock mainly because the United States is the largest producer of soybean oil in the world. 170 figs., 148 tabs.

Sheehan, J.; Camobreco, V.; Duffield, J.; Graboski, M.; Shapouri, H.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Life Cycle Assessment of Gasoline and Diesel Produced via Fast Pyrolysis and Hydroprocessing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work, a life cycle assessment (LCA) estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and net energy value (NEV) of the production of gasoline and diesel from forest residues via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing, from production of the feedstock to end use of the fuel in a vehicle, is performed. The fast pyrolysis and hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are based on a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) design report. The LCA results show GHG emissions of 0.142 kg CO2-equiv. per km traveled and NEV of 1.00 MJ per km traveled for a process using grid electricity. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis shows a range of results, with all values better than those of conventional gasoline in 2005. Results for GHG emissions and NEV of gasoline and diesel from pyrolysis are also reported on a per MJ fuel basis for comparison with ethanol produced via gasification. Although pyrolysis-derived gasoline and diesel have lower GHG emissions and higher NEV than conventional gasoline does in 2005, they underperform ethanol produced via gasification from the same feedstock. GHG emissions for pyrolysis could be lowered further if electricity and hydrogen are produced from biomass instead of from fossil sources.

Hsu, D. D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Preserving Plutonium-244 as a National Asset  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-244 (244 Pu) is an extremely rare and long-lived isotope of plutonium with a half-life of 80 million years. Measureable amounts of 244 Pu are found in neither reactor-grade nor weapons-grade plutonium. Production of this isotope requires a very high thermal flux to permit the two successive neutron captures that convert 242 Pu to 243 Pu to 244 Pu, particularly given the short (about 5 hour) half-life of 243 Pu. Such conditions simply do not exist in plutonium production processes. Therefore, 244 Pu is ideal for precise radiochemical analyses measuring plutonium material properties and isotopic concentrations in items containing plutonium. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry is about ten times more sensitive when using 244 Pu rather than 242 Pu for determining plutonium isotopic content. The isotope can also be irradiated in small quantities to produce superheavy elements. The majority of the existing global inventory of 244 Pu is contained in the outer housing of Mark-18A targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The total inventory is about 20 grams of 244 Pu in about 400 grams of plutonium distributed among the 65 targets. Currently, there are no specific plans to preserve these targets. Although the cost of separating and preserving this material would be considerable, it is trivial in comparison to new production costs. For all practical purposes, the material is irreplaceable, because new production would cost billions of dollars and require a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles spanning up to 50 years. This paper will discuss a set of options for overcoming the significant challenges to preserve the 244 Pu as a National Asset: (1) the need to relocate the material from SRS in a timely manner, (2) the need to reduce the volume of material to the extent possible for storage, and (3) the need to establish an operational capability to enrich the 244 Pu in significant quantities. This paper suggests that if all the Mark-18A plutonium is separated, it would occupy a small volume and would be inexpensive to store while an enrichment capability is developed. Very small quantities could be enriched in existing mass separators to support critical needs.

Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL; Benker, Dennis [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Romano, Catherine E [ORNL; Wham, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Clean Energy Asset Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asset Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Energy Asset Management Place Santa Monica, California Zip 94040 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product String...

390

Guinness Asset Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asset Management" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGuinnessAssetManagement&oldid346270" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations...

391

Glass Composition Constraint Recommendations for Use in Life-Cycle Mission Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The component concentration limits that most influence the predicted Hanford life-cycle HLW glass volume by HTWOS were re-evaluated. It was assumed that additional research and development work in glass formulation and melter testing would be performed to improve the understanding of component effects on the processability and product quality of these HLW glasses. Recommendations were made to better estimate the potential component concentration limits that could be applied today while technology development is underway to best estimate the volume of HLW glass that will eventually be produced at Hanford. The limits for concentrations of P2O5, Bi2O3, and SO3 were evaluated along with the constraint used to avoid nepheline formation in glass. Recommended concentration limits were made based on the current HLW glass property models being used by HTWOS (Vienna et al. 2009). These revised limits are: 1) The current ND should be augmented by the OB limit of OB ? 0.575 so that either the normalized silica (NSi) is less that the 62% limit or the OB is below the 0.575 limit. 2) The mass fraction of P2O5 limit should be revised to allow for up to 4.5 wt%, depending on CaO concentrations. 3) A Bi2O3 concentration limit of 7 wt% should be used. 4) The salt accumulation limit of 0.5 wt% SO3 may be increased to 0.6 wt%. Again, these revised limits do not obviate the need for further testing, but make it possible to more accurately predict the impact of that testing on ultimate HLW glass volumes.

McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

392

Life Cycle Assessment of the MBT plant in Ano Liossia, Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the operation of an MBT plant in Greece based on LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare four different MBT operating scenarios (among them and with landfilling). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Even the current operation of the MBT plant is preferable to landfilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilization of the MBT compost and metals generates the most environmental gains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal exploitation of RDF improves further the environmental performance of the plant. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the application of Life Cycle Assessment to the operation of the MBT facility of Ano Liossia in the region of Attica in Greece. The region of Attica is home to almost half the population of Greece and the management of its waste is a major issue. In order to explicitly analyze the operation of the MBT plant, five scenarios were generated. Actual operation data of the MBT plant for the year 2008 were provided by the region of Attica and the LCA modeling was performed via the SimaPro 5.1 software while impact assessment was performed utilizing the Eco-indicator'99 method. The results of our analysis indicate that even the current operation of the MBT plant is preferable to landfilling. Among the scenarios of MBT operation, the one with complete utilization of the MBT outputs, i.e. compost, RDF, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, is the one that generates the most environmental gains. Our analysis indicates that the exploitation of RDF via incineration is the key factor towards improving the environmental performance of the MBT plant. Our findings provide a quantitative understanding of the MBT plant. Interpretation of results showed that proper operation of the modern waste management systems can lead to substantial reduction of environmental impacts and savings of resources.

Abeliotis, Konstadinos, E-mail: kabeli@hua.gr [Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece); Kalogeropoulos, Alexandros [Department of Home Economics and Ecology, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece); Lasaridi, Katia [Department of Geography, Harokopio University, Athens (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Geothermal completion technology life cycle cost model (GEOCOM). Volume I. Final report. Volume II. User instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Just as with petroleum wells, drilling and completing a geothermal well at minimum original cost may not be the most cost-effective way to exploit the resource. The impacts of the original completion activities on production and costs later in the life of the well must also be considered. In order to evaluate alternate completion and workover technologies, a simple computer model has been developed to compare total life-cycle costs for a geothermal well to total production or injection. Volume I discusses the mechanics of the model and then presents detailed results from its application to different completion and workover questions. Volume II is the user instruction manual.

Anderson, E.R.; Hoessel, W.C.; Mansure, A.J.; McKissen, P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Descriptions of Past Research in Program 79: Combustion Turbine and Combined-Cycle Operations and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The asset value of natural-gas-fired combustion turbines, especially in combined cycle plants, is on the rise, driven by their inherent efficiency, emissions, operational characteristics, broader market fit with a forecast affordable fuel supply, and complementary role covering load swings such as those from intermittent renewables. Cycling and high-temperature operations adversely affect combustion turbine life, as well as plant reliability and availability. The risks associated with hot section durabil...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implicaitons of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Simulated with the GREET Model  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implications of Life-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emission Implications of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Simulated with the GREET Model Michael Wang*, May Wu, Hong Huo and Jiahong Liu Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA. *Contact author: Tel: +1 (630) 252 2819 Fax: +1 (630) 252 3443 Email: mqwang@anl.gov In International Sugar Journal 2008, Vol. 110, No. 1317 ABSTRACT By using data available in the open literature, we expanded the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne National Laboratory to include Brazilian-grown sugarcane ethanol. With the expanded GREET model, we examined the well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and

396

CO2 Footprint Life-Cycle Analyses: EPRI CoalFleet Study Cases and State of Knowledge Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life-cycle analyses of the global warming potential of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, sometimes known as a carbon footprint and expressed in CO2-equivalent emissions, have been used to compare the environmental impacts of technologies with different energy conversion characteristics and upstream and downstream uses of energy and materials. Historically, such analyses have been conducted to assess the benefits of electricity production and delivery from renewable energy sources and alternative fuel trans...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Test Profile Development for the Evaluation of Battery Cycle Life for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and DaimlerChrysler have developed a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) concept for the DaimlerChrysler Sprinter Van in an effort to reduce the emissions, fuel consumption, and operating costs of the vehicle while maintaining equivalent or superior functionality and performance. This report describes the development of a test profile to evaluate the life cycle of the batteries for the PHEV vehicle.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union?s Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Life-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions for air-blown gasification combined-cycle using selexol  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. With its higher efficiency, this process can reduce CO{sub 2} production. It is also amenable to CO{sub 2} capture, because CO{sub 2} Can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, CO{sub 2} transport -by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of CO{sub 2} in geological reservoirs. The intent of this study is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the fill study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget will be 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh{sub e}. The base case is a 470-MW (at the busbar) IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, US Illinois {number_sign}6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 461 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.830 kg/kWh{sub e}. In the CO{sub 2} recovery case, the gasifier output is taken through water-gas shift and then to Selexol, a glycol-based absorber-stripper process that recovers CO{sub 2} before it enters the combustion turbine. This process results in 350 MW at the busbar.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Life Cycle Assessment Applied to 95 Representative U.S. Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since World War II, concern for the environmental impacts of human activities has grown. Agriculture plays a significant role in several impact categories including global warming. Governments, including the U.S., have recently begun or are considering the regulation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission to mitigate the global warming effect. Because agriculture accounts for a large portion of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, it is necessary to establish a baseline measure of the GHG emission of U.S. agriculture at the farm level. The objective of this research is to estimate the GHG emission levels for multicrop farms in the U.S. and identify the major sources of GHG emissions in their supply chains. To accomplish the objective, a partial life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used to establish a GHG baseline for the representative farms. LCA as defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) includes four phases: goal and scope definition, inventory, impact assessment, and interpretation. It is a holistic approach that catalogues environmental impacts of all relevant processes at all stages of production, from raw material extraction to disposal. However, this study only catalogues impacts up to the farm gate. Partial LCAs are common in agriculture. Emissions of three GHGs, CO2, CH4, and N2O, are inventoried for 95 U.S. farms. The results are characterized using their 100-year global warming potentials into CO2 equivalents. The CO2 equivalents are then normalized over four functional units: enterprises, acres or head, harvest units, and pounds of production. The variation of GHG intensity between crops and farms is very large. However, it is clear that GHG intensity is affected by three characteristics: location, size, and irrigation practice. Crops grown in their associated regions tend to be more GHG efficient than those grown outside their associated regions. Also, crops grown on large farms tend to be more GHG efficient than the same crop grown on a small farm in the same area. Lastly, with the exceptions of cotton and soybeans, irrigated crops tend to be more GHG intensive than non-irrigated crops. These results combine to suggest that there may be a correlation between production efficiency and carbon efficiency.

Rutland, Christopher T.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Guidelines for Intelligent Asset Replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI8217s asset management research focuses on developing a rational basis for selecting repair or replacement options for specific classes of equipment by balancing the risks of equipment failure against the costs of continued maintenance or capital replacement. This report, the fourth report on guidelines for asset replacement, discusses methods for making decisions about wood poles. It significantly enhances a prior report on this subject by explicitly modeling pole degradation, inspection and test ef...

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance, and decommissioning of the infrastructure,material extraction to decommissioning/end of life. As shownmaintaining, and decommissioning infrastructure must be

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Bioethanol and Petroleum Gasoline. Argonne NationalMolburg, J. Allocation of Energy Use in Petroleum Refineriesto Petroleum Products. The International Journal of Life

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Carbon Footprint of Bioenergy Sorghum Production in Central Texas: Production Implications on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Carbon Cycling, and Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced interest in biofuel production has renewed interest in bioenergy crop production within the United States. Agriculture’s role in biofuel production is critical because it has the potential to supply renewable energy while minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, agronomic management practices influence direct and indirect GHG emissions, and both can have a significant impact on biofuel production efficiency. Our overall objective was to determine the carbon (C) footprint of bioenergy sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) production in central Texas. Specifically, we determined the impacts of crop rotation, nitrogen (N) fertilization, and residue return on direct and indirect GHG emissions, theoretical biofuel yield, C pools, and life cycle GHG emissions from bioenergy sorghum production in 2010 and 2011. An experiment established in 2008 near College Station, TX to quantify the impacts of crop management practices on bioenergy sorghum yield and soil properties was utilized, and included two crop rotations (sorghum-sorghum or corn-sorghum), two fertilization levels (0 or 280 kg N ha^(-1) annually), and two residue return rates (0 or 50% biomass residue returned) to assess management impacts on sorghum production, C cycling, and life cycle GHGs. Corn production was poor under moderate drought conditions, while bioenergy sorghum produced relatively large yields under both moderate and severe drought conditions. Nitrogen addition increased crop yields, and rotated sorghum had higher yield than monoculture sorghum. Fluxes of CO_(2) and N_(2)O were higher than those reported in literature and highest soil fluxes were frequently observed following precipitation events during the growing season. Residue return increased cumulative CO_(2) emissions and N fertilization increased N_(2)O emissions. Residue return also increased soil microbial biomass-C, an important indicator of soil quality. Continuous sorghum significantly increased soil organic C (SOC) concentrations near the soil surface and at two depths below 30 cm. Analysis of change in SOC across time to estimate net CO_(2) emissions to the atmosphere revealed bioenergy sorghum production accrued high amounts of SOC annually. Most treatments accrued more than 4 Mg C ha^(-1) yr^(-1) from 2008 to 2012, which indicated great potential for C sequestration and offsetting GHG emissions. Life cycle GHG emissions (as g CO_(2)-eq MJ^(-1)) were all negative due to high SOC increases each year and indicated all bioenergy sorghum production treatments sequestered atmospheric CO_(2) per unit of theoretical energy provided. Despite its relatively low production efficiency, rotated sorghum with N addition and residue return was selected as the ideal bioenergy sorghum production scenario due to a number of sustainability factors. Bioenergy sorghum may offer great benefit as a high-yielding biofuel feedstock with minimal impacts to net GHG emissions.

Storlien, Joseph Orgean

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Life cycle assessment of TV sets in China: A case study of the impacts of CRT monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with the rapid increase in both production and use of TV sets in China, there is an increasing awareness of the environmental impacts related to the accelerating mass production, electricity use, and waste management of these sets. This paper aims to describe the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate the environmental performance of Chinese TV sets. An assessment of the TV set device (focusing on the Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitor) was carried out using a detailed modular LCA based on the international standards of the ISO 14040 series. The LCA was constructed using SimaPro software version 7.2 and expressed with the Eco-indicator' 99 life cycle impact assessment method. For a sensitivity analysis of the overall LCA results, the CML method was used in order to estimate the influence of the choice of the assessment method on the results. Life cycle inventory information was compiled by Ecoinvent 2.2 databases, combined with literature and field investigations on the current Chinese situation. The established LCA study shows that the use stage of such devices has the highest environmental impact, followed by the manufacturing stage. In the manufacturing stage, the CRT and the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) are those components contributing the most environmental impacts. During the use phase, the environmental impacts are due entirely to the methods of electricity generation used to run them, since no other aspects were taken into account for this phase. The final processing step-the end-of-life stage-can lead to a clear environmental benefit when the TV sets are processed through the formal dismantling enterprises in China.

Song Qingbin [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau (Macao); Wang Zhishi, E-mail: zswang@umac.mo [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau (Macao); Li Jinhui; Zeng Xianlai [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effic. Natural Gas-Fired Power Plants (NGCC turbine) K2Orecovery effic. Natural Gas-Fired Power Plants (Simple CycleNG recovery effic. Natural Gas-Fired Power Plants (Utility

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iii 3.4. Co-products of biofuels . . . . . .CYCLE GHG EMISSION ESTIMATES FOR BIOFUELS 3.1. Purpose and10.3.1. Low-GWI biofuels required to meet a 12-state

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Monitoring and Evaluation: Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing mission of this project is the development of statistical tools for analyzing fisheries tagging data in the most precise and appropriate manner possible. This mission also includes providing statistical guidance on the best ways to design large-scale tagging studies. This mission continues because the technologies for conducting fish tagging studies continuously evolve. In just the last decade, fisheries biologists have seen the evolution from freeze-brands and coded wire tags (CWT) to passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, balloon-tags, radiotelemetry, and now, acoustic-tags. With each advance, the technology holds the promise of more detailed and precise information. However, the technology for analyzing and interpreting the data also becomes more complex as the tagging techniques become more sophisticated. The goal of the project is to develop the analytical tools in parallel with the technical advances in tagging studies, so that maximum information can be extracted on a timely basis. Associated with this mission is the transfer of these analytical capabilities to the field investigators to assure consistency and the highest levels of design and analysis throughout the fisheries community. Consequently, this project provides detailed technical assistance on the design and analysis of tagging studies to groups requesting assistance throughout the fisheries community. Ideally, each project and each investigator would invest in the statistical support needed for the successful completion of their study. However, this is an ideal that is rarely if every attained. Furthermore, there is only a small pool of highly trained scientists in this specialized area of tag analysis here in the Northwest. Project 198910700 provides the financial support to sustain this local expertise on the statistical theory of tag analysis at the University of Washington and make it available to the fisheries community. Piecemeal and fragmented support from various agencies and organizations would be incapable of maintaining a center of expertise. The mission of the project is to help assure tagging studies are designed and analyzed from the onset to extract the best available information using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The overarching goals of the project is to assure statistically sound survival studies so that fish managers can focus on the management implications of their findings and not be distracted by concerns whether the studies are statistically reliable or not. Specific goals and objectives of the study include the following: (1) Provide consistent application of statistical methodologies for survival estimation across all salmon life cycle stages to assure comparable performance measures and assessment of results through time, to maximize learning and adaptive management opportunities, and to improve and maintain the ability to responsibly evaluate the success of implemented Columbia River FWP salmonid mitigation programs and identify future mitigation options. (2) Improve analytical capabilities to conduct research on survival processes of wild and hatchery chinook and steelhead during smolt outmigration, to improve monitoring and evaluation capabilities and assist in-season river management to optimize operational and fish passage strategies to maximize survival. (3) Extend statistical support to estimate ocean survival and in-river survival of returning adults. Provide statistical guidance in implementing a river-wide adult PIT-tag detection capability. (4) Develop statistical methods for survival estimation for all potential users and make this information available through peer-reviewed publications, statistical software, and technology transfers to organizations such as NOAA Fisheries, the Fish Passage Center, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey (USGS), US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Public Utility Districts (PUDs), the Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), and other members of the Northwest fisheries community. (5) Provide and maintain statistical software for tag analysis

Skalski, John

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane reformer FTR: Fischer-Tropsch reactor LCA: life3–8, 17 Mark E. Dry, The Fischer–Tropsch process: 1950–2000,From the internet, Fischer–Tropsch process Wikipedia site:

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Wave Packets and Life Cycles of Troughs in the Upper Troposphere: Examples from the Southern Hemisphere Summer Season of 1984/85  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, reanalysis data for the Southern Hemisphere summer season of 1984/85, produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, have been analyzed to examine wave packets and life cycles of baroclinic waves. A ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Characteristic Life Cycle of Upper-Tropospheric Cyclogenetic Precursors during the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents a characteristic life cycle of upper-tropospheric precursors to surface cyclogenesis observed during the field phase of the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA, December 1988–February 1989). ...

Gary M. Lackmann; Daniel Keyser; Lance F. Bosart

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Life Cycle Study of a Diabatic Rossby Wave as a Precursor to Rapid Cyclogenesis in the North Atlantic—Dynamics and Forecast Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of a North Atlantic cyclone in December 2005 that included a rapid propagation phase as a diabatic Rossby wave (DRW) is investigated by means of operational analyses and deterministic forecasts from the ECMWF. A quasigeostrophic ...

Maxi Boettcher; Heini Wernli

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Multiscale Interactions in the Life Cycle of a Tropical Cyclone Simulated in a Global Cloud-System-Resolving Model. Part II: System-Scale and Mesoscale Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Tropical Storm Isobel was simulated reasonably well in the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), a global cloud-system-resolving model. The evolution of the large-scale circulation and the storm-scale structure ...

Hironori Fudeyasu; Yuqing Wang; Masaki Satoh; Tomoe Nasuno; Hiroaki Miura; Wataru Yanase

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A Soft Approach to Encapsulate Sulfur: Polyaniline Nanotubes for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Long Cycle Life  

SciTech Connect

Applications of rechargeable batteries are diverse and range from storing energy from renewable resources such as wind generators and solar arrays , powering electric vehicles and portable electronic devices. Significant R&D efforts have focused on achieving high energy density, long cycling life, low cost, and safety.1 Among all known rechargeable battery systems, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have attracted considerable attention.2, 3 Elemental sulfur is abundant, and is a very attractive cathode material for lithium batteries because of its high theoretical capacity (1672 mAh g-1) and specific energy (2600 Wh kg-1), assuming complete reaction of lithium with sulfur to form Li2S.

Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Jie; Schwenzer, Birgit; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Nie, Zimin; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

420

Specification and implementation of IFC based performance metrics to support building life cycle assessment of hybrid energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Minimizing building life cycle energy consumption is becoming of paramount importance. Performance metrics tracking offers a clear and concise manner of relating design intent in a quantitative form. A methodology is discussed for storage and utilization of these performance metrics through an Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) instantiated Building Information Model (BIM). The paper focuses on storage of three sets of performance data from three distinct sources. An example of a performance metrics programming hierarchy is displayed for a heat pump and a solar array. Utilizing the sets of performance data, two discrete performance effectiveness ratios may be computed, thus offering an accurate method of quantitatively assessing building performance.

Morrissey, Elmer; O' Donnell, James; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac, Vladimir

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cycle Life Studies of Advanced Technology Development Program Gen 1 Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the test results of a special calendar-life test conducted on 18650-size, prototype, lithium-ion battery cells developed to establish a baseline chemistry and performance for the Advanced Technology Development Program. As part of electrical performance testing, a new calendar-life test protocol was used. The test consisted of a once-per-day discharge and charge pulse designed to have minimal impact on the cell yet establish the performance of the cell over a period of time such that the calendar life of the cell could be determined. The calendar life test matrix included two states of charge (i.e., 60 and 80%) and four temperatures (40, 50, 60, and 70°C). Discharge and regen resistances were calculated from the test data. Results indicate that both discharge and regen resistance increased nonlinearly as a function of the test time. The magnitude of the discharge and regen resistance depended on the temperature and state of charge at which the test was conducted. The calculated discharge and regen resistances were then used to develop empirical models that may be useful to predict the calendar life or the cells.

Wright, Randy Ben; Motloch, Chester George

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Asset Utilization Index (AUI) Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Asset Utilization Index (AUI) Guidance Asset Utilization Index (AUI) Guidance AUI Guidance090227.pdf More Documents & Publications Guiding Principles of Real Property Asset...

423

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products, Part 3: LED Environmental Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the third part of a larger U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project to assess the life-cycle environmental and resource impacts in the manufacturing, transport, use, and disposal of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting products in relation to incumbent lighting technologies. All three reports are available on the DOE website (www.ssl.energy.gov/tech_reports.html). • Part 1: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent and LED Lamps; • Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance; • Part 3: LED Environmental Testing. Parts 1 and 2 were published in February and June 2012, respectively. The Part 1 report included a summary of the life-cycle assessment (LCA) process and methodology, provided a literature review of more than 25 existing LCA studies of various lamp types, and performed a meta-analysis comparing LED lamps with incandescent and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). Drawing from the Part 1 findings, Part 2 performed a more detailed assessment of the LED manufacturing process and used these findings to provide a comparative LCA taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. Both reports concluded that the life-cycle environmental impact of a given lamp is dominated by the energy used during lamp operation—the upstream generation of electricity drives the total environmental footprint of the product. However, a more detailed understanding of end-of-life disposal considerations for LED products has become increasingly important as their installation base has grown. The Part 3 study (reported herein) was undertaken to augment the LCA findings with chemical analysis of a variety of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps using standard testing procedures. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different models, were tested to determine whether any of 17 elements were present at levels exceeding California or Federal regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste. Key findings include: • The selected models were generally found to be below thresholds for Federally regulated elements; • All CFLs and LED lamps and most incandescent lamps exceeded California thresholds for Copper; • Most CFL samples exceeded California thresholds for Antimony and Nickel, and half of the LED samples exceeded California thresholds for Zinc; • The greatest contributors were the screw bases, drivers, ballasts, and wires or filaments; • Overall concentrations in LED lamps were comparable to cell phones and other types of electronic devices, and were generally attributable to components other than the internal LED light sources; • Although the life-cycle environmental impact of the LED lamps is favorable when compared to CFLs and incandescent lamps, recycling will likely gain importance as consumer adoption increases. This study was exploratory in nature and was not intended to provide a definitive indication of regulatory compliance for any specific lamp model or technology. Further study would be needed to more broadly characterize the various light source technologies; to more accurately and precisely characterize a specific model; or to determine whether product redesign would be appropriate.

Tuenge, Jason R.; Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Development and Life Cycle of the Indian Monsoon: Effect of the 30–50 Day Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity-potential fields generated from the FGGE III-b horizontal winds of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts were subjected to an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis to extract the annual cycle and the 30–50 day ...

Tsing-Chang Chen; Ren-Yow Tzeng; Ming-Cheng Yen

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Life Cycle of a Minimal Protocell---A Dissipative Particle Dynamics Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross-reactions and other systematic difficulties generated by the coupling of functional chemical subsystems pose the largest challenge for assembling a viable protocell in the laboratory. Our current work seeks to identify and clarify such key issues ... Keywords: Artificial life, chemical reactions, dissipative particle dynamics, minimal protocell self-assembly

Harold Fellermann; Steen Rasmussen; Hans-Joachim Ziock; Ricard V. Solé

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, we used Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model to assess the life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of four soybean-derived fuels: biodiesel fuel produced via transesterification, two renewable diesel fuels (I and II) produced from different hydrogenation processes, and renewable gasoline produced from catalytic cracking. Five approaches were employed to allocate the coproducts: a displacement approach; two allocation approaches, one based on the energy value and the other based on the market value; and two hybrid approaches that integrated the displacement and allocation methods. The relative rankings of soybean-based fuels in terms of energy and environmental impacts were different under the different approaches, and the reasons were analyzed. Results from the five allocation approaches showed that although the production and combustion of soybean-based fuels might increase total energy use, they could have significant benefits in reducing fossil energy use (>52%), petroleum use (>88%), and GHG emissions (>57%) relative to petroleum fuels. This study emphasized the importance of the methods used to deal with coproduct issues and provided a comprehensive solution for conducting a life-cycle assessment of fuel pathways with multiple coproducts.

Huo, H.; Wang, M.; Bloyd, C.; Putsche, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Asset Management: A Simple Management Tool To Be Fiscally Responsible And Competitive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most public agencies are under heavy scrutiny, to produce within the allotted funds and re-engineer the processes to achieve savings and operate like a private enterprise. Many industries and institutions have faced increasing maintenance costs over the last few years, far outpacing the operational or production costs. The cost of maintenance is going up at an average rate of 9 - 11% per year and it is our estimate that the total maintenance cost in the US exceeds $ 150 Billion in both the private and public sectors and this does not include renewal costs. It is estimated that the assets in question could be in the many trillions and this is a wild guess as true replacement cost figures are hard to obtain. This threat has been heeded by some, but not by most. Those who have noticed this threat have found that integrating their maintenance operations has made them streamline, become efficient, manage the backlog, prioritize the maintenance activities and the replacement of assets, and provide the building blocks for the life cycle replacement program. Integration brings about the kind of business practices desired by a world class organization that seeks to contain costs while maintaining the services demanded by the stakeholders. Modern maintenance management business practices provides the tools necessary for agencies to run their operations like a business, and reap the benefits of a privately run corporation. With cost effectiveness and better productivity, privatization will never be an option to be considered, as there will be no benefit gained by an entity wanting to take over. This paper and others are from the Asset Management Super-sized Session held at the APWA Annual Congress and Exposition in Philadelphia September, 2001. Electroni...

Raj Sivalingam Global; Y. (raj Sivalingam

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Robust Maintenance Policies in Asset Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Maintenance and Repair Policies in Asset ManagementROBUST MAINTENANCE POLICIES IN ASSET MANAGEMENT Kenneth D.management policies and shows how the proposed approach may reduce maintenance and

Kuhn, Kenneth D.; Madanat, Samer M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Life Cycle Testing and Evaluation of Energy Storage Devices - Summer Ferreira, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life Life C ycle T es,ng a nd Evalua,on o f E nergy S torage Devices Summer Ferreira, Wes Baca, Tom Hund and David Rose September 28, 2012 Photos placed in horizontal position with even amount of white space between photos and header Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2011-XXXXP Sandia Battery Testing Introduction FY-10 East Penn UltraBattery® Lead-Acid/Supercap Furukawa UltraBattery® Lead-Acid/Supercap International Battery Li-FePO 4 GS Yuasa granular silica tubular gel The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of Dr. Imre Gyuk and the

430

EM Contractors for Capital Asset Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Read the EM Contractors for Capital Asset Projects list, which includes the project name, number, site, and contractor.

431

Third Power Delivery Asset Management Conference Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's utility managers face an array of conflicting business objectives. In response, many utilities are considering implementing asset management concepts. The Third EPRI Power Delivery Asset Management Conference highlighted the work of researchers, consultants, software providers, and utilities in identifying and overcoming challenges faced in implementing asset management programs for transmission, distribution, and independent system operator (ISO) business segments of power delivery.

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

432

Five Essays on Modern Asset Management Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a basic orientation and education about state-of-the-art asset management techniques in American industry and examples of how they can be used for managing electricity generation assets. The report describes EPRI R&D activities in support of generation asset management and discusses how current and planned research leverages these state-of-the-art techniques.

1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

High cycle life, cobalt free, AB{5} metal hydride electrodes [Revised 11/10/98  

SciTech Connect

Cobalt-free La(Ni,Sn)5+x alloys have been identified as low cost, corrosion resistant electrodes for nickel-metal-hydride batteries. The structure of theses alloys are similar to non-stoichiometric La(Ni,Cu)5+x compounds; i.e., they retain the P6/mmm space group while Ni dumbbells occupy La sites. Electrodes fabricated from some of these novel alloys have capacities and cycle lives equivalent to those made from commercial, battery grade, AB5 alloys with cobalt.

Vogt, Tom; Reilly, J.J.; Johnson, J.R.; Adzic, G.D.; Ticianelli, E.A.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

Combustion Turbine/Combined-Cycle Operations and Maintenance Cost Analyzer, Version 8.61  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CTCC O&M Cost Analyzer is a spreadsheet software product that estimates operations and maintenance (O&M) costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle plants for specific gas turbine models over the operating life of the asset The CTCC O&M Cost Analyzer software contains powerful capabilities to assist users in evaluating non-fuel O&M costs and in supporting a life-cycle cost evaluation perspective.  The software uses a "bottoms-up" approach for ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES--INTEGRATED LIFE-CYCLE OPTIMIZATION INITIATIVES FOR THE HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT--WASTE TREATMENT PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the ongoing integrated life-cycle optimization efforts to achieve both design flexibility and design stability for activities associated with the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford. Design flexibility is required to support the Department of Energy Office of River Protection Balance of Mission objectives, and design stability to meet the Waste Treatment Plant construction and commissioning requirements in order to produce first glass in 2007. The Waste Treatment Plant is a large complex project that is driven by both technology and contractual requirements. It is also part of a larger overall mission, as a component of the River Protection Project, which is driven by programmatic requirements and regulatory, legal, and fiscal constraints. These issues are further complicated by the fact that both of the major contractors involved have a different contract type with DOE, and neither has a contract with the other. This combination of technical and programmatic drivers, constraints, and requirements will continue to provide challenges and opportunities for improvement and optimization. The Bechtel National, Inc. team is under contract to engineer, procure, construct, commission and test the Waste Treatment Plant on or ahead of schedule, at or under cost, and with a throughput capacity equal to or better than specified. The Department of Energy is tasked with the long term mission of waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. While each mission is a compliment and inextricably linked to one another, they are also at opposite ends of the spectrum, in terms of expectations of one another. These mission requirements, that are seemingly in opposition to one another, pose the single largest challenge and opportunity for optimization: one of balance. While it is recognized that design maturation and optimization are the normal responsibility of any engineering firm responsible for any given project, the aspects of integrating requirements and the management of issues across contract boundaries is a more difficult matter. This aspect, one of a seamless systems approach to the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site, is the focus of the Optimization Studies. This ''big O''Optimization of Life-Cycle operations is what is meant when the term ''optimization'' is used on the River Protection Project and initiatives cited in this paper. From the early contractor centric methods and processes used to move toward an integrated solution, through extensive partnering approaches, to the current quality initiatives with multi-organizational participation, significant progress is being made towards achieving the goal of truly integrated life-cycle optimization for the Department of Energy's River Protection Project and Waste Treatment Plant.

Auclair, K. D.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

436

Life Cycle Results from the IGCC LCI&C Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results from the IGCC LCI&C Study Results from the IGCC LCI&C Study Robert E. James III, Timothy J. Skone Office of Systems, Analyses and Planning National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), U.S. DOE Revision 2, June 2013 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 ‹#› Conceptual Study Boundary Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) ‹#› LCA's Expanded Boundary for IGCC Mine Construction Train & Rail Manufacturing Plant Construction/ Installation Coal Extraction/ Operation Train Operation Mine Decommissioning Stage #1 Raw Material Acquisition Stage #2 Raw Material Transport Plant Operation Carbon Capture (CC), Operation CO 2 Pipeline, Operation CO 2 Sequestration, Operation Plant Decommissioning Construction & Installation Deinstallation Transmission & Distribution, Operation

437

Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Commercial Refrigeration Systems Using Life Cycle Climate Performance Analysis: From System Design to Refrigerant Options  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) analysis is used to estimate lifetime direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent gas emissions of various refrigerant options and commercial refrigeration system designs, including the multiplex DX system with various hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, the HFC/R744 cascade system incorporating a medium-temperature R744 secondary loop, and the transcritical R744 booster system. The results of the LCCP analysis are presented, including the direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for each refrigeration system and refrigerant option. Based on the results of the LCCP analysis, recommendations are given for the selection of low GWP replacement refrigerants for use in existing commercial refrigeration systems, as well as for the selection of commercial refrigeration system designs with low carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, suitable for new installations.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

El Hanandeh, Ali, E-mail: alel5804@uni.sydney.edu.a [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); El-Zein, Abbas [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

What Can Meta-Analyses Tell Us About the Reliability of Life Cycle Assessment for Decision Support?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature is vast and has grown over the last decade at a dauntingly rapid rate. Many LCAs have been published on the same or very similar technologies or products, in some cases leading to hundreds of publications. One result is the impression among decision makers that LCAs are inconclusive, owing to perceived and real variability in published estimates of life cycle impacts. Despite the extensive available literature and policy need formore conclusive assessments, only modest attempts have been made to synthesize previous research. A significant challenge to doing so are differences in characteristics of the considered technologies and inconsistencies in methodological choices (e.g., system boundaries, coproduct allocation, and impact assessment methods) among the studies that hamper easy comparisons and related decision support. An emerging trend is meta-analysis of a set of results from LCAs, which has the potential to clarify the impacts of a particular technology, process, product, or material and produce more robust and policy-relevant results. Meta-analysis in this context is defined here as an analysis of a set of published LCA results to estimate a single or multiple impacts for a single technology or a technology category, either in a statistical sense (e.g., following the practice in the biomedical sciences) or by quantitative adjustment of the underlying studies to make them more methodologically consistent. One example of the latter approach was published in Science by Farrell and colleagues (2006) clarifying the net energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ethanol, in which adjustments included the addition of coproduct credit, the addition and subtraction of processes within the system boundary, and a reconciliation of differences in the definition of net energy metrics. Such adjustments therefore provide an even playing field on which all studies can be considered and at the same time specify the conditions of the playing field itself. Understanding the conditions under which a meta-analysis was conducted is important for proper interpretation of both the magnitude and variability in results. This special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology includes 12 high-quality metaanalyses and critical reviews of LCAs that advance understanding of the life cycle environmental impacts of different technologies, processes, products, and materials. Also published are three contributions on methodology and related discussions of the role of meta-analysis in LCA. The goal of this special supplemental issue is to contribute to the state of the science in LCA beyond the core practice of producing independent studies on specific products or technologies by highlighting the ability of meta-analysis of LCAs to advance understanding in areas of extensive existing literature. The inspiration for the issue came from a series of meta-analyses of life cycle GHG emissions from electricity generation technologies based on research from the LCA Harmonization Project of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, which also provided financial support for this special supplemental issue. (See the editorial from this special supplemental issue [Lifset 2012], which introduces this supplemental issue and discusses the origins, funding, peer review, and other aspects.) The first article on reporting considerations for meta-analyses/critical reviews for LCA is from Heath and Mann (2012), who describe the methods used and experience gained in NREL's LCA Harmonization Project, which produced six of the studies in this special supplemental issue. Their harmonization approach adapts key features of systematic review to identify and screen published LCAs followed by a meta-analytical procedure to adjust published estimates to ones based on a consistent set of methods and assumptions to allow interstudy comparisons and conclusions to be made. In a second study on methods, Zumsteg and colleagues (2012) propose a checklist for a sta

Brandao, M.; Heath, G.; Cooper, J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline * Goals * Scope & schedule * Guiding principles * Program design issues - Metrics - Rating method - Rating scale - Opportunities for efficiency improvement - Quality assurance Please submit clarifying questions during today's webinar via the Q&A function of Live Meeting. 3 eere.energy.gov National Building Rating Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "life cycle asset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES The Hanford Site provides the opportunity for long-term sustainable energy and industry development. The area boasts a specialized workforce that is highly educated and well-established; is rich in resources including land, infrastructure, low-cost energy, and available workforce; more scientists and engineers per capita than any other area in the Pacific Northwest; and is an optimum location for the development of sustainable energy solutions. Land The Hanford Site is one of the largest remaining land mega-sites available in the United States. * The 586-square-mile Hanford Site includes 39,000 acres designated for industrial use (9,000 acres for R&D). * The Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement allows for a planning process

442

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Risk-Informed Asset Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains business requirements for Risk-Informed Asset Management (RIAM) software. The requirements pertain to both a full-blown version of RIAM (including uncertainty analysis of the economic and safety risk of a proposed equipment improvement project) and for RIAM Level 1 project screening software. The RIAM Level 1 analysis is a bounding process intended to estimate the most optimistic effect that the proposed investment would have on plant safety, cost, and revenue. The optimistic assumpt...

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Information-Based Asset Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new framework for asset price dynamics is introduced in which the concept of noisy information about future cash flows is used to derive the price processes. In this framework an asset is defined by its cash-flow structure. Each cash flow is modelled by a random variable that can be expressed as a function of a collection of independent random variables called market factors. With each such "X-factor" we associate a market information process, the values of which are accessible to market agents. Each information process is a sum of two terms; one contains true information about the value of the market factor; the other represents "noise". The noise term is modelled by an independent Brownian bridge. The market filtration is assumed to be that generated by the aggregate of the independent information processes. The price of an asset is given by the expectation of the discounted cash flows in the risk-neutral measure, conditional on the information provided by the market filtration. When the cash flows are th...

Brody, Dorje C; Macrina, Andrea

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Monitoring and Evaluation; Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the statistical analysis and consulting activities performed under Contract No. 00025093, Project No. 199105100, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) during 2006. These efforts are focused on providing real-time predictions of outmigration timing, assessment of life-history performance measures, evaluation of status and trends in recovery, and guidance on the design and analysis of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife studies monitoring and evaluation studies. The overall objective of the project is to provide BPA and the rest of the fisheries community with statistical guidance on design, analysis, and interpretation of monitoring data, which will lead to improved monitoring and evaluation of salmonid mitigation programs in the Columbia/Snake River Basin. This overall goal is being accomplished by making fisheries data readily available for public scrutiny, providing statistical guidance on the design and analyses of studies by hands-on support and written documents, and providing real-time analyses of tagging results during the smolt outmigration for review by decision makers. For over a decade, this project has been providing in-season projections of smolt outmigration timing to assist in spill management. As many as 52 different fish stocks at 10 different hydroprojects are tracked in real-time to predict the 'percent of run to date' and 'date to specific percentile'. The project also conducts added-value analyses of historical tagging data to understand relationships between fish responses, environmental factors, and anthropogenic effects. The statistical analysis of historical tagging data crosses agency lines in order to assimilate information on salmon population dynamics irrespective of origin. The lessons learned from past studies are used to improve the design and analyses of future monitoring and evaluation efforts. Through these efforts, the project attempts to provide the fisheries community with reliable analyses and interpretations of monitoring data to evaluate hydrosystem operations and the recovery of endangered and threatened salmonid stocks.

Skalski, John

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Monitoring and Evaluation; Statistical Support for Life-cycle Studies, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the statistical analysis and consulting activities performed under Contract No. 00004134, Project No. 199105100 funded by Bonneville Power Administration during 2003. These efforts are focused on providing real-time predictions of outmigration timing, assessment of life-history performance measures, evaluation of status and trends in recovery, and guidance on the design and analysis of Columbia Basin fish and wildlife studies monitoring and evaluation studies. The overall objective of the project is to provide BPA and the rest of the fisheries community with statistical guidance on design, analysis, and interpretation of monitoring data, which will lead to improved monitoring and evaluation of salmonid mitigation programs in the Columbia/Snake River Basin. This overall goal is being accomplished by making fisheries data readily available for public scrutiny, providing statistical guidance on the design and analyses of studies by hands-on support and written documents, and providing real-time analyses of tagging results during the smolt outmigration for review by decision makers. For a decade, this project has been providing in-season projections of smolt outmigration timing to assist in spill management. As many as 50 different fish stocks at 8 different hydroprojects are tracked and real-time to predict the 'percent of run to date' and 'date to specific percentile'. The project also conducts added-value analyses of historical tagging data to understand relationships between fish responses, environmental factors, and anthropogenic effects. The statistical analysis of historical tagging data crosses agency lines in order to assimilate information on salmon population dynamics irrespective of origin. The lessons learned from past studies are used to improve the design and analyses of future monitoring and evaluation efforts. Through these efforts, the project attempts to provide the fisheries community with reliable analyses and interpretations of monitoring data to evaluate hydrosystem operations and the recovery of endangered and threatened salmonid stocks.

Skalski, John

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Demonstration of Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components: With Pilot Applications at Oconee and Prairie Island Nuclear Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, interest is growing in life cycle management (LCM) of nuclear plants over their remaining operating life. This report describes a process and software tools for identifying the most effective and economical way to manage the aging and obsolescence of important systems, structures, and components -- thereby enhancing their long-term reliability, availability, and value. Also described are pilot LCM planning studies at Oconee and Prairie Island nucle...

2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

449

Information Technology for Enterprise Asset Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise asset management is a maturing discipline that facilitates business decisions about long-term planning, asset replacement, capital investments, maintenance priorities, and risk management. The growing number of new business processes and applications that support asset management depend on successful interaction with data and information in enterprise systems such as work management, operations data historians, graphical information systems, and financial systems. Concurrently, business applic...

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricityAn Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

451

The life cycle CO2 emission performance of the DOE/NASA solar power satellite system: a comparison of alternative power generation systems in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar power generation and, in particular, space solar power generation seem to be one of the most promising electric power generation technologies for reducing emissions of global warming gases (denoted collectively as CO2 emissions below). ... Keywords: Alternative technology, CO, Department of Energy (DOE)/NASA reference system, life cycle assessment (LCA), power generation, solar power satellite (SPS)

H. Hayami; M. Nakamura; K. Yoshioka

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, it produces energy and does not emit fossil carbonCCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood

Florida, University of

453

Progress in Photovoltaics Research and Applications, 14:179-190, 2006 Energy Pay-Back and Life Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hansen3 and H.C. Kim2 1 Solar Energy Campaign, 52 Columbia Street, Farmingdale, NY 11735, E such savings and lower emissions is timely. Previous life-cycle assessments of field and rooftop PV systems plants is much greater than the energy requirements in rooftop and facade installations.1

454

ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANDERSON-TEIXEIRA FINAL PROOF.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 3/7/2011 9:29 AM 589 DO BIOFUELS LIFE CYCLE ANALYSES ACCURATELY QUANTIFY THE CLIMATE IMPACTS OF BIOFUELS-RELATED LAND USE CHANGE? Kristina J. Anderson in determining the sustainability of biofuels. To ensure that legal standards are effective in limiting climate

DeLucia, Evan H.

455

Life Cycle Management Planning at Wolf Creek Generating Station: EDG, Main Steam, and Feedwater Isolation Valves, and Reactor Protec tion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes very important to keep plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms (either 40-year or 60-year terms). This report provides the industry with lessons learned from applying EPRI's LCM planning process to three SSCs at Wolf Creek Generating Station.

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

DEC Asset Rating | CUBIC APPLE LTD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

NON-DOMESTIC ENERGY ... if you are worried about the DEC asset rating for your public building why not get in contact with Cubic Apple on 01529 300 ...

457

ORISE: Asset Readiness Management System (ARMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How ORISE is Making a Difference Asset Readiness Management System (ARMS) Tracks Emergency Response Exercises and Equipment Developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and...

458

real_property_asset_ver_10.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOEME-0060 Editors Notes: This Real Property Asset Management Plan covers the Department of Energy including the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Energy Information...

459

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Asset Score Energy Asset Score Photo of a laptop with energy asset score image on the screen The free online Asset Scoring Tool will generate a score based on inputs about the building envelope and buildling systems (heating, ventilation, cooling, lighting, and service hot water). Launch Energy Asset Score The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a Commercial Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) program to allow building owners and managers to more accurately assess building energy performance. The Asset Score program will act as a national standard and will include the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (Asset Scoring Tool) to evaluate the physical characteristics and as-built energy efficiency of buildings. The Asset Scoring Tool will identify cost-effective energy efficient improvements that, if implemented, can reduce energy bills and potentially improve building asset value. View the Asset Score fact sheet for a brief overview of the program.

460

Environmental Life Cycle Implications of Using Bagasse-Derived Ethanol as a Gasoline Oxygenate in Mumbai (Bombay)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bagasse is the fibrous residue generated during sugar production and can be a desirable feedstock for fuel ethanol production. About 15%--25% of the bagasse is left after satisfying the mills' energy requirements, and this excess bagasse can be used in a bioconversion process to make ethanol. It is estimated that a 23 million L/yr ({approximately}6 million gal/yr) ethanol facility is feasible by combining excess bagasse from three larger sugar mills in Maharashtra state. The plant could supply about half of the ethanol demand in Mumbai, assuming that all gasoline is sold as an E10 fuel, a blend of 90% gasoline and 10% ethanol by volume. The life cycle assessment (LCA) performed in this study demonstrated the potentially significant benefits of diverting excess bagasse in Maharashtra to ethanol production, as opposed to disposing it by burning. In particular, lower net values for the ethanol production scenario were observed for the following: fossil energy consumption, and emissions of carbon monoxide , hydrocarbons (except methane), SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, and methane. The lower greenhouse potential of the ethanol scenario is also important in the context of Clean Development Mechanism and Joint Implementation because India is a developing country.

Kadam, K.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

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