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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Long-Term Evaluation of Temperature Profiles Measured by an Operational Raman Lidar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the accuracy and calibration stability of temperature profiles derived from an operational Raman lidar over a 2-yr period from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. The lidar, which uses the rotational Raman technique for ...

Rob K. Newsom; David D. Turner; John E. M. Goldsmith

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

3

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date...

5

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

6

Comparison of temperature and humidity profiles with elastic-backscatter lidar data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution analyzes elastic-backscatter lidar data and temperature and humidity profiles from radiosondes acquired in Barcelona in July 1992. Elastic-backscatter lidar data reveal the distribution of aerosols within the volume of atmosphere scanned. By comparing this information with temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere at a similar time, we are able to asses de relationship among aerosol distribution and atmospheric stability or water content, respectively. Comparisons have shown how lidar`s revealed layers of aerosols correspond to atmospheric layers with different stability condition and water content.

Soriano, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buttler, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baldasano, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Impact of airborne Doppler wind lidar profiles on numerical simulations of a tropical cyclone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Impact of airborne Doppler wind lidar profiles on numerical simulations Regional Campaign (TPARC) field experiment in 2008, an airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) was onboard the U measurements on the numerical simulation of Typhoon Nuri (2008) in its formation phase. With an advanced

Pu, Zhaoxia

8

Vertical profiles of halocarbons in the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stratospheric air samples collected between 10 and 35 km altitude by means of a cryogenic sampler were analyzed by gaschromatography. Thus vertical profiles of source gases for halogen radicals were derived, such as CCl4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, CClF3, CF4, C2F3Cl3, C2F4Cl2, C2F5Cl, C2F6, CH3Cl, CH3CCl3, CHF2Cl, CH3Br, CBrF3, and CBrCl2F. Systematic discrepancies between measured and modelled halocarbon profiles point to deficiencies of present one- and two-dimensional models. Measurements of fully halogenated hydrocarbons provide a tool for systematically studying these deficiencies and thus improving the models. 40 references.

Fabian, P.; Borchers, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lidar Scanning of Momentum Flux in and above the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods to measure the vertical flux of horizontal momentum using both continuous wave and pulsed Doppler lidar profilers are evaluated. The lidar measurements are compared to momentum flux observations performed with sonic anemometers over flat ...

J. Mann; A. Pea; F. Bingl; R. Wagner; M. S. Courtney

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

Ferrare, R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

11

RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

FERRARE,R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

12

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Particle Size Vertical Profile Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inhomogeneity in terms of ice crystal sizes and shapes. The vertical variation of ice crystal size can alter the radiative heatingcooling profiles in cirrus cloudy...

13

Estimating forest structural characteristics with airborne lidar scanning and a near-real time profiling laser systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) directly measures canopy vertical structures, and provides an effective remote sensing solution to accurate and spatiallyexplicit mapping of forest characteristics, such as canopy height and Leaf Area Index...

Zhao, Kaiguang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Method for Estimating the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation Rate from a Vertically Pointing Doppler Lidar, and Independent Evaluation from Balloon-Borne In Situ Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method of estimating dissipation rates from a vertically pointing Doppler lidar with high temporal and spatial resolution has been evaluated by comparison with independent measurements derived from a balloon-borne sonic anemometer. This method ...

Ewan J. OConnor; Anthony J. Illingworth; Ian M. Brooks; Christopher D. Westbrook; Robin J. Hogan; Fay Davies; Barbara J. Brooks

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period March 2004 - February 2005. The Aerosol Best-Estimate (ABE) Value-Added Procedure (VAP) is to provide continuous estimates of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single-scatter albedo, and asymmetry parameter above the Northern Slopes of Alaska (NSA) facility. In the interest of temporal continuity, we have developed an algorithm that

16

Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characterizing Vertical Mass Flux Profiles in Aeolian Saltation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*) - 0.4133 (r^2=0.65). The values of beta ranged from 6.11 ? 17.83 for all the experiments. The Rouse profiles calculated using this approach predict very similar vertical distributions to the observed data and predicted 86% and 81% of the observed...

Farrell, Eugene

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Majer, 2003) (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

19

Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

Ferrare, Richard

20

Development of All-fiber Coherent Doppler Lidar to Measure Atmosphere Wind Speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An all-fiber pulsed coherent Doppler lidar is developed to measure wind profiles. The maximum horizontal and vertical range for wind speed is 4.2km and 2km with speed accuracy of...

Liu, Jiqiao; Chen, Weibiao; Zhu, Xiaopeng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Identifying the top of the tropical tropopause layer from vertical mass flux analysis and CALIPSO lidar cloud observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

defined as the level of zero net radiative heating, which occurs near 14.5­15 km [e.g., Folkins et al layer (TTL) by analyzing the vertical mass flux profile based on radiative transfer calculations will rise into the stratosphere. Thus convection has to transport air at least to the zero radiative heating

Hochberg, Michael

22

Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

23

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-120 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman SA McFarlane October 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

24

Instrument Development Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical Radiation Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tethered Balloon Sounding System Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical Radiation Profiles C. D. Whiteman J. M. Alzheimer G. A. Anderson M. R. Garnich W. J. Shaw Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 platform is built on a triangular frame identical to the one on the Sky Platform, but the MSP carries no radiometric sensors, control loop, or leveling motors. Rather. the MSP is instrumented to measure the motions to which the Sky Platform will be subjected; the data provide engineering information to be used in the final design of the control loop and structural elements of the Sky Platform. An array of six miniature solid state accelerometers provides the raw data from which balloon motions are determined. Future plans call for the installation of a small attitude gyroscope on the

25

The Influence of Turbulence and Vertical Wind Profile in Wind Turbine Power Curve  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To identify the influence of turbulence and vertical wind profile in wind turbine performance, wind speed measurements at different heights have been ... equipment, specifically a pulsed wave one. The wind profil...

A. Honrubia; A. Vigueras-Rodrguez

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Measurements of Wind Speed, Direction, and Vertical Profiles in an Evergreen Forest in Central Cambodia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wind characteristics of speed, direction, and vertical profile were studied ... Thom Province, Cambodia. Three seasonal patterns of wind speeds and directions were identified. The first occurred ... , as well...

Koji Tamai; Akira Shimizu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Identification of subsurface fractures in the Austin Chalk using vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF SUSSURFACE FRACTURES IN THE AUSTIN CHALK USING VERTICAL SEISMIC PROFILES A Thesis by KYLE THOMAS LEWALLEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Geophysics IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FRACTURES IN THE AUSTIN CHALK USING VERTICAL SEISMIC PROFILES A Thesis by KYLE THOMAS LEWALLEN Approved as to style and content by: T. W. Spencer...

Lewallen, Kyle Thomas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2003), 129, pp. 30793098 doi: 10.1256/qj. Simulation of Wind Profiles from a Space-borne Doppler Wind Lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2003), 129, pp. 3079­3098 doi: 10.1256/qj. Simulation of Wind Profiles on numerical weather prediction and climate processes. This paper describes the simulation of Aeolus LOS wind from a Space-borne Doppler Wind Lidar By G.J. MARSEILLE and A. STOFFELEN KNMI, The Netherlands

Stoffelen, Ad

29

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-100 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report R Newsom January 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

30

Spaceborne profiling of atmospheric temperature and particle extinction with pure rotational Raman lidar and of relative humidity in combination with differential absorption lidar: performance simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a spaceborne temperature lidar based on the pure rotational Raman (RR) technique in the UV has been simulated. Results show that such a system deployed onboard a low-Earth-orbit satellite would provide global-scale clear-sky temperature measurements in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with precisions that satisfy World Meteorological Organization (WMO) threshold observational requirements for numerical weather prediction and climate research applications. Furthermore, nighttime temperature measurements would still be within the WMO threshold observational requirements in the presence of several cloud structures. The performance of aerosol extinction measurements from space, which can be carried out simultaneously with temperature measurements by RR lidar, is also assessed. Furthermore, we discuss simulations of relative humidity measurements from space obtained from RR temperature measurements and water-vapor data measured with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique.

Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

31

Classification of Vertical Wind Speed Profiles Observed Above a Sloping Forest at Nighttime Using the Bulk Richardson Number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind speed profiles above a forest canopy relate to ... atmosphere. Many studies have reported that vertical wind speed profiles above a relatively flat forest can ... be classified by a stability index developed...

Hikaru Komatsu; Norifumi Hotta; Koichiro Kuraji

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND FARM SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are compared and tested: Four models tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rødsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind

Heinemann, Detlev

33

Concept of spinsonde for multi-cycle measurement of vertical wind profile of tropical cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical cyclones and cyclogenesis are active areas of research. Chute-operated dropsondes jointly developed by NASA and NCAR are capable of acquiring high resolution vertical wind profile of tropical cyclones. This paper proposes a chute-free vertical retardation technique (termed as spinsonde) that can accurately measure vertical wind profile. Unlike the expendable dropsondes, the spinsonde allows multi-cycle measurement to be performed within a single flight. Proof of principle is demonstrated using a simulation software and results indicate that the GPS ground speed correlates with the wind speeds to within +/-5 km/h. This technique reduces flying weight and increases payload capacity by eliminating bulky chutes. Maximum cruising speed (Vh) achieved by the spinsonde UAV is 372 km/h.

Poh, Chung-How

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Unexpected vertical wind speed profiles in the boundary layer over the southern North Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shallow atmospheric internal boundary layers over the southern part of the North Sea are common. Analysis of one year of meteorological data from the FINO1 research platform in the German Bight reveals that vertical wind speed profiles frequently do not conform to the expected modified logarithmic profile of MoninObukhov similarity theory. The wind profiles are mostly characterized by local maxima or kinks within the first 100m over the sea surface. The data reveals the most frequent occurrence of a single maximum, but multiple maxima are often present, and there are sometimes even reversed profiles with the wind speed decreasing with height. The expected modified logarithmic profile occurs for a minority of cases. The evidence suggests the frequent presence of internal boundary layers that propagate from coastal land masses that surround the North Sea. A census of vertical wind speed profiles is presented that shows how different inflection states are linked with wind speed and atmospheric stability. The kinks are most prevalent in the upper part of the measurement range near the 100m hub height of modern offshore the wind turbines, so that internal boundary layers represent a possible concern for the offshore wind energy industry in the North Sea region.

Anthony J. Kettle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Lidar-based Research and Innovation at DTU Wind Energy a Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As wind turbines during the past decade have increased in size so have the challenges met by the atmospheric boundary-layer meteorologists and the wind energy society to measure and characterize the huge-volume wind fields surpassing and driving them. At the DTU Wind Energy test site "sterild" for huge wind turbines, the hub-height of a recently installed 8 MW Vestas V164 turbine soars 143 meters up above the ground, and its rotor of amazing 164 meters in diameter make the turbine tips flicker 225 meters into the sky. Following the revolution in photonics-based telecommunication at the turn of the Millennium new fibre-based wind lidar technologies emerged and DTU Wind Energy, at that time embedded within Rise National Laboratory, began in collaboration with researchers from wind lidar companies to measure remote sensed wind profiles and turbulence structures within the atmospheric boundary layer with the emerging, at that time new, all-fibre-based 1.55 ? coherent detection wind lidars. Today, ten years later, DTU Wind Energy routinely deploys ground-based vertical profilers instead of met masts for high-precision measurements of mean wind profiles and turbulence profiles. At the departments test site "Hvsre" DTU Wind Energy also routinely calibrate and accredit wind lidar manufactures wind lidars. Meanwhile however, new methodologies for power curve assessment based on ground-based and nacelle based lidars have also emerged. For improving the turbines power curve assessments and for advancing their control with feed-forward wind measurements experience has also been gained with wind lidars installed on turbine nacelles and integrated into the turbines rotating spinners. A new mobile research infrastructure WindScanner.dk has also emerged at DTU Wind Energy. Wind and turbulence fields are today scanned from sets of three simultaneously in space and time synchronized scanning lidars. One set consists of three fast scanning continuous-wave based wind lidars (short-range system), and another consisting of three synchronized pulsed wind lidar systems (long-range system). Today, wind lidar profilers and WindScanners are routinely deployed and operated during field tests and measurement campaigns. Lidars have been installed and operated from ground, on offshore platforms, and also as scanning lidars integrated in operating turbines. As a result, wind profiles and also detailed 3D scanning of wind and turbulence fields have been achieved: 1) of the free wind aloft, 2) over complex terrain, 3) at coastal ranges with land-sea interfaces, 4) offshore, 5) in turbine inflow induction zone, and 6) of the complex and turbulent flow fields in the wakes inside wind parks.

T Mikkelsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Four-Year LidarSun Photometer Aerosol Study at So Paulo, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A backscattering lidar system, the first of this kind in Brazil, has been used to provide the vertical profile of the aerosol backscatter coefficient at 532 nm up to an altitude of 46 km above sea level (ASL), in a suburban area in the city of ...

Eduardo Landulfo; Alexandros Papayannis; Ani Sobral Torres; Sandro Toshio Uehara; Lucila Maria Viola Pozzetti; Caio Alencar de Matos; Patricia Sawamura; Walter Morinobu Nakaema; Wellington de Jesus

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In December 1997 LBNL obtained a VSP in well 46-28 to determine the seismic reflectivity in the area and to obtain velocity information for the design and potential processing of the proposed 3-D seismic survey Feighner et al. (1998). Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. References M. Feighner, R. Gritto, T. M. Daley, H. Keers, E. L. Majer (1999)

38

2.1 RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors with the use of narrowband (~0.4 nm bandpass) filters, reduces the background skylight and, therefore

39

Lidar characterization of crystalline silica generation and gravel plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lidar vertical pro?les and wind speed data were used toof wind speed and concentration (based on lidar verticalvertical plane at a given height, z, was calculated as the product of the wind speed

Trzepla-Nabaglo, K.; Shiraki, R.; Holm'en, B. A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

J.V. Reynolds-Fleming et al Portable Auton. Vert. Profiler for Estuaries Portable Autonomous Vertical Profiler for Estuarine Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J.V. Reynolds-Fleming et al Portable Auton. Vert. Profiler for Estuaries Portable Autonomous-Fleming et al 1 Abstract The design and implementation of a portable autonomous vertical profiler are documented and example data sets from a mesotidal estuary and a microtidal, wind-driven estuary are presented

Luettich, Rick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lidar Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

Wollpert.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

43

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

44

Raman Lidar Receives Improvements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

central facility is receiving upgrades to its environmental controls. This ground-based remote sensing instrument uses a laser to measure vertical profiles of water vapor mixing...

45

Geographic variability in the export of moist static energy and vertical motion profiles in the tropical Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are primarily due to differences in the shape of the vertical motion profile. In the west Pacific warm pool-coupled equatorial waves match the speeds predicted by shallow water theory with an equivalent depth of about 25 is approximately conserved following air parcels, even as they undergo phase changes between vapor and liquid

Bretherton, Chris

46

Estimating Vertical Motion Profile Shape within Tropical Weather States over the Oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The vertical structure of tropical deep convection strongly influences interactions with larger-scale circulations and climate. This paper focuses on investigating this vertical structure and its relationship with mesoscale tropical weather ...

Zachary J. Handlos; Larissa E. Back

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Doppler LidarBased Wind-Profile Measurement System for Offshore Wind-Energy and Other Marine Boundary Layer Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of wind speed profiles aloft in the marine boundary layer is a difficult challenge. The development of offshore wind energy requires accurate information on wind speeds above the surface at least at the levels occupied by ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta; W. Alan Brewer; Scott P. Sandberg; R. Michael Hardesty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Estimation of sector roughness lengths and the effect on prediction of the vertical wind speed profile  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An estimate of roughness length is required by some atmospheric models and is also used in the logarithmic profile to determine the increase of wind speed with height under neutral conditions. The choice ... thei...

R. J. Barthelmie; J. P. Palutikof; T. D. Davies

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Raman Lidar (RL) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (SGPRL) is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures height and time resolved profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities. The system is a non-commercial custom-built instrument developed by Sandia National Laboratories specifically for the ARM Program. It is fully computer automated, and will run unattended for many days following a brief (~5-minute) startup period. The self-contained system (requiring only external electrical power) is housed in a climate-controlled 8x8x20 standard shipping container.

Newsom, RK

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Towards quantifying mesoscale flows in the troposphere using Raman lidar and sondes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water vapor plays an important role in the energetics of the boundary layer processes which in turn play a key role in regulating regional and global climate. It plays a primary role in Earth`s hydrological cycle, in radiation balance as a direct absorber of infrared radiation, and in atmospheric circulation as a latent heat energy source as well as in determining cloud development and atmospheric stability. Water vapor concentration, expressed as a mass mixing ratio, is conserved in all meteorological processes except condensation and evaporation. This property makes it an ideal choice for studying many of the atmosphere`s dynamic features. Raman scattering measurements from lidar also allow retrieval of water vapor mixing ratio profiles at high temporal and vertical resolution. Raman lidars sense water vapor to altitudes not achievable with towers and surface systems, sample the atmosphere at much higher temporal resolution than radiosondes or satellites, and do not require strong vertical gradients or turbulent fluctuations in temperature that is required by acoustic sounders and radars. Analysis of highly resolved water vapor profiles are used here to characterize two important mesoscale flows: thunderstorm outflows and a cold front passage.

Demoz, B.; Evans, K. [Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD (United States); Starr, D. [NASA, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center] [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The retrieval of vertical profiles of chlorine source gases and N2O5 from MIPAS-B-92 limb emission spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) the balloon-borne cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) recorded several sequences of mid-infrared limb emission spectra, which were used for the retrieval of vertical profiles of CFC-11, CFC-12, HCFC-22, CF4, and N2O5. These gases are characterized by very dense emission bands of unresolved lines. Results are consistent with the current theories of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry.

Clarmann, T.V.; Linden, A.; Wetzel, G.; Oelhaf, H.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ozone Measurements at Geesthacht (53.4 N, 10.4 E) with an Advanced Raman Lidar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An advanced Raman lidar, which measures ozone, water vapor, aerosol backscatter, and extinction profiles simoultaneously and independently, has been in routine operation at Geesthacht since February 1995. Results...

Marcus Seiwazi; Jens Reichardt

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) 1999.05.01 - 2004.05.14 Site(s) SGP General Description The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and radiosonde thermodynamic profiles. The optical depth retrieval is derived following Comstock et al. (2001), which retrieves visible optical depth and layer average backscatter-to-extinction ratio (k) at the lidar wavelength for each backscatter profile. Data Information Data Directory Contacts Principal Investigator Jennifer Comstock (509) 372-424

54

Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tropical oceanic and tropical continental MCSs during the monsoon wet seasons of 1987/1988 and 1988/1989. The atmospheric structure, particularly the CAPE and low level vertical wind shear for all the MCS events studied is analyzed to help... lectivity, at a height of 1. 9 km, of the 68 72 2 December 1988 tropical monsoon case at 0542 LT . . 74 36 37 38 As in Fig. 35, except at 0609 LT Time series of zonal wind and CAPE at Darwin during the 1988/1989 monsoon wet season. Contour plot...

Lutz, Kurt Reed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Fracture detection using crosshole surveys and reverse vertical seismic profiles at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......profiles at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma...RVSPs) at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma...than 50 m, suggest large fracture densities...granite, Scientific Drilling, 1, 21-26. Crampin...system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Kay......

Enru Liu; Stuart Crampin; John H. Queen

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The micropulse lidar (MPL) is a ground-based optical remote sensing system designed primarily to determine the altitude of clouds overhead. The physical principle is the same as for radar. Pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is infered. Besides real-time detection of clouds, post-processing of the lidar return can also characterize the extent and properties of aerosol or other particle-laden regions.

Mendoza, A; Flynn, C

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Mobile multiwave lidar complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiwave mobile lidar complexes (MLCs) are designed and developed. A number of vehicle-based MLCs are built. The set of complex lidar probing data obtained with the help of MLCs is synchronised in space and time, covers a large area (the operation range of an MLC is 15 km), and is based on a unified methodological approach. The results of probing contain information on the concentration and physical nature of atmospheric aerosol, chemical composition of the gaseous phase of the atmosphere, wind and turbulence. The obtained data form the basis for a complex analysis of the ecological situation and prognosis of its development.

A S Boreysho; M A Konyaev; A V Morozov; A V Pikulik; A V Savin; A V Trilis; S Ya Chakchir; N I Boiko; Yu N Vlasov; S P Nikitaev; A V Rozhnov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Algorithms and Software Tools for Extracting Coastal Morphological Information from Airborne LiDAR Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coastal forms and processes. This research aims at developing algorithms for automatically extracting coastal morphological information from LiDAR data. The primary methods developed by this research include automated algorithms for beach profile feature...

Gao, Yige

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Simple Model for Correcting Sodar and Lidar Errors in Complex Terrain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground-based sensing of wind profiles by sodars and lidars is becoming the standard for wind energy and other applications. However, there remain difficulties in complex terrain since the instruments sense wind components in spatially separated ...

Stuart Bradley

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by wind profilers at the Wharton (WH), Liberty (LB), Houston Southwest (HSW), Ellington (EL), and LaMarque (LM) sites.................................................................. 93 18 Skew-T of WH radiosonde data at 1100 UTC...), Houston Southwest (HSW), Ellington (EL), and LaMarque (LM) sites ....................................... 97 21 The ML height distribution at 1600 UTC around the city of Houston...

Smith, Christina Lynn

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Can Wind Lidars Measure Turbulence?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of the systematic errors in the second-order moments of wind speeds measured by continuous-wave (ZephIR) and pulsed (WindCube) lidars is presented. These lidars use the conical scanning technique to measure the velocity field. The model ...

A. Sathe; J. Mann; J. Gottschall; M. S. Courtney

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Forbidden vertices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. In this work, we introduce and study the forbidden-vertices problem. Given a polytope P and a subset X of its vertices, we study the complexity of linear...

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Primary LiDAR application to this project was Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM). This particular application was used to gather data over a specific land area then used to create a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with a resolution of approximately 1m in the horizontal direction and 10cm in the vertical direction. The LiDAR data gathered for MCAGCC was analyzed in conjunction with other data, such as aerial photography and field

64

NASA multipurpose airborne DIAL system and measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The...

Browell, E V; Carter, A F; Shipley, S T; Allen, R J; Butler, C F; Mayo, M N; Siviter, J H; Hall, W M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

NASA DC-8 Airborne Scanning Lidar System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scanning lidar system is being developed for installation on the NASA DC-8 atmospheric research aircraft to support...in-situ aerosol and gas measurements. Design and objectives of the DC-8 scanning lidar are p...

Norman B. Nielsen; Edward E. Uthe

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

67

SSAASSSAP and SSASMP profiles were projected over a 1 cm vertical grid and difference between them was evaluated in terms of RMSD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements Snow penetration resistance profiles were obtained using the Snow Micro Pen (developed at SLF = structural element size = deflection at rupture Acknowledgments: - We thank M. Schneebeli and H. Loewe (SLF

Ribes, Aurélien

68

Energy conservation in high-rise buildings: Changes in air conditioning load induced by vertical temperature and humidity profile in Delhi  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature and humidity profiles in the upper atmosphere are different from those observed by ground level meteorological stations and used to design HVAC systems for high-rise buildings. There exist correlations among solar energy, atmospheric turbidity and pollutants in urban areas, affecting the temperature and humidity profiles with variation in height. In the present study, a theoretical model is developed considering these parameters, and the HVAC load is calculated. The results are compared with the HVAC load calculated from data obtained from the meteorological station, and the comparison showed that the results differ significantly (20%) for a hypothetical 200 m high office building.

S. Sinha; Sanjay Kumar; N. Kumar

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Synergistic Analysis of Cloud Cover and Vertical Distribution from A-Train and Ground-Based Sensors over the High Arctic Station Eureka from 2006 to 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Active remote sensing instruments such as lidar and radar allow one to accurately detect the presence of clouds and give information on their vertical structure and phase. To better address cloud radiative impact over the Arctic area, a combined ...

Yann Blanchard; Jacques Pelon; Edwin W. Eloranta; Kenneth P. Moran; Julien Delano; Genevive Sze

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Raman lidar and MPL Measurements during ALIVE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raman lidar and MPL Measurements during ALIVE Raman lidar and MPL Measurements during ALIVE Ferrare, Richard NASA Langley Research Center Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Petty, Diana Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mendoza, Albert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Clayton, Marian NASA Langley Research Center Schmid, Beat Bay Area Environmental Research Institute Category: Field Campaigns Analysis of the aerosol and water vapor data collected by the Raman lidar during the May 2003 Aerosol IOP indicated that the sensitivity of the lidar was significantly lower than when the lidar was initially deployed. This decrease in sensitivity contributed to a significant high bias of the Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements in relation to airborne Sun

71

Vertical Circuits Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Circuits Inc Circuits Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Vertical Circuits, Inc. Place Scotts Valley, California Zip 95066 Sector Services Product Vertical Circuits Inc. is a global supplier of advanced die level vertical interconnect packaging technology, products, services and intellectual property for the manufacture of low cost ultra high-speed/high-density semiconductor components. References Vertical Circuits, Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Vertical Circuits, Inc. is a company located in Scotts Valley, California . References ↑ "Vertical Circuits, Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Vertical_Circuits_Inc&oldid=352802"

72

Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingöl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike Courtney, Gunner Larsen, Ebba Dellwik Juan Jose Trujillo* and Hans E. Jørgensen Wind Energy Department Risø of the presentation · Introduction to wind energy · Accurate profiles of the mean wind speed · Wakes behind turbines

73

Fluorescence lidar monitoring of historic buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser-induced fluorescence spectra detected with high-spectral-resolution lidar on the facades of the Baptistery and the Cathedral in Parma are presented and discussed. The...

Raimondi, Valentina; Cecchi, Giovanna; Pantani, Luca; Chiari, Roberto

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems that are designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed the validity of physicist G.I. Taylor's 1938 frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) 5-megawatt turbine model to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution was applied to a frozen wind field that was used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements were also evaluated using a large eddy simulation (LES) of a stable boundary layer that was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The LIDAR measurement scenario investigated consists of a hub-mounted LIDAR that scans a circle of points upwind of the turbine in order to estimate the wind speed component in the mean wind direction. Different combinations of the preview distance that is located upwind of the rotor and the radius of the scan circle were analyzed. It was found that the dominant source of measurement error for short preview distances is the detection of transverse and vertical wind speeds from the line-of-sight LIDAR measurement. It was discovered in previous studies that, in the absence of wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances is the spatial averaging caused by the LIDAR's sampling volume. However, by introducing wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances was found to be the coherence loss caused by evolving turbulence. Different measurement geometries were compared using the bandwidth for which the measurement coherence remained above 0.5 and also the area under the measurement coherence curve. Results showed that, by increasing the intensity of wind evolution, the measurement coherence decreases. Using the coherence bandwidth metric, the optimal preview distance for a fixed-scan radius remained almost constant for low and moderate amounts of wind evolution. For the wind field with the simple wind evolution model introduced, the optimal preview distance for a scan radius of 75% blade span (47.25 meters) was found to be 80 meters. Using the LES wind field, the optimal preview distance was 65 meters. When comparing scan geometries using the area under the coherence curve, results showed that, as the intensity of wind evolution increases, the optimal preview distance decreases.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.; Kelley, N.; Jonkman, B.; Frehlich, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Field Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A coherent Doppler lidar has been used in an aircraft to measure the 2-dimensional wind field in a number of different atmospheric situations. The lidar, a pulsed CO2 system, was installed in the NASA Convair 990. Galileo II, and flown in a ...

J. Bilbro; G. Fichtl; D. Fitzjarrald; M. Krause; R. Lee

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Definition: LiDAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LiDAR LiDAR Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png LiDAR Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology that uses optical measurements of scattered light to find range (Young, 2006). Measurements can be made from aircraft- or land-based sensors. Distance to an object is determined by the time delay between transmission and detection of a laser pulse. It is accurate to within 0.1 m (at 1-m resolution, 0.3 m at 3-m resolution) and has the ability to measure the land surface elevation beneath the vegetation canopy. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Light Detection And Ranging Related Terms DEM, Digital Elevation Model tran LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. smission lines,transmission line,transmission

77

Development of LED mini-Lidar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we aim to develop a mini-lidar system using a LED (Light Emitting Diode) as the light source for near-range measurement. Because LED is small size device and its...

Koyama, Moriaki; Shiina, Tatsuo

78

Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH Place Schwanau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany Zip 77961 Sector Geothermal energy Product Specialized company that builds vertical drilling equipment for the development of geothermal resources. References Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH is a company located in Schwanau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany . References ↑ "Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Herrenknecht_Vertical_GmbH&oldid=346498" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

79

Semiconductor Laser Lidar Wind Velocity Sensor for Turbine Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dual line-of-sight CW lidar that measures both wind speed and direction is presented. The wind lidar employs a semiconductor laser, which allows for inexpensive remote sensors geared...

Rodrigo, Peter John; Hu, Qi; Pedersen, Christian

80

Simultaneous radar and lidar cloud measurements at Geesthacht (53.5N, 10.5E)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparisons have been made of the cloud profiles obtained from the backscatter signals of a 95-GHz radar and a 720-nm lidar system between 23 May and 4 November 1997 at Geesthacht (5324? N, 1026? E). Although the wavelengths of the two systems differ by a factor of 4 000, remarkably similar data have been obtained in many cases. There are differences, though. Small droplets do not interact significantly with the radar pulses, and hence can only be seen by the lidar due to their strong scattering in the UV/VIS. On the other hand, attenuation of the lidar pulses by underlying clouds and gas absorbers makes upper cloud regions and especially cloud top heights better detectable for the radar. Rain and snow falling out of a cloud and evaporating on the way down cannot be distinguished from the cloud region by the radar, but a fast downward component in the Doppler spectrum is indicative of precipitation in or under a cloud. For quantitative cloud studies collocated radar-lidar systems considerably add to the experimental capabilities of each of the two systems alone.

C. Weitkamp; H. Flint; W. Lahmann; F.A. Theopold; O. Danne; M. Quante; E. Raschke

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

LiDAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LiDAR LiDAR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: LiDAR Details Activities (10) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Active Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: delineate faults, create high-resolution DEMS, quantify fault kinemaics, develop lineament maps Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 300.0030,000 centUSD 0.3 kUSD 3.0e-4 MUSD 3.0e-7 TUSD / sq. mile Median Estimate (USD): 850.0085,000 centUSD 0.85 kUSD 8.5e-4 MUSD 8.5e-7 TUSD / sq. mile High-End Estimate (USD): 1,300.00130,000 centUSD 1.3 kUSD 0.0013 MUSD 1.3e-6 TUSD / sq. mile

83

Macrophysical Properties of Tropical Cirrus Clouds from the CALIPSO Satellite and from Ground-based Micropulse and Raman Lidars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and In- frared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while the MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cy- cle is significantly different than zero only below about 11 km; where it is the opposite sign (i.e. more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geomet- rical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both datasets have signficantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the vast im- provement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds as well as a valuable ground-based lidar dataset for the validation of CALIPSO observations and to help im- prove our understanding of tropical cirrus clouds.

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, D.; Turner, David D.

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

84

Systematic Sampling of Scanning Lidar Swaths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Popescu Proof of concept lidar research has, to date, examined wall-to-wall models of forest ecosystems. While these studies have been important for verifying lidars efficacy for forest surveys, complete coverage is likely not the most cost effective... year of my graduate studies. Also, to Jin Zhu and the other members of the Aerial Photography project at the Texas Forest Service for opening my eyes to the practical uses of GIS and remote sensing, their encouragement for me to obtain a graduate...

Marcell, Wesley Tyler

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

85

Vertical axis wind turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

Vertical axis wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with a starting and braking control system. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotary axis by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the axis and being provided with a low speed control windmill in which the radial position of each operating piece varies with a centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the vertical rotary axis.

Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol lidar profilometer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CLASIC Summary: Lidar RH Changes in aerosol properties and RH near clouds Airborne NASA LaRC HSRL, ARM SGP ground... ) RamanLidar RelativeHumidityRamanLidar Aerosol Extensive...

88

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template A remotely-operated lidar for aerosol, temperature, and water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template A remotely-operated lidar for aerosol, temperature, and water vapor profiling in the High Arctic. G. J. Nott, T. J. Duck, J. G. Doyle, M. E. W. Coffin, C. Perro, C. P. Thackray, and J. R. Drummond Department of Physics and Atmospheric

Duck, Thomas J.

89

Vertical Structure of Convective Systems during NAME 2004  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study describes the vertical structure of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that characterized the 2004 North American monsoon utilizing observations from a 2875-MHz (S band) profiler and a dual-polarimetric scanning Doppler radar. Both ...

David G. Lerach; Steven A. Rutledge; Christopher R. Williams; Robert Cifelli

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption lidar performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

performed with the lidar25 operated simultaneously at Bordeaux (550 km away... . The NASA God- dard Space Flight Center (GSFC) mobile lidar system ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

91

Vertical axis wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with rotational speed control systems. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotating shaft by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the shaft and being provided with aerodynamic control elements operating manually or automatically to control the rotational speed of the turbine.

Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modifications reduced but could not eliminate these adverse effects. The Raman lidar water vapor (aerosol extinction) measurements produced by these modified algorithms were,...

93

EN-025 Tools & Applications December 2008 Lidar Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IS LIDAR? Lidar (light detection and ranging system) is a relatively new type of active remote sensing are small-footprint, discrete return systems that record two to five returns for each emitted laser pulse fashion as an aerial photography camera. · An inertial measurement unit that records the pitch, yaw

94

Ris-PhD-Report Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAs;#12;Author: Ferhat Bingöl Title: Complex terrain and wind lidars Division: Wind Energy Division Risø-PhD-52 and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated

95

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

Jaffe, Todd

96

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. , 2005). The vertical profile of wind speed over the seavertical directionality Depth-dependence of wind speedVertical noise directional density function versus depth. 93 Measured and acoustically estimated wind speeds.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVertical velocity govMeasurementsVertical velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Vertical velocity The component of the velocity vector, along the local vertical. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System KAZR : Ka ARM Zenith Radar MMCR : Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar SODAR : Mini Sound Detection and Ranging

98

Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Sommargren, Gary E. (Santa Cruz, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Optical turbulence vertical distribution with standard and high resolution at Mt Graham  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......are obtained with the standard GS technique. Dotted...achieved so far with standard vertical profilers such...Section 2, we briefly review the principle of the...the C 2 N profiles at standard and high vertical resolution...produce on the detector plan, optically placed below......

E. Masciadri; J. Stoesz; S. Hagelin; F. Lascaux

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Features of point clouds synthesized from multi-view ALOS/PRISM data and comparisons with LiDAR data in forested areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract LiDAR waveform data from airborne LiDAR scanners (ALS) e.g. the Land Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) have been successfully used for estimation of forest height and biomass at local scales and have become the preferred remote sensing dataset. However, regional and global applications are limited by the cost of the airborne LiDAR data acquisition and there are no available spaceborne LiDAR systems. Some researchers have demonstrated the potential for mapping forest height using aerial or spaceborne stereo imagery with very high spatial resolutions. For stereo images with global coverage but coarse resolution new analysis methods need to be used. Unlike most research based on digital surface models, this study concentrated on analyzing the features of point cloud data generated from stereo imagery. The synthesizing of point cloud data from multi-view stereo imagery increased the point density of the data. The point cloud data over forested areas were analyzed and compared to small footprint LiDAR data and large-footprint LiDAR waveform data. The results showed that the synthesized point cloud data from ALOS/PRISM triplets produce vertical distributions similar to LiDAR data and detected the vertical structure of sparse and non-closed forests at 30m resolution. For dense forest canopies, the canopy could be captured but the ground surface could not be seen, so surface elevations from other sources would be needed to calculate the height of the canopy. A canopy height map with 30mpixels was produced by subtracting national elevation dataset (NED) from the averaged elevation of synthesized point clouds, which exhibited spatial features of roads, forest edges and patches. The linear regression showed that the canopy height map had a good correlation with RH50 of LVIS data with a slope of 1.04 and R2 of 0.74 indicating that the canopy height derived from PRISM triplets can be used to estimate forest biomass at 30m resolution.

Wenjian Ni; Kenneth Jon Ranson; Zhiyu Zhang; Guoqing Sun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The influence of LiDAR pulse density on the precision of inventory metrics in young unthinned Douglas-fir stands during initial and subsequent LiDAR acquisitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LiDAR is an established technology that is increasingly being used to characterise spatial variation in stand metrics used in forest inventory. As the cost of LiDAR acquisition markedly declines with LiDAR pul...

Michael S Watt; Andrew Meredith; Pete Watt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madisons Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

103

Mitigation of Coastal Bluff Instability in San Diego County, California/Evaluating Seacliff Morphology and Erosion Control in San Diego County Using LIDAR and GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County Using LIDAR and GIS In order to evaluate seacliffgeographic information systems (GIS) analysis. LIDAR is the

Ashford, Scott

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

LiDAR (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LiDAR (Laney, 2005) LiDAR (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Design of Sampling Strategies to Detect CO2 Emissions From Hidden Geothermal Systems, Lewicki, Oldenburg and Kennedy. The objective of this project is to investigate geothermal CO2 monitoring in the near surface as a tool to discover hidden geothermal reservoirs. A primary goal of this project is to develop an approach that places emphasis on cost and time-efficient near-surface exploration methods and yields results to guide and focus more cost-intensive geophysical measurements, installation of

105

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar 2005.05.21 - 2005.05.24 Lead Scientist : Michael Dobbs Description Overflights Underway at ACRF Southern Great Plains Site (M.Dobbs/J.Liljegren) Science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted flights over the Central Facility at ACRF's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as part of the Climate Sources and Sink (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP), using a CW lidar. The objective of the flights was to validate, by demonstration and comparison with SGP ground observations, the performance of the ITT system when used in conjunction with retrieval

106

URBAN MODELING FROM LIDAR DATA IN AN INTEGRATED GIS ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are analyzed and possible solutions are proposed by fusing lidar data with other image data. Study shows: it allows rapid generation large-scale DTM (digital terrain model); is daylight independent; is relatively

Shan, Jie

107

Comparison of 2- and 10-m Coherent Doppler Lidar Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of 2- and 10-m coherent Doppler lidar is presented in terms of the statistical distribution of the maximum-likelihood velocity estimator from simulations for fixed range resolution and fixed velocity search space as a function of ...

Rod Frehlich

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Cirrus Classification at Midlatitude from Systematic Lidar Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic cirrus lidar measurements performed in the south of France during 2000 are analyzed statistically to search for cloud classes. The classes are based on cloud characteristics (cloud thickness, light backscattering efficiency, and its ...

P. Keckhut; F. Borchi; S. Bekki; A. Hauchecorne; M. SiLaouina

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Oil spill fluorosensing lidar for inclined onshore or shipboard operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An oil spill detection fluorosensing lidar for onshore or shipboard operation is described. Some difficulties for its operation arise from the inclined path of rays. This is due to...

Karpicz, Renata; Dementjev, Andrej; Kuprionis, Zenonas; Pakalnis, Saulius; Westphal, Rainer; Reuter, Rainer; Gulbinas, Vidmantas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Site(s) NIM SGP General Description The Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain (VERVELSR) value-added product (VAP) uses the unique properties of a 95-GHz radar Doppler velocity spectra to produce vertical profiles of air motion during low-to-moderate (1-20 mm/hr) rainfall events It is designed to run at ARM sites that include a W-band ARM cloud radar (WACR) radar with spectra data processing. The VERVELSR VAP, based on the work of Giangrande et al. (2010), operates by exploiting a resonance effect that occurs in

112

Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mapping surface fuels using LIDAR and multispectral data fusion for fire behavior modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, LIDAR derived data provides accurate estimates of surface fuel parameters efficiently and accurately over extensive areas of forests. This study demonstrates the importance of using accurate maps of fuel models derived using new LIDAR remote sensing...

Mutlu, Muge

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Influence of Thermal Stratification on Wind Profiles for Heights up to 140 m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.energiemeteorologie.de The vertical wind speed profile has to be know for many wind power applications. Although the large effect speeds are not measured or predicted in the hubheight of the wind turbine. For the vertical trans stratification of the boundary layer has also an important influence on the vertical wind speed profile. Only

Heinemann, Detlev

115

Alternate spatial sampling approaches for ecosystem structure inventory using spaceborne lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in aircraft lidar remote sensing where power, heat, and reliability are less of a concern since January 2011 Accepted 29 January 2011 Available online 23 March 2011 Keywords: Lidar Remote sensing Laser collected in transects and should be considered for future lidar remote sensing missions. © 2011 Elsevier

Lefsky, Michael

116

Advanced Lidars for ARM: What Would We Get?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CMWG Breakout Session CMWG Breakout Session 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting Advanced Lidars for ARM: What Would We Get? Dave Turner, Ed Eloranta University of Wisconsin - Madison CMWG Breakout Session 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting What is an "Advanced Lidar?" (1) * Ceilometer - Max range ~7km, unpolarized, uncalibrated * Micropulse lidar (MPL) - Sensitive to clouds & aerosols throughout troposphere - Small telescope, rep rate is 1.5 kHz, microjoules of power - Loses sensitivity to cirrus in upper trop during the day - Polarization sensitive - Uncalibrated * Backscatter signals measured by both the MPL and the Ceilometer are convolutions of molecular and particle scattering events - Unable to determine particle extinction without significant assumptions - Main use by ARM has been to determine layer boundaries

117

ARM - Field Campaign - Lidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsLidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland govCampaignsLidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland Campaign Links ICECAPS Campaign Summary (PDF) Summit Station Research Highlight New Data from Greenland for Arctic Climate Research Cloud Cocktail Melts Greenland Ice Sheet Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland 2010.04.15 - 2014.10.31 Lead Scientist : David Turner Description Beginning in May 2010, the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric State, and Precipitation over Summit (ICECAPS) project, funded through the National Science Foundation's Arctic Observing Network, is deploying a suite of remote sensors at Summit, Greenland, for four years. With dining facilities and communications gear, the "Big House" at Summit Station serves as the central gathering area for site researchers. (Photo courtesy Summit Station.)

118

Vertical distribution of euphausiid life stages in waters adjacent to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin had a stratified profile of tem- perature and oxygen. Lower abun- dances of the larger euphausiids in the upper layers of Salsipuedes Chan- nel. whereas in Guaymas Basin and Point Eugenia. the youngest larvae. In La Jolla Bight near San Diego, differences in patterns of vertical migration of Euphausia pacifica

119

Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbine-mounted lidars provide preview measurements of the incoming wind field. By reducing loads on critical components and increasing the potential power extracted from the wind, the performance of wind turbine controllers can be improved [2]. As a result, integrating a light detection and ranging (lidar) system has the potential to lower the cost of wind energy. This paper presents an evaluation of turbine-mounted lidar availability. Availability is a metric which measures the proportion of time the lidar is producing controller-usable data, and is essential when a wind turbine controller relies on a lidar. To accomplish this, researchers from Avent Lidar Technology and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory first assessed and modeled the effect of extreme atmospheric events. This shows how a multirange lidar delivers measurements for a wide variety of conditions. Second, by using a theoretical approach and conducting an analysis of field feedback, we investigated the effects of the lidar setup on the wind turbine. This helps determine the optimal lidar mounting position at the back of the nacelle, and establishes a relationship between availability, turbine rpm, and lidar sampling time. Lastly, we considered the role of the wind field reconstruction strategies and the turbine controller on the definition and performance of a lidar's measurement availability.

Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon, M.; Vercherin, B.; Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Simple Model of Climatological Rainfall and Vertical Motion Patterns over the Tropical Oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple model is developed that predicts climatological rainfall, vertical motion, and diabatic heating profiles over the tropical oceans given the sea surface temperature (SST), using statistical relationships deduced ...

Back, Larissa E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Observations of Nepheloid Layers Made With an Autonomous Vertical Profiler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appears to be local resuspension events caused either directly or indirectly by near-inertial internal and maintenance of the bnl in the Great Lakes. These include local resuspension (Chambers and Eadie 1981

122

The measurement of attenuation from vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that attenuation is linear with frequency, the very assumption used to generate the synthetic VSP! To understand how this phenomena comes about, the data processing scheme used to generate the synthetic VSP cumulative attenuation values must be investigated... that attenuation is linear with frequency, the very assumption used to generate the synthetic VSP! To understand how this phenomena comes about, the data processing scheme used to generate the synthetic VSP cumulative attenuation values must be investigated...

Davis, Francis Erwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Investigation of frequency dependent attenuation in a vertical seismic profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the results analyzed. Use of monitor geophones allows corrections to be made for source variability. Correction for interference by employment of syn- thetic seismogram modeling is attempted, but without success. The synthetic modeling does reveal... of the Problem. Concepts. CHAPTER II ? SEISMIC DATA PROCESSING. . . 12 The VSP Data Set. 12 Cumulative Attenuation Measurements. 23 Variance. 30 CHAPTER III ? SYNTHETIC SEISMOGRAMS. 35 Data Processing. 35 Interference Correction. 41 CHAPTER IV...

Zeitvogel, Mark Evan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Frequency domain computation of synthetic vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the artifacts in the time function. The algorithm fails when the total attenuation xfx/Qv is so large that underflow occurs. For this model and multi-precision computation the failure point of the algorithm occurs when sfx/Qv is about 30. Synthetic VSPs were... in Figure 6c. The relative amplitude between events Al and A2 at interface 1 has been checked against the theoretical expression: Amp(A2)/Amp(A') = [(r /r )-r r ]exp[ (~f0/Qv)2x] = -1. 2693 exp(-0. 050265f ). 0 (28) This formula is the exact expression...

Wu, Ru-Chuan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Simulation of anisotropic wave propagation in Vertical Seismic Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they are powerful tools to simulate seismic wave propagation in three-dimensional anisotropic subsurface models. The code is currently under development using a C++ object oriented programming approach because it provides high flexibility in the design of new...

Durussel, Vincent Bernard

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

101 INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR TRACKSITE (WYOMING. At the First International Symposium on Dinosaur Tracks and Traces in 1989, concerns were expressed about collection and imaging techniques used to document fossil resources. Digital techniques are typically non

Falkingham, Peter

127

Evolution of vertical drafts and cloud-to-ground lightning within the convective region of a mesoscale convective complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ground in every 10 minute dme interval from 0600-1200 UTC for the 4 June 1985 MCC 43 24 Vertical profile of area-averaged vertical velocity for (a) west lobe froin 0905-1042 UTC, (b) east lobe from 0914-0952 UTC, and (c) east lobe from 1002-1042 UTC.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 25 Vertical profile of variance of the vertical velocity for (a) west lobe from 0905-1042 UTC, (b) east lobe from 0914-0952 UTC, and (c) east lobe froin 1002-1042 UTC...

Saul, Scott Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Chocolate Mountains Area Exploration Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Recent exploration includes a high resolution aerial Li-DAR survey flown over the project areas, securing over 177,000 square kilometers of <30cm accuracy digital elevation data. LiDAR data were analyzed to characterize the active tectonic environment, and identify Holocene structures, which are common conduits for upwelling geothermal fluids. References Steve Alm, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, A. Sabin1, D. Meade, J. Shoffner, W. C. Huang, J. Unruh, M. Strane, H. Ross (2010) Geothermal

129

Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating Lidar to improve wind turbine controls is a potential breakthrough for reducing the cost of wind energy. By providing undisturbed wind measurements up to 400m in front of the rotor, Lidar may provide an accurate update of the turbine inflow with a preview time of several seconds. Focusing on loads, several studies have evaluated potential reductions using integrated Lidar, either by simulation or full scale field testing.

Scholbrock, F. A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon M.; Vercherin, B.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The problem of vertical zoning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...deposits, genesis sheet silicates silicates talc United States Vermont Vertical zoning GeoRef, Copyright 2012, American Geosciences...levelgivingasmuchas29ouncesofgold per ton." Similar descriptionsof the Yankee Girl and other minesin the districtconvincinglydemonstrateverticalchangesin...

Charles Frederick Park

131

Ground-truth aerosol lidar observations: can the Klett solutions obtained from ground and space be equal for the same aerosol case?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upcoming multiyear satellite lidar aerosol observations need strong support by a worldwide ground-truth lidar network. In this context the question arises as to whether the ground...

Ansmann, Albert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Vertical axis wind turbine acoustics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Acoustics Charlie Pearson Corpus Christi College Cambridge University Engineering Department A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy September 2013 Declaration Described in this dissertation is work... quickly to changing wind conditions, small- scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) have been proposed as an efficient solution for deployment in built up areas, where the wind is more gusty in nature. If VAWTs are erected in built up areas...

Pearson, Charlie

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

133

NASAs Space Lidar Measurements of Earth and Planetary Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This presentation will give an overview of history, ongoing work, and plans for using space lidar for measurements of planetary surfaces.

Abshire, James B

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption lidar system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

light absorption... lidar system are proposed ... Source: Zavrtanik, Marko - Experimental Particle Physics Department, Jozef Stefan Institute Collection: Physics 77 Atmos. Chem....

135

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

136

High-resolution lidar observations of mesospheric sodium and implications for adaptive optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of sodium density variability in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere, obtained using a high-resolution lidar system, show rapid fluctuations in the sodium centroid...

Pfrommer, Thomas; Hickson, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes Speaker(s): Pierre S. Farrugia Date: November 18, 2010 - 12:05pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Lorenzetti Thermal plumes have been widely investigated in a variety of scenarios, including natural convection and stratified environments. The resulting theory may be used to predict ventilation flow rates in, for example, natural and displacement ventilation, and under-floor air distribution (UFAD) systems. However, there has been little effort in investigating how uniform upward flows affect the plume velocity, rate of growth, and thermal profile. Such situations can arise if, for example, the diffusers of a UFAD system are evenly distributed. In order to study such situations, analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature profiles of a plume

138

Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: (1) Develop scanning LiDAR and multispectral imagery methods to estimate PCC and LAI over both hardwood and coniferous forests; (2) investigate whether a LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data fusion through linear regression...

Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

People Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What Is NIF? How NIF Works Seven Wonders Beamline NIF Construction Who Works for NIF & PS? People Profiles Management Awards Honors Fellows Who Partners with NIF? FAQs Visit Us...

140

ARM - Evaluation Product - Cloud and Vertical Velocity Statistics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dlprofwstats1newsom.c1 Directory Organization subdirectories Citations ARM Doppler Lidar Handbook, DOESC-ARM-TR-101, http:www.arm.govpublicationstechreportshandbooks...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Quality Control and Verification of Weather Radar Wind Profiles IWAN HOLLEMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tions of the vertical velocity, which is a sum of the vertical wind velocity and the hydrometeor fall. 1986). Profiles of wind speed and direction, hydrometeor fall speed, and divergence have been obtainedQuality Control and Verification of Weather Radar Wind Profiles IWAN HOLLEMAN Royal Netherlands

Stoffelen, Ad

142

An initial assessment of the Robust And Compact Hybrid Environmental Lidar (RACHEL)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the greatest source of uncertainty in global climate models [1]. Their rapid variability in both time and space lidar techniques, the extinction and backscat- ter coefficients of an aerosol can be measured simul the assembly of a high-density, automated lidar network is impractical, despite the sig- nificant science gains

Oxford, University of

143

A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements Chuanfeng algorithm to detect aerosols and clouds based on micropulse lidar measurements. A semidiscretization is then introduced. Combined with empirical threshold values, we determine if the signal waves indicate clouds

Li, Zhanqing

144

3D Turbulence Measurements Using Three Synchronous Wind Lidars: Validation against Sonic Anemometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a technique to measure the time series of the three components of the wind vector at a point in space from synchronous measurements of three scanning Doppler wind lidars. Knowing the position of each lidar on the ground and the ...

Fernando Carbajo Fuertes; Giacomo Valerio Iungo; Fernando Port-Agel

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN* AND DAVID S. NOLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN independent of both the maximum wind speed and the radius of maximum winds (RMW). This can be seen winds change with height. Above 2-km height, vertical profiles of Vmaxnorm are nearly independent

Nolan, David S.

146

First Verification Test and Wake Measurement Results Using a SHIP-LIDAR System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Measuring wind offshore in deep water depths will be a future challenge. Where the sea bed foundation installation for fixed meteorological masts is impossible, floating systems tend to be a sophisticated solution. In addition to the use of moored lidar- buoy systems, ship-lidar systems are an alternative solution for a number of different applications. In this paper we describe general aspects of motion influences on lidar measurements as well as two motion-correction methods for motion-influenced lidar measurements. The implementation of the ship-lidar system and different scanning modes will be presented. First measurements were carried out as part of the EERA-DTOC project. Hence a verification of one of the two correction algorithms as well as first results from wake measurements behind the Alpha Ventus offshore wind farm will be shown. This comprises distinct wind speed wake losses and an increasing turbulence intensity in a distance of approximately 2km behind the wind farm.

G. Wolken-Mhlmann; J. Gottschall; B. Lange

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Vertical integration and market power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the continuing debates of industrial organization surrounds the importance of market structure in determining a firm's performance. This controversy develops naturally from the difficulties in measuring the relevant variables and the hazards of statistical analysis. The focus of this empirical study is the relationship between vertical integration, as an element of market structure, and market power, as a component of a firm's performance. The model presented in this paper differs from previous efforts because vertical integration is measured by the Vertical Industry Connections (VIC) index. VIC is defined as a function of the relative net interactions among the industries in which a firm operates, and is calculated by use of the national input-output tables. A linear regression model is estimated by means of a random sample of firms selected from the Standard and Poor's COMPUSTAT data base for 1963, 1967, and 1972. Combined cross-sectional, time-series methods are employed. The dependent variable is the price-cost margin; the independent variables include not only VIC, but also the concentration ratio, diversification index, value of assets, capital-output ratio, and sales growth. The results indicate that VIC is significant in increasing the price-cost margin, and thus support the hypothesis that vertical integration is a strategy to enhance market power. 1 figure, 3 tables.

Maddigan, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Lidar-Measured Wind Profiles: The Missing Link in the Global Observing System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The three-dimensional global wind field is the most important remaining measurement needed to accurately assess the dynamics of the atmosphere. Wind information in the tropics, high latitudes, and stratosphere is particularly deficient. Furthermore, only ...

Wayman E. Baker; Robert Atlas; Carla Cardinali; Amy Clement; George D. Emmitt; Bruce M. Gentry; R. Michael Hardesty; Erland Klln; Michael J. Kavaya; Rolf Langland; Zaizhong Ma; Michiko Masutani; Will McCarty; R. Bradley Pierce; Zhaoxia Pu; Lars Peter Riishojgaard; James Ryan; Sara Tucker; Martin Weissmann; James G. Yoe

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison of Rainfall Profiles in the West African Monsoon as Depicted by TRMM PR and the LMDZ Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical rainfall profiles obtained with TRMM-PR 2A25 standard products are compared with rain profiles deduced from the Laboratoire de Mtorologie Dynamique second generation global climate model (LMDZ, the Z stands for zoom capability) with ...

Samo Diatta; Frdric Hourdin; Amadou Thierno Gaye; Nicolas Viltard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

Paul Mattione

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Study on the Effect of Nudging on Long-Term Boundary Layer Profiles of Wind and Weibull Distribution Parameters in a Rural Coastal Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By use of 1 yr of measurements performed with a wind lidar up to 600-m height, in combination with a tall meteorological tower, the impact of nudging on the simulated wind profile at a flat coastal site (Hvsre) in western Denmark using the ...

S.-E. Gryning; E. Batchvarova; R. Floors

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

155

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

Vertical Integration and Technology: Theory and Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the determinants of vertical integration. We first derive a number of predictions regarding the relationship between technology intensity and vertical integration from a simple incomplete contracts model. Then, ...

Acemoglu, Daron

157

Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement Shuang Gao,1,2 Maurice OSullivan,3 and Rongqing Hui2,* 1Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Science, University of Science and Technology of China... lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in- phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation...

Gao, Shuang; Sullivan, Maurice O.; Hui, Rongqing

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Mentee Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

159

Mentor Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

160

MHK Technologies/Vertical Axis Venturi System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Axis Venturi System Axis Venturi System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Warrior Girl Corporation Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The proprietary venturi system uses two venturies one on the upstream side of the vertical axis turbine to force the water flow into the turbine and one at the downstream side of the turbine which creates a lower pressure region that pulls the water through the turbine The vertical axis orientation of the turbine is believed by the company to allow for efficiency gains

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a...

162

Fully automatic calibration of LIDAR and video streams from a vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work describes a fully automatic technique to calibrate a geometric mapping between lidar and video feeds on a mobile ground-based platform. This data association is a crucial first step for any multi-modal scene ...

Bileschi, Stanley M.

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption lidar sensitivity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has been modified in recent years (McGee et al., 1991, 1993,20 1995). A Xe... . The NASA God- dard Space Flight Center (GSFC) mobile lidar system was deployed at the Observa-...

164

Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and Backscatter Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison of mineral dust aerosol retrievals from two instruments, MODIS and CALIPSO lidar. And, we implement and evaluate a new mineral dust detection algorithm based on the analysis of thin dust radiative signature. In comparison, three commonly used...

Cho, Hyoun-Myoung

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

165

Narrowband sodium lidar for the measurements of mesopause region temperature and wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report here a narrowband high-spectral resolution sodium temperature/wind lidar recently developed at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China...

Li, Tao; Fang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Dou, Xiankang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

LiDAR At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Helton, Et Al., 2011)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project. Notes High resolution LiDAR and 1:12000 scale low-sun-angle aerial photography was used in southern Dixie Valley to help better characterize...

167

Digital Outcrop Models: Applications of Terrestrial Scanning Lidar Technology in Stratigraphic Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...passive sensors. All but the most extreme atmospheric and lighting conditions will have little effect on terrestrial lidar...Changes, Cycles, and Reservoirs on Carbonate Platforms in Greenhouse and Ice-house Worlds: SEPM, Short Course no. 35, 147...

J.A. Bellian; C. Kerans; D.C. Jennette

168

2.5 MHz Line-Width High-Energy, 2m Coherent Wind Lidar Transmitter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design of a diode pumped, injection seeded MOPA with a transform limited line width and diffraction limited beam quality is presented. This lidar transmitter produces over 300mJ...

Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N; Reithmaier, Karl

169

NESTED HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION AND LIDAR VALIDATION OF A LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NESTED HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION AND LIDAR VALIDATION OF A LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION by GIJS DE BOER local forcing. A wide range of scales is simulated using the nesting capability of the University

Eloranta, Edwin W.

170

A Portable Airborne Scanning Lidar System for Ocean and Coastal Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A portable compact airborne scanning lidar system based on the Riegl LMS-Q240i has been developed and its functionality demonstrated for oceanographic and coastal measurements. Differential GPS (DGPS) and an inertial navigation system are ...

Benjamin D. Reineman; Luc Lenain; David Castel; W. Kendall Melville

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Lidar-Observed Stress Vectors and Veer in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that a pulsed wind lidar is a reliable instrument for measuring angles between horizontal vectors of significance in the atmospheric boundary layer. Three different angles are considered: the wind turning, the angle between ...

Jacob Berg; Jakob Mann; Edward G. Patton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Development of a lidar polarimeter technique of measuring suspended solids in water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W. PRESLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject; Electrical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W, PRESLEY Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committee H d of Department...

Presley, David W

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Effects of Vertically-Resolved Solar Heating, Snow Aging, and Black  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Effects of Vertically-Resolved Solar Heating, Snow Aging formats: Committee Chair University of California, Irvine 2007 ii #12;To my parents, John and Cindy. iii, albedo, snow grain size, and absorbing impurities. . 8 2.1 Solar absorption profiles prescribed by CLM

Zender, Charles

174

ARM - PI Product - SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsSGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical ProductsSGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

175

Field location & marking of no-passing zones due to vertical alignments using the global positioning system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternatives need to be developed for the safe, accurate, and efficient location of no- passing zones on two-lane roadways. This thesis addresses the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates to evaluate sight distance along the vertical profile... of roadways to provide an alternative for an automated no-passing zone location system. A system was developed that processes GPS coordinates and converts them into easting and northing values, smoothes inaccurate vertical elevation data, and evaluates...

Williams, Cameron Lee

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt Graham  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......October 2010 research-article Papers Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt Graham...characterization of the vertical distribution of wind speed, V(h), is fundamental for an...many different reasons: (i) the wind speed shear contributes to trigger optical......

S. Hagelin; E. Masciadri; F. Lascaux

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Deriving a Framework for Estimating Individual Tree Measurements with Lidar for Use in the TAMBEETLE Southern Pine Beetle Infestation Growth Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. TAMBEETLE was used to compare spot growth between a lidar-derived forest map and a forest map generated by TAMBEETLE, based on sample plot characteristics. The lidar-derived forest performed comparably to the TAMBEETLE generated forest. Using lidar to map...

Stukey, Jared D.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wind velocity measurements using a pulsed LIDAR system: first results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A laser beam of 1.54 µm wavelength takes measurements of the wind speed in beamwise direction. To obtain the three-dimensinal wind vector, the beam is inclined by 30 from vertical direction and measurements 12345 t [s] vh[m/s] Figure 2. Segment of measured time series of the horizontal wind speed magnitude vh

Peinke, Joachim

179

ARM - Evaluation Product - Convective Vertical Velocity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Convective Vertical Velocity 2011.04.25 - 2011.05.23 Site(s) SGP General Description Convective processes play an important role in Earth's energy balance by distributing heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. In particular, vertical air motions associated with these processes are inherently linked to the life cycle of these convective systems and are therefore directly tied to their energy budget. However, direct measurements of vertical air motions (e.g., in situ aircraft observations) are sparse, making it difficult to compare them with numerical model output, which relies on convective parameterization schemes that have yet to be extensively

180

Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Flowmeter Test Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Define permeable zones within a well Thermal: Dictionary.png Vertical Flowmeter Test: A well testing technique done upon completion of a well to identify locations of permeable zones within the well and to quantify the relative permeability of each zone. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction A vertical flowmeter test is also known as a spinner test and is preformed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Progress Report on Frequency - Modulated Differential Absorption Lidar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling done at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in FY2000 predicted improved sensitivity for remote chemical detection by differential absorption lidar (DIAL) if frequency-modulated (FM) lasers were used. This improved sensitivity results from faster averaging away of speckle noise and the recently developed quantum cascade (QC) lasers offer the first practical method for implementing this approach in the molecular fingerprint region of the infrared. To validate this model prediction, a simple laboratory bench FM-DIAL system was designed, assembled, tested, and laboratory-scale experiments were carried out during FY2001. Preliminary results of the FM DIAL experiments confirm the speckle averaging advantages predicted by the models. In addition, experiments were performed to explore the use of hybrid QC - CO2 lasers for achieving sufficient frequency-modulated laser power to enable field experiments at longer ranges (up to one kilometer or so). This approach will allow model validation at realistic ranges much sooner than would be possible if one had to first develop master oscillator - power amplifier systems utilizing only QC devices. Amplification of a QC laser with a CO2 laser was observed in the first hybrid laser experiments, but the low gain and narrow linewidth of the CO2 laser available for these experiments prevented production of a high-power FM laser beam.

Cannon, Bret D.; Harper, Warren W.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sensing Hadley cell with space-borne lidar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Some recent studies reported expansion of the Earth?s tropical regime in the past few decades. The poleward expansion of the Hadley cell is a strong indication of the warming of the globe. The extent of Hadley cell also has very important implications to the climate of dry subtropical regions because of the prevalence of precipitation in the deep tropical belt. Determination of the Hadley circulation especially its extent has great significance for monitoring global climate change and for the subtropical climate studies. Although many methods have been developed in recent years, reliable measurement of the extent of Hadley cell is still an issue in climate studies. This letter shows that the extent of the Hadley cell could reliably be estimated by measuring the height of the uppermost super-thin clouds in the troposphere with space-borne lidar. Through consecutive multi-year measurements of the height of the uppermost super-thin clouds, a good estimation of the expansion of the Hadley cell could be obtained.

Wenbo Sun; Bing Lin; Rosemary R. Baize; Gorden Videen; Yongxiang Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improve Reliability Bookmark and Share The Raman Lidar is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures vertical profiles of water-vapor mixing ratio and...

184

LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes As previously mentioned, a deep slim hole is scheduled to be drilled in the Camp Wilson area of MCAGCC in June, 2010. The location of this hole is entirely driven by favorable structures as interpreted from LiDAR data and results of the Seabee TGH drilling program completed in early 2009. Details of the MCAGCC work are available in another section of this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A.

185

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract The goal of this study is to map and characterize Quaternary faults in southern Dixie Valley for the Department of the Navy Geothermal Program Office's NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project. We will use this information to better characterize the regional structure and geothermal resource potential of the area,with a focus on determining the structural

186

A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Optically thin clouds (e.g. optical depth < 3) can have a significant impact on radiative heating in the atmosphere, particularly in the cold upper troposphere. Currently, there is no value-added product (VAP) in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program archive that produces thin cloud optical depth, particularly at the Tropical Western Pacific and North Slope of Alaska sites. A VAP is under development to obtain the cirrus cloud visible optical depth from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized

187

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

188

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

189

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

190

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

191

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

192

Continuous Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), sometimes called forests or carpets, are a promising material due to their unique physical and scale-dependent physical properties [1-3]. Continuous production of VACNTs is ...

Guzman de Villoria, R.

193

Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

Giannitsis, Constantine

194

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

Lodde, P.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vertical Flowmeter Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flowmeter Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vertical Flowmeter Logging Author U.S. Geological Survey Published USGS Groundwater...

196

Sandia National Laboratories: Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WindInnovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors This project seeks to advance large offshore vertical-axis wind...

197

User_TalentProfile  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile information. Task A. Access Talent Profile Enter the web address (URL) of the user application into your browser Address field and press the Enter key. Enter your user ID in the User ID textbox. Enter your password in the Password textbox. Click Sign In. Access Talent Profile 4 Steps Task A Add Information to Talent Profile Sections 5 Steps Task B Edit Talent Profile Sections

198

Category:Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Vertical Flowmeter Test page?...

199

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS? Ania Morvannoua , Nicolas-equilibrium model, preferential flow path, vertical flow constructed wetlands INTRODUCTION Constructed wetlands (CWs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

A geometric framework for channel network extraction from lidar: Nonlinear diffusion and geodesic paths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A geometric framework for channel network extraction from lidar: Nonlinear diffusion and geodesic extraction. Following this preprocessing, channels are defined as curves of minimal effort, or geodesics and geodesic paths, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F01002, doi:10.1029/2009JF001254. 1. Introduction [2] The detection

Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AUTOMATED MODELING OF 3D BUILDING ROOFS USING IMAGE AND LIDAR DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTOMATED MODELING OF 3D BUILDING ROOFS USING IMAGE AND LIDAR DATA N. Demir* , E. Baltsavias, Detection, 3D Modelling ABSTRACT: In this work, an automated approach for 3D building roof modelling on the 3D building roof modelling. Buildings have a critical role for 3D city models, decision support

Schindler, Konrad

202

Measuring forest structure and biomass in New England forest stands using Echidna ground-based lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring forest structure and biomass in New England forest stands using Echidna ground Accepted 12 March 2010 Available online 14 May 2011 Keywords: Ground-based lidar Forest structure Biomass biomass with very good accuracy in six New England hardwood and conifer forest stands. Comparing forest

Ni-Meister, Wenge

203

Master thesis: "Validation of wake-simulation models based on long-range lidar measurements."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: Simulation of lidar measurements in the wake of a wind turbine using a LES generated wind field mapping and wake/vortex detection in several research projects and airport applications. At ForWind resolution wind data from the inflow and wake of two multi-megawatt wind energy converters. Possible

Peinke, Joachim

204

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model 1 dynamics, lIre performed at four diameters behind a 95 kW wind turbine. The wake 111eaeasurement technique allows esti111ation of qUClsiinstantancou~ two dimensional wind fields in an area

205

USING LIDAR TO MEASURE PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR THE VERIFICATION AND MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING LIDAR TO MEASURE PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR THE VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF CAP AND COVER to detect PMCH (perfluoromethylcyclohexane, one of a group of PFTs used at BNL). Laboratory measurements then measured down to 1 ppb-m. These results are very promising and show great potential for monitoring

206

Fusion of 3D-LIDAR and camera data for scene parsing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion of information gathered from multiple sources is essential to build a comprehensive situation picture for autonomous ground vehicles. In this paper, an approach which performs scene parsing and data fusion for a 3D-LIDAR scanner (Velodyne HDL-64E) ... Keywords: Camera, Fuzzy logic, MRF, Object detection, RGBD, Scene parsing, Temporal fusion, Velodyne scanner

Gangqiang Zhao; Xuhong Xiao; Junsong Yuan; Gee Wah Ng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

208

Using LIDAR in Highway Rock Cuts Norbert H. Maerz, Ph. D., P. Eng,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the data needed to begin the process of modeling the rock raveling process. INTRODUCTION LIDAR damage, injury, and even death. Highways impeded by even small spills of rock material by blasting techniques to facilitate the highway construction. A constant danger to the motoring public

Maerz, Norbert H.

209

LIDAR-BASED VEHICLE TRACKING FOR STOPPING DISTANCE MEASUREMENT AT INTERSECTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] are currently the most commonly used system to detect vehicle and measure velocities at a fixed site of a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) sensor to accurately track a vehicle as it passes through to traffic laws. Driver warning systems can increase vehicle safety, especially near accident

Brennan, Sean

210

Linking imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR with floristic composition and forest structure in Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Landsat and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) imagery have recently been used to identify broad-scale floristic units in Neotropical rain forests, corresponding to geological formations and their edaphic properties. Little is known about the structural and functional variation between these floristic units, however, and Landsat and SRTM data lack the spectral and spatial resolution needed to provide this information. Imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) have been used to measure canopy structure and function in a variety of ecosystems, but the ability of these technologies to measure differences between compositionally-distinct but otherwise uniform tropical forest types remains unknown. We combined 16 tree inventories from central Panama with imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR elevation data from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory to test our ability to identify patterns in plant species composition, and to measure the spectral and structural differences between adjacent closed-canopy tropical forest types. We found that variations in spectroscopic imagery and LiDAR data were strong predictors of spatial turnover in plant species composition. We also found that these compositional, chemical, and structural patterns corresponded to underlying geological formations and their geomorphological properties. We conclude that imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR data can be used to interpret patterns identified in lower resolution sensors, to provide new information on forest function and structure, and to identify underlying determinants of these patterns.

Mark A. Higgins; Gregory P. Asner; Roberta E. Martin; David E. Knapp; Christopher Anderson; Ty Kennedy-Bowdoin; Roni Saenz; Antonio Aguilar; S. Joseph Wright

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Improved forecasts of extreme weather events by future space borne Doppler wind lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive areas. To answer these questions simulation experiments with state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) models have proved great value to test future meteorological observing systems a prioriImproved forecasts of extreme weather events by future space borne Doppler wind lidar Gert

Marseille, Gert-Jan

212

Master Thesis: Dual-Doppler technique applied to scanning lidars for the characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wind turbine wakes in large wind farms offshore. Wind Energy, 12(5):431­444, 2009. [2] Brian Hirth, D of single wind turbines for the validation or tuning of wake models [1]. Recent full-field campaigns showed-lidar system was developed and installed at the offshore wind farm "alpha ventus". This system includes three

Peinke, Joachim

213

Metal uorescence lidar (light detection and ranging) and the middle atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lidar takes advantage of the naturally occurring sodium atoms between 80 and 110 km above sea level (the though it is exposed to constant solar radiation. The hope of explaining a region strongly coupled as the `-pause' of the layer below them (see ®gure 1). Radiative absorption and emission are dominating eects

214

Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

Gay, G.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Statistics of Storm Updraft Velocities from TWP-ICE Including Verification with Profiling Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The vertical component of storm dynamics has a large impact on the life cycle of convective systems. While use, in which measurements from a dual-frequency radar profiler system and volumetric radar-based wind the profiling system. This prompted a statistical analysis of an extended period of an active monsoon period

Protat, Alain

216

Ground-based C-band tomographic profiling of a conifer forest stand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide a demonstration of the new tomographic profiling TP technique, here applied to forestry for the first time. The portable ground-based synthetic aperture radar GB-SAR system was used to capture profiles of the vertical polarimetric backscattering ...

Keith Morrison; John Bennett; Svein Solberg

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Ionization of Group II A Elements in the Direct Current Plasma: Effects of Ionization Potential on Emission Profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies of background corrected ion and atom emission profiles of the group IIA elements in the two-electrode direct current plasma show great variation in both vertical and...

Williams, Ronald R; Coleman, Geoffrey N

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

An Alternative Mass Flux Profile in the KainFritsch Convective Parameterization and Its Effects in Seasonal Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have altered the vertical profile of updraft mass flux detrainment in an implementation of the KainFritsch2 (KF2) convective parameterization within the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric ...

Christopher J. Anderson; Raymond W. Arritt; John S. Kain

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Definition: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sounding Configurations Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations A vertical electrical sounding (VES) is a DC resistivity survey which provides information regarding the change in apparent resistivity with depth. A quantitative interpretation of the results from VES measurements enable determination of the parameters for the geoelectric section.[1] Also Known As VES; Schlumberger Sounding References ↑ http://www.nga.com/Flyers_PDF/NGA_DC_Resistivity.pdf http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Electric-Borehole-Geophysics-Geochemistry/dp/0444529942 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Vertical_Electrical_Sounding_Configurations&oldid=596183

220

A low order model for vertical axis wind turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new computational model for initial sizing and performance prediction of vertical axis wind turbines

Drela, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Use of LiDAR to estimate stand characteristics for thinning operations in young Douglas-fir plantations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) has been successfully used to describe a wide range of forest metrics at local, regional and national scales. However, little research has used this technology in young Doug...

Michael S Watt; Andrew Meredith; Pete Watt

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Method to determine and adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a LIDAR system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to determine the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system. This method can be employed to determine the far-field intensity distribution of the transmitter beam, as well as the variations in transmitted laser beam pointing as a function of time, temperature, or other environmental variables that may affect the co-alignment of the LIDAR system components. In order to achieve proper alignment of the transmitter and receiver optical systems when a LIDAR system is being used in the field, this method employs a laser-beam-position-sensing detector as an integral part of the receiver optics of the LIDAR system.

Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Henson, Tammy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumel, Leslie J. (Cedar Crest, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Wyko Optical Profiler This machine investigates variations in topography for surfaces ranging from very smooth to 2mm step  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wyko Optical Profiler Purpose This machine investigates variations in topography for surfaces as the interferometric objective moves vertically through sample focus. The vertical position of the optics at peak. · Adjust the tip/tilt to orient the optic head until the rings spread into one large ring (nulling). DO

224

Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Vertical pump with free floating check valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

Lindsay, Malcolm (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

PATTERI'JSOF VERTICAL AND REPRODUCIIONIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of six corTrrno species of Hawaii-an Oplophoridae are presented. Trvo different patterns of adult conmon species lived above 7OO m and undervrent extensive vertical migrat-ions to shallorver rvaters aE of the adultsl the type of embryonic develop- mentl and Ehe amount of yolk in the embryo aE the time of hatching

Luther, Douglas S.

229

Na double-edge magneto-optic filter for Na lidar profiling of wind and temperature in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposed by one of the authors (Williams), originating from the Na magneto-optic filter in solar-edge magneto-optic fil- ter (Na-DEMOF). It has advantages over the FPIs and iodine filters because of its magnetic field across the Na cell causes the Zeeman splitting of Na energy levels, which shifts

Chu, Xinzhao

230

Lidar determination of altitude profile of the refraction index in electro-optical monitoring of the Earths atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated data 1. Introduction Control of atmosphere pollution is a complex problem of environmental of the reconstruction of the individual contributions and the overall altitude pro- file of the refraction index of air the pollutants and obtain detailed information about the distri- bution of the substances both in altitude

231

Eddy-resolving Lidar Measurements and Numerical Simulations of the Convective Internal Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in speed. The vertical gradient of wind-speed decreases offshore because of strong vertical mixing caused correlation functions and winds derived from horizontal (PPI) and vertical (RHI) scans of the VIL during Lake.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 DOWNSTREAM WIND SPEEDS FROM RHI SCANS ON 13 JANUARY 1998 SPATIALLY RESOLVED 5-m WINDS

Eloranta, Edwin W.

232

ARM - Field Campaign - NASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsNASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test Campaign govCampaignsNASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : NASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test Campaign 2009.07.27 - 2009.08.07 Lead Scientist : Edward Browell For data sets, see below. Description This airborne field test campaign was designed to obtain a coordinated set of remote CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) measurements using the NASA Langley/ITT 1.57-micron Continuous-Wave (CW) LAS operating from the NASA Langley UC-12 aircraft; the NASA Goddard 1.57-micron pulsed LAS operating from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft; and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 2.0-micron CW-coherent LAS operating from a contracted Twin Otter aircraft. These remote LAS CO2 column measurements were compared with

233

Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations page? For detailed information on Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Add.png Add a new Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Technique Pages in category "Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total.

234

Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

LANSCE | News & Media | Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Profiles Shea Mosby: Lighting the way for nuclear science discoveries By Diana Del Mauro ADEPS Communications Photos by Richard Robinson, IRM-CAS Shea Mosby Cradling a heavy...

237

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)...

238

Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7-26-2013. Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile The Bonneville Power Administration is a federal agency under the Department of Energy. BPA markets wholesale electrical power...

239

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity...

240

Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt. Graham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characterization of the wind speed vertical distribution V(h) is fundamental for an astronomical site for many different reasons: (1) the wind speed shear contributes to trigger optical turbulence in the whole troposphere, (2) a few of the astroclimatic parameters such as the wavefront coherence time (tau_0) depends directly on V(h), (3) the equivalent velocity V_0, controlling the frequency at which the adaptive optics systems have to run to work properly, depends on the vertical distribution of the wind speed and optical turbulence. Also, a too strong wind speed near the ground can introduce vibrations in the telescope structures. The wind speed at a precise pressure (200 hPa) has frequently been used to retrieve indications concerning the tau_0 and the frequency limits imposed to all instrumentation based on adaptive optics systems, but more recently it has been proved that V_200 (wind speed at 200 hPa) alone is not sufficient to provide exhaustive elements concerning this topic and that the vertical d...

Hagelin, S; Lascaux, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

Weiss, Samuel Bruce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental Vertical Wind Shear with Hurricane Bertha (1996)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hurricane Bertha (1996) was influenced by vertical wind shear with highly variable direction and magnitude. The paper describes a unique method for determining the vertical tilt of a tropical cyclone vortex using satellite and aircraft data. ...

Raymond M. Zehr

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

An Autonomous Doppler Sodar Wind Profiling System PHILIP S. ANDERSON, RUSSELL S. LADKIN, AND IAN A. RENFREW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Autonomous Doppler Sodar Wind Profiling System PHILIP S. ANDERSON, RUSSELL S. LADKIN, AND IAN A form 27 September 2004) ABSTRACT An autonomous Doppler sodar wind profiling system has been designed panels, and two vertical axis wind generators, plus charging control and isolation circuitry. The sodar

Renfrew, Ian

244

Imaging Vertically Oriented Defects with Multi-Saft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Imaging vertically oriented defects using the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) requires special consideration. When the faces...

M. Lorenz; U. Stelwagen; A. J. Berkhout

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Methane Hydrate and Free Gas on the Blake Ridge from Vertical Seismic Profiling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subtle differences in permeability between lithologically...hydrate filling 2% of porosity at Site 994 and...estimate of 1% of porosity, on average, occupied...estimate of 5 to 7% of porosity (33, 34...UNCONSOLIDATED POROUS SAND RESERVOIRS, GEOPHYSICS 42...SEISMIC-WAVES IN POROUS ROCKS, GEOPHYSICS...

W. Steven Holbrook; Hartley Hoskins; Warren T. Wood; Ralph A. Stephen; Daniel Lizarralde

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

246

Measurements and modeling of the vertical profile of specific surface area of an alpine snowpack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for dry snow ranged between ca. 5 and 80 m2 kg?1 , and generally decreased over time in a given snow layer radius in Crocus, and the other one deter- mined from density and snow type. Both parameterizations metamorphism, i.e. the morphological transformation of snow grains over time, induce variations in snow SSA [20

Ribes, Aurélien

247

Methane Hydrate and Free Gas on the Blake Ridge from Vertical Seismic Profiling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...expression: The phase boundary between methane hydrate and methane plus...and methane hydrate, CH4-5.75H20...a structure I hydrate construct-ed...documented anomalous behavior in the formation...325 Fig. 1. Phase diagram for the...

W. Steven Holbrook; Hartley Hoskins; Warren T. Wood; Ralph A. Stephen; Daniel Lizarralde

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

248

July 7, 2008 Vertical temperature profile and mesospheric winds retrieval on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Circulation Model, as provided through the Mars Climate Database (MCD) numerical tool. Methods. We from the Mars Climate Database (MCD) provides satisfactory fits to the 2001 and 2005 data when. Key words. Planets and satellites: individual: Mars ; Radio lines: solar system 1. Introduction

249

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

250

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

251

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

253

1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cirrus Extinction and Lidar Ratio Derived from Raman Cirrus Extinction and Lidar Ratio Derived from Raman Lidar Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Site D. Petty and J. Comstock Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. Tuner Space Science Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Range resolved microphysical properties and extinction coefficient in cirrus clouds are critical for assessing the impact of cirrus on climate. Vertical profiles of cirrus extinction are important parameters for radiative flux and heating rate calculations. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio (also called lidar ratio) provides information on the transmission and reflection properties of cirrus clouds and also on the

254

High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

256

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

257

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

258

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

259

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

260

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

262

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

263

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

264

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

265

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

266

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

267

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

268

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

269

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

270

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

271

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

272

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

273

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

274

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

275

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

276

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

277

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

278

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

279

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

280

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

282

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

283

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

284

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

285

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

286

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

287

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

288

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

289

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

290

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

291

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

292

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

293

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

294

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

295

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

296

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

297

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

298

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

299

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

300

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

302

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

303

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

304

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

305

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

306

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

307

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

308

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

309

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

310

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

311

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

312

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

313

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

314

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

315

profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

profiles profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

316

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

317

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

318

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

319

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

320

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

322

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

323

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

324

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

325

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

326

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

327

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

328

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

329

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

330

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,837 14...

331

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,587...

332

Profiling for Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance and profiling are critical words in our everyday conversations in the office where I work, in our engagements with clients, and in our teaching. Both words apply equally well to all aspec...

Ron Crisco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

334

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

335

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

336

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

337

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

338

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

339

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

340

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

342

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

343

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

344

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

345

Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

McNerney, G.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (915RWP) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 915 MHz radar wind profiler/radio acoustic sounding system (RWP/RASS) measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 0.1 km and 5 km and virtual temperature profiles between 0.1 km and 2.5 km. It operates by transmitting electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. Virtual temperatures are recovered by transmitting an acoustic signal vertically and measuring the electromagnetic energy scattered from the acoustic wavefront. Because the propagation speed of the acoustic wave is proportional to the square root of the virtual temperature of the air, the virtual temperature can be recovered by measuring the Doppler shift of the scattered electromagnetic wave.

Coulter, R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling which included various single- layer and multilayer cloud conditions. Overall, the CO2-slicing method

Sheridan, Jennifer

349

SIMULTANEOUS AND COMMON-VOLUME LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE MESOSPHERIC FE AND NA LAYERS AT BOULDER (40N, 105W)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inputs can reproduce some large-scale characteristics but are challenged in simulating small- scale the general structures more precisely as well as simulating the challenging small scale features. In Aug. The Fe Boltzmann temperature lidar was under upgrading and validating at Boulder before its deployment

Chu, Xinzhao

350

Modeling lidar waveforms with time-dependent stochastic radiative transfer theory for remote estimations of forest structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with field data from two conifer forest stands (southern old jack pine and southern old black spruce estimations of forest structure Svetlana Y. Kotchenova,1 Nikolay V. Shabanov,1 Yuri Knyazikhin,1 Anthony B (lidars) have demonstrated a potential for accurate remote sensing of forest biomass and structure

Goldberg, Bennett

351

Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Light sensitivity in larval fishes: Implications for vertical zonation in ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

have focused on diel changes in vertical distribution (Neil- .... The temperature and photoperiod are ...... BOEHLERT, G. W., W. WATSON, AND L. C. SUN. 1992.

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Annis, Eric R. Temperature effects on the vertical distribution of ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature effects on the vertical distribution of lobster postlarvae. (Homarus americanus) .... days than in bright sun (Hudon et al. 1986), and anecdotal.

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

354

Simulation of vertical ship responses in high seas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research was done to study the effect of sea severity on the vertical ship responses like heave and pitch. Model testing of a 175m (more)

Rajendran, Suresh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Direct observation of biomixing by vertically migrating zooplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light-emitting diode. (LED) panels (maximum 4560 lux; 450760 nm) were placed above and below the experimental tank to stimulate vertical swimming (

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

356

Numerical simulations of a vertical tail of a commercial aircraft...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a commercial aircraft with active flow control Authors: Rasquin, M., Martin, J., Jansen, K. A series of numerical simulations of a realistic vertical tail of a commercial...

357

Optimal design of aperiodic, vertical silicon nanowire structures for photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We design a partially aperiodic, vertically-aligned silicon nanowire array that maximizes photovoltaic absorption. The optimal structure is obtained using a random walk algorithm...

Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Preparation and Characterisation of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents the preparation of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using porous anodic alumina templates via thermal chemical vapour deposition. The characteristics of prepared carbon (more)

Xu, Rui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al.,...

360

Continuous Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials due their numerous applications in flexible electronic devices, biosensors and multifunctional aircraft materials, among others. However, the ...

Guzman de Villoria, Roberto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Improved design of a deep vertical-lift gate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. Redesigning of the framework of a deep vertical-lift gate by replacing the multibeam framework by a two-beam ...

P. R. Khlopenkov

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 vii Major Findings This edition of Performance Profiles reviews financial and operating data for the calendar year 2009 and discusses important trends and emerging issues relevant to U.S. energy company operations. Major U.S.-based oil and natural gas producers and petroleum refiners submit the data in this report annually on Form EIA-28, the Financial Reporting System (FRS). FRS companies' net income declined to the lowest level since 2002.  Net income fell 66 percent (in constant 2009 dollars) to $30 billion in 2009 from $88 billion in 2008. Substantial reductions in oil and natural gas prices in 2009 slowed revenue growth. FRS companies cut operating costs but by less than the decline in revenue, resulting in a 69-percent drop in operating income.

363

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

364

Retrieval of Hydrometeor Profiles in Tropical Cyclones and Convection from Combined Radar and Radiometer Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of understanding the global energy and water cycles by providing four-dimensional distributions of latent heat- ing related to latent heating, ice water content (IWC) and liquid water content (LWC) have implications A retrieval algorithm is described to estimate vertical profiles of precipitation ice water content and liquid

Jiang, Haiyan

365

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

366

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

367

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

368

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

369

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

370

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

371

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

372

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

373

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

374

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

375

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

376

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

377

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

378

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

379

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

380

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

382

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

383

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

384

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

385

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

386

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

387

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

388

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

389

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

390

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

391

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

392

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

393

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

394

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

395

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

396

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

397

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

398

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

399

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

400

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

402

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

403

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

404

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

405

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

406

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

407

Electrically long vertical interconnects for microwave circuits and antennas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . 2 . . . . 3 . . . . 4 . 4 . 4 . 5 . . . . 5 . . . . 6 . . . . 7 A. Transmission Line Interconnects. . B. Electromagnetically Coupled lnterconnects . . . . . C. Conclusions . . . . . . 8 . . . 10 III FIDELITY SIMULATION 12 A. B. C. D... interconnects satisfying specifications set by Raytheon Systems Co. This research was sponsored by Raytheon Systems Co. RF/Microwave Division. A vertical interconnect couples transmission lines, antennas, and components between vertically spaced layers...

Coutant, Matthew Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

Rough Set Approximation Framework for Smarter Vertical Handovers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Rough Set Approximation Framework for Smarter Vertical Handovers Nalin ChakooO, Saewoong to support seamless mobility. In this paper, we propose rough set based decision framework for vertical handoff in heterogeneous networks. We apply fuzzy decision to fuzzy-rough set which gives us the advantage

Bahk, Saewoong

409

SeedChaser: Vertical soil tillage distribution model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge of the vertical distribution of surface residues, chemicals, or seeds following tillage operations is of great importance to a wide variety of soil research areas. This paper describes a 1D empirical vertical soil tillage distribution model ... Keywords: Conservation tillage, Leslie matrix, Seed movement, Seedbank, Soil movement

K. Spokas; F. Forcella; D. Archer; D. Reicosky

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hedging and Vertical Integration in Electricity Markets Gilles Chemla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or demand insurance rationale for vertical integration as most important. 1 In the 1970s, for example, oil and vertical integration are two separate mechanisms for demand and spot price risk diversification that both integration restores the symmetry between producers' and retailers' exposure to demand risk while linear

Touzi, Nizar

411

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams

412

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

413

Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ARM - Instrument - rl  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsrl govInstrumentsrl Documentation RL : Handbook RL : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports RL : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Raman Lidar (RL) Beneficiary of Recovery Act funding. Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Profiling Picture of the Raman Lidar (RL) Picture of the Raman Lidar (RL) General Overview The Raman Lidar (RL) is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures vertical profiles of water-vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities. Lidar (light detection and ranging) is the optical analog of radar, using pulses of laser radiation to probe the atmosphere. This system is fully computer automated, and will run

415

Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Aerosols R. A. Ferrare and K. D. Evans (a) Hughes STX Corporation Lanham, Maryland S. H. Melfi and D. N. Whiteman NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland The principal objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) is to develop a better understanding of the atmospheric radiative balance in order to improve the parameterization of radiative processes in general circulation models (GCMs) which are used to study climate change. Meeting this objective requires detailed measurements of both water vapor and aerosols since these atmospheric constituents affect the radiation balance directly, through scattering and absorption of solar and

416

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

417

Performance profiles style sheet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

06) 06) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 December 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2006 is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division, Financial

418

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

419

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

420

Temperature profile detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a temperature profile detector shown as a tubular enclosure surrounding an elongated electrical conductor having a plurality of meltable conductive segments surrounding it. Duplicative meltable segments are spaced apart from one another along the length of the enclosure. Electrical insulators surround these elements to confine molten material from the segments in bridging contact between the conductor and a second electrical conductor, which might be the confining tube. The location and rate of growth of the resulting short circuits between the two conductors can be monitored by measuring changes in electrical resistance between terminals at both ends of the two conductors. Additional conductors and separate sets of meltable segments operational at differing temperatures can be monitored simultaneously for measuring different temperature profiles. 8 figs.

Tokarz, R.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Long range constant force profiling for measurement of engineering surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new instrument bridging the gap between atomic force microscopes (AFMs) and stylus profiling instruments is described. The constant force profiler is capable of subnanometer resolution over a 15??m vertical range with a horizontal traverse length of 50 mm. This long traverse length coupled with the possibilities of utilizing standard radius diamondmeasurement styli make the force profiler more compatible with existing profiling instrument standards. The forces between the specimen and a diamond stylus tipped cantilever spring are sensed as displacements using a capacitance bridge. This displacement signal is then fed through a proportional plus integral controller to a high stability piezoelectric actuator to maintain a constant tip?to?sample force of approximately 100 nN. Much of the sensor head and traverse mechanism is made of Zerodur glass?ceramic to provide the thermal stability needed for long travel measurements. Profiles of a 30?nm silica step height standard and an 8.5??m step etched on Zerodur are presented.

L. P. Howard; S. T. Smith

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

VERTICAL BEAM SIZE CONTROL IN TLS AND TPS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical beam size control is an important issue in the light source operations. The horizontal-vertical betatron coupling and vertical dispersion were measured and corrected to small values in the TLS 1.5 GeV storage ring. Estimated beam sizes are compared with the measured values. By employing an effective transverse damping system, the vertical beam blow-up due to transverse coherent instabilities, such as the fast-ion beam instability, was suppressed. As a result, the light source is very stable. In NSRRC we are designing an ultra low emittance 3-GeV storage ring and its designed vertical beam size could be as small as a few microns. The ground and mechanic vibration effects, and coherent instabilities could spoil the expected photon brightness due to blow-up of the vertical beam size if not well taken care of. The contributions of these effects to vertical beam size increase will be evaluated and the counter measures to minimize them will be proposed and reported in this paper.

KUO, C.C.; CHEN, J.R.; CHOU, P.J.; CHANG, H.P.; HSU, K.T.; LUO, G.H.; TSAI, H.J.; WANG, D.J.; WANG, M.H.

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

1990-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTES ON NEUTRON DEPTH PROFILING by J.K. Shultis Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering College of Engineering Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas 66506 Dec. 2003 #12;Notes on Neutron Depth Profiling J. Kenneth Shultis December 2003 1 Introduction The purpose of neutron depth profiling

Shultis, J. Kenneth

426

Free-energy profiles and scaling in polymer brushes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for an unattached polymer in a grafted polymer layer (a polymer brush). The simulations employ a non-Boltzmann sampling method to calculate the free energy of the unattached chain as a function of its vertical position in the brush, W(z), and the free energy per chain in the grafted layer, f. Contrary to other recent reports, we find grafting conditions where the variation of f is consistent with scaling and analytical self-consistent field (SCF) theories. The free-energy profile, W(z), also follows a form predicted from SCF theory.

J. Scott Shaffer

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined...

428

Texas Crop Profile: Potatoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

175 pounds of nitrogen, 80 pounds of phosphorus, and 80 pounds of potassium. Potassium is generally not needed in the High Plains, although many growers apply it. Texas Crop Profile P O T A T O E S E-19 3-00 Prepared by Kent D. Hall, Rodney L. Holloway..., following drag-off or after potato plants have fully emerged. Controls weeds by disrupting growth process during germination. Does not control established weeds. State Contacts Rodney L. Holloway Extension Specialist 2488 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843...

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

429

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment at diff erent temperatures * Biomass is heated by steam injection to temperatures of 120°C to 210°C in the pressurized mixing tube * Preheated, premixed biomass is retained for specified residence time in vertical holding vessel; material continuously moves by gravity from top to bottom of reactor in plug-fl ow fashion * Residence time is adjusted by changing amount of material held in vertical vessel relative to continuous fl ow of material entering and exiting vessel * Optional additional reactor vessel allows for secondary pretreatment at lower temperatures-120°C to 180°C-with potential to add other chemical catalysts * First vessel can operate at residence

430

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country March 1, 2012 Las Vegas, Nevada Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country" was held March 1, 2012, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The forum focused on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The forucm provided an opportunity for tribal

431

Vertical morphology in solution-processed organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated by a report of an all-solution processed P3HT/PCBM bilayer organic solar cell, we have investigated the vertical morphology by using a combination of...

Lee, Kwan H; Schwenn, Paul E; Smith, Arthur R G; Cavaye, Hamish; Shaw, Paul E; James, Michael; Krueger, Karsten B; Gentle, Ian R; Meredith, Paul; Burn, Paul L

432

Turbulent Vertical Kinetic Energy in the Ocean Mixed Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical velocities in the ocean boundary layer were measured for two weeks at an open ocean, wintertime site using neutrally buoyant floats. Simultaneous measurements of the surface meteorology and surface waves showed a large variability in ...

Eric A. D'Asaro

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Generating efficient execution plans for vertically partitioned XML databases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experience with relational systems has shown that distribution is an effective way of improving the scalability of query evaluation. In this paper, we show how distributed query evaluation can be performed in a vertically partitioned XML database system. ...

Patrick Kling; M. Tamer zsu; Khuzaima Daudjee

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

Caddeau, MP

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

435

Characterization of the Lumsden-Lynch vertical elutriator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LUMSDEN-LYNCH VERTICAL ELUTRIATOR A Thesis by CARL BRIAN GRIMM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Unrversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 19gl... Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LUMSDEN-LYNCH VERTICAL ELUTRIATOR A Thesis by CARL BRIAN GRIMM Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommittee) ( mber) embe (Member) ead of Department) August, 1981 ABSTRACT...

Grimm, Carl Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Vertical velocity in oceanic convection off tropical Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . v Vl Vl I I 1 3 6 10 Description of the Data Data Processing . . Event Criteria 10 15 21 III RESULTS . . . 26 Cores. Environment 26 34 IV COMPARISON WITH OTHER STUDIES . . . . . 40 Cores... Variations with altitude of median and strongest 10'/o-level statistics of (a) average vertical velocity, (b) maximum vertical velocity, (c) mass flux per unit length normal to the flight track and (d) diameter 32 Figure Page Reconstructed temperature...

Lucas, Christopher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

437

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

438

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

439

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

440

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

442

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

443

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

444

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

445

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

446

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

447

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

448

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

449

Estimating the fracture density of small-scale vertical fractures when large-scale vertical fractures are present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When fractures are vertical, aligned and their dimensions are small relative to the seismic wavelength, the medium can be considered to be an equivalent Horizontal Transverse Isotropic (HTI) medium. However, geophysical ...

Liu, Yuwei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A deep-water approximation of the Stokes drift velocity profile is explored as an alternative to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profile investigated relies on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, namely, the ...

yvind Breivik; Peter A. E. M. Janssen; Jean-Raymond Bidlot

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001b.htm06/07/2004 13:02:41 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001d.htm06/07/2004 13:02:52 #12;5 Year

452

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0029.htm06/07/2004 13:01:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_002d.htm06/07/2004 13:01:34 #12;5 Year

453

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0067.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_006b.htm06/07/2004 13:04:46 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

454

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0079.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_007b.htm06/07/2004 13:05:59 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

455

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration at cloud base is the most relevant measure of the aerosol that influences droplet formation in clouds. Since the CCN concentration depends on supersaturation, a more general measure of the CCN concentration is the CCN spectrum (values at multiple supersaturations). The CCN spectrum is now measured at the surface at several fixed ARM sites and by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), but is not measured at the cloud base. Rather than rely on expensive aircraft measurements for all studies of aerosol effects on clouds, a way to project CCN measurements at the surface to cloud base is needed. Remote sensing of aerosol extinction provides information about the vertical profile of the aerosol, but cannot be directly related to the CCN concentration because the aerosol extinction is strongly influenced by humidification, particularly near cloud base. Ghan and Collins (2004) and Ghan et al. (2006) propose a method to remove the influence of humidification from the extinction profiles and tie the dry extinction retrieval to the surface CCN concentration, thus estimating the CCN profile. This methodology has been implemented as the CCN Profile (CCNPROF) value-added product (VAP).

McFarlane, S; Sivaraman, C; Ghan, S

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

456

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe1mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

457

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe370mcfarlane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

458

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe1mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

459

Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) - SGP ripbe370mcfarlane  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties needed for BBHRP into a single gridded input file. Additionally, an interface between the RIPBE input file and the RRTM was developed using the new ARM integrated software development environment (ISDE) and effort was put into developing quality control (qc) flags and provenance information on the BBHRP output files so that analysis of the output would be more straightforward. This new version of BBHRP, sgp1bbhrpripbeC1.c1, uses the RIPBE files as input to RRTM, and calculates broadband SW and LW fluxes and heating rates at 1-min resolution using the independent column approximation. The vertical resolution is 45 m in the lower and middle troposphere to match the input cloud properties, but is at coarser resolution in the upper atmosphere. Unlike previous versions, the vertical grid is the same for both clear-sky and cloudy-sky calculations.

Riihimaki, Laura; Shippert, Timothy

460

Modeling conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain with WAsP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the vertical wind speed W changes linearly with the downwind position x. This could crudely mimic the flow over to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scholarship Search Profile Personal Information Name: ____________________________________ Address) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Work Experience: List most recent job first Employer/Company Name _______________________________________________________________ Reference: Name and telephone _____________________________________________ Employer/Company Name

Mather, Patrick T.

462

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluating a Federal agency's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile means getting a solid understanding of the organization's largest emission categories, largest emission sources, and its potential for improvement.

463

High resolution properties of the marine atmospheric boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) participated in the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) by fielding a water-vapor Raman lidar on board the Research Vessel Vickers. The lidar measured water vapor concentration from the surface to lower tropospheric altitudes in order to support the CEPEX goal of evaluating a hypothesis regarding feedback mechanisms for global circulation models. This report describes some of the features observed within the marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the lower troposphere. Data was collected continuously 24 hours per day over the equatorial Pacific from March 8th to March 2 1st of 1993 while in route between Guadalcanal and Christmas Island (the transect was at approximately 2{degree} south latitude). The lidar collected vertical transects of water vapor concentration up to 10 km during night operations and 4 km in the day. The vertical lidar profiles of water vapor were produced by summing the data over a period up to 600 seconds. The water-vapor Raman lidar measured the properties of the marine ABL as well as the lower and mid-troposphere. From the lidar water vapor profiles, ``images`` of water vapor concentration versus altitude and date or sea surface temperature will be produced along with other products such as latent heat fluxes. The Raman water vapor lidar data will be used to better understand the role of transport and exchange at the ocean-atmosphere interface and throughout the marine atmosphere.

Cooper, D.; Cottingame, W.; Eichinger, W.; Forman, P.; Lebeda, C.; Poling, D.; Thorton, R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths.

Hadley, G. Ronald (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Awyoung, Adelbert (Albuquerque, NM); Choquette, Kent D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Downstream Heat Flux Profile vs. Midplane T Profile in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between the midplane scrape-off-layer electron temperature profile and the parallel heat flux profile at the divertor in tokamaks is investigated. A model is applied which takes into account anisotropic thermal diffusion, in a rectilinear geometry with constant density. Eigenmode analysis is applied to the simplified problem with constant thermal diffusivities. A self-similar nonlinear solution is found for the more realistic problem with anisotropically temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities. Numerical solutions are developed for both cases, with spatially dependent heat flux emerging from the plasma. For both constant and temperature-dependent thermal diffusivities it is found that, below about one-half of its peak, the heat flux profile shape at the divertor, compared with the midplane temperature profile shape, is robustly described by the simplest two-point model. However the physical processes are not those assumed in the simplest two-point model, nor is the numerical coefficient relating q||div to Tmp ?||mp/L|| as predicted. For realistic parameters the peak in the heat flux, moreover, can be reduced by a factor of two or more from the two-point model scaling which fits the remaining profile. For temperature profiles in the SOL region above the x-point set by marginal stability, the heat flux profile to the divertor can be largely decoupled from the prediction of the two-point model. These results suggest caveats for data interpretation, and possibly favorable outcomes for divertor configurations with extended field lines.

Robert J. Goldston

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

466

Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-Safe Scanning Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for Monitoring/Verification/Accounting at Geologic Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for monitoring carbon dioxide has been developed. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto- optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 {micro}J, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 {micro}m. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL instrument has been operated from a laboratory environment on the campus of Montana State University, at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site located in the agricultural research area on the western end of the Montana State University campus, and at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership site located in north-central Montana. DIAL data has been collected and profiles have been validated using a co-located Licor LI-820 Gas Analyzer point sensor.

Repasky, Kevin

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004b.htm06/07/2004 12:57:08 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_004d.htm06/07/2004 12:57:19 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

468

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008b.htm06/07/2004 12:51:21 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_008d.htm06/07/2004 12:51:31 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

469

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010b.htm06/07/2004 10:57:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010c.htm06 http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_010d.htm06/07/2004 12:40:15 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5

470

A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

471

A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

472

k-PROTECTED VERTICES IN BINARY SEARCH TREES MIKLOS BONA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

k-PROTECTED VERTICES IN BINARY SEARCH TREES MIKL´OS B´ONA Abstract. We show that for every k, the probability that a randomly selected vertex of a random binary search tree on n nodes is at distance k - 1. In another model, leaves may represent end-users (customers) of a company, and in that case, it may

Bona, Miklos

473

Cretaceous Vertical Motion of Australia and the Australian-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the SEIR be- tween 120° and 128°E, south of the Great Australian Bight (GAB), is characterized by ruggedCretaceous Vertical Motion of Australia and the Australian- Antarctic Discordance Michael Gurnis, R and the present-day distinctive geochemistry and geophysics of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance. The dynamic

Müller, Dietmar

474

Continental seismic events observed by the MPL vertical DIFAR array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vertical DIFAR array, an underwater acoustic sensor system, deployed by the Marine Physical Laboratory (MPL) was in place over the continental shelf off of Southern California and recorded the HUNTERS TROPHY nuclear test and nearly a score of after-shocks of the Landers/Big Bear earthquakes. Data from this array raise the possibility that detection thresholds for continental events may be significantly lower for arrays over the continental shelf than for arrays in the deep ocean basins. Offshore stations could be used to fill gaps in land-based seismic networks for monitoring the NPT and a CTBT, especially for monitoring non-cooperating nations with large coastlines. This preliminary report provides an analysis of the HUNTERS TROPHY observation as well as one of the Landers aftershocks. The analysis suggests detection thresholds for vertical hydrophone arrays below mb 3.0 at ranges between 3 and 4 degrees, and below mb 4.4 out to 6 degrees. This report also describes two signal processing techniques that enhance the detection potential of short vertical arrays. These methods are deterministic null steering to suppress horizontally propagating ambient ocean noise, and matched field processing for vertically-incident acoustic fields. The latter technique is ideally suited for acoustic fields derived from incident seismic waves, and may be viewed as a {open_quotes}synthetic aperture{close_quotes} approach to increase the effective aperture of the array.

Harris, D.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); D`Spain, G. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States). Marine Physical Lab.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Two phase pressure drop in inclined and vertical pipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method of calculating the pressure drop in inclined and vertical oil-gas wells is proposed. The data used to establish the method is from a variety of sources but is largely from air and water flowing in systems close ...

Griffith, P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

NAVARRO VERTICES AND NORMAL SUBGROUPS IN GROUPS OF ODD ORDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAVARRO VERTICES AND NORMAL SUBGROUPS IN GROUPS OF ODD ORDER JAMES P. COSSEY Abstract. Let p be a prime and suppose G is a finite solvable group and is an ordinary irreducible character of G. Navarro character of Q, which is unique up to conjugacy. This pair is called the Navarro vertex

Cossey, James P.

477

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities Income Breakdown Expenditure Breakdown http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005b.htm06/07/2004 13:00:29 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005c.htm06

478

Measurement of Vertical Kinetic Energy and Vertical Velocity Skewness in Oceanic Boundary Layers by Imperfectly Lagrangian Floats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of upward buoyancy on the accuracy with which Lagrangian floats can measure the Eulerian mean variance ?ww?E and skewness SwE of vertical fluid velocity w in the wind-driven upper-ocean boundary layer is investigated using both ...

Ramsey R. Harcourt; Eric A. DAsaro

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce too much solid water (ice and snow) and not enough liquid water. 1. Introduction Ice clouds playThe Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long

Protat, Alain

480

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPEAK UP, EPPING! COMMUNITY PROFILE REPORT Epping, New Hampshire April 14, 2007 #12;TABLE ............................................................................................. 21 6. Community Services, Facilities and Utilities........................................................................................................................... 38 1. Natural Resources & Environment 2. Communication 3. Infrastructure & Public Safety 4

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar vertical profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Profile of Alec J. Jeffreys 10.1073/pnas.0603953103 Nick Zagorski As one of the great contributors to modern genetics...the forensic sciences. That achievement alone is worthy of merit, contributing to Jeffreys' receiving three high distinctions...

Nick Zagorski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Neuropsychological Profile of Stuttering Children  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the cognitive profile of stuttering children. A sample of 290 children was ... classified as stutterers. In general, performance in stuttering children was similar to the ...

Alfredo Ardila; Mnica Rosselli

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Energy Consumption Profile for Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

317 Chapter 12 Energy Consumption Profile for Energy Harvested WSNs T. V. Prabhakar, R Venkatesha.............................................................................................318 12.2 Energy Harvesting ...................................................................................318 12.2.1 Motivations for Energy Harvesting...............................................319 12

Langendoen, Koen

484

Vibration of Tethered Microstructure Profilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although loosely tethered turbulence profilers have many advantages, they are prone to resonant vibrations at frequencies in the dissipation range when they are falling rapidly or when the tether is strummed. Using the Advanced Microstructure ...

Jack B. Miller; M. C. Gregg; Vernon W. Miller; Gordon L. Welsh

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

16B.2 VERTICAL PROFILES OF TROPICAL CONVECTION AS OBSERVED BY THE TRMM SATELLITE Walter A. Petersen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics. 2. DISTRIBUTIONS OF REFLECTIVITY AS COMPARED TO ICE WATER CONTENT AND LIGHTNING FLASH DENSITY ensembles. These differences are similarly manifested in plots of LIS Lightning Flash Density (LFD) and Ice; 2A-25 algorithm) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) data to conduct statistical studies

Rutledge, Steven

486

Influence of in situ biological activity on the vertical profile of pre-emergence herbicides in sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in sediment Damien A. Devault,* Sebastien Delmotte, Georges Merlina, Puy Lim, Magali Gerino and Eric Pinelli was studied in sediment. Early diagenesis indicators of organic matter (OM) was selected to provide in the degradation of fresh organic matter, the vector of herbicides in sediment. Two tandem-coring samples were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

487

Vertical Velocity and Buoyancy Characteristics of Coherent Echo Plumes in the Convective Boundary Layer, Detected by a Profiling Airborne Radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have a pronounced impact on radiative transfer and global climate. Over land sur- faces, solar heating made using tethered balloons (e.g., Readings et al. 1973), instrumented towers (e.g., LeMone 1973

Geerts, Bart

488

JOBAID-ACCESSING AND MODIFYING TALENT PROFILE  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile...

489

Proceedings of EARSeL-SIG-Workshop LIDAR, Dresden/FRG, June 16 17, 2000 EARSeL eProceedings No. 1 77  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

77 MARINE CODE FOR MODELLING RANGE RESOLVED OCEANOGRAPHIC LIDAR FLUOROSENSOR MEASUREMENTS R. Barbini1 environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption in the frame of the Italian Research Pro- gram for Antarctica (PNRA), has been designed to remotely detect

Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

490

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

Hogan, Robin

491

Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data ERWIN L. A. WOLTERS, ROBERT A. ROEBELING, AND ARNOUT J. FEIJT Royal Netherlands 2007) ABSTRACT Three cloud-phase determination algorithms from passive satellite imagers are explored

Stoffelen, Ad

492

A Critical Review of the Database Acquired for the Long-Term Surveillance of the Middle Atmosphere by the French Rayleigh Lidars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The database obtained by Rayleigh lidars over the south of France is now used for monitoring the middle-atmosphere structure and to validate satellite data. For these reasons it is crucial to ensure the quality of the data. The purpose of this ...

P. Keckhut; A. Hauchecorne; M. L. Chanin

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

A comparison of automated land cover/use classification methods for a Texas bottomland hardwood system using lidar, spot-5, and ancillary data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decisions affecting these disappearing systems. SPOT-5 imagery from 2005 was combined with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data from 2006 and several ancillary datasets to map a portion of the bottomland hardwood system found in the Sulphur River Basin...

Vernon, Zachary Isaac

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Session: Site assessment (CS4.4) Track: Scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in horizontal focus distances. Results: Half hour periods as functions of direction show that the wind speed observed as it was expected. Conclusion: We can measure profiles with a LiDAR both of the mean wind speed, the wind direction, and, with more uncertainty, the momentum flux in vertical scanning mode and simple

496

Gas flow in vertical slots with large horizontal temperature differences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perfect gas exact solutions to the steady Navier--Stokes equations are given for laminar convective motion in open and closed vertical slots with large temperature differences using Sutherland law transport properties. The solutions are valid a few slot widths away from the ends in the asymptotic region where the opposite hot and cold wall boundary layers are fully merged. It is found that the static pressure (in the closed slot) and temperature and velocity distributions (in all cases) are very sensitive to property variations, even though the heat flux may not be. We observe the net horizontal and vertical heat fluxes to be the same as those obtained from the Boussinesq equations. Comparisons with constant property solutions and the well-known Boussinesq limiting solution for small temperature differences are given for examples using air.

Chenoweth, D.R.; Paolucci, S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Heat and mass transfer of moist air in vertical channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural convection heat transfer in vertical open channel flows has been widely studied for various geometric configurations since it concerns a number of applications, ranging from the cooling of electronic equipment to the heating of buildings. This study examines energy transport associated with liquid film condensation or evaporation in natural convection flows driven by differences in density due to temperature and concentration gradients. The most common compositional gradient which is encountered in humid air is considered. A steady, laminar, Boussinesq flow of an ideal gas-vapor mixture is studied for the case of a vertical open plane channel. The influence of the species interdiffusion due to enthalpy difference between air and water vapor is considered first in the case of evaporation. It is shown that the species interdiffusion term is negligible even at moderate temperature differences. This study mainly investigates wall condensation of humid air and preliminary results are presented.

Desrayaud, G.; Garnier, V.; Lauriat, G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Physics of vertically integrated waveguide photodetectors and amplifiers. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the efforts supported by LLNL under the Subcontract No. B239593 at the University of Arizona during the Fiscal Year 1992. A solid physical foundation has been developed for understanding the operation of vertically integrated photodetectors and amplifiers. This has been achieved through a combination of numerical simulation and development of simple coupled-mode theories. Coupled-mode theory has been used to elucidate the physics underlying the operation of vertically integrated photodetectors. In particular, the relation between the spatial transients observed in experiments and numerical simulations, and the non-power orthogonality of the underlying modes has been clarified. The coupled-mode theory has been extended to the case of coupled waveguide-amplifiers.

Wright, E.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Optical Sciences Center

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device is disclosed. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths. 10 figs.

Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Awyoung, A.; Choquette, K.D.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

500

Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z