Sample records for lidar validation experiment

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. NO2 lidar profile measurements for satellite interpretation and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirksen, Ruud

    NO2 lidar profile measurements for satellite interpretation and validation H. Volten,1 E. J matter. We describe a novel instrument, the RIVM NO2 mobile lidar, to measure tropospheric NO2 profiles collection of lidar NO2 profiles, coinciding with OMI and SCIAMACHY overpasses. On clear days and early

  3. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

  4. Simple Doppler Wind Lidar adaptive observation experiments with 3D-Var and an ensemble Kalman filter in a global primitive equations model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    the next few years, the first Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) will be deployed in space by the European Space1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Simple Doppler Wind Lidar adaptive Experiments, we compare several adaptive observation strategies designed to subsample Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL

  5. Scientific investigations planned for the lidar in-space technology experiment (LITE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, M.P.; Winker, D.M.; Browell, E.V. (NASA/Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)); Coakley, J.A. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States)); Gardner, C.S. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States)); Hoff, R.M. (Center for Atmospheric Research Experiments, Egbert, Ontario (Canada)); Kent, G.S. (Science and Technology Corp., Hampton, VA (United States)); Melfi, S.H. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Menzies, R.T. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)); Platt, C.M.R. (CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)); Randall, D.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)); Reagan, J.A. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is being developed by NASA/Langley Research Center for a series off lights on the space shuttle beginning in 1994. Employing a three-wave-length ND:YAG laser and a 1-m-diameter telescope, the system is a test-bed for the development of technology required for future operational spaceborne lidars. The system has been designed to observe clouds, tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols, characteristics of the planetary boundary layer, and stratospheric density and temperature perturbations with much greater resolution than is available from current orbiting sensors. In addition to providing unique datasets on these phenomena, the data obtained will be useful in improving retrieval algorithms currently in use. Observations of clouds and the planetary boundary layer will aid in the development of global climate model (GCM) parameterizations. This article briefly describes the LITE program and discusses the types of scientific investigations planned for the first flight.

  6. Value of Laboratory Experiments for Code Validations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wawersik, W.R.

    1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical codes have become indispensable for designing underground structures and interpretating the behavior of geologic systems. Because of the complexities of geologic systems, however, code calculations often are associated with large quantitative uncertainties. This papers presents three examples to demonstrate the value of laboratory(or bench scale) experiments to evaluate the predictive capabilities of such codes with five major conclusions: Laboratory or bench-scale experiments are a very cost-effective, controlled means of evaluating and validating numerical codes, not instead of but before or at least concurrent with the implementation of in situ studies. The design of good laboratory validation tests must identifj what aspects of a code are to be scrutinized in order to optimize the size, geometry, boundary conditions, and duration of the experiments. The design of good and sometimes difficult numerical analyses and sensitivity studies. Laboratory validation tests must involve: Good validation experiments will generate independent data sets to identify the combined effect of constitutive models, model generalizations, material parameters, and numerical algorithms. Successfid validations of numerical codes mandate a close collaboration between experimentalists and analysts drawing from the full gamut of observations, measurements, and mathematical results.

  7. Master thesis: "Validation of wake-simulation models based on long-range lidar measurements."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    REpower 6M wind turbines with rotor blades of different designs installed in the Ellhöft/Westre wind farm developed by the wind turbine manufacturer. Work plan 2011 2012 Task 11 12 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Figure 1: Simulation of lidar measurements in the wake of a wind turbine using a LES generated wind field

  8. Observations of tropical cirrus properties in the pilot radiation observation experiment using lidar and the CSIRO ARM filter radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.J.; Patterson, G.R. [CSIRO, Victoria (Australia)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A narrow beam fast filter radiometer has been developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The radiometer is intended to operate alongside a lidar at ARM sites in a lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) configuration. The radiometer detects in three narrow bands at 8.62-, 10.86-, and 12.04-m central wavelengths in the atmospheric window. In addition, it has a variable field aperture that varies the radiance incident on the detector and also allows the field of view to be tailored to that of a lidar used in the LIRAD technique. The radiometer was deployed in the ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) at Kavieng, Papua New Guinea in January-February 1993. The radiometer worked satisfactorily and appeared to be very stable. The radiometer was compared with a previous CSIRO radiometer and the improved performance of the ARM instrument was very evident. The ARM radiometer was also compared with a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratories (ETL) interferometer and gave closely equivalent radiances. The LIRAD method was used at Kavieng to obtain the optical properties of cirrus clouds. Continuous observations of water vapor path obtained by the NOAA ETL microwave radiometer were employed to allow for the strong tropical water vapor absorption and emission. Cirrus cells that developed on one morning, independent of other clouds, had measured infrared emittances varying from <0.1 to 1.0.

  9. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F. (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  10. Additional critical experiments for computer code validation base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, E.P.; Tollefson, D.A.; Vornehm, R.G.

    1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the validation, in accordance with ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983(R1988), of KENO V.a using the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross section library for some neutronic systems containing highly-enriched uranium, carbon, and hydrogen. This constituent combination is present in many packaging applications for the safe transportation of fissile and fissionable materials. The validation has been performed for two separate computational platforms: an IBM 3090 mainframe and an HP 9000 Series 700 workstation, both using the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Software (NCSS) code package. Critical experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Rover reactor program were identified as having the constitutents desired for this validation as well as sufficient experimental detail to allow accurate construction of KENO V.a calculational models. Calculated values of k{sub eff} for the Rover experiments, which contain uranium, carbon, and hydrogen, are between 1.0012 {+-} 0.0026 and 1.0245 {+-} 0.0023. These experiments can now be added to KENO V.a and other computer code critical experiment data bases which are used for validation and to establish upper limits on calculated values of k{sub eff} for specific applications.

  11. Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

  12. Experiments for calibration and validation of plasticity and failure material modeling: 304L stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kenneth L.; Korellis, John S.; McFadden, Sam X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data for material plasticity and failure model calibration and validation were obtained from 304L stainless steel. Model calibration data were taken from smooth tension, notched tension, and compression tests. Model validation data were provided from experiments using thin-walled tube specimens subjected to path dependent combinations of internal pressure, extension, and torsion.

  13. Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

  14. Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Validating

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Protocol assessment of a field reliability experiment at the NDI Validation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashbaugh, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spencer, F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial task pursued by the Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) at the request of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was to plan and to implement a specific field experiment. The purpose was to assess the reliability of detecting a crack originating within fastener holes in thin aluminum structure using high-frequency eddy current inspection methods. To accomplish this the authors developed a consistent and systematic methodology to assess reliability of nondestructive inspections through field experiments (Spencer et al., 1993). In this article they briefly discuss major elements necessary for field experimentation. The authors also relate how they tested these elements for the Eddy Current Inspection Reliability Experiment (ECIRE) through a dress rehearsal in the Validation Center.

  17. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogi, Y., E-mail: kogi@fit.ac.jp; Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-0811 (Japan); Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  18. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  19. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  20. Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, A; Flynn, C

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) is a ground-based optical remote sensing system designed primarily to determine the altitude of clouds overhead. The physical principle is the same as for radar. Pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is infered. Besides real-time detection of clouds, post-processing of the lidar return can also characterize the extent and properties of aerosol or other particle-laden regions.

  1. Design and Execution of Model Experiments to Validate Numerical Modelling of 2D Ship Operations in Pack Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Steve

    in Pack Ice Roelof C. Dragt Offshore Engineering Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Material Engineering of experiments to validate a Graphics Processing Unit based numerical modelling of ship operations in 2D pack ice interaction, 2D Model Experiments, Image Processing. I. INTRODUCTION A ship travelling through pack ice

  2. A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for MOX Fuel Based on the IFA-597 Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillippe, Aaron M [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Banfield, James E [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The IFA-597 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the thermal behavior of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and the effects of an annulus on fission gas release in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for MOX fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the first 20 time steps ( 6 GWd/MT(iHM)) for explicit comparison between the codes. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole, dish, and chamfer. The analysis demonstrated relative agreement for both solid (rod 1) and annular (rod 2) fuel in the experiment, demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for MOX fuel, while also revealing a small energy loss artifact in how gap conductance is currently handled in Exnihilo for chamfered fuel pellets. The within-pellet power shape was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for MOX fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

  3. Experiments to populate and validate a processing model for polyurethane foam :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondy, Lisa Ann; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Shelden, Bion; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Grillet, Anne; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Russick, Edward Mark; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hileman, Michael Bryan; Urquhart, Alexander; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Smith, David Michael

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing computational models to elucidate the expansion and dynamic filling process of a polyurethane foam, PMDI. The polyurethane of interest is chemically blown, where carbon dioxide is produced via the reaction of water, the blowing agent, and isocyanate. The isocyanate also reacts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. Here we detail the experiments needed to populate a processing model and provide parameters for the model based on these experiments. The model entails solving the conservation equations, including the equations of motion, an energy balance, and two rate equations for the polymerization and foaming reactions, following a simplified mathematical formalism that decouples these two reactions. Parameters for the polymerization kinetics model are reported based on infrared spectrophotometry. Parameters describing the gas generating reaction are reported based on measurements of volume, temperature and pressure evolution with time. A foam rheology model is proposed and parameters determined through steady-shear and oscillatory tests. Heat of reaction and heat capacity are determined through differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal conductivity of the foam as a function of density is measured using a transient method based on the theory of the transient plane source technique. Finally, density variations of the resulting solid foam in several simple geometries are directly measured by sectioning and sampling mass, as well as through x-ray computed tomography. These density measurements will be useful for model validation once the complete model is implemented in an engineering code.

  4. Preliminary validation of rock mass models by comparison to laboratory frictional sliding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Miller, J.D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization will be facilitated by the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The ESF and potential repository will be excavated from both nonwelded and welded ashflow tuff with varying rock quality (degree of welding, rock mass strength, etc.) and fault and fracture characteristics. Design concerns for the construction of these facilities include the integrity of the structure during underground testing operations and, if it occurs, the emplacement and storage of high-level nuclear waste which could increase the local temperatures in the underground rock mass to as high as 300{degrees}C. Because of the associated issues regarding personnel and long-term environmental safety, sophisticated jointed rock mass models will be required to provide a high degree of confidence for decisions regarding the design, site characterization, and licensing of such facilities. The objective of the work documented in this report is to perform code validation calculations for three rock-mass computer models. The three rock-mass computer models used for this report are the discrete element code UDEC, Version 1.82; and the finite element continuum joint models JAC2D Version 5.10 and JAS3D Version 1.1. The rock mass behavior predicted by the models are compared to the results of laboratory experiments on layered polycarbonate (Lexan) and granite plate experiments. These experiments examine the rock mass behavior of well-defined jointed rock structures or models of jointed structures under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The laboratory environment allows control over the boundary conditions, material properties, and quality and quantity of the data obtained.

  5. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density between the 2003 and 2009 did not affect the biomass estimates. Overall, LiDAR data coupled with field reference data offer a powerful method for calculating pools and changes in aboveground carbon in forested systems. The results of our study suggest that multitemporal LiDAR-based approaches are likely to be useful for high quality estimates of aboveground carbon change in conifer forest systems.

  6. Characterization of materials for a reactive transport model validation experiment: Interim report on the caisson experiment. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, M.D.; Cheng, W.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models used in performance assessment and site characterization activities related to nuclear waste disposal rely on simplified representations of solute/rock interactions, hydrologic flow field and the material properties of the rock layers surrounding the repository. A crucial element in the design of these models is the validity of these simplifying assumptions. An intermediate-scale experiment is being carried out at the Experimental Engineered Test Facility at Los Alamos Laboratory by the Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories to develop a strategy to validate key geochemical and hydrological assumptions in performance assessment models used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  7. SU-E-T-344: Validation and Clinical Experience of Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo Algorithm (EMC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokharel, S [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Rana, S [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to validate Eclipse Electron Monte Carlo (Algorithm for routine clinical uses. Methods: The PTW inhomogeneity phantom (T40037) with different combination of heterogeneous slabs has been CT-scanned with Philips Brilliance 16 slice scanner. The phantom contains blocks of Rando Alderson materials mimicking lung, Polystyrene (Tissue), PTFE (Bone) and PMAA. The phantom has 30×30×2.5 cm base plate with 2cm recesses to insert inhomogeneity. The detector systems used in this study are diode, tlds and Gafchromic EBT2 films. The diode and tlds were included in CT scans. The CT sets are transferred to Eclipse treatment planning system. Several plans have been created with Eclipse Monte Carlo (EMC) algorithm 11.0.21. Measurements have been carried out in Varian TrueBeam machine for energy from 6–22mev. Results: The measured and calculated doses agreed very well for tissue like media. The agreement was reasonably okay for the presence of lung inhomogeneity. The point dose agreement was within 3.5% and Gamma passing rate at 3%/3mm was greater than 93% except for 6Mev(85%). The disagreement can reach as high as 10% in the presence of bone inhomogeneity. This is due to eclipse reporting dose to the medium as opposed to the dose to the water as in conventional calculation engines. Conclusion: Care must be taken when using Varian Eclipse EMC algorithm for dose calculation for routine clinical uses. The algorithm dose not report dose to water in which most of the clinical experiences are based on rather it just reports dose to medium directly. In the presence of inhomogeneity such as bone, the dose discrepancy can be as high as 10% or even more depending on the location of normalization point or volume. As Radiation oncology as an empirical science, care must be taken before using EMC reported monitor units for clinical uses.

  8. Raman Lidar Receives Improvements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaising funds for a cure Raising2 Raman Lidar

  9. Micro-chamber filling experiments for validation of macro models with applications in capillary driven microfluidics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauntt, Stephen Byron

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of bubble formation during filling of microchambers is often critical for determining the efficacy of microfluidic devices in various applications. In this study experimental validation is performed to verify the predictions from a...

  10. Micro-chamber filling experiments for validation of macro models with applications in capillary driven microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauntt, Stephen Byron

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of bubble formation during filling of microchambers is often critical for determining the efficacy of microfluidic devices in various applications. In this study experimental validation is performed to verify the predictions from a...

  11. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  12. Reactivity loss validation of high burn-up PWR fuels with pile-oscillation experiments in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leconte, P.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Eschbach, R.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALIX experimental program relies on the experimental validation of the spent fuel inventory, by chemical analysis of samples irradiated in a PWR between 5 and 7 cycles, and also on the experimental validation of the spent fuel reactivity loss with bum-up, obtained by pile-oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor. These latter experiments provide an overall validation of both the fuel inventory and of the nuclear data responsible for the reactivity loss. This program offers also unique experimental data for fuels with a burn-up reaching 85 GWd/t, as spent fuels in French PWRs never exceeds 70 GWd/t up to now. The analysis of these experiments is done in two steps with the APOLLO2/SHEM-MOC/CEA2005v4 package. In the first one, the fuel inventory of each sample is obtained by assembly calculations. The calculation route consists in the self-shielding of cross sections on the 281 energy group SHEM mesh, followed by the flux calculation by the Method Of Characteristics in a 2D-exact heterogeneous geometry of the assembly, and finally a depletion calculation by an iterative resolution of the Bateman equations. In the second step, the fuel inventory is used in the analysis of pile-oscillation experiments in which the reactivity of the ALIX spent fuel samples is compared to the reactivity of fresh fuel samples. The comparison between Experiment and Calculation shows satisfactory results with the JEFF3.1.1 library which predicts the reactivity loss within 2% for burn-up of {approx}75 GWd/t and within 4% for burn-up of {approx}85 GWd/t. (authors)

  13. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

  14. Ozone profile and tropospheric ozone retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment: Algorithm description and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Ozone profile and tropospheric ozone retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment October 2005. [1] Ozone profiles are derived from back scattered radiance spectra in the ultraviolet (289­339 nm) measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) using the optimal estimation technique

  15. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  16. Well-characterized open pool experiment data and analysis for model validation and development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundberg, David W.; Brown, Alexander L.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Well-Characterized Open Pool fires were conducted by Fire Science and Technology Department. The focus of the Well-Characterized Open Pool fire series was to provide environmental information for open pool fires on a physics first principal basis. The experiments measured the burning rate of liquid fuel in an open pool and the resultant heat flux to a weapon-sized object and the surrounding environment with well-characterized boundary and initial conditions. Results presented in this report include a general description of test observation (pre- and post-test), wind measurements, fire plume topology, average fuel recession and heat release rates, and incident heat flux to the pool and to the calorimeters. As expected, results of the experiments show a strong correlation between wind conditions, fuel vaporization (mass loss) rate, and incident heat flux to the fuel and ground surface and calorimeters. Numerical fire simulations using both temporally- and spatially-dependant wind boundary conditions were performed using the Vulcan fire code. Comparisons of data to simulation predictions showed similar trends; however, simulation-predicted incident heat fluxes were lower than measured.

  17. A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for UO2 Fuel Based on the IFA-432 Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillippe, Aaron M [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Banfield, James E [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IFA-432 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the effects of gap size, fuel density, and fuel densification on fuel centerline temperature in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for uranium dioxide (UO$_2$) fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the densification stage (2.2 \\unitfrac{GWd}{MT(UO$_{2}$)}). In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole. The analysis demonstrated excellent agreement for rods 1, 2, 3, and 5 (varying gap thicknesses and density with traditional fuel), demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for traditional fuel. For rod 6, which contained unstable fuel that densified an order of magnitude more than traditional, stable fuel, the magnitude of densification was over-predicted and the temperatures were outside of the experimental uncertainty. The radial power shape within the fuel was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures, whereas modeling the fuel at the thermocouple location as either annular or solid was relatively negligible. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for UO$_2$ fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

  18. airborne oceanographic lidar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Channels Landslides Spatial Cognition The emergence of airborne lidar data cognition and perception, we also explore the notion that the ongoing use of lidar enables...

  19. airborne aura lidar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Channels Landslides Spatial Cognition The emergence of airborne lidar data cognition and perception, we also explore the notion that the ongoing use of lidar enables...

  20. Retrieval of Urban Boundary Layer Structures from Doppler Lidar Data. Part I: Accuracy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Quanxin; Lin, Ching Long; Calhoun, Ron; Newsom, Rob K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two coherent Doppler lidars from the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Arizona State University (ASU) were deployed in the Joint Urban 2003 atmospheric dispersion field experiment (JU2003) held in Oklahoma City. The dual lidar data are used to evaluate the accuracy of the four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) method and identify the coherent flow structures in the urban boundary layer. The objectives of the study are three-fold. The first objective is to examine the effect of eddy viscosity models on the quality of retrieved velocity data. The second objective is to determine the fidelity of single-lidar 4DVAR and evaluate the difference between single- and dual-lidar retrievals. The third objective is to correlate the retrieved flow structures with the ground building data. It is found that the approach of treating eddy viscosity as part of control variables yields better results than the approach of prescribing viscosity. The ARL single-lidar 4DVAR is able to retrieve radial velocity fields with an accuracy of 98% in the along-beam direction and 80-90% in the cross-beam direction. For the dual-lidar 4DVAR, the accuracy of retrieved radial velocity in the ARL cross-beam direction improves to 90-94%. By using the dual-lidar retrieved data as a reference, the single-lidar 4DVAR is able to recover fluctuating velocity fields with 70-80% accuracy in the along-beam direction and 60-70% accuracy in the cross-beam direction. Large-scale convective roll structures are found in the vicinity of downtown airpark and parks. Vortical structures are identified near the business district. Strong updrafts and downdrafts are also found above a cluster of restaurants.

  1. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections and calculational methods for the advanced neutron source against the FOEHN critical experiments measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.A.; Gallmeier, F.X. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Energy, TN (United States); Gehin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FOEHN critical experiment was analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections and Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutronics computer codes in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. The ANSL-V 99-group master cross section library was used for all the calculations. Three different critical configurations were evaluated using the multigroup KENO Monte Carlo transport code, the multigroup DORT discrete ordinates transport code, and the multigroup diffusion theory code VENTURE. The simple configuration consists of only the fuel and control elements with the heavy water reflector. The intermediate configuration includes boron endplates at the upper and lower edges of the fuel element. The complex configuration includes both the boron endplates and components in the reflector. Cross sections were processed using modules from the AMPX system. Both 99-group and 20-group cross sections were created and used in two-dimensional models of the FOEHN experiment. KENO calculations were performed using both 99-group and 20-group cross sections. The DORT and VENTURE calculations were performed using 20-group cross sections. Because the simple and intermediate configurations are azimuthally symmetric, these configurations can be explicitly modeled in R-Z geometry. Since the reflector components cannot be modeled explicitly using the current versions of these codes, three reflector component homogenization schemes were developed and evaluated for the complex configuration. Power density distributions were calculated with KENO using 99-group cross sections and with DORT and VENTURE using 20-group cross sections. The average differences between the measured values and the values calculated with the different computer codes range from 2.45 to 5.74%. The maximum differences between the measured and calculated thermal flux values for the simple and intermediate configurations are {approx} 13%, while the average differences are < 8%.

  2. URBAN MODELING FROM LIDAR DATA IN AN INTEGRATED GIS ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    . In fact, the first satellites carrying lidar sensors, Alissa, Balkan-1, and Balkan-2 are scheduled

  3. LIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    of the Lake-Induced Convection Experiments (Lake-ICE), on December 21, 1997 the University of Wisconsin VolumeLIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT G circulation over Lake Michigan. Backscatter returns revealed a steady offshore flow extending 1.5 to 4 km

  4. Validation of the BERT Point Source Inversion Scheme Using the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Experiment Dataset - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambilla, Sara [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A terrorist attack in a U.S. city utilizing biological weapons could have severe consequences. A biological agent could be aerosolized and emitted into the air in the middle of a city, invisibly traveling with the winds, and dosing an unknowing populace. The magnitude of the problem would only be revealed as sick people started arriving several days later at hospitals with symptoms, many already too ill to be saved. A national program has deployed a network of biological agent collectors in U.S. cities to provide early detection of a bio-weapon attack, thereby hastening medical intervention and potentially saving many thousands of lives. In fact, the most effective treatment takes place prior to infection or in its early stages and early warning might reduce the disease progression and, consequently, the possibility of an outbreak. If a biological attack were to occur in a city, one or more collectors may register hits with specific dosages and the city would be alerted that an attack had taken place. This piece of information alone, however, would not be enough to determine how serious the attack was, i.e., how much biological agent was released into the air and where the bio-plume traveled. The first responders and public health communities will want to know what regions were impacted, how many persons might get sick, which people most need medical supplies, and where to clean up. The law enforcement community will want to look for forensic evidence at the release location. The Bio-Agent Event Reconstruction Tool (BERT) has been developed in order to recreate what might have happened during an airborne biological agent attack based on biological agent collector measurements and wind collectors mounted around a city. The tool can be used to estimate possible release areas while eliminating other areas, and can estimate bounds on the amount of material released. The tool can then be used to project forward from the possible source areas to estimate potential hazard zones. Due to a unique source inversion technique - called the upwind collector footprint approach - the tool runs fast and the source regions can be determined in a few minutes. In this report, we provide an overview of the BERT framework, followed by a description of the source inversion technique. The Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment held in Oklahoma City that was used to validate BERT is then described. Subsequent sections describe the metrics used for evaluation, the comparison of the experimental data and BERT output, and under what conditions the BERT tool succeeds and performs poorly. Results are aggregated in different ways (e.g., daytime vs. nighttime releases, 1 vs. 2 vs. 3 hit collectors) to determine if BERT shows any systematic errors. Finally, recommendations are given for how to improve the code and procedures for optimizing performance in operational mode.

  5. Comments on ''Accuracy of Raman lidar water vapor calibration and its applicability to long-term measurements''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, David N.; Venable, Demetrius; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent publication, Leblanc and McDermid [Appl. Opt., 47, 5592 (2008)]APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.005592 proposed a hybrid calibration technique for Raman water vapor lidar involving a tungsten lamp and radiosondes. Measurements made with the lidar telescope viewing the calibration lamp were used to stabilize the lidar calibration determined by comparison with radiosonde. The technique provided a significantly more stable calibration constant than radiosondes used alone. The technique involves the use of a calibration lamp in a fixed position in front of the lidar receiver aperture. We examine this configuration and find that such a configuration likely does not properly sample the full lidar system optical efficiency. While the technique is a useful addition to the use of radiosondes alone for lidar calibration, it is important to understand the scenarios under which it will not provide an accurate quantification of system optical efficiency changes. We offer examples of these scenarios. Scanning of the full telescope aperture with the calibration lamp can circumvent most of these limitations. Based on the work done to date, it seems likely that the use of multiple calibration lamps in different fixed positions in front of the telescope may provide sufficient redundancy for long-term calibration needs. Further full-aperture scanning experiments, performed over an extended period of time, are needed to determine a ''best practice'' for the use of multiple calibration lamps in the hybrid technique.

  6. Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ferrare, Richard

    Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

  7. LIDAR, Point Clouds, and their Archaeological Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Devin A [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is common in contemporary archaeological literature, in papers at archaeological conferences, and in grant proposals to see heritage professionals use the term LIDAR to refer to high spatial resolution digital elevation models and the technology used to produce them. The goal of this chapter is to break that association and introduce archaeologists to the world of point clouds, in which LIDAR is only one member of a larger family of techniques to obtain, visualize, and analyze three-dimensional measurements of archaeological features. After describing how point clouds are constructed, there is a brief discussion on the currently available software and analytical techniques designed to make sense of them.

  8. Verification and validation of the maximum entropy method for reconstructing neutron flux, with MCNP5, Attila-7.1.0 and the GODIVA experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas S. Crawford; Tony Saad; Terry A. Ring

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification and validation of reconstructed neutron flux based on the maximum entropy method is presented in this paper. The verification is carried out by comparing the neutron flux spectrum from the maximum entropy method with Monte Carlo N Particle 5 version 1.40 (MCNP5) and Attila-7.1.0-beta (Attila). A spherical 100% 235U critical assembly is modeled as the test case to compare the three methods. The verification error range for the maximum entropy method is 15–21% where MCNP5 is taken to be the comparison standard. Attila relative error for the critical assembly is 20–35%. Validation is accomplished by comparing a neutron flux spectrum that is back calculated from foil activation measurements performed in the GODIVA experiment (GODIVA). The error range of the reconstructed flux compared to GODIVA is 0–10%. The error range of the neutron flux spectrum from MCNP5 compared to GODIVA is 0–20% and the Attila error range compared to the GODIVA is 0–35%. The maximum entropy method is shown to be a fast reliable method, compared to either Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) or 30 multienergy group methods (Attila) and with respect to the GODIVA experiment.

  9. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokaltun, Seckin; Munroe, Norman; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  10. An Attempt to Calibrate and Validate a Simple Ductile Failure Model Against Axial-Torsion Experiments on Al 6061-T651.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin; Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details a work in progress. We have attempted to calibrate and validate a Von Mises plasticity model with the Johnson-Cook failure criterion ( Johnson & Cook , 1985 ) against a set of experiments on various specimens of Al 6061-T651. As will be shown, the effort was not successful, despite considerable attention to detail. When the model was com- pared against axial-torsion experiments on tubes, it over predicted failure by 3 x in tension, and never predicted failure in torsion, even when the tube was twisted by 4 x further than the experiment. While this result is unfortunate, it is not surprising. Ductile failure is not well understood. In future work, we will explore whether more sophisticated material mod- els of plasticity and failure will improve the predictions. Selecting the appropriate advanced material model and interpreting the results of said model are not trivial exercises, so it is worthwhile to fully investigate the behavior of a simple plasticity model before moving on to an anisotropic yield surface or a similarly complicated model.

  11. Systematic Sampling of Scanning Lidar Swaths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcell, Wesley Tyler

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Marian Eriksson Sorin Pospescu Committee Members, Cristine Morgan Ross Nelson Head of Department, Steven Whisenant December 2009 Major Subject: Forestry... iii ABSTRACT Systematic Sampling of Scanning Lidar Swaths. (December 2009) Wesley Tyler Marcell, B.S., Texas A&M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Marian Eriksson Dr. Sorin...

  12. Lidar techniques for search and rescue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, W.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four techniques for using LIDAR in Search and Rescue Operations will be discussed. The topic will include laser retroreflection, laser-induced fluorescence in the visible, laser-induced fluorescence during daylight hours, and laser-induced fluorescence in the uv. These techniques use high-repetition rate lasers at a variety of frequencies to induce either fluorescence in dye markers or retroreflection from plastic corner cubes on life preservers and other emergency markers.

  13. Elements of a pragmatic approach for dealing with bias and uncertainty in experiments through predictions : experiment design and data conditioning; %22real space%22 model validation and conditioning; hierarchical modeling and extrapolative prediction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Vicente Jose

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explores some important considerations in devising a practical and consistent framework and methodology for utilizing experiments and experimental data to support modeling and prediction. A pragmatic and versatile 'Real Space' approach is outlined for confronting experimental and modeling bias and uncertainty to mitigate risk in modeling and prediction. The elements of experiment design and data analysis, data conditioning, model conditioning, model validation, hierarchical modeling, and extrapolative prediction under uncertainty are examined. An appreciation can be gained for the constraints and difficulties at play in devising a viable end-to-end methodology. Rationale is given for the various choices underlying the Real Space end-to-end approach. The approach adopts and refines some elements and constructs from the literature and adds pivotal new elements and constructs. Crucially, the approach reflects a pragmatism and versatility derived from working many industrial-scale problems involving complex physics and constitutive models, steady-state and time-varying nonlinear behavior and boundary conditions, and various types of uncertainty in experiments and models. The framework benefits from a broad exposure to integrated experimental and modeling activities in the areas of heat transfer, solid and structural mechanics, irradiated electronics, and combustion in fluids and solids.

  14. Ris {R{1127(EN) Lidar data used in the COFIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3.1 Generation of arti cial smoke 7 4 Data processing 8 4.1 The lidar equation 8 4.2 Backscatter, see below. In FLADIS the smoke were added to an initial heavy gas plume. 2 Experimental design Figures response. However, the Lidar does have a averaging volume due to the leng

  15. Airborne lidar detection and characterization of internal waves in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    , Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, Rhode Island 02874 Abstract. A dual-polarization lidar though the contrast is low (2%). Combined with the lidar profile, the total energy of the internal wave heating at the surface and/or fresh water input from terrestrial runoff or melting ice create a layer

  16. ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  17. ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  18. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  19. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  20. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  1. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  2. Linearly Organized Turbulence Structures Observed Over a Suburban Area by Dual-Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron; Ligon, David; Allwine, K Jerry

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual-Doppler lidar observations are used to investigate the structure and evolution of surface layer flow over a suburban area. The observations were made during the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment in Oklahoma City in the summer of 2003. This study focuses specifically on a 10-hour sequence of scan data beginning shortly after noon local time on July 7, 2003. During this period two coherent Doppler lidars performed overlapping low elevation angle sector scans upwind and south of Oklahoma City’s central business district (CBD). Radial velocity data from the two lidars are processed to reveal the structure and evolution of the horizontal velocity field in the surface layer throughout the afternoon and evening transition periods. The retrieved velocity fields clearly show a tendency for turbulence structures to be elongated in the direction of the mean flow throughout the entire 10-hour study period. As the stratification changed from unstable to weakly stable the turbulence structures became increasingly more linearly organized, and the cross-stream separation between high- and low-speed regoins decreased. The spatially resolved velocity fields are used to estimate streamwise and cross-stream turbulence length scales as functions of stability.

  3. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Tellier, L. L. (Larry L.); Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  4. Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

  5. Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: • An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 • Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 • MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

  6. airborne lidar mapping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A minimum height of 1 m was applied to define woody understorey. Critical to this process were a Digital Terrain Model (extracted from the leaf-off last return LiDAR data)...

  7. BPA's LiDAR program maps corridor to success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analyzed by BPA's LiDAR program. The animation was produced by Ryan Beck and Drew Thompson in BPA's Geospatial Services group. Sometimes the pace of change is imperceptible,...

  8. absorption lidar dial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Development of an eye-safe diode-laser-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (MP-dial) for atmospheric water-vapor and aerosol studies. Open Access Theses...

  9. A motor drive control system for the Lidar Polarimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Waiming

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MOTOR DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LIDAR POLARIMETER A Thesis by Waiming Leung Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A/M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF, May 1977 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering A MOTOR DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LIDAR POLARIMETER A Thesis by Waiming Leung Approved as to style and content by: Chairman o Comm' ee ea o epartment Member Mem er May 1977 ABSTRACT A Motor Drive Control...

  10. Simulated performance of an airborne lidar wind shear detection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Kenneth Scott

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRBORNE LIDAR WIND SHEAR DETECTION SYSTEM A Thesis by KENNETH SCOTT GRIFFITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1987 Major Subject: Physics SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRBORNE LIDAR WIND SHEAR DETECTION SYSTEM A Thesis by KENNETH SCOTT GRIFFITH Approved as to style and content by: e . atta ar (Chair an of Committee) T omas . air, III (Member) ic...

  11. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  12. Validation of two tropical marine bivalves as bioindicators of mining1 contamination in the New Caledonia lagoon: Field transplantation experiments2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    nickel exploitation. Among other, local mining activities result in large53 anthropogenic inputs1 Validation of two tropical marine bivalves as bioindicators of mining1 contamination in the New, DCBS,25 Departamento de Hidrobiología, C.P. 09340, Iztapalapa, Mexico D.F., Mexico26 27 hal-00566717

  13. PROBING NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE WITH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AND HIGH-RESOLUTION HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. KAO; D. COOPER; ET AL

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As lidar technology is able to provide fast data collection at a resolution of meters in an atmospheric volume, it is imperative to promote a modeling counterpart of the lidar capability. This paper describes an integrated capability based on data from a scanning water vapor lidar and a high-resolution hydrodynamic model (HIGRAD) equipped with a visualization routine (VIEWER) that simulates the lidar scanning. The purpose is to better understand the spatial and temporal representativeness of the lidar measurements and, in turn, to extend their utility in studying turbulence fields in the atmospheric boundary layer. Raman lidar water vapor data collected over the Pacific warm pool and the simulations with the HIGRAD code are used for identifying the underlying physics and potential aliasing effects of spatially resolved lidar measurements. This capability also helps improve the trade-off between spatial-temporal resolution and coverage of the lidar measurements.

  14. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of achievement in V&V activities, how closely related the V&V benchmarks are to the actual application of interest, and the quantification of uncertainties related to the application of interest.

  15. Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal densities; therefore, geospatial analysis, when applied to decadal lidar time series, needs to address

  16. Alternate spatial sampling approaches for ecosystem structure inventory using spaceborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    used in aircraft lidar remote sensing where power, heat, and reliability are less of a concern since January 2011 Accepted 29 January 2011 Available online 23 March 2011 Keywords: Lidar Remote sensing Laser collected in transects and should be considered for future lidar remote sensing missions. © 2011 Elsevier

  17. The effect of specular reflection on spaceborne lidar measurements of ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Chapter 2 The effect of specular reflection on spaceborne lidar measurements of ice clouds Summary increase in extinction, it can make interpretation of the lidar echo in terms of cloud radiative properties stage which have among their primary aims the global measurement of ice clouds. The NASA Calipso lidar

  18. Comparison of Two Independent LIDAR-Based Pitch Control Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Schlipf, D.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different lidar-based feedforward controllers have previously been designed for the NREL 5 MW wind turbine model under separate studies. Feedforward controller A uses a finite-impulse-response design, with 5 seconds of preview, and three rotating lidar measurements. Feedforward controller B uses a static-gain design, with the preview time defined by the pitch actuator dynamics, a simulation of a real nacelle-based scanning lidar system, and a lowpass filter defined by the lidar configuration. These controllers are now directly compared under the same lidar configuration, in terms of fatigue load reduction, rotor speed regulation, and power capture. The various differences in design choices are discussed and compared. We also compare frequency plots of individual pitch feedforward and collective pitch feedforward load reductions, and we see that individual pitch feedforward is effective mainly at the once-per-revolution and twice-per-revolution frequencies. We also explain how to determine the required preview time by breaking it down into separate parts, and we then compare it to the expected preview time available.

  19. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  20. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  1. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  2. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

  3. National Airborne Field Experiments for Prediction in Ungauged Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    , such as validation of these data products from new sensors, maturing retrieval algorithms, developing techniques with thermal infrared, near infrared, visible and lidar data. Passive microwave data will be collected in both if there is sufficient interest. A trial campaign to evalu

  4. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon, M.; Vercherin, B.; Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine-mounted lidars provide preview measurements of the incoming wind field. By reducing loads on critical components and increasing the potential power extracted from the wind, the performance of wind turbine controllers can be improved [2]. As a result, integrating a light detection and ranging (lidar) system has the potential to lower the cost of wind energy. This paper presents an evaluation of turbine-mounted lidar availability. Availability is a metric which measures the proportion of time the lidar is producing controller-usable data, and is essential when a wind turbine controller relies on a lidar. To accomplish this, researchers from Avent Lidar Technology and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory first assessed and modeled the effect of extreme atmospheric events. This shows how a multirange lidar delivers measurements for a wide variety of conditions. Second, by using a theoretical approach and conducting an analysis of field feedback, we investigated the effects of the lidar setup on the wind turbine. This helps determine the optimal lidar mounting position at the back of the nacelle, and establishes a relationship between availability, turbine rpm, and lidar sampling time. Lastly, we considered the role of the wind field reconstruction strategies and the turbine controller on the definition and performance of a lidar's measurement availability.

  5. SANSMIC Validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Paula D.; Rudeen, David Keith; Lord, David

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SANSMIC is solution mining software that was developed and utilized by SNL in its role as geotechnical advisor to the US DOE SPR for planning purposes. Three SANSMIC leach modes - withdrawal, direct, and reverse leach - have been revalidated with multiple test cases for each mode. The withdrawal mode was validated using high quality data from recent leach activity while the direct and reverse modes utilized data from historical cavern completion reports. Withdrawal results compared very well with observed data, including the location and size of shelves due to string breaks with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 10% and relative radius differences from 1.5 - 3%. Profile comparisons for the direct mode were very good with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 12% and relative radius differences from 5 - 7%. First, second, and third reverse configurations were simulated in order to validate SANSMIC over a range of relative hanging string and OBI locations. The first-reverse was simulated reasonably well with relative leached volume differences ranging from 1 - 9% and relative radius differences from 5 - 12%. The second-reverse mode showed the largest discrepancies in leach profile. Leached volume differences ranged from 8 - 12% and relative radius differences from 1 - 10%. In the third-reverse, relative leached volume differences ranged from 10 - 13% and relative radius differences were ~4 %. Comparisons to historical reports were quite good, indicating that SANSMIC is essentially the same as documented and validated in the early 1980's.

  6. Ris-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the approaching wind fields from this vantage point. Time series of wind speed measurements from the lidar with 50: Time series of the yaw misalignment 67 #12;4 Risø-R-1741(EN) Preface Mikael Rasmussen and Per Hansen is acknowledged for safety supervision of the operation of the NM80 research turbine. The Spin

  7. FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

  8. Lidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    be discriminated from heavy fuel, and from less harmful substances like fish oil or vegetable oil, Fig. 3, whichLidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface Theo Hengstermann and Rainer Reuter Airborne .fluorosensor measurements over maritime oil spills show that this method enables a sensitive

  9. Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

  10. Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars James Whiteway,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, Thomas J.

    Cameron Dickinson,1 Leonce Komguem,1 and Clive Cook1 Received 30 August 2007; revised 9 March 2008 of backscattered laser light from airborne dust and clouds. These observations will be coordinated with solar, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10

  11. absorption lidar performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption lidar performance First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a...

  12. absorption lidar sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption lidar sensitivity First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a...

  13. absorption lidar system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption lidar system First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a differential...

  14. INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkingham, Peter

    101 INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR TRACKSITE (WYOMING Resource Technology Section, National Operations Center, Bu- reau of Land Management, Bldg. 50 Denver, CO of successful schemes is testament to the advances made in attitudes and approaches to fossil site management

  15. Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholbrock, F. A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon M.; Vercherin, B.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating Lidar to improve wind turbine controls is a potential breakthrough for reducing the cost of wind energy. By providing undisturbed wind measurements up to 400m in front of the rotor, Lidar may provide an accurate update of the turbine inflow with a preview time of several seconds. Focusing on loads, several studies have evaluated potential reductions using integrated Lidar, either by simulation or full scale field testing.

  16. SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint Citation Details In-Document...

  17. Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

  18. Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

  19. ARM: ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  20. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  1. URBAN AEROSOLS SURVEY USING LIDAR AND NUMERICAL MODEL S. GEFFROY1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    URBAN AEROSOLS SURVEY USING LIDAR AND NUMERICAL MODEL S. GEFFROY1 , L. SOULHAC2 , E. FREJAFON3 , R technologique ALATA BP2, F-60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte, France. Keywords: LIDAR, URBAN AEROSOLS, MODEL, IMPACT SURVEY. INTRODUCTION The impact of particulate matters and aerosols on environment and on radiative

  2. Turbine Reliability and Operability Optimization through the use of Direct Detection Lidar Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, David K; Lewis, Matthew J; Pavlich, Jane C; Wright, Alan D; Johnson, Kathryn E; Pace, Andrew M

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this Department of Energy (DOE) project is to increase wind turbine efficiency and reliability with the use of a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system. The LIDAR provides wind speed and direction data that can be used to help mitigate the fatigue stress on the turbine blades and internal components caused by wind gusts, sub-optimal pointing and reactionary speed or RPM changes. This effort will have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs of turbines across the industry. During the course of the project, Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) modified and tested a prototype direct detection wind LIDAR instrument; the resulting LIDAR design considered all aspects of wind turbine LIDAR operation from mounting, assembly, and environmental operating conditions to laser safety. Additionally, in co-operation with our partners, the National Renewable Energy Lab and the Colorado School of Mines, progress was made in LIDAR performance modeling as well as LIDAR feed forward control system modeling and simulation. The results of this investigation showed that using LIDAR measurements to change between baseline and extreme event controllers in a switching architecture can reduce damage equivalent loads on blades and tower, and produce higher mean power output due to fewer overspeed events. This DOE project has led to continued venture capital investment and engagement with leading turbine OEMs, wind farm developers, and wind farm owner/operators.

  3. A technique for autocalibration of cloud lidar EWAN J. O'CONNOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    The lidar return backscattered from clouds is a power- ful tool in the remote sensing of clouds (e.g. Platt signal from the atmosphere (e.g. Fernald et al., 1972; Platt, 1973). To detect molecular backscatter. The integrated backscatter is equal to the reciprocal of twice the lidar ra- tio (Platt, 1979

  4. Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    #12;Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology Arlen F. Chasea,1. The impor- tance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from in the remote geospatial imaging of cultural landscapes, including ancient communities and their anthropogenic

  5. BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    BUILDING ROOF SEGMENTATION AND RECONSTRUCTION FROM LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES presents an approach to creating a polyhedral model of building roof from LiDAR point clouds using. The normal vectors are then clustered together to determine the principal directions of the roof planes

  6. 3-D tomographic imaging of ocean mines from real and simulated lidar returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Andrew C

    3-D tomographic imaging of ocean mines from real and simulated lidar returns Nail C¸adalli, Peter J of underwater objects, where the trans- mitted laser beam can penetrate the air-water interface and illuminate by using an accurate statistical model that incorporates multiple scattering. Keywords: lidar, ocean optics

  7. Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually con- tains rich vegetation. Thus representing the 3D urban reality of residential areas. Keywords: urban modeling, LiDAR, residential area

  8. Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou and Ulrich models for residential areas from aerial LiDAR scans. The key differ- ence between downtown area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually contains rich vegetation. Thus, we propose a robust

  9. A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements Chuanfeng algorithm to detect aerosols and clouds based on micropulse lidar measurements. A semidiscretization is then introduced. Combined with empirical threshold values, we determine if the signal waves indicate clouds

  10. Use of a lidar forward model for global comparisons of cloud fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    555 Use of a lidar forward model for global comparisons of cloud fraction between the ICESat lidar in extinction-to-backscatter ratio and effective radius affect the forward modeled mean cloud fraction by no more than 10%. 1. Introduction Clouds play a major role in the Earth's radiation budget and predictions

  11. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - M-PACE - Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) Campaign Links M-PACE Website ARM Data Discovery

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - M-PACE HSR Lidar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) Campaign Links M-PACE Website ARM Data DiscoveryHSR

  14. A precise narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with lidar in the ARM Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first six months of the grant (December 1991--May 1992) have been taken up with the design and specification for the new narrow-beam radiometer. The radiometer will be built and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research over the next three months. Improved algorithms for obtaining cloud extinction have also been developed. It is proposed during 1993 to use the radiometer in conjunction with a new CSIRO 3-wavelength lidar in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Guinea, which is a test mission under tropical conditions for the ARM CART Tropical West Pacific site, and is part of the TOGA COARE experiment. During the latter part of 1992, the radiometer will be tested thoroughly and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research, Aspendale.

  15. Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

  16. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Revercomb, David Tobin, Robert Knuteson, Lori Borg, Leslie Moy

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the “grand tour” of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004. More specifically, our major achievements for ARM include 1. Development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) to function like a satellite on the ground for ARM, providing a steady stream of accurately calibrated spectral radiances for Science Team clear sky and cloud applications (Knuteson et al. 2004a), 2. Detailed radiometric calibration and characterization of AERI radiances, with uncertainty estimates established from complete error analyses and proven by inter-comparison tests (Knuteson et al. 2004b), 3. AERI data quality assessment and maintenance over the extended time frames needed to support ARM (Dedecker et al., 2005) 4. Key role in the radiative transfer model improvements from the AERI/LBLRTM QME (Turner et al. 2004) and AERI-ER especially from the SHEBA experiment (Tobin et al. 1999), 5. Contributed scientific and programmatic leadership leading to significant water vapor accuracy improvements and uncertainty assessments for the low to mid troposphere (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003), 6. Leadership of the ARM assessment of the accuracy of water vapor observations from radiosondes, Raman Lidar and in situ aircraft observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (Tobin et al. 2002, Ferrare et al. 2004), 7. New techniques for characterizing clouds from AERI (DeSlover et al. 1999, Turner 2003b, Turner et al. 2003b), 8. Initial design and development of the Scanning-HIS aircraft instrument and application to ARM UAV Program missions (Revercomb et al. 2005), and 9. Coordinated efforts leading to the use of ARM observations as a key validation tool for the high resolution Atmospheric IR Sounder on the NASA Aqua platform (Tobin et al. 2005a) 10. Performed ARM site and global clear sky radiative closure studies that shows closure of top-of-atmosphere flux at the level of ~1 W/m2 (Moy et al 2008 and Section 3 of this appendix) 11. Performed studies to characterize SGP site cirrus cloud property retrievals and assess impacts on computed fluxes and heating rate profiles (Borg et al. 2008 and Section 2 of this appendix).

  17. Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shuang; Sullivan, Maurice O.; Hui, Rongqing

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement Shuang Gao,1,2 Maurice O’Sullivan,3 and Rongqing Hui2,* 1Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Science, University of Science and Technology of China... lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in- phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation...

  18. Development of a lidar polarimeter technique of measuring suspended solids in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presley, David W

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of depolarization would indicate the relative concentration of scattering particles. The laboratory measurements supported the hypothesis and established the potential of measuri ng suspended solids, turbi dity and transmi ssi vi ty using a lidar polarimeter...

  19. Fully automatic calibration of LIDAR and video streams from a vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bileschi, Stanley M.

    This work describes a fully automatic technique to calibrate a geometric mapping between lidar and video feeds on a mobile ground-based platform. This data association is a crucial first step for any multi-modal scene ...

  20. Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and Backscatter Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Hyoun-Myoung

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison of mineral dust aerosol retrievals from two instruments, MODIS and CALIPSO lidar. And, we implement and evaluate a new mineral dust detection algorithm based on the analysis of thin dust radiative signature. In comparison, three commonly used...

  1. Accessing the Energy Department’s Lidar Buoy Data off Virginia Beach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) deployed the Energy Department’s floating lidar buoy off of Virginia Beach, Virginia, in less than 30 meters (m) of water,...

  2. Long-range micro-pulse aerosol lidar at 1.5 um with an up-conversion single-photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haiyun Xia; Guoliang Shentu; Mingjia Shangguan; Xiuxiu Xia; Xiaodong Jia; Chong Wang; Jun Zhang; Qiang Zhang; Xiankang Dou; Jianwei Pan

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-pulse lidar at eye-safe wavelength is constructed based on an up-conversion single-photon detector. The ultralow noise detector enables using integration technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the atmospheric backscattering even at daytime. With the pulse energy of 110uJ, the pulse repetition rate of 15 kHz, the optical antenna diameter of 100 mm and integration time of 5 minutes, a horizontal detection range of 7 km is realized. In the demonstration experiment, atmospheric visibility over 24 hours is monitored continuously, with results in accordance with the weather forecasts.

  3. Assessing Available Woody Plant Biomass on Rangelands with Lidar and Multispectral Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku, Nian-Wei

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ASSESSING AVAILABLE WOODY PLANT BIOMASS ON RANGELANDS WITH LIDAR AND MULTISPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING A Thesis by NIAN-WEI KU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... ASSESSING AVAILABLE WOODY PLANT BIOMASS ON RANGELANDS WITH LIDAR AND MULTISPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING A Thesis by NIAN-WEI KU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  4. Algorithms and Software Tools for Extracting Coastal Morphological Information from Airborne LiDAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yige

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ALGORITHMS AND SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR EXTRACTING COASTAL MORPHOLOGICAL INFORMATION FROM AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA A Thesis by YIGE GAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2009 Major Subject: Geography ALGORITHMS AND SOFTWARE TOOLS FOR EXTRACTING COASTAL MORPHOLOGICAL INFORMATION FROM AIRBORNE LiDAR DATA A Thesis by YIGE GAO...

  5. An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

  6. Roll-up of validation results to a target application.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, Richard Guy

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suites of experiments are preformed over a validation hierarchy to test computational simulation models for complex applications. Experiments within the hierarchy can be performed at different conditions and configurations than those for an intended application, with each experiment testing only part of the physics relevant for the application. The purpose of the present work is to develop methodology to roll-up validation results to an application, and to assess the impact the validation hierarchy design has on the roll-up results. The roll-up is accomplished through the development of a meta-model that relates validation measurements throughout a hierarchy to the desired response quantities for the target application. The meta-model is developed using the computation simulation models for the experiments and the application. The meta-model approach is applied to a series of example transport problems that represent complete and incomplete coverage of the physics of the target application by the validation experiments.

  7. Technology Validation Sig Gronich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and validate integrated hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in a systems context under real operating in quantity that is powered by a wind turbine. · By 2008, validate hydrogen vehicles with greater than 250. . Distributed Generation TransportationBiomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil With

  8. The effect of specular reflection on spaceborne lidar measurements of ice clouds ROBIN J. HOGAN # AND ANTHONY J. ILLINGWORTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    The effect of specular reflection on spaceborne lidar measurements of ice clouds ROBIN J. HOGAN echo in terms of cloud radiative properties problematic, so is of concern for spaceborne cloud lidar which have among their primary aims the global measurement of ice clouds. The NASA Calipso li­ dar

  9. Remote control and telescope auto-alignment system for multiangle LIDAR under development at CEILAP, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallotta, Juan; Otero, Lidia; Chouza, Fernando; Raul, Delia; Gonzalez, Francisco; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET), a multiangle LIDAR is under development to monitor aerosol extinction coefficients in the frame of the CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) Project. This is an initiative to build the next generation of ground-based instruments to collect very high energy gamma-ray radiation (>10 GeV). The atmospheric conditions are very important for CTA observations, and LIDARs play an important role in the measurement of the aerosol optical depth at any direction. The LIDAR being developed at CEILAP was conceived to operate in harsh environmental conditions during the shifts, and these working conditions may produce misalignments. To minimize these effects, the telescopes comprising the reception unit are controlled by a self-alignment system. This paper describes the self-alignment method and hardware automation.

  10. Introduction As part of the LAKE-ICE experiment the University of Wisconsin Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    Introduction As part of the LAKE-ICE experiment the University of Wisconsin Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL) observed a land-breeze circulation along the western shore of Lake Michigan. During the classic structure of a density current along with gravity waves forced by the front. The University

  11. Model Validation Status Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.L. Hardin

    2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M&O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and engineered barriers, plus the TSPA model itself Description of the model areas is provided in Section 3, and the documents reviewed are described in Section 4. The responsible manager for the Model Validation Status Review was the Chief Science Officer (CSO) for Bechtel-SAIC Co. (BSC). The team lead was assigned by the CSO. A total of 32 technical specialists were engaged to evaluate model validation status in the 21 model areas. The technical specialists were generally independent of the work reviewed, meeting technical qualifications as discussed in Section 5.

  12. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  13. Criticality Safety Code Validation with LWBR’s SB Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putman, Valerie Lee

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first set of critical experiments from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Program included eight, simple geometry critical cores built with 233UO2-ZrO2, 235UO2-ZrO2, ThO2, and ThO2-233UO2 nuclear materials. These cores are evaluated, described, and modeled to provide benchmarks and validation information for INEEL criticality safety calculation methodology. In addition to consistency with INEEL methodology, benchmark development and nuclear data are consistent with International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project methodology.Section 1 of this report introduces the experiments and the reason they are useful for validating some INEEL criticality safety calculations. Section 2 provides detailed experiment descriptions based on currently available experiment reports. Section 3 identifies criticality safety validation requirement sources and summarizes requirements that most affect this report. Section 4 identifies relevant hand calculation and computer code calculation methodologies used in the experiment evaluation, benchmark development, and validation calculations. Section 5 provides a detailed experiment evaluation. This section identifies resolutions for currently unavailable and discrepant information. Section 5 also reports calculated experiment uncertainty effects. Section 6 describes the developed benchmarks. Section 6 includes calculated sensitivities to various benchmark features and parameters. Section 7 summarizes validation results. Appendices describe various assumptions and their bases, list experimenter calculations results for items that were independently calculated for this validation work, report other information gathered and developed by SCIENTEC personnel while evaluating these same experiments, and list benchmark sample input and miscellaneous supplementary data.

  14. Validating Energy Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chari, S.; Thomas, D.

    Energy measurements play a very important role in a detailed energy analysis. The role is more important in industrial processes where wide variations of process conditions exist. Valid energy measurements make the decision making process easier...

  15. Accelerated Testing Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in the HD6 MEA. Failure analysis of these MEAs has beenpotential hold test. The failure analysis from these stacksbe validated with the failure analysis from both the AST and

  16. A precise narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with lidar in the ARM Program. Progress report, 1 December 1991--31 May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first six months of the grant (December 1991--May 1992) have been taken up with the design and specification for the new narrow-beam radiometer. The radiometer will be built and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research over the next three months. Improved algorithms for obtaining cloud extinction have also been developed. It is proposed during 1993 to use the radiometer in conjunction with a new CSIRO 3-wavelength lidar in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Guinea, which is a test mission under tropical conditions for the ARM CART Tropical West Pacific site, and is part of the TOGA COARE experiment. During the latter part of 1992, the radiometer will be tested thoroughly and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research, Aspendale.

  17. Estimating uncertainty of inference for validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Jane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Timothy J [UNM

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a validation process based upon the concept that validation is an inference-making activity. This has always been true, but the association has not been as important before as it is now. Previously, theory had been confirmed by more data, and predictions were possible based on data. The process today is to infer from theory to code and from code to prediction, making the role of prediction somewhat automatic, and a machine function. Validation is defined as determining the degree to which a model and code is an accurate representation of experimental test data. Imbedded in validation is the intention to use the computer code to predict. To predict is to accept the conclusion that an observable final state will manifest; therefore, prediction is an inference whose goodness relies on the validity of the code. Quantifying the uncertainty of a prediction amounts to quantifying the uncertainty of validation, and this involves the characterization of uncertainties inherent in theory/models/codes and the corresponding data. An introduction to inference making and its associated uncertainty is provided as a foundation for the validation problem. A mathematical construction for estimating the uncertainty in the validation inference is then presented, including a possibility distribution constructed to represent the inference uncertainty for validation under uncertainty. The estimation of inference uncertainty for validation is illustrated using data and calculations from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The ICF measurements of neutron yield and ion temperature were obtained for direct-drive inertial fusion capsules at the Omega laser facility. The glass capsules, containing the fusion gas, were systematically selected with the intent of establishing a reproducible baseline of high-yield 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} neutron output. The deuterium-tritium ratio in these experiments was varied to study its influence upon yield. This paper on validation inference is the first in a series of inference uncertainty estimations. While the methods demonstrated are primarily statistical, these do not preclude the use of nonprobabilistic methods for uncertainty characterization. The methods presented permit accurate determinations for validation and eventual prediction. It is a goal that these methods establish a standard against which best practice may evolve for determining degree of validation.

  18. CONTAIN: recent highlights in code testing and validation. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murata, K.K.; Bergeron, K.D.; Rexroth, P.E.; Clauser, M.J.; Tills, J.L.; Sciacca, F.W.; Senglaub, M.E.; Trebilcock, W.; Williams, D.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CONTAIN code is currently being developed for LWR applications. The status of the LWR features and the code testing program will be briefly reviewed. New CONTAIN blind predictions for code validation experiments in the ABCOVE program and the HDR program will be presented, along with CONTAIN comparisons to an NSPP aerosol experiment in a steam environment and to a CSE spray experiment.

  19. The Composition and Validation of Heterogeneous Control Laws Benjamin Kuipersy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    Introduction Much control theory is based on linear models. This works very well for steady state regulation cation." Again, design and validation of these control laws is based primarily on experienceThe Composition and Validation of Heterogeneous Control Laws Benjamin Kuipersy University of Texas

  20. Impact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    forecast errors of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. Tropical mass­windImpact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation, De Bilt, Netherlands CHRISTOPHE ACCADIA AND PETER SCHL�SSEL European Organisation

  1. Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingöl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike Courtney, Gunner Larsen, Ebba Dellwik Juan Jose Trujillo* and Hans E. Jørgensen Wind Energy Department Risø of the presentation · Introduction to wind energy · Accurate profiles of the mean wind speed · Wakes behind turbines

  2. Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

  3. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  4. Surface-Layer Wind and Turbulence Profiling from LIDAR: Theory and Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface-Layer Wind and Turbulence Profiling from LIDAR: Theory and Measurements Régis DANIELIAN (Vestas Wind System) Hans Ejsing JØRGENSEN (Wind Energy Department, Risø. Contact: haej@risoe.dk) Torben MIKKELSEN (Wind Energy Department, Risø. Contact: tomi@risoe.dk) Jacob MANN (Wind Energy Department, Risø

  5. Remote sensing the wind using Lidars and Sodars Ioannis Antoniou (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    masts for their mounting and the costs associated with the purchase, erection and instrumentation for wind energy applications. The first reason is that the cost (purchase, erection, instrumentation with power curve and resource assessment measurements. Both SODAR (SOund Detection And Ranging) and LIDAR

  6. Bistatic receiver model for airborne lidar returns incident on an imaging array from underwater objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Andrew C

    returns from the surrounding water medium and ocean bottom. Our results provide a generalization ocean lidar return, obtained by a CCD array. © 2002 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 010.3640, 030 a laser to generate a short, high-powered pulse of light. The transmitted laser beam can penetrate the air

  7. Topographic accuracy assessment of bare earth lidar-derived unstructured meshes Matthew V. Bilskie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    : Shallow water equations Unstructured mesh Lidar DEM Storm surge Accuracy a b s t r a c t This study water equations model. A methodology is developed to compute root mean square error (RMSE) and the 95th, urban regions, etc.) and have coarse mesh resolution in areas outside the focus region (e.g. deep water

  8. Master Thesis: Dual-Doppler technique applied to scanning lidars for the characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    -lidar system was developed and installed at the offshore wind farm "alpha ventus". This system includes three and wind turbine wakes in large wind farms offshore. Wind Energy, 12(5):431­444, 2009. [2] Brian Hirth, D of multiple wakes in a wind farm M. van Dooren Supervisors: D. Trabucchi, K. S. Hansen University

  9. Adaptation and Validation of an Agent Model of Functional State and Performance for Individuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treur, Jan

    functional state model to the individual and validation of the resulting model. First, human experiments have mostly qualitative theories from Psychology, but was not validated yet using human experiments been performed by taking a number of steps. First of all, an experiment with 31 human subjects has been

  10. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  11. Workshop: Dados SAR e LIDAR para Anlise de Parmetros Biofsicos e de Estrutura Vertical de Tipologias Florestais (SAR and LIDAR Data for the Analysis of Biophysical Parameters and Vertical Structure from Forest Typologies)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forests, allowing the optimized planning and operational management of forest resources. Microwave, Brazil) 10:45h Design and Implementation of Lidar & Radar Surveys for Forest Carbon Monitoring in REDD

  12. Method to determine and adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a LIDAR system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Henson, Tammy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumel, Leslie J. (Cedar Crest, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to determine the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system. This method can be employed to determine the far-field intensity distribution of the transmitter beam, as well as the variations in transmitted laser beam pointing as a function of time, temperature, or other environmental variables that may affect the co-alignment of the LIDAR system components. In order to achieve proper alignment of the transmitter and receiver optical systems when a LIDAR system is being used in the field, this method employs a laser-beam-position-sensing detector as an integral part of the receiver optics of the LIDAR system.

  13. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  14. AIRBORNE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The second major experiment was the Texas Air Quality Union 2007 Joint Assembly Acapulco, Mexico May 22-25, 2007 Environmental Sciences Department Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX

  15. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  16. OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

  17. MELCOR validation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, C.D.; Byers, R.K.; Shaffer, C.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent comparisons of MELCOR predictions to three sets of experiments, the ABCOVE Aerosol Experiments, the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, and the Battelle-Frankfurt Gas Mixing Experiments are presentd. All three comparisons involve conditions that are of concern in an LWR containment during a severe accident. MELCOR results are compared to the experimental data and the predictions of at least one other state-of-the-art code for each test. In the ABCOVE comparisons, the MELCOR aerosol modeling is demonstrated. In comparisons to the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, MELCOR predictions of the response of the containment to the release of steam from the primary system are shown, and in the Battelle-Frankfurt comparisons, MELCOR predictions of the diffusion in a containment of an injected hydrogen-nitrogen gas are studied. These comparisons provide critical testing of the MELCOR control volume hydrodynamics package, the radionuclide package, and the flow path package.

  18. Three dimensional winds: A maximum cross-correlation application to elastic lidar data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  19. The Experimental Cloud Lidar Pilot Study (ECLIPS) for cloud-radiation research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.; Young, S.A. [Division of Atmospheric Research, Victoria (Australia)] [Division of Atmospheric Research, Victoria (Australia); Carswell, A.I.; Pal, S.R. [York Univ., North York, Ontario (Canada)] [York Univ., North York, Ontario (Canada); McCormick, M.P.; Winker, D.M. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); DelGuasta, M.; Stefanutti, L. [Institute Ricerca Onde Elettromagnetiche, Florence (Italy)] [Institute Ricerca Onde Elettromagnetiche, Florence (Italy); Eberhard, W.L.; Hardesty, M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)] [and others] [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); and others

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Cloud Lidar Pilot Study (ECLIPS) was initiated to obtain statistics on cloud-base height, extinction, optical depth, cloud brokenness, and surface fluxes. Two observational phases have taken place, in October-December 1989 and April-July 1991, with intensive 30-day periods selected within the two time intervals. Data are being archived at NASA Langley Research Center, and, once there, are readily available to the international scientific community. 43 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

  1. Model Verification and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A.Model Verification and Validation Engineering

  2. A precise passive narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with LIDAR in the ARM program. Progress report, 1 June 1992--31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work done divides conveniently into two parts. First, the completion of the design and manufacture of the new narrow-beam radiometer, which occupied the period of July to December, 1992. The second part of the report concerns participation of the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research (DAR) Lidar/radiometer team in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea as part of the international TOGA COARE experiment. The DAR team participated for about one month from mid-January. The PROBE experiment allowed the new radiometer to be tested under field conditions, a test which was very successful, with very few teething problems. It is proposed during the rest of 1993 and during 1994 to make further tests with the radiometer and particularly to look at using a stirling cycle liquid nitrogen detector to obviate the need for supplies of liquid nitrogen. It is proposed further during 1994 to carry out a thorough analysis of the PROBE data and collaborate with other US PROBE participants in studying and interpreting the observations as a whole. Some further work with the new ARM radiometer will be done during the CSIRO SOCEX experiment.

  3. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  4. Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

  5. Proceedings of EARSeL-SIG-Workshop LIDAR, Dresden/FRG, June 16 17, 2000 EARSeL eProceedings No. 1 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    and Development Center, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center Hydrographic Operational Airborne Lidar Survey) system has been used to collect regional data gives an overview of SHOALS, the RSMDP and the SHOALS data sets that have been collected for the region

  6. Meas. Sci. Technol. 10 (1999) 11781184. Printed in the UK PII: S0957-0233(99)06575-3 Submarine lidar for seafloor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    for the detection of dissolved and sunken pollutants. One of these instruments is the submarine lidar, combining: fluorescence lidar, range-gating video, seafloor monitoring 1. Submarine sensor network for pollution of Oldenburg, Laser Remote Sensing Group), · an acoustic sensor for measuring the acoustic impedance

  7. TARSHA-KURDI, F., LANDES, T., GRUSSENMEYER, P., (2008). Extended RANSAC algorithm for automatic detection of building roof planes from Lidar data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection of building roof planes from Lidar data. The Photogrammetric Journal of Finland. Vol. 21, n°1, 2008, pp.97-109. EXTENDED RANSAC ALGORITHM FOR AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF BUILDING ROOF PLANES FROM LIDAR the detection of 3D building roof planes are of crucial importance. For this purpose, this paper studies

  8. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  9. The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

  10. Experimental validation of XRF inversion code for Chandrayaan-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athiray, P S; Tiwari, M K; Narendranath, S; Lodha, G S; Deb, S K; Sreekumar, P; Dash, S K

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an algorithm (x2abundance) to derive the lunar surface chemistry from X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data for the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment. The algorithm converts the observed XRF line fluxes to elemental abundances with uncertainties. We validated the algorithm in the laboratory using high Z elements (20 XRF experiments performed on Lunar simulant (JSC-1A) and anorthosite using a synchrotron beam excitation. We also discuss results from the validation of x2abundance using Monte Carlo simulation (GEANT4 XRF simulation).

  11. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

  12. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m Documentation DataDatastreamsxsaprhsrhi1-minProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - NASA Coordinated Airborne CO2 Lidar Flight Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL)govCampaignsMixed-Phase Arctic Cloud

  14. Software Verification and Validation Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olund, Thomas S.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Software Verification and Validation procedure provides the action steps for the Tank Waste Information Network System (TWINS) testing process. The primary objective of the testing process is to provide assurance that the software functions as intended, and meets the requirements specified by the client. Verification and validation establish the primary basis for TWINS software product acceptance.

  15. Experiments in validating formal semantics for C Sandrine Blazy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blazy, Sandrine

    [1]. Another example is Cyclone, a type-safe dialect of C that makes programs in- vulnerable, separation logic has been defined as an extension of Hoare logic for reasoning about programs that manipulate and memory footprints, such as non overlapping (i.e. separation) between memory regions. Contrary to Hoare

  16. 70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling & Validation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 8365 DOE Tank Safety Workshop April 29, 2010 SAND Number: 2010-2830 P Sandia National Laboratories connections (network) ­ One dimensional flow in tubing ­ Vessels modeled as single control volumes

  17. Nuclear data to support computer code validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, S.E.; Broadhead, B.L.; DeHart, M.D.; Primm, R.T. III

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of plutonium disposition will be a key parameter in determining the degree of success of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. Estimates of the disposition rate are dependent on neutronics calculations. To ensure that these calculations are accurate, the codes and data should be validated against applicable experimental measurements. Further, before mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel can be fabricated and loaded into a reactor, the fuel vendors, fabricators, fuel transporters, reactor owners and operators, regulatory authorities, and the Department of Energy (DOE) must accept the validity of design calculations. This report presents sources of neutronics measurements that have potential application for validating reactor physics (predicting the power distribution in the reactor core), predicting the spent fuel isotopic content, predicting the decay heat generation rate, certifying criticality safety of fuel cycle facilities, and ensuring adequate radiation protection at the fuel cycle facilities and the reactor. The U.S. in-reactor experience with MOX fuel is first presented, followed by information related to other aspects of the MOX fuel performance information that is valuable to this program, but the data base remains largely proprietary. Thus, this information is not reported here. It is expected that the selected consortium will make the necessary arrangements to procure or have access to the requisite information.

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL)govCampaignsMixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

  19. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  20. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5and PM10mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regional sources are characterized by pollutionmore »transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  1. Strategy for experimental validation of waste package performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Gerding, T.J.; Seils, C.A.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A strategy for the experimental validation of waste package performance assessment has been developed as part of a program supported by the Repository Technology Program. The strategy was developed by reviewing the results of laboratory analog experiments, in-situ tests, repository simulation tests, and material interaction tests. As a result of the review, a listing of dependent and independent variables that influence the ingress of water into the near-field environment, the reaction between water and the waste form, and the transport of radionuclides from the near-field environment was developed. The variables necessary to incorporate into an experimental validation strategy were chosen by identifying those which had the greatest effect of each of the three major events, i.e., groundwater ingress, waste package reactions, and radionuclide transport. The methodology to perform validation experiments was examined by utilizing an existing laboratory analog approach developed for unsaturated testing of glass waste forms. 185 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Quantifying and relating land-surface and subsurface variability in permafrost environments using LiDAR and surface geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LiDAR and surface geophysical datasets S. S. Hubbard & C. Gangodagamage & B. Dafflon & H. Wainwright. Wullschleger Abstract The value of remote sensing and surface geophysical data for characterizing the spatial to extract geomorphic metrics, which potentially indicate drainage potential. Geophysical data were used

  3. Lidar observations of polar mesospheric clouds at Rothera, Antarctica (67.5S, 68.0W)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xinzhao

    Chu,1 Graeme J. Nott,2 Patrick J. Espy,2 Chester S. Gardner,1 Jan C. Diettrich,2 Mark A. Clilverd,2 and Martin J. Jarvis2 Received 15 September 2003; revised 15 October 2003; accepted 30 October 2003. Diettrich, M. A. Clilverd, and M. J. Jarvis (2004), Lidar observations of polar mesospheric clouds

  4. A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling which included various single- layer and multilayer cloud conditions. Overall, the CO2-slicing method

  5. Estimating forest structural characteristics with airborne lidar scanning and a near-real time profiling laser systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Kaiguang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for realtime remote sensing platforms, e.g., to provide timely information for urgent applications. This study aims to develop an airborne profiling LiDAR system, featured with on-the-fly data processing, for near real- or real- time forest inventory...

  6. Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) as a direct method to evaluate forest canopy parameters is vital in addressing both forest management and ecological concerns. The overall goal of this study was to develop the use of airborne...

  7. Arctic-Winter Climatology and Radiative Effects of Clouds and Aerosols Based on Lidar and Radar Measurements at PEARL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    Arctic-Winter Climatology and Radiative Effects of Clouds and Aerosols Based on Lidar and Radar Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Results on the climatology and radiative effects of clouds, arctic regions are the site of interactions between aerosols, clouds, radiation and precipitations

  8. XML Document XML Document Types and Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gregory D.

    XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 April, 2010 #12;XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives Learning Objectives Understand: The need for validation Two ways to specify validity: Document Type Definitions (DTDs) XML Schemas #12;XML

  9. Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

  10. The SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data - VALID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) at ORNL contains high quality, independently reviewed models and results that improve confidence in analysis. VALID is developed and maintained according to a procedure of the SCALE quality assurance (QA) plan. This paper reviews the origins of the procedure and its intended purpose, the philosophy of the procedure, some highlights of its implementation, and the future of the procedure and associated VALID library. The original focus of the procedure was the generation of high-quality models that could be archived at ORNL and applied to many studies. The review process associated with model generation minimized the chances of errors in these archived models. Subsequently, the scope of the library and procedure was expanded to provide high quality, reviewed sensitivity data files for deployment through the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Sensitivity data files for approximately 400 such models are currently available. The VALID procedure and library continue fulfilling these multiple roles. The VALID procedure is based on the quality assurance principles of ISO 9001 and nuclear safety analysis. Some of these key concepts include: independent generation and review of information, generation and review by qualified individuals, use of appropriate references for design data and documentation, and retrievability of the models, results, and documentation associated with entries in the library. Some highlights of the detailed procedure are discussed to provide background on its implementation and to indicate limitations of data extracted from VALID for use by the broader community. Specifically, external users of data generated within VALID must take responsibility for ensuring that the files are used within the QA framework of their organization and that use is appropriate. The future plans for the VALID library include expansion to include additional experiments from the IHECSBE, to include experiments from areas beyond criticality safety, such as reactor physics and shielding, and to include application models. In the future, external SCALE users may also obtain qualification under the VALID procedure and be involved in expanding the library. The VALID library provides a pathway for the criticality safety community to leverage modeling and analysis expertise at ORNL.

  11. Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations with SCALE 6.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCALE 6.2 provides numerous updates in nuclear data, nuclear data processing, and computational tools utilized in the criticality safety calculational sequences relative to SCALE 6.1. A new 252-group ENDF/B-VII.0 multigroup neutron library, improved ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy data, as well as the previously deployed 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron library are included in SCALE 6.2 for criticality safety analysis. The performance of all three libraries for keff calculations is examined with a broad sampling of critical experiment models covering a range of fuels and moderators. Critical experiments from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE) that are available in the SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) are used in this validation effort. Over 300 cases are used in the validation of KENO V.a, and a more limited set of approximately 50 configurations are used for KENO-VI validation. Additionally, some KENO V.a cases are converted to KENO-VI models so that an equivalent set of experiments can be used to validate both codes. For continuous-energy calculations, SCALE 6.2 provides improved performance relative to SCALE 6.1 in most areas with notable improvements in fuel pin lattice cases, particularly those with mixed oxide fuel. Multigroup calculations with the 252-group library also demonstrate improved performance for fuel lattices, uranium (high and intermediate enrichment) and plutonium metal experiments, and plutonium solution systems. Overall, SCALE 6.2 provides equivalent or smaller biases than SCALE 6.1, and the two versions of KENO provide similar results on the same suite of problems.

  12. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Validation of...

  13. Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  14. Application of Covariance Data to Criticality Safety Data Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Parks, C.V.

    1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of cross-section covariance data has long been a key part of traditional sensitivity and uncertainty analyses (S/U). This paper presents the application of S/U methodologies to the data validation tasks of a criticality safety computational study. The S/U methods presented are designed to provide a formal means of establishing the area (or range) of applicability for criticality safety data validation studies. The goal of this work is to develop parameters that can be used to formally determine the ''similarity'' of a benchmark experiment (or a set of benchmark experiments individually) and the application area that is to be validated. These parameters are termed D parameters, which represent the differences by energy group of S/U-generated sensitivity profiles, and ck parameters, which are the correlation coefficients, each of which gives information relative to the similarity between pairs of selected systems. The application of a Generalized Linear Least-Squares Methodology ( GLLSM) tool to criticality safety validation tasks is also described in this paper. These methods and guidelines are also applied to a sample validation for uranium systems with enrichments greater than 5 wt %.

  15. Deriving a Framework for Estimating Individual Tree Measurements with Lidar for Use in the TAMBEETLE Southern Pine Beetle Infestation Growth Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stukey, Jared D.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this study was to develop a framework for using airborne lidar to derive inputs for the SPB infestation growth model TAMBEETLE. The specific objectives were (1) to estimate individual tree characteristics of XY location...

  16. Sedimentological Reinterpretation of Surficial Unconsolidated Debris Flows and Stream Deposits of the Southern Flanks of Grand Mesa, CO: An Integrated LiDAR Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakeley, Mitchell W.

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . This study developed a sedimentological description and interpretation of these deposits and tested the capabilities of terrestrial LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) for use in sedimentological studies. This research addressed the origin of the deposits...

  17. Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkoff, Susan E.

    Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor N. Petra1, J. Zweck1, S. E optothermoacoustic sensor is validated by comparison with experiments performed with 0.5% acetylene in nitrogen Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 300.6430, 300.6340. 1. Introduction Quartz-Enhanced Photo

  18. POLCA-T code validation against Peach Bottom 2 End of Cycle 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    : Three Turbine Trip transient experiments were performed prior to shutdown for refueling at the endE: 10 POLCA-T code validation against Peach Bottom 2 End of Cycle 2 Turbine Trip Test 2 by: Henric at the Department of Energy Technology Title: POLCA-T code validation against Peach Bottom 2 End of Cycle 2 Turbine

  19. Validation and Calibration in ACE Models: An Investigation on the CATS model.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Validation and Calibration in ACE Models: An Investigation on the CATS model. Carlo Bianchi deal with some validation (and a ...rst calibration) experiments on the CATS model proposed whether the simulation model is an acceptable representation of the real system are available (Sar- gent

  20. Author's personal copy Experimental validation of large-scale simulations of dynamic fracture along

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosakis, Ares J.

    in monolithic homo- geneous brittle solids and along weak interfaces between homo- geneous solids has also been for the fitting of parameters. Then, the results of these simulations are validated against those of experiments

  1. Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

  2. Activities at the FAA aging aircraft NDI validation center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurtleff, W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) was established by the FAA Technical Center (FAATC) at Sandia National Laboratories in August of 1991. The Validation Center supports the inspection portion of the FAA`s National Aging Aircraft Program which was mandated by Congress in the 1988 Aviation Safety Act. The ultimate customers of the AANC include the FAA, airframe and engine manufacturers, airlines, and third party maintenance facilities. One goal of the AANC is to provide independent validation of technologies intended to enhance the structural inspection of aging commuter and transport aircraft. Another goal is to assist in transferring emerging inspection technology from other parts of the FAA`s program to the aircraft industry. The deliverables from both these activities are an assessment of the reliability and cost benefits of an inspection technology as applied to a particular inspection or class of inspections. The validation process consists of a quantitative and systematic assessment of the reliability and cost/benefits on a Nondestructive Inspection (NDI) process. A NDI process is defined as the NDI systems and procedures used for inspections. This includes the NDI operator, inspection environment, and the object being inspected. The phases of the validation process are: 1. Conceptual, 2. Preliminary design, 3. Final design, and 4. Field implementation. The AAANC usually gets involved in the validation process during Phases 2 and 3. The Center supports field trials with a full array of test specimens and established procedures for conducting the trials. Phase 4 reliability includes field trials using independent inspectors either at the Center`s hangar or at outside maintenance facilities. Three activities are summarized below where inspection technology has been validated in the field. These are: (1) eddy current inspection reliability experiment; (2) magneto optic imager validation; and (3) inspection tool improvement.

  3. Rayleigh LIDAR and satellite (HALOE, SABER, CHAMP and COSMIC) measurements of stratosphere-mesosphere temperature over a southern sub-tropical site, Reunion (20.8° S; 55.5° E): climatology and comparison study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, V.; Vishnu Prasanth, P.; Kishore, P.; Bencherif, H.; Keckhut, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climatology of the mid- dle atmosphere from long-termLIDAR measurements at mid- dle and low latitudes, J.Over the southern tropics, mid- dle atmosphere temperature

  4. Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

  5. Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    ID-SAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity Enforcement Toby Ehrenkranz ://netsec.cs.uoregon.edu #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE What's The Problem? While routers know which direction a packet should are unreliable ID-SAVE attacks this root cause! 1 #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE ID-SAVE Basics Create and maintain

  6. IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

  7. Validation of NCSSHP for highly enriched uranium systems containing beryllium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krass, A.W.; Elliott, E.P.; Tollefson, D.A.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the validation of KENO V.a using the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross section library for highly enriched uranium and beryllium neutronic systems, and is in accordance with ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983(R1988) requirements for calculational methods. The validation has been performed on a Hewlett Packard 9000/Series 700 Workstation at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Department using the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Software code package. Critical experiments from LA-2203, UCRL-4975, ORNL-2201, and ORNL/ENG-2 have been identified as having the constituents desired for this validation as well as sufficient experimental detail to allow accurate construction of KENO V.a calculational models. The results of these calculations establish the safety criteria to be employed in future calculational studies of these types of systems.

  8. Validation needs of seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods applied to nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effort to validate seismic PRA methods is in progress. The work concentrates on the validation of plant response and fragility estimates through the use of test data and information from actual earthquake experience. Validation needs have been identified in the areas of soil-structure interaction, structural response and capacity, and equipment fragility. Of particular concern is the adequacy of linear methodology to predict nonlinear behavior. While many questions can be resolved through the judicious use of dynamic test data, other aspects can only be validated by means of input and response measurements during actual earthquakes. A number of past, ongoing, and planned testing programs which can provide useful validation data have been identified, and validation approaches for specific problems are being formulated.

  9. Analysis and Calibration of CRF Raman Lidar Cloud Liquid Water Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D.D.

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Raman lidar (RL), located at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF), is a unique state-of-the-art active remote sensor that is able to measure profiles of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud properties at high temporal and vertical resolution throughout the diurnal cycle. In October 2005, the capability of the RL was extended by the addition of a new detection channel that is sensitive to the Raman scattering of liquid water. This new channel permits the system, in theory, to measure profiles of liquid water content (LWC) by the RL. To our knowledge, the ARM RL is the only operation lidar with this capability. The liquid water Raman backscattering cross-section is a relatively weak and spectrally broad feature, relative to the water vapor Raman backscatter signal. The wide bandpass required to achieve reasonable signal-to-noise in the liquid water channel essentially eliminates the ability to measure LWC profiles during the daytime in the presence of large solar background, and thus all LWC observations are nighttime only. Additionally, the wide bandpass increases the probability that other undesirable signals, such as fluorescence from aerosols, may contaminate the observation. The liquid water Raman cross-section has a small amount of overlap with the water vapor Raman cross-section, and thus there will be a small amount of ‘cross-talk’ between the two signals, with water vapor contributing a small amount of signal to the LWC observation. And finally, there is significant uncertainty in the actual strength of the liquid water Raman cross-section in the literature. The calibrated LWC profiles, together with the coincident cloud backscatter observations also made by the RL, can be used to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius. By combining these profiles of effective radius in the lower portion of the cloud with the aerosol extinction measurements made below the cloud by the RL, the first aerosol indirect effect can be investigated using a single instrument, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with aligning the different sampling periods and fields of view of multiple instruments. We have applied a “first principles” calibration to the LWC profiles. This approach requires that the relative differences in optical efficiency between the water vapor and liquid water channels be known; this relative difference is easily computed using the efficiency values of the beam splitters and interference filters in the lidar that were provided by the vendors of these components. The first principles approach then transfers the calibration from the water vapor mixing ratio to the LWC using the difference in the optical efficiency and an interpolated value of the liquid water Raman cross section from the literature, and the better established water vapor Raman cross section. After accounting for all known error sources, the vertical integral of LWC was compared against a similar value retrieved from a co-located ground-based infrared radiometer. The RL and infrared radiometer have significantly different fields of view; thus to compare the two sensors the data were averaged to 5 min intervals where only cloudy samples were included in the average of each. While there is fair scatter in the data (r=0.47), there is also a clear indication of a positive correlation between the infrared and the RL values. The value of the slope of the regression is 0.49, which indicates a tendency of the RL measurements to underestimate the total liquid amount with respect to the infrared retrieval. Research continues to investigate the source of the bias, but the most likely candidate is the large uncertainty in the liquid water Raman cross-section as there have been no direct measurements made of this parameter at the lidar’s laser wavelength of 355 nm. The calibrated LWC profile was then used together with the cloud backscatter coefficient profile from the RL to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number density. These profiles o

  10. NEAMS Experimental Support for Code Validation, INL FY2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatore; C. Rabiti

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Whereas the Verification part of the process does not rely on experiment, the Validation part, on the contrary, necessitates as many relevant and precise experimental data as possible to make sure the models reproduce reality as closely as possible. Hence, this report presents a limited selection of experimental data that could be used to validate the codes devoted mainly to Fast Neutron Reactor calculations in the US. Emphasis has been put on existing data for thermal-hydraulics, fuel and reactor physics. The principles of a new “smart” experiment that could be used to improve our knowledge of neutron cross-sections are presented as well. In short, it consists in irradiating a few milligrams of actinides and analyzing the results with Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy to infer the neutron cross-sections. Finally, the wealth of experimental data relevant to Fast Neutron Reactors in the US should not be taken for granted and efforts should be put on saving these 30-40 years old data and on making sure they are validation-worthy, i.e. that the experimental conditions and uncertainties are well documented.

  11. Model Validation with Hybrid Dynamic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Kosterev, Dmitry; Guttromson, Ross T.; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Model validation has been one of the central topics in power engineering studies for years. As model validation aims at obtaining reasonable models to represent actual behavior of power system components, it has been essential to validate models against actual measurements or known benchmark behavior. System-wide model simulation results can be compared with actual recordings. However, it is difficult to construct a simulation case for a large power system such as the WECC system and to narrow down to problematic models in a large system. Hybrid dynamic simulation with its capability of injecting external signals into dynamic simulation enables rigorous comparison of measurements and simulation in a small subsystem of interest. This paper presents such a model validation methodology with hybrid dynamic simulation. Two application examples on generator and load model validation are presented to show the validity of this model validation methodology. This methodology is further extended for automatic model validation and dichotomous subsystem model validation.

  12. Experimental validation of lead cross sections for scale and MCNP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrikson, D.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moving spent nuclear fuel between facilities often requires the use of lead-shielded casks. Criticality safety that is based upon calculations requires experimental validation of the fuel matrix and lead cross section libraries. A series of critical experiments using a high-enriched uranium-aluminum fuel element with a variety of reflectors, including lead, has been identified. Twenty-one configurations were evaluated in this study. The fuel element was modelled for KENO V.a and MCNP 4a using various cross section sets. The experiments addressed in this report can be used to validate lead-reflected calculations. Factors influencing calculated k{sub eff} which require further study include diameters of styrofoam inserts and homogenization.

  13. Analysis of Doppler Lidar Data Acquired During the Pentagon Shield Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from two coherent Doppler lidars deployed during the Pentagon Shield field campaign are analyzed in conjunction with other sensors to characterize the overall boundary-layer structure, and identify the dominant flow characteristics during the entire two-week field campaign. Convective boundary layer (CBL) heights and cloud base heights (CBH) are estimated from an analysis of the lidar signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and mean wind profiles are computed using a modified velocity-azimuth-display (VAD) algorithm. Three-dimensional wind field retrievals are computed from coordinated overlapping volume scans, and the results are analyzed by visualizing the flow in horizontal and vertical cross sections. The VAD winds show that southerly flows dominate during the two-week field campaign. Low-level jets (LLJ) were evident on all but two of the nights during the field campaign. The LLJs tended to form a couple hours after sunset and reach maximum strength between 03 and 07 UTC. The surface friction velocities show distinct local maxima during four nights when strong LLJs formed. Estimates of the convective boundary layer height and residual layer height are obtained through an analysis of the vertical gradient of the lidar signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). Strong minimum in the SNR gradient often develops just above the surface after sunrise. This minimum is associated with the developing CBL, and increases rapidly during the early portion of the daytime period. On several days, this minimum continues to increase until about sunset. Secondary minima in the SNR gradient were also observed at higher altitudes, and are believed to be remnants of the CBL height from previous days, i.e. the residual layer height. The dual-Doppler analysis technique used in this study makes use of hourly averaged radial velocity data to produce three-dimensional grids of the horizontal velocity components, and the horizontal velocity variance. Visualization of horizontal and vertical cross sections of the dual-Doppler wind retrievals often indicated a jet-like flow feature over the Potomac River under southerly flow conditions. This linear flow feature is roughly aligned with the Potomac River corridor to the south of the confluence with the Anatostia River, and is most apparent at low levels (i.e. below ~150 m MSL). It is believed that this flow arises due to reduced drag over the water surface and when the large scale flow aligns with the Potomac River corridor. A so-called area-constrained VAD analysis generally confirmed the observations from the dual-Doppler analysis. When the large scale flow is southerly, wind speeds over the Potomac River are consistently larger than the at a site just to the west of the river for altitudes less than 100 m MSL. Above this level, the trend is somewhat less obvious. The data suggest that the depth of the wind speed maximum may be reduced by strong directional shear aloft.

  14. The Daytime Mixed Layer Observed by Radiosonde, Profiler, and LIDAR during MILAGRO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, William J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Coulter, Richard L.; Martin, Tim J.; Walters, Justin

    2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    During the MILAGRO campaign centered in the Mexico City area, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operated several atmospheric profiling systems at Veracruz and at two locations on the Central Mexican Plateau in the region around Mexico City. These systems included radiosondes, wind profilers, a sodar, and an aerosol backscatter lidar. An additional wind profiler was operated by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) at the Mexican Petroleum Institue (IMP) near the center of Mexico City. Because of the opportunity afforded by collocation of profilers, radiosondes, and a lidar, and because of the importance of boundary layer depth on aerosol properties, we have carried out a comparison of mixed layer depth as determined independently from these three types of measurement systems during the campaign. We have then used results of this comparison and additional measurements to develop a detailed description of the daily structure and evolution of the boundary layer on the Central Mexican Plateau during MILAGRO. Our analysis indicates that the profilers were more consistently successful in establishing the mixing layer depth during the daytime. The boundary layer growth was similar at the three locations, although the mixing layer tended to be slightly deeper in the afternoon in central Mexico City. The sodar showed that convection began about an hour after sunrise. Maximum daily mixed layer depths always reached 2000 m AGL and frequently extended to 4000 m. The rate and variability of mixing layer growth was essentially the same as that observed during the IMADA-AVER campaign in the same season in 1997. This growth did not seem to be related to whether deep convection was reported on a given day. Wind speeds within the boundary layer exhibited a daily low-altitude maximum in the late afternoon with lighter winds aloft, consistent with previous reports of diurnal regional circulations. Norte events, which produced high winds at Veracruz, did not appreciably modulate the winds on the plateau. Finally, despite the typically dry conditions at the surface, radiosonde profiles showed that relative humidity often exceeded 50% in the early morning and in the upper part of the boundary layer.

  15. Bachelor thesis: "Validation of an engineering model of the near wake wind field of wind turbines based on nacelle based lidar measurements"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    , in an early stage of wind farm layout optimisation and wind turbine loading calculation in wind farms by Ainslie[1], This is widely used in the industry for wind farming purposes. Scope During this project analysis are performed of near wake measurements of a 5 MW wind turbine at the offshore test field alpha

  16. MMV: Metamodeling Based Microprocessor Validation Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    MMV: Metamodeling Based Microprocessor Validation Environment Ajit Dingankar, Deepak A. Mathaikutty- tionality, recent generations of microprocessors face difficult validation challenges. The systematic to production RTL, which is likely to remain the dominant design methodology of complex microprocessors

  17. Criticality Safety Validation of SCALE 6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.0 Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANSI/ANS-8.1-1998;2007, Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Material Outside Reactors, and ANSI/ANS-8.24-2007, Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations, require validation of a computer code and the associated data through benchmark evaluations based on physical experiments. The performance of the code and data are validated by comparing the calculated and the benchmark results. A SCALE procedure has been established to generate a Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID). This procedure provides a framework for preparing, peer reviewing, and controlling models and data sets derived from benchmark definitions so that the models and data can be used with confidence. The procedure ensures that the models and data were correctly generated using appropriate references with documented checks and reviews. Configuration management is implemented to prevent inadvertent modification of the models and data or inclusion of models that have not been subjected to the rigorous review process. VALID entries for criticality safety are based on critical experiments documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). The findings of a criticality safety validation of SCALE 6.1 utilizing the benchmark models vetted in the VALID library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are summarized here.

  18. Verification and Validation Strategy for LWRS Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl M. Stoots; Richard R. Schultz; Hans D. Gougar; Thomas K Larson; Michael Corradini; Laura Swiler; David Pointer; Jess Gehin

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One intension of the Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is to create advanced computational tools for safety assessment that enable more accurate representation of a nuclear power plant safety margin. These tools are to be used to study the unique issues posed by lifetime extension and relicensing of the existing operating fleet of nuclear power plants well beyond their first license extension period. The extent to which new computational models / codes such as RELAP-7 can be used for reactor licensing / relicensing activities depends mainly upon the thoroughness with which they have been verified and validated (V&V). This document outlines the LWRS program strategy by which RELAP-7 code V&V planning is to be accomplished. From the perspective of developing and applying thermal-hydraulic and reactivity-specific models to reactor systems, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.203 gives key guidance to numeric model developers and those tasked with the validation of numeric models. By creating Regulatory Guide 1.203 the NRC defined a framework for development, assessment, and approval of transient and accident analysis methods. As a result, this methodology is very relevant and is recommended as the path forward for RELAP-7 V&V. However, the unique issues posed by lifetime extension will require considerations in addition to those addressed in Regulatory Guide 1.203. Some of these include prioritization of which plants / designs should be studied first, coupling modern supporting experiments to the stringent needs of new high fidelity models / codes, and scaling of aging effects.

  19. k-Validity vs Validity in Q: A formula of Q that is k-valid for all k, but not valid Branden Fitelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    k-Validity vs Validity in Q: A formula of Q that is k-valid for all k, but not valid Branden Fitelson 03/13/07 Consider the following three formulas of Q [where, as always, p q (p q), and p p]: p x A false on any k-element interpretation. And, since A is a closed formula, it must either be true or false

  20. Evaluation of tropospheric water vapor profiling using eye-safe, infrared differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rye, B.J. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences]|[National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Technology Lab.; Machol, J.L.; Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Technology Lab.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. In addition, these should be acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. To date, application of profiles have been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness and high operating cost, or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost. Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the studies reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of solving some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameters representative of current technologies. These simulations are also applied to determine the strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application.

  1. Choosing a Kernel for Cross-Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savchuk, Olga

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    methods of bandwidth selection termed: Indirect cross-validation and Robust one-sided cross- validation. The kernels used in the Indirect cross-validation method yield an improvement in the relative bandwidth rate to n^1=4, which is substantially better...

  2. Modeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Prabhat

    -on-Chip design process. Many existing approaches employ a bottom-up approach to pipeline validation, where description language (ADL) constructs, and thus allows a powerful top-down approach to pipeline validationModeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications PRABHAT MISHRA and NIKIL DUTT University

  3. INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related to VHTRs, sodium-cooled fast reactors, and light-water reactors. These experiments range from relatively low-cost benchtop experiments for investigating individual phenomena to large electrically-heated integral facilities for investigating reactor accidents and transients.

  4. Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-Safe Scanning Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for Monitoring/Verification/Accounting at Geologic Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Repasky, Kevin

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for monitoring carbon dioxide has been developed. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto- optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 {micro}J, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 {micro}m. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL instrument has been operated from a laboratory environment on the campus of Montana State University, at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site located in the agricultural research area on the western end of the Montana State University campus, and at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership site located in north-central Montana. DIAL data has been collected and profiles have been validated using a co-located Licor LI-820 Gas Analyzer point sensor.

  5. Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols at the US Southern Great Plains Climate Study Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Blair, F.H.; Bisson, S.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program, Southern Great Plains CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site in northern Oklahoma. Research conducted at several laboratories has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We have developed and installed a ruggedized Raman lidar system that resides permanently at the CART site, and that is computer automated to eliminate the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar provides quantitative characterizations of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies.

  6. A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

  7. A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

  8. Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shizhong

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  9. D&D Waste Estimate Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Templeton, J. H.; Stevens, J. L.; Dorr, K.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocky Flats Closure Project (Site) includes several multi-year decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects which, over the next four years, will dismantle and demolish four major plutonium facilities, four major uranium facilities, and over 400 additional facilities of different types. The projects are currently generating large quantities of transuranic, low-level, mixed, hazardous, and sanitary wastes. A previous paper described the initial conceptual estimates and methods, and the evolution of these methods based on the actual results from the decommissioning of a ''pilot'' facility. The waste estimating method that resulted from that work was used for the waste estimates incorporated into the current Site baseline. This paper discusses subsequent developments on the topic of waste estimating that have occurred since the baseline work. After several months of operation under the current Site baseline, an effort was initiated to either validate or identify improvements to the waste basis-of-estimate. Specific estimate and estimating method elements were identified for additional analysis based on the element's potential for error and the impact of that error on Site activities. The analysis took advantage of actual, more detailed data collected both from three years additional experience in decommissioning a second plutonium facility and from experience in deactivating certain non-plutonium facilities. It compared the actual transuranic and low-level waste generation against their respective estimates based on overall distribution and for individual media (i.e. equipment type), and evaluated trends. Finally, it projected the quantity of lead-characteristic low-level mixed waste that will be generated from plutonium building decommissioning and upgraded the decommissioning waste estimates of the non-plutonium buildings.

  10. Model Validation with Hybrid Dynamic Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Kosterev, Dmitry; Guttromson, Ross T.; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Model validation has been one of the central topics in power engineering studies for years. As model validation aims at obtaining reasonable models to represent actual behavior of power system components, it has been essential to validate models against actual measurements or known benchmark behavior. System-wide model simulation results can be compared with actual recordings. However, it is difficult to construct a simulation case for a large power system such as the WECC system and to narrow down to problematic models in a large system. Hybrid dynamic simulation with its capability of injecting external signals into dynamic simulation enables rigorous comparison of measurements and simulation in a small subsystem of interest. This paper presents such a model validation methodology with hybrid dynamic simulation. Two application examples on generator and load model validation are presented to show the validity of this model validation methodology. This methodology is further extended for automatic model validation and dichotomous subsystem model validation. A few methods to define model quality indices have been proposed to quantify model error for model validation criteria development.

  11. A joint study of the lower ionosphere by radar, lidar, and spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Qihou.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics and associated phenomena occurring in the lower ionospheric-E region, especially the mesopause region between 80 km to 110 km at low latitude, are studied. In particular, incoherent scatter radar (ISR), sodium lidar and airglow spectrometry are used to study the ionospheric structure and neutral sodium structure. The simultaneous study of the ionospheric plasma and neutral atomic sodium is unprecedented in scope and detail. The joint study of the mesopause region reveals that plasma, neutral densities and temperature are interconnected through the same atmospheric dynamics. The theme of the thesis is to explain the formation of the controversial sporadic sodium layer (SSL) events. Strong correlation is established between the average total ion and sodium concentrations, and between sporadic-E and SSL events. The mechanism proposed in the thesis, which invokes temperature fluctuations induced by tides and gravity waves, finds good agreement with observations. Tides and gravity waves can converge ions into thin layers through the windshear mechanisms and can influence the concentration of atomic sodium through temperature fluctuations. Sodium abundance is shown to augment rapidly when the temperature is increased. Gravity wave theory states that the ion convergence node coincides with a temperature maximum for a westward propagating gravity wave, and coincides with a temperature minimum for an eastward propagating wave. Because tidal winds propagate westward, the ion layer coincides with the temperature maximum which consequently induces higher sodium concentration. This can account for the general correlation between sodium and total ion concentration and is supported by the O2(0-1) rotational temperature. Gravity waves and their interaction with tidal winds are believed to be responsible for the close association between sudden sodium layers and sporadic-E layers.

  12. Robust Background Subtraction with Foreground Validation for Urban Traffic Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, S S; Kamath, C

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying moving objects in a video sequence is a fundamental and critical task in many computer-vision applications. Background subtraction techniques are commonly used to separate foreground moving objects from the background. Most background subtraction techniques assume a single rate of adaptation, which is inadequate for complex scenes such as a traffic intersection where objects are moving at different and varying speeds. In this paper, we propose a foreground validation algorithm that first builds a foreground mask using a slow-adapting Kalman filter, and then validates individual foreground pixels by a simple moving object model, built using both the foreground and background statistics as well as the frame difference. Ground-truth experiments with urban traffic sequences show that our proposed algorithm significantly improves upon results using only Kalman filter or frame-differencing, and outperforms other techniques based on mixture of Gaussians, median filter, and approximated media filter.

  13. PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories This...

  14. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase Core Storage R&D Storage Infrastructure Strategic Program Support NATCARBAtlas Program Plan Project Portfolio...

  15. Calibration and Validation of Measurement System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    +45 98 14 25 55 Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering No. 2 Calibration and Validation of Measurement ......................................................................................................................................11 9. SIPHON TURBINE ......................................................................................................................................12 10. DUMMY TURBINES

  16. HEV, PHEV, BEV Test Standard Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BEV Test Standard Validation 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 10, 2011 Michael Duoba Argonne National Laboratory Sponsored by Lee Slezak...

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Validation of Multicomponent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validation of Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry at Four Geothermal Power Plants Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search...

  18. Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Independent Oversight Division Performance Objective: The purpose of this assessment is...

  19. FIMS Data Validation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FIMS Data Validation The Facility Information Management System (FIMS) is the Department's official repository of real property data. The Department relies on the FIMS data for...

  20. Fuel Cell Backup Power Technology Validation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation about fuel cell backup power technology validation activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  1. FACILITIES INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (FIMS) DATA VALIDATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    not scored xii) Year Acquired - Validated not scored xiii) Disposition Date (Archived data) xiv) Disposition Method (Archived data) xv) Net Proceeds (Archived data) b) The...

  2. Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Modeling and Simulation SHARE Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation and Validation Reactor physics depletion model for the Advanced Test Reactor Reactor physics depletion...

  3. experiment, collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Departamento Energias Renovables, Plataforma Solar de Almeria, E-04080 Almeria, Spain Departamento de Lenguajes y ca. factor 10 less complex then imaging solar Cerenkov exp.:smaller cost, fewer systematic errors #12; 5 Rainer Plaga The GRAAL experiment, ECRS Lodz July 2000 Location of GRAAL " Plataforma Solar de

  4. Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA’s High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

  5. Observational Studies of Atmospheric Aerosols over Bozeman, Montana, Using a Two-Color Lidar, a Water Vapor DIAL, a Solar Radiometer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Observational Studies of Atmospheric Aerosols over Bozeman, Montana, Using a Two-Color Lidar form 24 June 2010) ABSTRACT Coordinated observational data of atmospheric aerosols were collected over-based nephelometer. The optical properties and spatial distribution of the atmospheric aerosols were inferred from

  6. SilviLaser 2011, Oct. 16-19, 2011 Hobart, Australia Towards automated and operational forest inventories with T-Lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    inventories with T-Lidar A. Othmani1 , A. Piboule2 , M. Krebs3 , C. Stolz1 and L.F.C. Lew Yan Voon1 1 Cluny, France, michael.krebs@ensam.eu Keywords: terrestrial laser scanning, forest inventory, tree detection, DBH. Abstract Forest inventory automation has become a major issue in forestry. The complexity

  7. Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

  8. Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data ERWIN L. A. WOLTERS, ROBERT A. ROEBELING, AND ARNOUT J. FEIJT Royal Netherlands 2007) ABSTRACT Three cloud-phase determination algorithms from passive satellite imagers are explored

  9. Detailed validation of an empirical model for viscous fingering with gravity effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayers, F.J.; Newley, T.M.J.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper extends to two-dimensional (2D) flows the derivation and validation of an empirical model for viscous fingering previously developed. Fine-scale numerical simulations are used to provide basic data for validating the approximations, and these fingering results are also checked against a range of experiments. The flow rate dependence of gravity segregation in vertical section experiments conducted by van der Poel is examined, where the broadly acceptable agreement of the empirical model is limited by some identified additional features.

  10. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

  11. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  12. Maui Electrical System Simulation Model Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maui Electrical System Simulation Model Validation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC-06NT42847 Task 9 Deliverable ­ Baseline Model Validation By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York And University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural

  13. Validation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, Alan

    of APIs in the directory and shows that REST1 [3] is in the majority and is growing faster than any other validation. 1ProgrammableWeb API styles are self-reported by the API owners, and APIs reported as RESTful mayValidation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation Peter J. Danielsen and Alan Jeffrey Bell Labs

  14. The Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment … ALIVE 1Schmid, B., 2Ferrare, R., 3Turner,D., 4Flynn, C., 5Cairns, B., 6Dominguez, R., 6Gore, W., 7Groff, D., 8Herman, B., 9Hovelman, B., 10Jefferson, A., 6Johnson, R., 5Knobelspiesse, K., 4Mendoza, A., 10Ogren, J., 4Petty, D., ?Russell, E., 6Russell, P., 4Roeder, L., 6Truong, N. 1BAER Institute, 2NASA Langley Res. Center, 3Univ. Of Wisconsin-Madison, 4Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., 5Columbia Univ., 6NASA Ames Res. Center, 7ARM SGP, 8City Univ. of New York, 9Sky Research, Inc., 10NOAA CMDL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed DonatARM Program Data Quality

  15. CFD Validation of Gas Injection into Stagnant Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations in the area of two-phase flow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility are progressing. It is expected that the target vessel lifetime could be extended by introducing gas into the liquid mercury target. As part of an effort to validate the two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, simulations and experiments of gas injection in stagnant water have been completed. The volume of fluid (VOF) method as implemented in ANSYS-CFX was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection into stagnant water. Flow visualization data were obtained with a high-speed camera for the comparison of predicted and measured bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth, detachment, and gravitational rise. The CFD model is validated with these experimental measurements at different gas flow rates. The acoustic waves emitted at the time of detachment and during subsequent oscillations of the bubble were recorded with a microphone. The acoustic signature aspect of this validation is particularly interesting since it has applicability to the injection of gas into liquid mercury, which is opaque.

  16. Rocky Flats 1990--91 winter validation tracer study: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.J. [North American Weather Consultants, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the winter of 1990--91, North American Weather Consultants (NAWC) and its subcontractor, ABB Environmental Services (ABBES), conducted a Winter Validation Study (WVS) for EG&G Rocky Flats involving 12 separate tracer experiments conducted between February 3 and February 19, 1991. Six experiments were conducted during nighttime hours and four experiments were conducted during daytime hours. In addition, there was one day/night and one night/day transitional experiment conducted. The primary purpose of the WVS was to gather data to further the approval process for the Terrain Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC). TRAC is an atmospheric dispersion model developed and operated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) north of Denver, Colorado. A secondary objective was to gather data that will serve to validate the TRAC model physics.

  17. Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a 10-year project conducted by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to determine the feasibility of coproducing hydrogen with electricity. The primary objective was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. This four-phase project had intermediate go/no-go decisions and the following specific goals: �¢���¢ Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis of the use of high-temperature fuel cells, including solid oxide and molten carbonate, for the co-production of power and hydrogen (energy park concept). �¢���¢ Build on the experience gained at the Las Vegas H2 Energy Station and compare/contrast the two approaches for co-production. �¢���¢ Determine the applicability of co-production from a high-temperature fuel cell for the existing merchant hydrogen market and for the emerging hydrogen economy. �¢���¢ Demonstrate the concept on natural gas for six months at a suitable site with demand for both hydrogen and electricity. �¢���¢ Maintain safety as the top priority in the system design and operation. �¢���¢ Obtain adequate operational data to provide the basis for future commercial activities, including hydrogen fueling stations. Work began with the execution of the cooperative agreement with DOE on 30 September 2001. During Phase 1, Air Products identified high-temperature fuel cells as having the potential to meet the coproduction targets, and the molten carbonate fuel cell system from FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FuelCell Energy) was selected by Air Products and DOE following the feasibility assessment performed during Phase 2. Detailed design, construction and shop validation testing of a system to produce 250 kW of electricity and 100 kilograms per day of hydrogen, along with site selection to include a renewable feedstock for the fuel cell, were completed in Phase 3. The system also completed six months of demonstration operation at the wastewater treatment facility operated by Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD, Fountain Valley, CA). As part of achieving the objective of operating on a renewable feedstock, Air Products secured additional funding via an award from the California Air Resources Board. The South Coast Air Quality Management District also provided cost share which supported the objectives of this project. System operation at OCSD confirmed the results from shop validation testing performed during Phase 3. Hydrogen was produced at rates and purity that met the targets from the system design basis, and coproduction efficiency exceeded the 50% target set in conjunction with input from the DOE. Hydrogen production economics, updated from the Phase 2 analysis, showed pricing of $5 to $6 per kilogram of hydrogen using current gas purification systems. Hydrogen costs under $3 per kilogram are achievable if next-generation electrochemical separation technologies become available.

  18. Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    List of Assumptions and Draft Workshop Agenda for the Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop, February 3-4, 2014, Golden, Colorado, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office.

  19. Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines Print In the struggle to keep up with microbes whose rapid mutations outpace our ability to produce vaccines, the human race has...

  20. A VALIDATION INDEX FOR ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    A VALIDATION INDEX FOR ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS Stephen Roberts, Lionel Tarassenko, James Pardey and estimation properties of artificial neural networks. Like many `traditional' statistical techniques & David Siegwart Neural Network Research Group Department of Engineering Science University of Oxford, UK

  1. Navy Technology Validation (Techval) Monitoring Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Navy Technology Validation (Techval) Monitoring Results and is given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2006 Spring meeting, held on May 3-4, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.

  2. Tools for event generator tuning and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andy Buckley

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the current status of MCnet tools for validating the performance of event generator simulations against data, and for tuning their phenomenological free parameters. For validation, the Rivet toolkit is now a mature and complete system, with a large library of prominent benchmark analyses. For tuning, the Professor system has recently completed its first tunes of Pythia 6, with substantial improvements on the existing default tune and potential to greatly aid the setup of new generators for LHC studies.

  3. MCNP-4B Validation for the DFS System at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the current work to date on the validation of the WSRC certified MCNP-4B, and is the last stage of the WSRC Validation Plan that was drafted to guide the validation effort.

  4. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clure, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ralph A [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost saving purposes by showing further testing wold not enhance the quality of the validation of predictive tools. The proposed methodology is at a conceptual level. When matured and if considered favorably by the stakeholders, it could serve as a new framework for the next generation of the best estimate plus uncertainty licensing methodology that USNRC developed previously. In order to come to that level of maturity it is necessary to communicate the methodology to scientific, design and regulatory stakeholders for discussion and debates. This paper is the first step to establish this communication.

  5. Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration...

  6. U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September...

  7. Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates...

  8. T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

  9. Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled Injection Spray Characteristics Optical Measurement Methods used in Calibration and Validation of Modeled...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon...

  11. V-139: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands V-139: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Users Inject...

  12. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefit analysis of cloud computing versus desktop grids.as: Ropella and Hunt: Cloud computing and validation ofCloud computing and validation of expandable in silico

  13. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for...

  14. Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

  15. Experience Report for WOPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, G

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the purposes of the SQA effort at LLNL is to attempt to determine the 'goodness' of the research codes used for various scientific applications. Typically these are two and three dimensional multi-physics simulation and modeling codes. These legacy research codes are used for applciations such as atmospheric dispersion modeling and analysis and prediction of the performance of engineered systems. These codes are continually subjected to automated regression test suites consisting of verified and validated expected results. Code is managed in repositories. Experience level of developers is high in the knowledge domain, platforms, and languages used. Code size of the multi-physics code used in this study was 578,242 lines excluding comment and blank lines or 5538.7 function points. Languages were 70% C++, 20% C, and 10% Fortran. The code has 130 users and a development team of 14 and an embedded SQE. The code has achieved 100% prime feature test coverage, 73.6% functional test coverage, and 71.5% statement test coverage. The average cyclomatic complexity of the code was 6.25. The codes have evolved over 10 years. Research codes are challenging because there is a desire to balance agility with discipline as well as compliance with DOE standards. Agility is important to allow experimentation with new algorithms and addition of the latest physics features. Discipline is important to increase the quality of the codes. Automation of processes and defect prevention/detection are deployed throughout the software development process. Since resarch codes are a small segment of the software industry, not much information exists in terms of reliability studies on these types of codes. This paper describes attempts to determine the goodness of these research codes. Goodness defined as both correctness of the codes and their fault densities. Correctness is determined by user interviews, peer review; feature based automated testing, and coverage measurement. This paper focuses on the fault density aspect of goodness and reliability of the codes in particular. The approach taken was to use multiple fault density prediction methods and compare results to actual experimentation and other industry studies on fault density. As a result of the predictions and experiments our confidence in the prediction methods was increased and our confidence in the goodness of the code from a fault density perspective was given more context. A large unintended benefit of these experiments was to find defects hidden for years in the codes when using the Monte Carlo reliability testing results to develop heuristic based bug driven tests.

  16. Data Validation Using Data Descriptors Data validation is often defined by six data descriptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX N Data Validation Using Data Descriptors Data validation is often defined by six data descriptors: 1) reports to decision maker 2) documentation 3) data sources 4) analytical method and detection limit 5) data review 6) data quality indicators The decision maker or reviewer examines the data

  17. Marketing Plan for Demonstration and Validation Assets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), is to be sustained by various programs, including technology demonstration and evaluation (DEMVAL). This project assists companies in developing technologies under the National Security Technology Incubator program (NSTI) through demonstration and validation of technologies applicable to national security created by incubators and other sources. The NSPP also will support the creation of an integrated demonstration and validation environment. This report documents the DEMVAL marketing and visibility plan, which will focus on collecting information about, and expanding the visibility of, DEMVAL assets serving businesses with national security technology applications in southern New Mexico.

  18. Validation Data Plan Implementation: Subcooled Flow Boiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidating Computer-DesignedValidation

  19. Model Based Test Generation for Microprocessor Architecture Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , Minneapolis, MN 55455 CESCA, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 Validation Technology, Intel Corporation

  20. Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results for the 10- and 15-min averaging periods. For these cases, correlation coefficients exceeded 0.9. As a part of the analysis, Eulerian integral time scales ({tau}) were estimated for the four high-wind nights. Time series of {tau} through each night indicated erratic behavior consistent with the nonstationarity. Histograms of {tau} showed a mode at 4-5 s, but frequent occurrences of larger {tau} values, mostly between 10 and 100 s.

  1. Validation of techniques to mitigate copper surface contamination in CUORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Alessandria; R. Ardito; D. R. Artusa; F. T. Avignone III; O. Azzolini; M. Balata; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; T. Bloxham; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; L. Canonica; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Casali; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; V. Datskov; A. De Biasi; M. M. Deninno; S. Di Domizio; M. L. di Vacri; L. Ejzak; R. Faccini; D. Q. Fang; H. A. Farach; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; M. A. Franceschi; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; J. Goett; A. Goodsell; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; E. Guardincerri; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; H. Z. Huang; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; L. Kogler; Yu. G. Kolomensky; D. Lenz; Y. L. Li; C. Ligi; X. Liu; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; M. Maino; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; Y. Mei; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; T. Napolitano; S. Newman; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. L. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; R. Reil; F. Rimondi; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; S. Sangiorgio; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; L. Sparks; F. Stivanello; L. Taffarello; M. Tenconi; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. S. Wang; H. W. Wang; C. A. Whitten Jr; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

    2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we describe the background challenges for the CUORE experiment posed by surface contamination of inert detector materials such as copper, and present three techniques explored to mitigate these backgrounds. Using data from a dedicated test apparatus constructed to validate and compare these techniques we demonstrate that copper surface contamination levels better than 10E-07 - 10E-08 Bq/cm2 are achieved for 238U and 232Th. If these levels are reproduced in the final CUORE apparatus the projected 90% C.L. upper limit on the number of background counts in the region of interest is 0.02-0.03 counts/keV/kg/y depending on the adopted mitigation technique.

  2. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  3. The limited validity of the Kubo formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    The limited validity of the Kubo formula for thermal conduction J. Gemmer, UniversitË?at Osnabr; Transport phenomena and Kubo formula Normal transport phenomena: ``field driven'' j = L F F electric current (#) F = -#V Kubo formula (KF): L F (#) = 1 V # # 0 dt e -i#t # # 0 d# Tr{â??# 0 â?? j(0) â?? j(t + i

  4. Sequence Assembly Validation by Restriction Digest Fingerprint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouchka, Eric

    Sequence Assembly Validation by Restriction Digest Fingerprint Comparison Eric C. Rouchka and David examines the use of restriction digest analysis as a method for testing the fidelity of sequence assembly. Restriction digest fingerprint matching is an established technology for high resolution physical map

  5. 1 Validation of the CERTS Microgrid Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microgrid Testbed; David K. Nichols; John Stevens; Robert H. Lasseter; Joseph H. Eto; Harry T. Vollkommer; Islanding Microgrid Microturbine

    Abstract—The development of test plans to validate the CERTS Microgrid concept is discussed, including the status of a testbed. Increased application of Distributed Energy Resources on the Distribution system has the potential to improve performance, lower operational costs and create value

  6. Validating Collective Classification Using Cohorts , Abdullah Sonmez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    in ecology to the cycles of energy and chemistry that drive weather and environmental change. We build]. General analysis of network data started with a statistical approach based on random graphs [5]. Work toolkit [15], and a book that covers several aspects in depth [16]. Recent work on validation

  7. Master Thesis Validation of Interpersonal Stances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    , people recognized the stances expressed by the virtual humans when they show the behaviors technology, such as 3D animation, programming in 3D game engine and virtual reality head-mounted displayMaster Thesis Validation of Interpersonal Stances Expressed by Virtual Suspect Characters

  8. RELAP-7 SOFTWARE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L [Idaho National Laboratory; Choi, Yong-Joon [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

  9. Network Security Validation Using Game Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavronicolas, Marios

    1 Network Security Validation Using Game Theory Vicky Papadopoulou and Andreas Gregoriades Computer.papadopoulou,a.gregoriades}@euc.ac.cy Abstract: Non-functional requirements (NFR) such as network security recently gained widespread attention the immunity property of the distributed systems that depended on these networks. Security requirements

  10. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  11. Temperature and heat flux datasets of a complex object in a fire plume for the validation of fire and thermal response codes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jernigan, Dann A.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is necessary to improve understanding and develop temporally- and spatially-resolved integral scale validation data of the heat flux incident to a complex object in addition to measuring the thermal response of said object located within the fire plume for the validation of the SIERRA/FUEGO/SYRINX fire and SIERRA/CALORE codes. To meet this objective, a complex calorimeter with sufficient instrumentation to allow validation of the coupling between FUEGO/SYRINX/CALORE has been designed, fabricated, and tested in the Fire Laboratory for Accreditation of Models and Experiments (FLAME) facility. Validation experiments are specifically designed for direct comparison with the computational predictions. Making meaningful comparison between the computational and experimental results requires careful characterization and control of the experimental features or parameters used as inputs into the computational model. Validation experiments must be designed to capture the essential physical phenomena, including all relevant initial and boundary conditions. This report presents the data validation steps and processes, the results of the penlight radiant heat experiments (for the purpose of validating the CALORE heat transfer modeling of the complex calorimeter), and the results of the fire tests in FLAME.

  12. Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Diabetes Experience Spring 2014 Interprofessional Diabetes Experience Phar 6226/Nurs 5011 Spring the opportunity to learn in-depth knowledge of diabetes mellitus through active, hands-on learning experience of living with diabetes, in which they will give "insulin" injections and check blood glucoses

  13. Airborne Multiwavelength High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) Observations During TCAP 2012: Vertical Proles of Optical and Microphysical Properties of a Smoke/Urban Haze Plume Over the Northeastern Coast of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Kolgotin, A.; Hair, John; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David; Rogers, R. R.; Hare, Rich; Cleckner, Craig; Obland, Michael; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Berg, Larry K.; Schmid, Beat

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present rst measurements with the rst airborne multiwavelength High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2), developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument was operated during the Department of Energy (DOE) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in July 2012. We observed out ow of urban haze and fresh biomass burning smoke from the East Coast of the US out over the West Atlantic Ocean. Lidar ratios at 355 and 532 nm were ... sr indicating moderately absorbing aerosols. Extinctionrelated Angstrom exponents were 1.5{2 pointing at comparably small particles. Our novel automated, unsupervised data inversion algorithm retrieves particle e*ective radii of approximately 0.2 *m, which is in agreement with the large Angstrom exponents. We nd reasonable agreement to particle size parameters obtained from situ measurements carried out with the DOE G-1 aircraft that ew during the lidar observations.

  14. Thermodynamics for Single-Molecule Stretching Experiments J. M. Rubi,*, D. Bedeaux, and S. Kjelstrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Thermodynamics for Single-Molecule Stretching Experiments J. M. Rubi,*, D. Bedeaux, and S to construct nonequilibrium thermodynamics for systems too small to be considered thermodynamically be viewed as a large thermodynamic system, we discuss the validity of nonequilibrium thermodynamics

  15. GRIMHX verification and validation action matrix summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trumble, E.F.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WSRC-RP-90-026, Certification Plan for Reactor Analysis Computer Codes, describes a series of action items to be completed for certification of reactor analysis computer codes used in Technical Specifications development and for other safety and production support calculations. Validation and verification of the code is an integral part of this process. This document identifies the work performed and documentation generated to satisfy these action items for the Reactor Physics computer code GRIMHX. Each action item is discussed with the justification for its completion. Specific details of the work performed are not included in this document but are found in the references. The publication of this document signals the validation and verification effort for the GRIMHX code is completed.

  16. NASA Remote Sensing Validation Data: Saudi Arabia

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Myers, Daryl R. [NREL; Al-Abbadi, Naif [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Energy Research Institite; Wilcox, Steve [NREL

    Since 1995, the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have co-operated to establish a 12 station network of high quality solar radiation monitoring installations across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. NREL and KACST realized the value of accurate surface solar radiation flux measurements for validation of satellite derived surface and atmospheric solar radiation flux measurements, and is making this data available to support validation of satellite data products related to the NASA Mission to Planet Earth component of the Earth Science Enterprise Earth Observing System (EOS) project to evaluate long term climate trends based on measuements from EOS Terra Platforms. A CIMEL 8 channel sunphotometer for measuring aerosol optical depth at 6 wavelengths and total column water has been deployed at the Solar Village station since February 24, 1999. [Taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/new_data/Saudi_Arabia/

  17. Validation of Dose Calculation Codes for Clearance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Wirendal, B.; Bjerler, J.; Studsvik; Teunckens, L.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Various international and national bodies such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, the European Commission, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have put forward proposals or guidance documents to regulate the ''clearance'' from regulatory control of very low level radioactive material, in order to allow its recycling as a material management practice. All these proposals are based on predicted scenarios for subsequent utilization of the released materials. The calculation models used in these scenarios tend to utilize conservative data regarding exposure times and dose uptake as well as other assumptions as a safeguard against uncertainties. None of these models has ever been validated by comparison with the actual real life practice of recycling. An international project was organized in order to validate some of the assumptions made in these calculation models, and, thereby, better assess the radiological consequences of recycling on a practical large scale.

  18. PV array simulator development and validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Lucca, Roberto (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA); Deuel, Don (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to harvest all available energy from a photovoltaic (PV) array is essential if new system developments are to meet levelized cost of energy targets and achieve grid parity with conventional centralized utility power. Therefore, exercising maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms, dynamic irradiance condition operation and startup and shutdown routines and evaluating inverter performance with various PV module fill-factor characteristics must be performed with a repeatable, reliable PV source. Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with Ametek Programmable Power to develop and demonstrate a multi-port TerraSAS PV array simulator. The simulator will replicate challenging PV module profiles, enabling the evaluation of inverter performance through analyses of the parameters listed above. Energy harvest algorithms have traditionally implemented methods that successfully utilize available energy. However, the quantification of energy capture has always been difficult to conduct, specifically when characterizing the inverter performance under non-reproducible dynamic irradiance conditions. Theoretical models of the MPPT algorithms can simulate capture effectiveness, but full validation requires a DC source with representative field effects. The DC source being developed by Ametek and validated by Sandia is a fully integrated system that can simulate an IV curve from the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) module data base. The PV simulator allows the user to change the fill factor by programming the maximum power point voltage and current parameters and the open circuit voltage and short circuit current. The integrated PV simulator can incorporate captured irradiance and module temperature data files for playback, and scripted profiles can be generated to validate new emerging hardware embedded with existing and evolving MPPT algorithms. Since the simulator has multiple independent outputs, it also has the flexibility to evaluate an inverter with multiple MPPT DC inputs. The flexibility of the PV simulator enables the validation of the inverter's capability to handle vastly different array configurations.

  19. Generator Dynamic Model Validation and Parameter Calibration Using Phasor Measurements at the Point of Connection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Du, Pengwei; Kosterev, Dmitry; Yang, Steve

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disturbance data recorded by phasor measurement units (PMU) offers opportunities to improve the integrity of dynamic models. However, manually tuning parameters through play-back events demands significant efforts and engineering experiences. In this paper, a calibration method using the extended Kalman filter (EKF) technique is proposed. The formulation of EKF with parameter calibration is discussed. Case studies are presented to demonstrate its validity. The proposed calibration method is cost-effective, complementary to traditional equipment testing for improving dynamic model quality.

  20. Verification, validation, and benchmarking report for TRIMHX: A three dimensional hexagonal transient diffusion theory code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, T.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRIMHX is a fundamental Reactor Analysis tool in use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and is an integral part of the Generalized Reactor Analysis Subsystem (GRASS). TRIMHX solves the time dependent multigroup neutron diffusion equation in two and three dimensional hexagonal geometry by standard and coarse mesh finite difference methods. The TRIMHX implementation assumes the solution to this equation can be discretized in space, energy, and time. These are industry accepted approaches which can be found in many nuclear engineering books. This report concerns the verification and validation of TRIMHX, a transient two and three dimensional hex-z diffusion theory code. The validation was performed to determine the accuracy of the code, and the verification was performed to determine if the code was correctly using the correct theory and that all the subroutines function as required. For TRIMHX, the validation requirement was satisfied by comparing the results of the code with experiments and benchmarking the code against other standard or validated code results. The verification requirement for TRIMHX was performed indirectly since it is impossible and not necessary to reverify a large code like TRIMHX line by line. The extensive operations history of TRIMHX in conjunction with the comparisons against many numerical experiments (exact solutions) and other diffusion theory codes is sufficient to establish that the code is functioning as intended and therefore it is verified. This report summarizes four sets of experiments performed in 1974, 1977, and 1988, two DIF3D/TRIMHX comparison problems performed in 1991, a DIF3D/FX2-TH/TRIMHX comparison problem produced for this report, and the comparison of TRIMHX/GRIMHX initial static calculations. The results of these experiments show that TRIMHX was correctly implemented and is ready to submit into SCMS production mode.

  1. Verification and Validation of Carbon-Fiber Laminate Low Velocity Impact Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle; Briggs, Timothy; Brown, Arthur

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is a model verification and validation effort using low - velocity impact (LVI) of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate experiments. A flat cylindrical indenter impacts the laminate with enough energy to produce delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. Included in the experimental efforts are ultrasonic scans of the damage for qualitative validation of the models. However, the primary quantitative metrics of validation are the force time history measured through the instrumented indenter and initial and final velocities. The simulations, whi ch are run on Sandia's Sierra finite element codes , consist of all physics and material parameters of importance as determined by a sensitivity analysis conducted on the LVI simulation. A novel orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model that is cap able of predicting progressive composite damage and failure is described in detail and material properties are measured, estimated from micromechanics or optimized through calibration. A thorough verification and calibration to the accompanying experiment s are presented. Specia l emphasis is given to the four - point bend experiment. For all simulations of interest, the mesh and material behavior is verified through extensive convergence studies. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter unc ertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating this phenomenon in structures of interest.

  2. Validation of the Monte Carlo Criticality Program KENO V. a for highly-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, J.R.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of calculations based on critical experiments have been performed using the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Criticality Program for the purpose of validating KENO V.a for use in evaluating Y-12 Plant criticality problems. The experiments were reflected and unreflected systems of single units and arrays containing highly enriched uranium metal or uranium compounds. Various geometrical shapes were used in the experiments. The SCALE control module CSAS25 with the 27-group ENDF/B-4 cross-section library was used to perform the calculations. Some of the experiments were also calculated using the 16-group Hansen-Roach Library. Results are presented in a series of tables and discussed. Results show that the criteria established for the safe application of the KENO IV program may also be used for KENO V.a results.

  3. V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2.3.3.216 Addthis Related Articles U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits...

  4. Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop February 3, 2015 12:00PM MST to February 4, 2015 2:15PM MST National Renewable Energy...

  5. Solar Energy Research Institute Validation Test House Site Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Wortman, D.; Judkoff, R.; Hunn, B.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Validation Test House at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado, is being used to collect performance data for analysis/design tool validation as part of the DOE Passive Solar Class A Performance Evaluation Program.

  6. Development and Validation of the Transition Coordinators Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjorkman Wade, Diana K.

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to create a valid and reliable instrument for the field of secondary special education and transition by developing and validating the Transition Coordinators Survey (TCS). Transition coordinators are professionals who...

  7. Validation of machine-oriented strategies in chess endgames 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niblett, Timothy B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is concerned with the validation of chess endgame strategies. It is also concerned with the synthesis of strategies that can be validated. A strategy for a given player is the specification of the move to ...

  8. Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline silicon test structures, as well as uncontrolled nonuniform changes in this quantity over time and during operation.

  9. Industrial engineering study of tank farm access qualifications and validations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, S.G., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering study of alternatives to reduce costs of validation worker`s qualification prior to Tank Farm area access.

  10. On the Practicality of Abductive Validation Tim Menzies 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Tim

    On the Practicality of Abductive Validation Tim Menzies 1 Abstract. An abductive framework is described for validating the- ories using a library of known or desired behaviour. Abduction is known. The computational limits of the framework is therefore explored. We find that abductive validation is a practical

  11. Deviational analyses for validating regulations on real systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    Deviational analyses for validating regulations on real systems Fiona Polack, Thitima Srivatanakul to the validation of reg- ulations, in the sense of their application of regulations to real systems. Keyword: deviational analysis, dependability, regulation validation 1 Background Regulations are intended to control

  12. NPP Atmosphere EDR Validation Plan NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NPP Atmosphere EDR Validation Plan DRAFT NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL and Aerosol EDRs DATE: 13 March 2009 No. I30008 VER. 1 REV. A PREPARED BY) 1 #12;NPP Atmosphere EDR Validation Plan DRAFT Calibration and Validation of the NPP/NPOESS VIIRS

  13. Double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of double beta decay experiments are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments, NEMO-3 and CUORICINO, are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments are considered. In these experiments sensitivity for the effective neutrino mass will be on the level of (0.1-0.01) eV.

  14. Reviews and Validations | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for| DepartmentReduce Hot WaterReviews and Validations

  15. Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidating Computer-Designed Proteins for

  16. Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidating Computer-Designed Proteins

  17. Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidating Computer-Designed

  18. Accelerated Testing Validation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of roofing surfaces HugoTesting Validation

  19. ORDINATEUR QUANTIQUE: UN MODELE THEORIQUE GENEVOIS VALIDE PAR UNE EXPERIENCE ALLEMANDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schibler, Ueli

    'atomes (doublon) , en laissant derrière eux une «boîte» vide ou un trou (holon). Ce doublon et ce holon forment un propagation des pairs doublon/holon intriqués. En 0.0025 #12;Presse Information Publications 24 rue du Général, doublons et holons ont parcouru une distance équivalente à dix atomes voisins. Toutes les données obtenues

  20. The MichelsonMorley Experiment as a Primer on Validation 1 March 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, D. E. "Steve"

    dangerous or com­ pletely impossible to carry out: e. g., nuclear winter and the maintenance of the U. S. nuclear weapons stockpile. Whether discrete or continuous, modeling our world has more difficult due

  1. DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan24,7,INL is aSC8 CARES:91

  2. 70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015 PeerBased onR.KATHLEEN HOGAN07.470

  3. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  4. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

  5. CASL Validation Data: An Initial Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study aims to establish a comprehensive view of “data” needed for supporting implementation of the Consortium of Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL). Insights from this review (and its continual refinement), together with other elements developed in CASL, should provide the foundation for developing the CASL Validation Data Plan (VDP). VDP is instrumental to the development and assessment of CASL simulation tools as predictive capability. Most importantly, to be useful for CASL, the VDP must be devised (and agreed upon by all participating stakeholders) with appropriate account for nature of nuclear engineering applications, the availability, types and quality of CASL-related data, and novelty of CASL goals and its approach to the selected challenge problems. The initial review (summarized on the January 2011 report version) discusses a broad range of methodological issues in data review and Validation Data Plan. Such a top-down emphasis in data review is both needed to see a big picture on CASL data and appropriate when the actual data are not available for detailed scrutiny. As the data become available later in 2011, a revision of data review (and regular update) should be performed. It is expected that the basic framework for review laid out in this report will help streamline the CASL data review in a way that most pertinent to CASL VDP.

  6. Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christina Lynn

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................ 119 ix LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 The diurnal evolution of the PBL modified from Stull, 1988........... 1 2 The Houston area with wind profiler and radiosonde sites............... 13... plot of wind profiler and lidar ML heights............................ 63 13 Standard Deviation between the MTP algorithm ML heights and wind profiler ML heights for all the sites combined .................. 70 14 Box and Whiskers Plots...

  7. Experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for fuel cycle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San-Felice, L.; Eschbach, R.; Bourdot, P. [DEN, DER, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 ST Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsilanizara, A.; Huynh, T. D. [DEN, DM2S, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ourly, H. [EDF, R and D, 1 av. General de Gaulle, F-92131 Clamart Cedex (France); Thro, J. F. [AREVA, Tour AREVA, F-92084 Paris la Defense (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DARWIN package, developed by the CEA and its French partners (AREVA and EDF) provides the required parameters for fuel cycle applications: fuel inventory, decay heat, activity, neutron, {gamma}, {alpha}, {beta} sources and spectrum, radiotoxicity. This paper presents the DARWIN2.3 experimental validation for fuel inventory and decay heat calculations on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). In order to validate this code system for spent fuel inventory a large program has been undertaken, based on spent fuel chemical assays. This paper deals with the experimental validation of DARWIN2.3 for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel inventory calculation, focused on the isotopes involved in Burn-Up Credit (BUC) applications and decay heat computations. The calculation - experiment (C/E-1) discrepancies are calculated with the latest European evaluation file JEFF-3.1.1 associated with the SHEM energy mesh. An overview of the tendencies is obtained on a complete range of burn-up from 10 to 85 GWd/t (10 to 60 GWcVt for MOX fuel). The experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for decay heat calculation is performed using calorimetric measurements carried out at the Swedish Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies, covering a large burn-up (20 to 50 GWd/t) and cooling time range (10 to 30 years). (authors)

  8. A fission matrix based validation protocol for computed power distributions in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, J. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3860, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); LaPorta, A. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 7136, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been engaged in a significant multi year effort to modernize the computational reactor physics tools and validation procedures used to support operations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC). Several new protocols for validation of computed neutron flux distributions and spectra as well as for validation of computed fission power distributions, based on new experiments and well-recognized least-squares statistical analysis techniques, have been under development. In the case of power distributions, estimates of the a priori ATR-specific fuel element-to-element fission power correlation and covariance matrices are required for validation analysis. A practical method for generating these matrices using the element-to-element fission matrix is presented, along with a high-order scheme for estimating the underlying fission matrix itself. The proposed methodology is illustrated using the MCNP5 neutron transport code for the required neutronics calculations. The general approach is readily adaptable for implementation using any multidimensional stochastic or deterministic transport code that offers the required level of spatial, angular, and energy resolution in the computed solution for the neutron flux and fission source. (authors)

  9. USING CFD TO ANALYZE NUCLEAR SYSTEMS BEHAVIOR: DEFINING THE VALIDATION REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schultz

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recommended protocol to formulate numeric tool specifications and validation needs in concert with practices accepted by regulatory agencies for advanced reactors is described. The protocol is based on the plant type and perceived transient and accident envelopes that translates to boundary conditions for a process that gives the: (a) key phenomena and figures-of-merit which must be analyzed to ensure that the advanced plant can be licensed, (b) specification of the numeric tool capabilities necessary to perform the required analyses—including bounding calculational uncertainties, and (c) specification of the validation matrices and experiments--including the desired validation data. The result of applying the process enables a complete program to be defined, including costs, for creating and benchmarking transient and accident analysis methods for advanced reactors. By following a process that is in concert with regulatory agency licensing requirements from the start to finish, based on historical acceptance of past licensing submittals, the methods derived and validated have a high probability of regulatory agency acceptance.

  10. Validation and Testing of ENDF/B-VII Decay Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, Ian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Pigni, Marco T [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear decay library developed for the ORIGEN code was upgraded from ENDF/B-VI.8 to -VII.0 and released in the SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system in 2011. Experience with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library identified serious errors and performance issues in the evaluated decay sublibrary. Initially, errors were identified in the decay scheme for the 238U series, leading to large discrepancies in the gamma emission rate for uranium. Further testing of the fission product decay data revealed significant performance issues with ENDF/B-VII.0 relative to the previous release of ENDF/B-VI. To address the performance issues, the decay data library in SCALE was upgraded to ENDF/B-VII.1 and released as an update for users in 2013. This paper describes the practical impact of the ENDF/B-VII.0 decay data performance issues on common code applications, and the validation and testing performed on the updated ORIGEN libraries developed from the ENDF/B-VII.1 sublibrary.

  11. The Blazar Sequence: Validity and Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The "blazar sequence" posits that the most powerful BL Lacertae objects and flat-spectrum radio quasars should have relatively small synchrotron peak frequencies, nu_peak, and that the least powerful such objects should have the highest nu_peak values. This would have strong implications for our understanding of jet formation and physics and the possible detection of powerful, moderately high-redshift TeV blazars. I review the validity of the blazar sequence by using the results of very recent surveys and compare its detailed predictions against observational data. I find that the blazar sequence in its simplest form is ruled out. However, powerful flat-spectrum radio quasars appear not to reach the nu_peak typical of BL Lacs. This could indeed be related to some sort of sequence, although it cannot be excluded that it is instead due to a selection effect.

  12. Real-World Hydrogen Technology Validation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Eudy, L.; Saur, G.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy, the Department of Defense's Defense Logistics Agency, and the Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration have funded learning demonstrations and early market deployments to provide insight into applications of hydrogen technologies on the road, in the warehouse, and as stationary power. NREL's analyses validate the technology in real-world applications, reveal the status of the technology, and facilitate the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, manufacturing, and operations. This paper presents the maintenance, safety, and operation data of fuel cells in multiple applications with the reported incidents, near misses, and frequencies. NREL has analyzed records of more than 225,000 kilograms of hydrogen that have been dispensed through more than 108,000 hydrogen fills with an excellent safety record.

  13. Portable controls experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Richard Winston

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments for controls classes like MIT's 2.004 require large lab setups and expensive equipment such as oscilloscopes and function generators. We developed a series of controls experiments based on National Instruments' ...

  14. Double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  15. Experiments: Preparation and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    the experimental set­up und the results of performing the experiment. Again, this is part of human cultureExperiments: Preparation and Measurement by Arnold Neumaier, Vienna March 1996 Abstract Introduction Experiments, properly arranged, provide information about a physical system by suitable

  16. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  17. Technology Development, Validation, and Transfer Via the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, R.L.

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) established an Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Its primary mission is to support technology development, validation, and transfer to industry in order to enhance the airworthiness and improve the aircraft maintenance practices of the U.S. commercial aviation industry. The Center conducts projects in a myriad of engineering disciplines. The results are placed in the public domain so that the industry at-large can reap the benefits of FAA-funded Research and Development efforts. To support the Center's goals, the FAA/AANC has set up a hangar facility at the Albuquerque International Airport which contains a collection of transport and commuter aircraft as well as other test specimens. The facility replicates a working maintenance environment by incorporating both the physical inspection difficulties as well as the environmental factors which influence maintenance reliability.

  18. Argonne X-rays validate quantum magnetism model | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany have validated a theorized model of quantum magnetism by observing it firsthand in a...

  19. atmosphere model validation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    predictability over eastern Australia in JJASON This research aims to improve intra Marshall, Andrew 3 Early validation analyses of atmospheric profiles from CiteSeer...

  20. Annual Property Training & Validations Must be Completed Between...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Property Training & Validations Must be Completed Between March 26 & April 24 It is that time again for all property custodians to take the annual Property Custodian...

  1. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of created fractures." State Colorado Objectives Develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create...

  2. HEV, PHEV, EV Test Standard Development and Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EV Test Standard Development and Validation 2013 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 13-17, 2013 Michael Duoba, Henning Lohse-Busch, Kevin...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: WEC-Sim code validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    validation Sandia, NREL Release Wave Energy Converter Modeling and Simulation Code: WEC-Sim On July 29, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events,...

  4. Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylation Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Mark R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis. In: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols, M.Segal: Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylationpackage and applications to genomics. Bioinformatics and

  5. Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures (VMM) Libby Berger (General Motors), Omar Faruque (Ford) Co-Principal Investigators US Automotive...

  6. Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aleks Obabko, Paul Fischer, and Tim Tautges, Argonne National Laboratory Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and Co-design PI Name: Paul F. Fischer PI...

  7. Validation of a Small Engine Based Procedure for Studying Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of Engine Lube Oils, Ionic Liquids as Lubricants andor Lubricant Additives, Opportunities for Engine Friction Reduction and Durable Design Validation of a...

  8. U-219: Symantec Web Gateway Input Validation Flaws Lets Remote...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9: Symantec Web Gateway Input Validation Flaws Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands, Execute Arbitrary Commands, and Change User Passwords U-219: Symantec Web Gateway Input...

  9. Validating agent based models through virtual worlds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakkaraju, Kiran; Whetzel, Jonathan H.; Lee, Jina [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Bier, Asmeret Brooke; Cardona-Rivera, Rogelio E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Bernstein, Jeremy Ray Rhythm [Gaikai, Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the US continues its vigilance against distributed, embedded threats, understanding the political and social structure of these groups becomes paramount for predicting and dis- rupting their attacks. Agent-based models (ABMs) serve as a powerful tool to study these groups. While the popularity of social network tools (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) has provided extensive communication data, there is a lack of ne-grained behavioral data with which to inform and validate existing ABMs. Virtual worlds, in particular massively multiplayer online games (MMOG), where large numbers of people interact within a complex environ- ment for long periods of time provide an alternative source of data. These environments provide a rich social environment where players engage in a variety of activities observed between real-world groups: collaborating and/or competing with other groups, conducting battles for scarce resources, and trading in a market economy. Strategies employed by player groups surprisingly re ect those seen in present-day con icts, where players use diplomacy or espionage as their means for accomplishing their goals. In this project, we propose to address the need for ne-grained behavioral data by acquiring and analyzing game data a commercial MMOG, referred to within this report as Game X. The goals of this research were: (1) devising toolsets for analyzing virtual world data to better inform the rules that govern a social ABM and (2) exploring how virtual worlds could serve as a source of data to validate ABMs established for analogous real-world phenomena. During this research, we studied certain patterns of group behavior to compliment social modeling e orts where a signi cant lack of detailed examples of observed phenomena exists. This report outlines our work examining group behaviors that underly what we have termed the Expression-To-Action (E2A) problem: determining the changes in social contact that lead individuals/groups to engage in a particular behavior. Results from our work indicate that virtual worlds have the potential for serving as a proxy in allocating and populating behaviors that would be used within further agent-based modeling studies.

  10. LIDAR nleasurenlents of \\vind turbine wake Ineanderi ng J)l'j',lillllL'nl ul \\kcl1~lI1i('al Engineering. Fluid \\kchanic~. \\ills Koppcls /l.ik. DTU-I)uildll1,lC ..jil3.ll'llJ:1il':i1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W wind turbine [1]. The wake dynamics was resol\\cd using a LIDAR based wind speed scanning system. RecentLIDAR nleasurenlents of \\vind turbine wake Ineanderi ng J)l'j',lillllL'nl ul \\kcl1~lI1i of identifying the wake characteristics associated \\\\ith a Ltrge KUt1l/2M\\V wino turbine. The turbine in question

  11. Improved computational neutronics methods and validation protocols for the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigg, D. W.; Nielsen, J. W.; Chase, B. M.; Murray, R. K.; Steuhm, K. A.; Unruh, T. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Street, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is in the process of updating the various reactor physics modeling and simulation tools used to support operation and safety assurance of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purposes. On the experimental side of the project, new hardware was fabricated, measurement protocols were finalized, and the first four of six planned physics code validation experiments based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted at the ATRC facility. Data analysis for the first three experiments, focused on characterization of the neutron spectrum in one of the ATR flux traps, has been completed. The six experiments will ultimately form the basis for flexible and repeatable ATR physics code validation protocols that are consistent with applicable national standards. (authors)

  12. Validation of KENO V.a for highly enriched uranium systems with hydrogen and/or carbon moderation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, E.P.; Vornehm, R.G. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); Dodds, H.L. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the validation in accordance with ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983(R1988) of KENO V.a using the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library for systems containing highly-enriched uranium, carbon, and hydrogen and for systems containing highly-enriched uranium and carbon with high carbon to uranium (C/U) atomic ratios. The validation has been performed for two separate computational platforms: an IBM 3090 mainframe and an HP 9000 Model 730 workstation, both using the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Software (NCSS) code package. Critical experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility, in support of the Rover reactor program, and at the Pajarito site at Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as having the constituents desired for this validation as well as sufficient experimental detail to allow accurate construction of KENO V.a calculational models. Calculated values of k{sub eff} for the Rover experiments, which contain uranium, carbon, and hydrogen, are between 1.0012 {+-} 0.0026 and 1.0245 {+-} 0.0023. Calculation of the Los Alamos experiments, which contain uranium and carbon at high C/U ratios, yields values of k{sub eff} between 0.9746 {+-} 0.0028 and 0.9983 {+-} 0.0027. Safety criteria can be established using this data for both types of systems.

  13. PXIE: Project X Injector Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne; Holmes, S.D.; Kephart, R.D.; Kerby, J.S.; Lebedev, V.A.; Mishra, C.S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Solyak, N.; Stanek, R.P.; /Fermilab; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are planning a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of the Project X. This program is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. Integrated systems testing, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), will be accomplished with a new test facility under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-16. PXIE will include an H{sup -} ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

  14. An Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses--Criticality (keff) Predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most significant remaining challenges associated with expanded implementation of burnup credit in the United States is the validation of depletion and criticality calculations used in the safety evaluation - in particular, the availability and use of applicable measured data to support validation, especially for fission products. Applicants and regulatory reviewers have been constrained by both a scarcity of data and a lack of clear technical basis or approach for use of the data. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff have noted that the rationale for restricting their Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) to actinide-only is based largely on the lack of clear, definitive experiments that can be used to estimate the bias and uncertainty for computational analyses associated with using burnup credit. To address the issue of validation, the NRC initiated a project with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to (1) develop and establish a technically sound validation approach (both depletion and criticality) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) criticality safety evaluations based on best-available data and methods and (2) apply the approach for representative SNF storage and transport configurations/conditions to demonstrate its usage and applicability, as well as to provide reference bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the criticality (k{sub eff}) validation approach, and resulting observations and recommendations. Validation of the isotopic composition (depletion) calculations is addressed in a companion paper at this conference. For criticality validation, the approach is to utilize (1) available laboratory critical experiment (LCE) data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC) program to support validation of the principal actinides and (2) calculated sensitivities, nuclear data uncertainties, and the limited available fission product LCE data to predict and verify individual biases for relevant minor actinides and fission products. This paper (1) provides a detailed description of the approach and its technical bases, (2) describes the application of the approach for representative pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor safety analysis models to demonstrate its usage and applicability, (3) provides reference bias results based on the prerelease SCALE 6.1 code package and ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross-section data, and (4) provides recommendations for application of the results and methods to other code and data packages.

  15. Report on a workshop concerning code validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of wind turbine components is becoming more critical as turbines become lighter and more dynamically active. Computer codes that will reliably predict turbine dynamic response are, therefore, more necessary than before. However, predicting the dynamic response of very slender rotating structures that operate in turbulent winds is not a simple matter. Even so, codes for this purpose have been developed and tested in North America and in Europe, and it is important to disseminate information on this subject. The purpose of this workshop was to allow those involved in the wind energy industry in the US to assess the progress invalidation of the codes most commonly used for structural/aero-elastic wind turbine simulation. The theme of the workshop was, ``How do we know it`s right``? This was the question that participants were encouraged to ask themselves throughout the meeting in order to avoid the temptation of presenting information in a less-than-critical atmosphere. Other questions posed at the meeting are: What is the proof that the codes used can truthfully represent the field data? At what steps were the codes tested against known solutions, or against reliable field data? How should the designer or user validate results? What computer resources are needed? How do codes being used in Europe compare with those used in the US? How does the code used affect industry certification? What can be expected in the future?

  16. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

  17. CSR SHIELDING EXPERIMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    triplets are essential elements of CSR shielding experiment beamline setup. e - e - e - BPMflag image HES image Dispersion function minimized in the dipole where shielding plates...

  18. ARM - Measurement - Lidar polarization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice

  19. Validation of CFD Simulations for Natural Ventilation , Camille Allocca1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Validation of CFD Simulations for Natural Ventilation Yi Jiang1 , Camille Allocca1 , and Qingyan ventilation, which may provide occupants with good indoor air quality and a high level of thermal comfort-driven and buoyancy-drive natural ventilation. The validation of the CFD models used the experimental data of wind

  20. Validation of the Window Model of the Modelica Buildings Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5735E Validation of the Window Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Thierry Stephane MODEL OF THE MODELICA BUILDINGS LIBRARY Thierry Stephane Nouidui, Michael Wetter, and Wangda Zuo the validation of the window model of the free open-source Modelica Buildings library. This paper starts

  1. MUTATION-BASED VALIDATION OF HIGH-LEVEL MICROPROCESSOR IMPLEMENTATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Asaad, Hussain

    MUTATION-BASED VALIDATION OF HIGH-LEVEL MICROPROCESSOR IMPLEMENTATIONS Jorge Campos and Hussain Al-level microprocessor implementation by generating a test sequence for a collection of ab- stract design error models of microprocessors, engineers are forced to validate a larger design space in a shorter time frame. This task becomes

  2. Evaluating Verification and Validation Methods in Knowledge Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen-Burger, Yun-Heh (Jessica)

    Evaluating Verification and Validation Methods in Knowledge Engineering Alun Preece University: Verification and validation (V&V) techniques have always been an essential part of the knowledge engineering effective V&V techniques. 1. The Art of Knowledge Engineering Knowledge-based systems (KBS) have proven

  3. Experimental validation of finite element codes for welding deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Experimental validation of finite element codes for welding deformations H. M. Aarbogha,b, , M Institute for Energy Technology, N-2027 Kjeller, Norway. Abstract A single pass Metal Inert Gas welding which numerical codes quantifying welding stresses can be validated. It includes a mov- ing heat source

  4. Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    monitored system outputs for performance validation and energy analysis. The paper presents results from1 Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation Tim Salsbury and Rick Francisco. 1 Introduction Significant potential exists with the current technology of energy management

  5. Minisymposium on Validated Methods: Applications to Modeling, Analysis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    in Medicine and Engineering Organizers: Andreas Rauh1 and Ekaterina Auer2 During the last decades, computer of the mathematical model of the considered process. In this minisymposium, we focus on validated methods as a meansMinisymposium on Validated Methods: Applications to Modeling, Analysis, and Design of Systems

  6. Ris-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources, e.g. in future planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysisRisø-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore Wind Speed Maps to In-Situ Data, Microscale project goal is to develop a method for utilizing the satellite wind speed maps for offshore wind

  7. Validating Process Refinement with Ontologies , Gerd Groener2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staab, Steffen

    Validating Process Refinement with Ontologies Yuan Ren1 , Gerd Groener2 , Jens Lemcke3 , Tirdad University of Koblenz-Landau, 3 SAP AG Abstract. A crucial task in process management is the validation of process refinements. A process refinement is a process description in a more fine-grained representation

  8. A Pragmatic Standard of Legal Validity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, John

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ann Boydston, Vol. 6 (Carbondale, IL: S. Illinois UP, 1985) 5-7. Dewey describes this error as ?the habit of philosophers of neglecting the indispensability of context, both in particular and in general. I should venture to assert that the most.... fallacy in Gregory F. Pappas, John Dewey?s Ethics: Democracy as Experience (Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 2008) 26-7. 6 Hart focuses on ?a purely analytical study of legal concepts, a study of the meaning of the distinctive vocabulary of the law.? H. L...

  9. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  10. Development and validation of detailed controls models of the Nelson River Bipole 1 HVDC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuffel, P.; Kent, K.L.; Mazur, G.B.; Weekes, M.A. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg (Canada))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Nelson River Bipole 1 mercury arc valve group replacement project and planning for the expansion of the Nelson River HVDC system with a third bipole underway, it was decided to pursue a program to develop and validate detailed models of the existing HVDC transmission facilities and their associated ac systems for use in system studies. The first phase of the program concentrated on the development of detailed controls models associated with the Bipole 1 transmission facility. Based on previous experience at Manitoba Hydro with the Electromagnetic Transient DC simulation program (EMTDC), it was decided that model development and validation would use this program. This paper presents the reasons behind the development of detailed models, the methods used in developing models related to Bipole 1, results of validation tests, difficulties encountered during the process, and the overall benefits resulting from the project. An example of applying the models to investigate a low frequency oscillation which has occurred on the dc system in the past is also presented.

  11. H Zhu, Validating Algebraic Class Testing in Final Algebra January 16, 2002 Validating Algebraic Class Testing in Final Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    H Zhu, Validating Algebraic Class Testing in Final Algebra January 16, 2002 1 Validating Algebraic Class Testing in Final Algebra Hong Zhu Department of Computing, Oxford Brookes University Wheatley Campus, Oxford OX33 1HX, UK, Email: hzhu@brookes.ac.uk Abstract Algebraic class testing is an object

  12. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

  13. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  14. Laser-direct-driven quasi-isentropic experiments on aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Quanxi, E-mail: quanxixue@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Wang, Feng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Xisheng; Liu, Jingru [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments were performed on long temporally shaped laser pulses based on an analytical isentropic compression model. Upper pressure limits, the ablation pressure scaling law, and stress-density curves were studied. The validity of the analytical model used, the ablation pressure scaling law, and the phenomena of missing line-imaging velocity interferometer (VISAR) fringes in the experimental results are discussed.

  15. MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINFROCK SH

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

  16. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

  17. Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

  18. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  19. Economic, organizational, and institutional impact of the survivability validation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, G. [Kaman Sciences Corp., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses some of the key economic, organizational, and institutional issues associated with the development and use of survivability validation protocols. It discusses factors affecting protocols, considerations for protocol selection, test- bed/simulator/analysis tool availability, organizational issues affecting protocol use, deviations precluding adherence to validated protocols, and protocol advantages. Knowledge of these factors will assist developers of survivability validation protocols in designing more flexible protocols that can be tailored for differing circumstances without losing the fidelity or assurance that the protocol will produce the desired survivability level.

  20. On integrating LES and laboratory turbulent flow experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, Fernando Franklin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

  1. Development and validation of scale nuclear analysis methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, Deokjung [ORNL] [ORNL; Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Steve A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ORNL is updating the nuclear analysis methods and data in the SCALE code system to support modeling of HTGRs. Development activities include methods used for reactor physics, criticality safety, and radiation shielding. This paper focuses on the nuclear methods in support of reactor physics, which primarily include lattice physics for cross-section processing of both prismatic and pebble-bed designs, Monte Carlo depletion methods and efficiency improvements for double heterogeneous fuels, and validation against relevant experiments. These methods enhancements are being validated using available experimental data from the HTTR and HTR-10 startup and initial criticality experiments. Results obtained with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models of the HTTR initial core critical configurations with SCALE6/KENO show excellent agreement between the continuous energy and multigroup methods and the results are consistent with results obtained by others. A three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo model for the initial critical core of the HTR-10 has been developed with SCALE6/KENO based on the benchmark specifications included in the IRPhE Handbook. The core eigenvalue obtained with this model is in very good agreement with the corresponding value obtained with a consistent continuous energy MCNP5 core model.

  2. ATLAS APPROVED EXPERIMENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Title Days 433-9 Miller Ion Irradiations of Anisotropic High-Tc Superconductors: Probing Dynamics of Magnetic Vortices 2 651-2 Paul Accelerator-Mass-Spectrometry...

  3. General relativity and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Damour

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  4. Simulated pion photoproduction experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, Ethan (Ethan Gabriel Grief)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: In this paper, I will be assessing the capabilities of the Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) detector in a planned experiment at the High Intensity Gamma Source at Duke University. I will review the relevant ...

  5. The MAJORANA Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MAJORANA Collaboration

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR.

  6. The Majorana Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Kephart, J. D.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H. O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Loach, J. C. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  7. The MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

  8. Field validation of monitoring method for ditertiary butylperoxide (DTBP) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stansbury, Anna Michelle

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this field study, a new air monitoring method, developed in the laboratory for measuring occupational exposure to ditertiary butylperoxide (DTBP) was validated by testing the overall accuracy and precision of the technique ...

  9. Validation of a Three Dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goumnerov, Hristo

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present research, the three dimensional particle tracking software OpenPTV is validated with synthetic images from the Standard PIV project by the Visualization Society of Japan, and with experimental data from the twin-jet facility...

  10. System development & validation process for emerging growing organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almazán López, José Antonio

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis has the main purpose of presenting the Development and Validation phase of the product development system from the point of view of an emerging and growing product development organization, denoting the obstacles ...

  11. SURVEY, ANALYSIS AND VALIDATION OF INFORMATION FOR BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURVEY, ANALYSIS AND VALIDATION OF INFORMATION FOR BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING Nuno Castela Escola, Business Processes, Informational Resources, Activities, UML Abstract: Business processes modeling became a fundamental task for organizations. To model business processes is necessary to know all the activities

  12. Biological Cluster Validity Indices Based on the Gene Ontology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Biological Cluster Validity Indices Based on the Gene Ontology Nora Speer, Christian Spieth 3646, pp. 429­439, 2005. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 #12;430 N. Speer, C. Spieth, and A

  13. Identifying, examining, and validating a description of the agriculture industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to identify, examine, and validate the various components and systems in agriculture while investigating three objectives related to Careers, Industries, and Systems using the Delphi technique over three rounds. Three...

  14. Development and Validation of an Occupational Skills Assessment Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and validation of an occupational skills assessment instrument is described. The instrument was designed to describe accurately a participant's actual level of occupational skills in a variety of job-related ...

  15. Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids Toan Nguyen-based computing environments and deploys, tests and analyzes multiphysics codes. A second approach executes model coupling, error correlations, alert definitions, best usage practices, code verification and code

  16. Technology Validation Hydrogen and fuel cells are a critical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). Technology validation does not certify marketability, but rather Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration The Energy Department's National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle cell technologies against targets such as fuel cell durability and efficiency, vehicle range

  17. Field validation of monitoring method for ditertiary butylperoxide (DTBP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stansbury, Anna Michelle

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions. The procedure was designed to identify any concerns which may be related to plant interferences, sample handling, storage and shipment. The field validation involved preliminary sampling to determine the concentration of DTBP present in the work...

  18. Bibliography for Verification and Validation in Computational Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bibliography has been compiled dealing with the verification and validation of computational simulations. The references listed in this bibliography are concentrated in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, references from the following fields are also included: operations research, heat transfer, solid dynamics, software quality assurance, software accreditation, military systems, and nuclear reactor safety. This bibliography, containing 221 references, is not meant to be comprehensive. It was compiled during the last ten years in response to the author's interest and research in the methodology for verification and validation. The emphasis in the bibliography is in the following areas: philosophy of science underpinnings, development of terminology and methodology, high accuracy solutions for CFD verification, experimental datasets for CFD validation, and the statistical quantification of model validation. This bibliography should provide a starting point for individual researchers in many fields of computational simulation in science and engineering.

  19. Verification and Validation of RADTRAN 5.5.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Douglas.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Mills, George Scott; Hamp, Steve C.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains a description of the verification and validation process used for the RADTRAN 5.5 code. The verification and validation process ensured the proper calculational models and mathematical and numerical methods were used in the RADTRAN 5.5 code for the determination of risk and consequence assessments. The differences between RADTRAN 5 and RADTRAN 5.5 are the addition of tables, an expanded isotope library, and the additional User-Defined meteorological option for accident dispersion. 3

  20. Validity and limitations of gas-drive relative permeability measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Anand Kumar

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VALIDITY AND LIMITATIONS OF GAS-DRIVE RELA TI VE PERMEABILITY MEASUREMEN T A Thesis by ANAND KUMAR GUPTA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillxnent of the requirement for the degree of MASTER Ok SCIENCE... August, 1971 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering VALIDITY AND LIMITATIONS OF GAS-DRIVE RELATIVE PERMEABILITY MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ANAND KUMAR GUPTA Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Committee) ber) Head of Department) (Member...

  1. Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) is a full scholarship, professional development program for Syracuse University

  2. Development of a test system for verification and validation of nuclear transport simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Morgan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Triplett, Brian S [GENERAL ELECTRIC; Anghaie, Samim [UNIV OF FL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification and validation of nuclear data is critical to the accuracy of both stochastic and deterministic particle transport codes. In order to effectively test a set of nuclear data, the data must be applied to a wide variety of transport problems. Performing this task in a timely, efficient manner is tedious. The nuclear data team at Los Alamos National laboratory in collaboration with the University of Florida has developed a methodology to automate the process of nuclear data verification and validation (V and V). This automated V and V process can efficiently test a number of data libraries using well defined benchmark experiments, such as those in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP). The process is implemented through an integrated set of Pyton scripts. Material and geometry data are read from an existing medium or given directly by the user to generate a benchmark experiment template file. The user specifies the choice of benchmark templates, codes, and libraries to form a V and V project. The Python scripts generate input decks for multiple transport codes from the templates, run and monitor individual jobs, and parse the relevant output automatically. The output can then be used to generate reports directly or can be stored into a database for later analysis. This methodology eases the burden on the user by reducing the amount of time and effort required for obtaining and compiling calculation results. The resource savings by using this automated methodology could potentially be an enabling technology for more sophisticated data studies, such as nuclear data uncertainty quantification. Once deployed, this tool will allow the nuclear data community to more thoroughly test data libraries leading to higher fidelity data in the future.

  3. Aerosol behavior experiments on light water reactor primary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahn, F.J.; Collen, J.; Wright, A.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of three experimental programs relevant to the behavior of aerosols in the primary systems of light water reactors (LWRs) are presented. These are the Large-Scale Aerosol Transport Test programs performed at the Marviken test facility in Sweden, parts of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) performed at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, and the TRAP-MELT validation project performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Marviken experiments focused on the behavior of aerosols released from fuel and structural materials in a damaged core. Data on the transport of these aerosols and their physical characteristics were obtained in five experiments that simulated LWR primary systems. The LACE program data include results from the containment bypass accident tests, which focused on aerosol transport in pipes. The TRAP-MELT validation project data include results from two types of experiments: (a) aerosol transport tests to investigate aerosol wall plateout in a vertical pipe geometry and (b) aerosol resuspension tests to provide a data base from which analytical models can be developed. Typical results from these programs are presented and discussed.

  4. Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

  5. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [ed.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis] [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

  6. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  7. Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Foliage dark and healthy. Plat 15. About same as Plat 10. Plat 16. No noticeable diflerence from Plat 14. 1 than oi IRISH POTATO EXPERIMENT, 1907. ..HARVEST RECORD. Plat 146 bu ....... 113.3 bu.. ...... I Gain Ma'ket- ab e Check Cotton Seed... Feed Inspector ....................... W. C. WELBORN.. .Vice Director and Agriculturist .............................................. M. FRANCIS. .Veterinarian .............................................. E. J. KYLE.. Horticulturist...

  8. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  9. The Majorana Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. E. Guiseppe; for the Majorana Collaboration

    2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge-76. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  10. The OLYMPUS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Milner; D. K. Hasell; M. Kohl; U. Schneekloth; N. Akopov; R. Alarcon; V. A. Andreev; O. Ates; A. Avetisyan; D. Bayadilov; R. Beck; S. Belostotski; J. C. Bernauer; J. Bessuille; F. Brinker; B. Buck; J. R. Calarco; V. Carassiti; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; N. D'Ascenzo; R. De Leo; J. Diefenbach; T. W. Donnelly; K. Dow; G. Elbakian; D. Eversheim; S. Frullani; Ch. Funke; G. Gavrilov; B. Gläser; N. Görrissen; J. Hauschildt; B. S. Henderson; Ph. Hoffmeister; Y. Holler; L. D. Ice; A. Izotov; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; J. Kelsey; D. Khaneft; P. Klassen; A. Kiselev; A. Krivshich; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; D. Lenz; S. Lumsden; Y. Ma; F. Maas; H. Marukyan; O. Miklukho; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; Y. Naryshkin; C. O'Connor; R. Perez Benito; R. Perrino; R. P. Redwine; D. Rodríguez Piñeiro; G. Rosner; R. L. Russell; A. Schmidt; B. Seitz; M. Statera; A. Thiel; H. Vardanyan; D. Veretennikov; C. Vidal; A. Winnebeck; V. Yeganov

    2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

  11. The MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiseppe, V.E. [Univ S Dakota; Keller, C. [Univ S Dakota; Mei, D-M [Univ S Dakota; Perevozchikov, O. [Univ S Dakota; Perumpilly, G. [Univ S Dakota; Thomas, K. [Univ S Dakota; Xiang, W. [Univ S Dakota; Zhang, C. [Univ S Dakota; Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Aguayo, E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Ely, J. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Fast, J.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Keillor, M. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kephart, J.D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kouzes, R. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Miley, H.S. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Mizouni, L. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Myers, A.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Reid, D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bergevin, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Prior, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yaver, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F.T. III [University of South Carolina; Creswick, R. [University of South Carolina; Farach, H. [University of South Carolina; Mizouni, L. [University of South Carolina; Avignone, Frank Titus [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Capps, Gregory L [ORNL; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL; Back, H.O. [University of North Carolina; Leviner, L. [North Carolina State University; Young, A.R. [North Carolina State University; Back (et al.), H.O. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC; Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Hong, H. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Medlin, D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Sobolev, V. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Barabash, A.S. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Vanyushin, I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Yumatov, V. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Boswell (et al.), M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Timkin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Yakushev, E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Efremenko, M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Busch, M. [Duke University; Esterline, J. [Duke University; Swift, G. [Duke University; Tornow, W. [Duke University/TUNL; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Shima, T. [Osaka University; Finnerty (et al.), P. [University of North Carolina; et al.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  12. The Majorana Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Bai, Xinhua; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hong, H.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Medlin, D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Reid, Douglas J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Ronquest, M. C.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

  13. Survivability validation protocol issues for a system-of-systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, G.; Ianacone, K.J.; Stringer, T.A. [Kaman Sciences Corp., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper illuminates the various issues confronting a protocol developer as he attempts to construct a system-of-systems (SOS) survivability validation protocol. These issues are considered in the context of a Battle Management Command, Control, and Communications (BMC{sup 3}) network in the form of a Hypothetical System Architecture consisting of air, sea, ground, and space platforms. The purpose of the protocol of concem is to validate the nuclear survivability of the BMC{sup 3} SOS. To achieve this validation, the combined susceptibilities of the SOS platforms and communications links must be considered. A basic SOS simulation concept is described, which assumes individual platform survivability. The nuclear environments to be considered in the simulation are outlined with a discussion of the relationship to basic system susceptibility. Various validation concepts for the SOS protocol are summarized in relation to the life cycle phase during which they would be utilized. Computer simulation issues are discussed, including the environments to be modeled, validation of the codes, documentation, and configuration control. Concluding remarks center on the most likely way of simulating nuclear effects and on treating simulation tools like mission critical items.

  14. The Bolund Experiment Design of Measurement Campaign using CFD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    determination of mean wind, wind gradients and turbulence intensity on potential wind turbine positions complex terrain for reliable estimation of power production and wind turbine loads. · Development of remote sensing techniques (Lidar) for measuring wind conditions in complex terrain, including

  15. Application of the SCALE TSUNAMI Tools for the Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations Involving 233U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Don [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiochemical Development Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been storing solid materials containing 233U for decades. Preparations are under way to process these materials into a form that is inherently safe from a nuclear criticality safety perspective. This will be accomplished by down-blending the {sup 233}U materials with depleted or natural uranium. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, a study has been performed using the SCALE sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools to demonstrate how these tools could be used to validate nuclear criticality safety calculations of selected process and storage configurations. ISOTEK nuclear criticality safety staff provided four models that are representative of the criticality safety calculations for which validation will be needed. The SCALE TSUNAMI-1D and TSUNAMI-3D sequences were used to generate energy-dependent k{sub eff} sensitivity profiles for each nuclide and reaction present in the four safety analysis models, also referred to as the applications, and in a large set of critical experiments. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was used together with the sensitivity profiles and the cross-section uncertainty data contained in the SCALE covariance data files to propagate the cross-section uncertainties ({Delta}{sigma}/{sigma}) to k{sub eff} uncertainties ({Delta}k/k) for each application model. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was also used to evaluate the similarity of each of the 672 critical experiments with each application. Results of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment are presented in this report. A total of 142 experiments were judged to be similar to application 1, and 68 experiments were judged to be similar to application 2. None of the 672 experiments were judged to be adequately similar to applications 3 and 4. Discussion of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment is provided for each of the four applications. Example upper subcritical limits (USLs) were generated for application 1 based on trending of the energy of average lethargy of neutrons causing fission, trending of the TSUNAMI similarity parameters, and use of data adjustment techniques.

  16. Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments using DRAGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. B. Ma; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulation to predict reactor rates. First, DRAGON was developed to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions,235U,238U,239Pu and141Pu, and it was validated for PWRs using the Takahama benchmark. The fission fraction calculation function was validated through comparing our calculation results with MIT's results. we calculate the fission fraction of the Daya Bay reactor core, and compare its with those calculated by the commercial reactor simulation program SCIENCE, which is used by the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, and the results was consist with each other. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was studied, and the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

  17. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

  18. VALIDATION AND VERIFICATION OF CMST-CP REMOTE SURVEILLANCE SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In its original form, this project was intended to utilize the capabilities of the Analytical Laboratory at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) to carry out validation and verification of data obtained in the field for purposes of characterization, monitoring, and sensing in relation to closure and post-closure of various sites throughout the DOE complex. To do this, technologies were to be identified that had already been deployed and had produced field data. The role of the FIU-HCET Analytical Laboratory was considered first as part of a round robin team with other laboratories or, alternatively, to act as an objective third-party laboratory in evaluating validation data by others. Shortly after the onset of the project, FIU-HCET determined that specific deployed technologies were not readily identifiable. Thus, the direction of the project was changed to one in which the FKJ-HCET Analytical Laboratory would investigate DOE needs that require validation. These needs were examined primarily on the Internet, as listed by each specific site. In addition, needs having validation implications for regulatory agencies, such as the EPA, were also investigated. Furthermore, contact was made with laboratories with which the FIU-HCET Analytical Laboratory could act in a round robin or third-party capacity. Included in this report are potentially deployable technologies that would lend themselves to validation and verification of field data. FIU-HCET intends to monitor the deployment of these technologies with a view toward carrying out the validation activities originally proposed.

  19. Development and Validation of a Lifecycle-based Prognostics Architecture with Test Bed Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, J. Wesley; Upadhyaya, Belle; Sharp, Michael; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    On-line monitoring and tracking of nuclear plant system and component degradation is being investigated as a method for improving the safety, reliability, and maintainability of aging nuclear power plants. Accurate prediction of the current degradation state of system components and structures is important for accurate estimates of their remaining useful life (RUL). The correct quantification and propagation of both the measurement uncertainty and model uncertainty is necessary for quantifying the uncertainty of the RUL prediction. This research project developed and validated methods to perform RUL estimation throughout the lifecycle of plant components. Prognostic methods should seamlessly operate from beginning of component life (BOL) to end of component life (EOL). We term this "Lifecycle Prognostics." When a component is put into use, the only information available may be past failure times of similar components used in similar conditions, and the predicted failure distribution can be estimated with reliability methods such as Weibull Analysis (Type I Prognostics). As the component operates, it begins to degrade and consume its available life. This life consumption may be a function of system stresses, and the failure distribution should be updated to account for the system operational stress levels (Type II Prognostics). When degradation becomes apparent, this information can be used to again improve the RUL estimate (Type III Prognostics). This research focused on developing prognostics algorithms for the three types of prognostics, developing uncertainty quantification methods for each of the algorithms, and, most importantly, developing a framework using Bayesian methods to transition between prognostic model types and update failure distribution estimates as new information becomes available. The developed methods were then validated on a range of accelerated degradation test beds. The ultimate goal of prognostics is to provide an accurate assessment for RUL predictions, with as little uncertainty as possible. From a reliability and maintenance standpoint, there would be improved safety by avoiding all failures. Calculated risk would decrease, saving money by avoiding unnecessary maintenance. One major bottleneck for data-driven prognostics is the availability of run-to-failure degradation data. Without enough degradation data leading to failure, prognostic models can yield RUL distributions with large uncertainty or mathematically unsound predictions. To address these issues a "Lifecycle Prognostics" method was developed to create RUL distributions from Beginning of Life (BOL) to End of Life (EOL). This employs established Type I, II, and III prognostic methods, and Bayesian transitioning between each Type. Bayesian methods, as opposed to classical frequency statistics, show how an expected value, a priori, changes with new data to form a posterior distribution. For example, when you purchase a component you have a prior belief, or estimation, of how long it will operate before failing. As you operate it, you may collect information related to its condition that will allow you to update your estimated failure time. Bayesian methods are best used when limited data are available. The use of a prior also means that information is conserved when new data are available. The weightings of the prior belief and information contained in the sampled data are dependent on the variance (uncertainty) of the prior, the variance (uncertainty) of the data, and the amount of measured data (number of samples). If the variance of the prior is small compared to the uncertainty of the data, the prior will be weighed more heavily. However, as more data are collected, the data will be weighted more heavily and will eventually swamp out the prior in calculating the posterior distribution of model parameters. Fundamentally Bayesian analysis updates a prior belief with new data to get a posterior belief. The general approach to applying the Bayesian method to lifecycle prognostics consisted of identifying the prior, which is the RUL es

  20. PV Validation and Bankability Workshop: San Jose, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granata, J.; Howard, J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). The report provides feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Program PV Validation and Bankability Workshop in San Jose, California on August 31, 2011. It focuses on the current state of PV in the United States, private funding to fund U.S. PV industry growth, roles and functions of the regional test center program, and ways to improve the current validation and bankability practices.

  1. The development and validation of the ESL composition ability profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartfiel, Vema Faye

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF THE ESL COMPOSITION ABILITY PROFILE A Thesis by VEMA FAYE HARTFIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1980... Major Subject: English THE DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF THE ESL COMPOSITION ABILITY PROFILE A Thesis by VEMA FAYE HARTF IEL Approved as to style and content by: au~ (Cha3. rman o f Committee) (Member) (He d o f Department) (Member) May 1980...

  2. Gross decontamination experiment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  3. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  4. A demonstration mobility experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Howard Lawrence

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    among under graduate physics students in the field of solid-stats physics. Ths Shocklsy Haynes mobility experiment, presented in this thesis, was selected because it is considered an excellent means of gaining these objectives by giving sn...& constructive criticism& and patience throughout the long period required to complete the experismntl Dr& J ~ R ~ haynes, of Bell Laboratories, for informat'on on exper- imental procedure and sm&ross of semiconductor samplssl Bill Closssr of' the Sandia...

  5. Hog Feeding Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, John C.

    1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................. ~eriment,s Nos. 111 and IV 17 I ...................................................................................... ,,,,proved Hogs vs. Scrubs 19 I Corn vs. Rice Bran vs. Spanish Peanuts ........................................................... 22... Straight Corn Ration IV. Rice Bran and Spanish Peanuts for Fattening Hogs. Compared with Indian Corn for Pork Production. for 190 II ascc st1zj coll fatt nnr7 fe\\v dnc reg: was The experiments reported in this bulletin cover all of those...

  6. Airspace Management Decision Tool Validating the Behavior and Structure of Software Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, Mark

    ..................................................................................................34 LTSA Code ...........................................................................................................36 MATLAB Validation with LTSA--50 iterations ...................................................37

  7. Multi-product valid inequalities for the DLSP with sequence-dependent changeover costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a heuristic separation algorithm for these valid inequalites. We finally discuss some preliminary

  8. Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet on Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology activities at NREL.

  9. The OLYMPUS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milner, R; Kohl, M; Schneekloth, U; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Andreev, V A; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bernauer, J C; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Buck, B; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; D'Ascenzo, N; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Gläser, B; Görrissen, N; Hauschildt, J; Henderson, B S; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ice, L D; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Khaneft, D; Klassen, P; Kiselev, A; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; O'Connor, C; Benito, R Perez; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Piñeiro, D Rodríguez; Rosner, G; Russell, R L; Schmidt, A; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collect...

  10. A Testing Platform for Validation of Overhead Conductor Aging Models and Understanding Thermal Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Young II, Marcus Aaron [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Stovall, John P [ORNL; Overholt, Philip N [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power system equipment manufacturers and researchers continue to experiment with novel overhead electric conductor designs that support better conductor performance and address congestion issues. To address the technology gap in testing these novel designs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory constructed the Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing (PCAT) facility to evaluate the performance of novel overhead conductors in an accelerated fashion in a field environment. Additionally, PCAT has the capability to test advanced sensors and measurement methods for accessing overhead conductor performance and condition. Equipped with extensive measurement and monitoring devices, PCAT provides a platform to improve/validate conductor computer models and assess the performance of novel conductors. The PCAT facility and its testing capabilities are described in this paper.

  11. Experimental validation of GADRAS's coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee T.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of {alpha}-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Development and validation of a modular, extensible docking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizzo, Robert C.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Development and validation of a modular, extensible docking program: DOCK 5 Demetri point out that success rates could be improved through more advanced modeling of the receptor prior non-covalent interactions are critical for bio- logical processes. The sequencing of a variety of ge

  13. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Experimental and Model Validation Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Experimental and Model Validation Study M. Mench, J. Scott, S. Thynell boundary Fuel cell performance Current density distribution measurements Conclusions #12;3 Method, flow rate, species inlet and fuel cell temperature, and humidity. Transparent polycarbonate windows

  14. Guide to Using the WIND Toolkit Validation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman-Cribbin, W.; Draxl, C.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of using 20% wind energy by 2030, the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was created to provide information on wind speed, wind direction, temperature, surface air pressure, and air density on more than 126,000 locations across the United States from 2007 to 2013. The numerical weather prediction model output, gridded at 2-km and at a 5-minute resolution, was further converted to detail the wind power production time series of existing and potential wind facility sites. For users of the dataset it is important that the information presented in the WIND Toolkit is accurate and that errors are known, as then corrective steps can be taken. Therefore, we provide validation code written in R that will be made public to provide users with tools to validate data of their own locations. Validation is based on statistical analyses of wind speed, using error metrics such as bias, root-mean-square error, centered root-mean-square error, mean absolute error, and percent error. Plots of diurnal cycles, annual cycles, wind roses, histograms of wind speed, and quantile-quantile plots are created to visualize how well observational data compares to model data. Ideally, validation will confirm beneficial locations to utilize wind energy and encourage regional wind integration studies using the WIND Toolkit.

  15. Modeling and Validating Hybrid Systems Using VDM and Mathematica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the state changes discretely, the other part changes continuously over time. Typically, modern control interface and data animation. 1 Introduction Modern control applications are realized throughModeling and Validating Hybrid Systems Using VDM and Mathematica Bernhard K. Aichernig and Reinhold

  16. Qualifying geospatial workflow models for adaptive controlled validity and accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Qualifying geospatial workflow models for adaptive controlled validity and accuracy Didier Leibovici, Gobe Hobona, Kristin Stock and Mike Jackson Centre for Geospatial Sciences, University.leibovici@nottingham.ac.uk Abstract--Sharing geospatial data and geoprocessing models within a system like GEOSS (Global Earth

  17. Age-validation of a leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC), tagged on the dorsal fin with yellow plastic livestock rototags, and released194 Age-validation of a leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata) recaptured after 20 years Susan E sharks were from a group of 948 leopard sharks tagged and released off Hunterís Point (37°44N lat., 122

  18. Validation of SSC using the FFTF natural-circulation tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.; Kennett, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Super System Code (SSC) validation program, the 100% power FFTF natural circulation test has been simulated using SSC. A detailed 19 channel, 2 loop model was used in SSC. Comparisons showed SSC calculations to be in good agreement with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), test data. Simulation of the test was obtained in real time.

  19. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review - 2010. Project summary: To effectively combine numerous exploration technologies to gather important data. Once information is combined into 3-D models, a target drilling location will be determined. Deep well capable of finding commercial quantities of geothermal resource will be drilled to validate methodology.

  20. Browser Interfaces and Extended Validation SSL Certificates: An Empirical Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Oorschot, Paul

    Browser Interfaces and Extended Validation SSL Certificates: An Empirical Study Robert Biddle provided by SSL certificates and browser interfaces in the face of var- ious attacks. As one response, basic SSL server certificates are being demoted to second-class status in conjunction

  1. Formal definition of POTENTIAL ENERGY (valid for conservative forces only)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    page - 16 Formal definition of POTENTIAL ENERGY (valid for conservative forces only) Given one type of conservative force F UB - UA= - = - Definition of 'Potential energy difference" conserv #12;page - 17 the definition of the "potential energy difference UB - UA " as equal to negative value of the work W done

  2. Validation of DWPF MOG dynamics model -- Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.S.

    1996-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The report documents the results of a study to validate the DWPF melter off-gas system dynamics model using the data collected during the Waste Qualification Runs in 1995. The study consisted of: (1) calibration of the model using one set of melter idling data, (2) validation of the calibrated model using three sets of steady feeding and one set of transient data, and (3) application of the validated model to simulate the melter overfeeding incident which took place on 7/5.95. All the controller tuning constants and control logic used in the validated model are identical to those used in the DCS in 1995. However, the model does not reflect any design and/or operational changes made in 1996 to alleviate the glass pouring problem. Based on the results of the overfeeding simulation, it is concluded that the actual feed rates during that incident were about 2.75 times the indicated readings and that the peak concentration of combustible gases remained below 15% of the lower flammable limit during the entire one-hour duration.

  3. Biomarkers identified with time-lapse imaging: discovery, validation, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by time-lapse imaging and correlated with clinical outcomes, may provide embryologists with new-lapse marker, it focuses on the criteria necessary for their successful integration into clinical practice, including [1] statistical and biological significance, [2] validation through prospec- tive clinical studies

  4. Ladder Metamodeling & PLC Program Validation through Time Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ladder Metamodeling & PLC Program Validation through Time Petri Nets Darlam Fabio Bender1,2, Benoît for Programmable Logical Controllers (PLCs). A PLC is a special purpose industrial computer used to automate the sequential, state-dependent logic in- herent in the program design [1]. Not found bugs in PLC programs

  5. Predicting Vehicle Crashworthiness: Validation of Computer Models for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Jim

    Predicting Vehicle Crashworthiness: Validation of Computer Models for Functional and Hierarchical. Cafeo, Chin-Hsu Lin, and Jian Tu Abstract The CRASH computer model simulates the effect of a vehicle colliding against different barrier types. If it accurately represents real vehicle crash- worthiness

  6. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  7. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe - phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  8. Fundamental experiments in velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

  9. BooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator|December 5, 2011Experiment

  10. Fermilab | Tevatron | Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FYU.S.at500-mileFYGrowing| HowExperiments In

  11. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  12. The NEXT experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Cadenas, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NEXT (Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC) is an experiment to search neutrinoless double beta decay processes (bb0nu) in Xe136. The NEXT technology is based in the use of time projection chambers operating at a typical pressure of 15 bar and using electroluminescence to amplify the signal (HPXE). The main advantages of the experimental technique are: a) excellent energy resolution; b) the ability to reconstruct the trajectory of the two electrons emitted in the decays, which further contributes to the suppression of backgrounds; c) scalability to large masses; and d) the possibility to reduce the background to negligible levels thanks to the barium tagging technology (BATA). The NEXT roadmap was designed in four stages: i) Demonstration of the HPXE technology with prototypes deploying a mass of natural xenon in the range of 1 kg, using the NEXT-DEMO (IFIC) and NEXT-DBDM (Berkeley) prototypes; ii) Characterisation of the backgrounds to the bb0nu signal and measurement of the bb2nu signal with the NEW detecto...

  13. The majorana experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rielage, Keith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boswell, Melissa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gehman, Victor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kidd, Mary F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Roque, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ronquest, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Harry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steele, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, MAJORANA aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype DEMONSTRATOR module are presented. Our proposed method uses the well-established technique of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in high purity Ge-diode radiation detectors that play both roles of source and detector. The use of P-PC Ge detectors present advances in background rejection and a Significantly lower energy threshold than conventional Ge detector technologies. The lower energy threshold opens up a broader and exciting physics program including searches for dark matter and axions concurrent with the double-beta decay search. The DEMONSTRATOR should establish that the backgrounds are low enough to justify scaling to tonne-scale experiment, probe the neutrino effective mass region above 100 meV, and search the low energy region with a sensitivity to dark matter. The DEMONSTRATOR will be sited at the 4850-ft level (4200 m.w.e) of the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake and preparations for construction are currently underway.

  14. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  15. Using XDAQ in Application Scenarios of the CMS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, L; Bruno, G; Cano, E; Csilling, A; Cittolin, Sergio; Drouhin, F; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Jacobs, C; Kozlovskii, Miroslaw P; Larsen, H; Magrans, I; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Mirabito, L; Murray, S; Dell, V O; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Sphicas, Paris; Schwick, C; Suzuki, I; Toniolo, N; Ventura, Sandro; Zangrando, L

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XDAQ is a generic data acquisition software environment that emerged from a rich set of of use-cases encountered in the CMS experiment. They cover not the deployment for multiple sub-detectors and the operation of different processing and networking equipment as well as a distributed collaboration of users with different needs. The use of the software in various application scenarios demonstrated the viability of the approach. We discuss two applications, the tracker local DAQ system for front-end commissioning and the muon chamber validation system. The description is completed by a brief overview of XDAQ.

  16. Using XDAQ in Application Scenarios of the CMS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Berti; V. Brigljevic; G. Bruno; E. Cano; A. Csilling; S. Cittolin; F. Drouhin; S. Erhan; D. Gigi; F. Glege; M. Gulmini; J. Gutleber; C. Jacobs; M. Kozlowski; H. Larsen; I. Magrans; G. Maron; F. Meijers; E. Meschi; L. Mirabito; S. Murray; V. O? Dell; A. Oh; L. Orsini; L. Pollet; A. Racz; D. Samyn; P. Scharff-Hansen; P. Sphicas; C. Schwick; I. Suzuki; N. Toniolo; S. Ventura; L. Zangrando

    2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    XDAQ is a generic data acquisition software environment that emerged from a rich set of of use-cases encountered in the CMS experiment. They cover not the deployment for multiple sub-detectors and the operation of different processing and networking equipment as well as a distributed collaboration of users with different needs. The use of the software in various application scenarios demonstrated the viability of the approach. We discuss two applications, the tracker local DAQ system for front-end commissioning and the muon chamber validation system. The description is completed by a brief overview of XDAQ.

  17. OPTIMIZATION STUDIES FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTOINJECTOR EXPERIMENT (APEX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photoinjector Experiment (APEX) seeks to validate the design of a proposed high-brightness, normal conducting RF photoinjector gun and bunching cavity feeding a superconducting RF linac to produce nC-scale electron bunches with sub-micron normalized emittances at MHz-scale repetition rates. The beamline design seeks to optimize the slice averaged 6D brightness of the beam prior to injection into a high gradient linac for further manipulation and delivery to an FEL undulator. Details of the proposed beamline layout and electron beam dynamics studies are presented.

  18. Reactor Simulation for Antineutrino Experiments using DRAGON and MURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Jones; A. Bernstein; J. M. Conrad; Z. Djurcic; M. Fallot; L. Giot; G. Keefer; A. Onillon; L. Winslow

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulations to predict reactor fission rates. Here we present results from the DRAGON and MURE simulation codes and compare them to other industry standards for reactor core modeling. We use published data from the Takahama-3 reactor to evaluate the quality of these simulations against the independently measured fuel isotopic composition. The propagation of the uncertainty in the reactor operating parameters to the resulting antineutrino flux predictions is also discussed.

  19. Experience with capture cavity II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeth, T.; /Fermilab /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Branlard, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; McGee, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valuable experience in operating and maintaining superconducting RF cavities in a horizontal test module has been gained with Capture Cavity II. We report on all facets of our experience to date.

  20. The T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abgrall, N; Ajima, Y; Albert, J B; Allan, D; Amaudruz, P -A; Andreopoulos, C; Andrieu, B; Anerella, M D; Angelsen, C; Aoki, S; Araoka, O; Argyriades, J; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; de André, J P A M; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Ballester, O; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Baron, P; Barr, G; Bartoszek, L; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berns, H; Bertram, I; Besnier, M; Beucher, J; Beznosko, D; Bhadra, S; Birney, P; Bishop, D; Blackmore, E; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Bodek, A; Bojechko, C; Bouchez, J; Boussuge, T; Boyd, S B; Boyer, M; Braam, N; Bradford, R; Bravar, A; Briggs, K; Brinson, J D; Bronner, C; Brook-Roberge, D G; Bryant, M; Buchanan, N; Budd, H; Cadabeschi, M; Calland, R G; Calvet, D; Rodríguez, J Caravaca; Carroll, J; Cartwright, S L; Carver, A; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cavata, C; Cazes, A; Cervera, A; Charrier, J P; Chavez, C; Choi, S; Chollet, S; Christodoulou, G; Colas, P; Coleman, J; Coleman, W; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cooke, P; Curioni, A; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davies, G S; Davis, S; Day, M; De La Broise, X; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Debraine, A; Delagnes, E; Delbart, A; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Tran, P Dinh; Dobson, J; Doornbos, J; Dore, U; Drapier, O; Druillole, F; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Durkin, T; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Dziomba, M; Ellison, B; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escallier, J E; Escudero, L; Esposito, L S; Faszer, W; Fechner, M; Ferrero, A; Finch, A; Fisher, C; Fitton, M; Flight, R; Forbush, D; Frank, E; Fransham, K; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Gallop, M; Galymov, V; Ganetis, G L; Gannaway, F C; Gaudin, A; Gaweda, J; Gendotti, A; George, M; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Giomataris, I; Giraud, J; Ghosh, A K; Golan, T; Goldhaber, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gomi, S; Gonin, M; Goyette, M; Grant, A; Grant, N; Grañena, F; Greenwood, S; Gumplinger, P; Guzowski, P; Haigh, M D; Hamano, K; Hansen, C; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Haruyama, T; Hasanen, R; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hastings, S; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayashi, K; Hayato, Y; Haycock, T D J; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Henderson, R; Herlant, S; Higashi, N; Hignight, J; Hiraide, K; Hirose, E; Holeczek, J; Honkanen, N; Horikawa, S; Hyndman, A; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Iida, M; Ikeda, M; Ilic, J; Imber, J; Ishida, T; Ishihara, C; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwasaki, M; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Joo, K K; Jover-Manas, G; Jung, C K; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Karlen, D; Kasami, K; Kasey, V; Kato, I; Kawamuko, H; Kearns, E; Kellet, L; Khabibullin, M; Khaleeq, M; Khan, N; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, J Y; Kim, S -B; Kimura, N; Kirby, B; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Kogan, G; Koike, S; Komorowski, T; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Kowalik, K; Kravtsov, V; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kubota, J; Kudenko, Y; Kulkarni, N; Kurchaninov, L; Kurimoto, Y; Kurjata, R; Kurosawa, Y; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Langstaf, R; Laveder, M; Lawson, T B; Le, P T; Coguie, A Le; Ross, M Le; Lee, K P; Lenckowski, M; Licciardi, C; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Lopez, G D; Lu, P; Ludovici, L; Lux, T; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Makida, Y; Malafis, C J; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marchionni, A; Mark, C; Marino, A D; Marone, A J; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Maryon, T; Marzec, J; Masliah, P; Mathie, E L; Matsumura, C; Matsuoka, K; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLachlan, T; Mercer, I; Messina, M; Metcalf, W; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Minvielle, R E; Mituka, G; Miura, M; Mizouchi, K; Mols, J -P; Monfregola, L; Monmarthe, E; Moreau, F; Morgan, B; Moriyama, S; Morris, D; Muir, A; Murakami, A; Muratore, J F; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagashima, G; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamoto, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Naples, D; Nelson, B; Nicholls, T C; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Nitta, K; Nizery, F; Nowak, J A; Noy, M; Obayashi, Y; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, H; Okamura, T; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Ohlmann, C; Olchanski, K; Openshaw, R; Oser, S M; Otani, M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Ozaki, T; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Paul, P; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Pearson, C; Perkin, J D; Pfleger, M; Pierre, F; Pierrepont, D; Plonski, P; Poffenberger, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Preece, R; Przewlocki, P; Qian, W; Raaf, J L; Radicioni, E; Ramos, K; Ratoff, P; Raufer, T M; Ravonel, M; Raymond, M; Retiere, F; Richards, D; Ritou, J -L; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rondio, E; Roney, M; Rooney, M; Ross, D; Rossi, B; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sadler, S; Sakashita, K; Sanchez, F; Sarrat, A; Sasaki, K; Schaack, P; Schmidt, J; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The T2K experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Its main goal is to measure the last unknown lepton sector mixing angle {\\theta}_{13} by observing {\

  1. Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kautz, Henry

    Understanding Human Experience Henry Kautz One of the earliest goals of research in artificial intelligence was to create systems that can interpret and understand day to day human experience. Early work on the goal of building systems that understand human experience. Each of the previous barriers is weakened

  2. Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    et al., 1992]. Thermal monitoring downgradient or in the vicinity of an artificial heat source has (TRTs) are a common field method in shallow geothermics to estimate thermal properties of the ground. During the test, a constantly heated fluid is circulated in closed tubes within a vertical borehole heat

  3. A controlled distributed parameter model for a fluid-flexible structure system: numerical simulations and experiment validations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudouin, Lucie

    A controlled distributed parameter model for a fluid-flexible structure system: numerical consider the problem of active reduction of vibrations in a fluid-flexible structure system and the sloshing of the fuel inside the wing's tank. The control is performed using piezoelectric patches

  4. Swing Check Valve Design Criteria and CFD Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallstream, Brian E.; Fricke, Brian A.; Becker, Bryan R. [University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides information on swing check valve selection criteria suitable for nuclear power plant applications. In this project, four swing check valves were analyzed to demonstrate the implementation and application of this information. In this example, swing check valves were selected according to 'ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III' and 'ASME B16.34, Valves Flanged, Threaded, and Welding End'. This paper also discusses the utilization of Computational Fluid Dynamics Software (CFD) as a means to analyze valve design. The use of CFD is a relatively new approach for validation of valve design that is becoming invaluable due to the high cost of physical bench testing. The Instrument Society of America (ISA) Analysis Division and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Computational Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee have taken a proactive approach in setting standards and practices for the use of CFD in design and validation. (authors)

  5. Sensor Data Management, Validation, Correction, and Provenance for Building Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello, Charles C [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; Rossiter, Jeffrey S [ORNL; Hensley, Zachary [Tennessee Technological University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on technologies that use a wide range of sensors to develop and characterize building energy performance. The management of high-resolution sensor data, analysis, and tracing lineage of such activities is challenging. Missing or corrupt data due to sensor failure, fouling, drifting, calibration error, or data logger failure is another issue. This paper focuses on sensor data management, validation, correction, and provenance to combat these issues, ensuring complete and accurate sensor datasets for building technologies applications and research. The design and development of two integrated software products are discussed: Sensor Data Validation and Correction (SensorDVC) and the Provenance Data Management System (ProvDMS) platform.

  6. EMPIRICAL VALIDATION OF BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION SOFTWARE: ENERGYPLUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper compares the results from a study conducted at Iowa Energy Center s Energy Resource Station with EnergyPlus simulation results. The building consists of controlled test rooms, dedicated air handling units and air-cooled chillers for the purpose of obtaining quality data suitable for empirical validation studies. Weather data were also collected at the facility and used for the simulation. Empirical validation can be performed on various levels of the program such as zone level, systems level, and plant level. This study is unique in the sense that it integrates the zones, system, and plant into one analysis. For this study, the difference between empirical and EnergyPlus predicted zone cooling loads varied from 1.7% to 10.2%, but the difference for the compressor power was as much as 22.4%. The paper also describes the potential reasons why simulation results might not match field data.

  7. A Validation System for the Complex Event Processing Directives of the ATLAS Shifter Assistant Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Alejandro; The ATLAS collaboration; Avolio, Giuseppe; Kazarov, Andrei; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Soloviev, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex Event Processing (CEP) is a methodology that combines data from many sources in order to identify events or patterns that need particular attention. It has gained a lot of momentum in the computing world in the past few years and is used in ATLAS to continuously monitor the behaviour of the data acquisition system, to trigger corrective actions and to guide the experiment’s operators. This technology is very powerful, if experts regularly insert and update their knowledge about the system’s behaviour into the CEP engine. Nevertheless, writing or modifying CEP rules is not trivial since the used programming paradigm is quite different with respect to what developers are normally familiar with. In order to help experts verify that the directives work as expected, we have thus developed a complete testing and validation environment. This system consists of three main parts: the first is the data reader from existing storage of all relevant data streams that are produced during data taking, the second...

  8. A Validation System for the Complex Event Processing Directives of the ATLAS Shifter Assistant Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Gabriel; The ATLAS collaboration; Kazarov, Andrei; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Santos, Alejandro; Soloviev, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex Event Processing (CEP) is a methodology that combines data from different sources in order to identify events or patterns that need particular attention. It has gained a lot of momentum in the computing world in the past few years and is used in ATLAS to continuously monitor the behaviour of the data acquisition system, to trigger corrective actions and to guide the experiment’s operators. This technology is very powerful, if experts regularly insert and update their knowledge about the system’s behaviour into the CEP engine. Nevertheless, writing or modifying CEP directives is not trivial since the used programming paradigm is quite different with respect to what developers are normally familiar with. In order to help experts verify that the directives work as expected, we have thus developed a complete testing and validation environment. This system consists of three main parts: the first is the persistent storage of all relevant data streams that are produced during data taking, the second is a...

  9. Validation of the new code package APOLLO2.8 for accurate PWR neutronics calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D.; Blaise, P.; Leconte, P.; Palau, J. M.; Roque, B.; Vaglio, C.; Vidal, J. F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the Qualification work performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the new APOLLO2.S/SHEM-MOC package based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file for the prediction of PWR neutronics parameters. This experimental validation is based on PWR mock-up critical experiments performed in the EOLE/MINERVE zero-power reactors and on P.I. Es on spent fuel assemblies from the French PWRs. The Calculation-Experiment comparison for the main design parameters is presented: reactivity of UOX and MOX lattices, depletion calculation and fuel inventory, reactivity loss with burnup, pin-by-pin power maps, Doppler coefficient, Moderator Temperature Coefficient, Void coefficient, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} poisoning worth, Efficiency of Ag-In-Cd and B4C control rods, Reflector Saving for both standard 2-cm baffle and GEN3 advanced thick SS reflector. From this qualification process, calculation biases and associated uncertainties are derived. This code package APOLLO2.8 is already implemented in the ARCADIA new AREVA calculation chain for core physics and is currently under implementation in the future neutronics package of the French utility Electricite de France. (authors)

  10. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stottler, Gary

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

  11. Scalar tensor theory : validity of Cosmic no hair conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudeshna Mukerji; Nairwita Mazumder; Ritabrata Biswas; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with cosmic no hair conjecture in scalar tensor theory of gravity. Here we have considered both Jordan frame and Einstein frame to examine the conjecture. In Jordan frame, one should restrict both the coupling function of the scalar field and the coupling parameter in addition to the ususal energy conditions for the the matter field for the validity of CNHC while in Einstein frame the restrictions are purely on the energy conditions.

  12. Current Status and Experience of WAMS Implementation in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Jim Y.; Huang, Zhenyu; Hauer, John F.; Martin, Kenneth E.

    2005-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The 15 years of successful implementation of Wide-Area Measurement Systems (WAMS) in the WECC power grid have shown significant value of WAMS data in system dynamic modeling and validation, FACTS control validation and pilot implementations of wide area protection schemes. The August 14 2003 blackout in the eastern interconnection of the North America revealed the urgent need for wide-area information acquisition for better power grid operations. The Eastern Interconnection Phasor Project (EIPP) was launched in 2003 to deploy a WAMS system in the eastern interconnection. Development of IEEE C37.118, a standard for phasor data acquisition and transmission, will aid in deployment of phasor measurement systems for WAMS applications. Technologies of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) with high precision time synchronization and Phasor Data Concentrators (PDCs) for phasor data aggregation and event recording are key to the success of WAMS implementation. This paper reviews the WAMS development in the North America and presents current and potential WAMS applications including dynamic modeling and validation and wide-area control. Past experience shows a promising future of WAMS in improving power system planning, operation and control. However, there remain challenges to make phasor measurement consistent and to meet both slow and fast data application needs.

  13. Robust design and model validation of nonlinear compliant micromechanisms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Larry L. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Baker, Michael Sean; Wittwer, Jonathan W. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the use of compliance or elastic flexibility in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) helps eliminate friction, wear, and backlash, compliant MEMS are known to be sensitive to variations in material properties and feature geometry, resulting in large uncertainties in performance. This paper proposes an approach for design stage uncertainty analysis, model validation, and robust optimization of nonlinear MEMS to account for critical process uncertainties including residual stress, layer thicknesses, edge bias, and material stiffness. A fully compliant bistable micromechanism (FCBM) is used as an example, demonstrating that the approach can be used to handle complex devices involving nonlinear finite element models. The general shape of the force-displacement curve is validated by comparing the uncertainty predictions to measurements obtained from in situ force gauges. A robust design is presented, where simulations show that the estimated force variation at the point of interest may be reduced from {+-}47 {micro}N to {+-}3 {micro}N. The reduced sensitivity to process variations is experimentally validated by measuring the second stable position at multiple locations on a wafer.

  14. Verification and validation guidelines for high integrity systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Dinsmore, G.; Hecht, S.; Tang, D. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High integrity systems include all protective (safety and mitigation) systems for nuclear power plants, and also systems for which comparable reliability requirements exist in other fields, such as in the process industries, in air traffic control, and in patient monitoring and other medical systems. Verification aims at determining that each stage in the software development completely and correctly implements requirements that were established in a preceding phase, while validation determines that the overall performance of a computer system completely and correctly meets system requirements. Volume I of the report reviews existing classifications for high integrity systems and for the types of errors that may be encountered, and makes recommendations for verification and validation procedures, based on assumptions about the environment in which these procedures will be conducted. The final chapter of Volume I deals with a framework for standards in this field. Volume II contains appendices dealing with specific methodologies for system classification, for dependability evaluation, and for two software tools that can automate otherwise very labor intensive verification and validation activities.

  15. Validation and Comparison of One-Dimensional Graound Motion Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Darragh; W. Silva; N. Gregor

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Both point- and finite-source stochastic one-dimensional ground motion models, coupled to vertically propagating equivalent-linear shear-wave site response models are validated using an extensive set of strong motion data as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. The validation and comparison exercises are presented entirely in terms of 5% damped pseudo absolute response spectra. The study consists of a quantitative analyses involving modeling nineteen well-recorded earthquakes, M 5.6 to 7.4 at over 600 sites. The sites range in distance from about 1 to about 200 km in the western US (460 km for central-eastern US). In general, this validation demonstrates that the stochastic point- and finite-source models produce accurate predictions of strong ground motions over the range of 0 to 100 km and for magnitudes M 5.0 to 7.4. The stochastic finite-source model appears to be broadband, producing near zero bias from about 0.3 Hz (low frequency limit of the analyses) to the high frequency limit of the data (100 and 25 Hz for response and Fourier amplitude spectra, respectively).

  16. Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL, and contribute to the Campaign milestone in 2018. Given their interdisciplinary nature, it is not surprising that these research needs are not being addressed by the other excellent high-energy density physics (HEDP) facilities coming on line, facilities aimed squarely at more established fields and missions. Although energy rich, these facilities deliver radiation (e.g., particle beams for isochoric heating) over a timescale that is too slow in these unit physics experiments to eliminate hydrodynamic evolution of the target plasma during the time it is being created. A theme shared by all of these experiments is the need to quickly create a quasi-homogeneous 'initial state' whose properties and evolution we wish to study. Otherwise, we cannot create unit experiments to isolate the physics of interest and validate the models in our codes, something that cannot be done with the integrated experiments often done in HED. Moreover, these experiments in some cases involve combinations of solid and plasmas, or matter in the warm-dense matter state, where neither the theoretical approximations of solid state or of fully-ionized weakly-coupled plasmas can be used. In all cases, the capability of 'isochoric heating' ('flash' heating at constant density) is important. In some cases, the ability to selectively heat to different degrees different species within a target, whether mixed or adjacent to each other, is critical for the experiment. This capability requires the delivery of very high power densities, which require the conversion of the laser into very short and intense pulses of secondary radiation (electrons, ions, neutrons, x-rays). Otherwise, there is no possibility of a clean experiment to constrain the models, in the cases there are any, or inform the creation of one. Another typical requirement of these experiments is the ability to probe these exotic extreme conditions of matter with flexible and diverse sources of secondary radiation. Without a high-intensity high-power laser with some unique attributes available on Trident today (e.g., ultra-high laser-puls

  17. Final Report on NPS/CIRPAS support of DOE Classic Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haflidi H Jonsson

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy conducted the Cloud-Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) in Poncha City Oklahoma, in June 2007. The purpose of the experiment was to study the influence of different surface conditions on properties of small cumulus clouds. The Oklahoma site provided climatologically arid surface in the western part of the state, and lush green conditions in the eastern part. The summer of 2007, however, was exceptionally wet, with flooded fields and rivers flowing over their banks. This had seriously adverse effect on the experiment. CIRPAS participated in this with its instrumented Twin Otter aircraft, flight crew and scientist. The CIRPAS instruments measured temperature, dewpoint temperature, pressure, winds, aerosol particle concentrations, aerosol size distribution, cloud droplet concentration, cloud droplet size spectra, total scatter coefficients and absorption coefficients at three different wavelengths. Additionally, CIRPAS provided measurements of aircraft location, velocity and attitude. CIRPAS reduced all the data to engineering units, quality assured the data, and submitted a coherent data set to the project’s archive. The Twin Otter flew 15 sorties from the airport in Ponca City, and characterized meteorological, aerosol and cloud conditions as well as the temperature of the underlying surface in a wide variety of conditions. Conditions ranged from deep convection and thunderstorms, to totally clear sky and stable atmosphere. Some flights were coordinated with other aircraft, such as the DOE’s G-1, which was in Ponca City simultaneously doing the CHAPS mission, the NASA King Air, which used lidar to characterize underlying aerosol and clouds, and a helicopter from Duke University, which was characterizing turbulence. Other flights were coordinated with satellite overpasses, ground-based observation sites. The field campaign took place during the month of June, 2007, and all CIRPAS data had been delivered by October that same year.

  18. NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Kammerud, R.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in two- and three-dimensional room geometries. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment performed at LBL. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. It is found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface. This study implies that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may have substantial errors as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure.

  19. Characterization and validation of an in silico toxicology model to predict the mutagenic potential of drug impurities*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov [Science and Research Staff, Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993–0002 (United States); Cross, Kevin P. [Leadscope, Inc., 1393 Dublin Road, Columbus, OH, 43215–1084 (United States)] [Leadscope, Inc., 1393 Dublin Road, Columbus, OH, 43215–1084 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control and minimization of human exposure to potential genotoxic impurities found in drug substances and products is an important part of preclinical safety assessments of new drug products. The FDA's 2008 draft guidance on genotoxic and carcinogenic impurities in drug substances and products allows use of computational quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR) to identify structural alerts for known and expected impurities present at levels below qualified thresholds. This study provides the information necessary to establish the practical use of a new in silico toxicology model for predicting Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of drug impurities and other chemicals. We describe the model's chemical content and toxicity fingerprint in terms of compound space, molecular and structural toxicophores, and have rigorously tested its predictive power using both cross-validation and external validation experiments, as well as case studies. Consistent with desired regulatory use, the model performs with high sensitivity (81%) and high negative predictivity (81%) based on external validation with 2368 compounds foreign to the model and having known mutagenicity. A database of drug impurities was created from proprietary FDA submissions and the public literature which found significant overlap between the structural features of drug impurities and training set chemicals in the QSAR model. Overall, the model's predictive performance was found to be acceptable for screening drug impurities for Salmonella mutagenicity. -- Highlights: ? We characterize a new in silico model to predict mutagenicity of drug impurities. ? The model predicts Salmonella mutagenicity and will be useful for safety assessment. ? We examine toxicity fingerprints and toxicophores of this Ames assay model. ? We compare these attributes to those found in drug impurities known to FDA/CDER. ? We validate the model and find it has a desired predictive performance.

  20. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  1. V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks April 2, 2013 - 1:13am Addthis...

  2. Validation of a group 24-hour recall method for dietary assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda Renee

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group 24-hour recall method developed by the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program of Texas was validated in a population of low-income female food service workers using unobtrusive meal observation as a validation standard. All subjects...

  3. Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT. "Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: A Validation of VENT

  4. Using Interactive Evolutionary Computation (IEC) with Validated Surrogate Fitness Functions for Redistricting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Steven Orla

    Using Interactive Evolutionary Computation (IEC) with Validated Surrogate Fitness Functions Evolu- tionary Computation (IEC) is a natural approach here, if practicable. The paper proposes development of Validated Surrogate Fitness (VSF) functions as a workable and gener- alizable form of IEC

  5. Comparison and Validation of Compressible Flow Simulations of Laser-Induced Cavitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison and Validation of Compressible Flow Simulations of Laser-Induced Cavitation Bubbles)). The validation is performed for the case of laser-induced cavitation bubbles collapsing in an infinite medium

  6. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  7. Laser Doppler vibrometry for assessment of arteriosclerosis: A first step towards validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campo, Adriaan; Dirckx, Joris [University of Antwerp, Laboratory of Biomedical Physics, Groenenborgerlaan 171 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that in cardiovascular risk management, stiffness of large arteries has a very good predictive value for cardiovascular disease and mortality. This parameter can be estimated from the pulse wave velocity (PWV) measured between the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck and femoral artery (FA) in the groin. However PWV can also be measured locally in the CCA, using non-invasive methods such as ultrasound (US) or laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). Potential of the latter approach was already explored in previous research, and in this work a first step towards clinical validation is made. 50 hypertension II/III patients aged between 30 and 65 participate in the study. Patients were asked to remain sober for 4 hours prior to the measurements. The trajectory of the CCA in the neck was determined by a trained clinician guided by an US probe. 3 laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) systems were aimed along the CCA. PWV was then calculated from the distance between beams and the time-shift between waveforms. Immediately after LDV measurements, PWV was measured with US. Additionally, carotid-femoral PWV was measured. As a validation, PWV results of the different techniques were compared with each other, and with medical background of the test subjects. Since data acquisition is still ongoing, data from only 20 patients will be discussed. No trends between measurement methods for PWV are apparent. However, a positive trend was detected between PWV as measured with LDV and blood pressure. More data, including additional experiments will be needed to verify this observation.

  8. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the parent aluminum skin must experience significant yield strains before any damage to the doubler will occur.

  9. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2008.

  10. Technology Validation of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Their Hydrogen Infrastructure (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes NREL's analysis and validation of fuel cell electric vehicles and hydrogen fueling infrastructure technologies.

  11. Bayes Factor of Model Selection Validates FLMP Dominic W. Massaro, Michael M. Cohen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Michael M.

    , using Newton's law of universal gravitation as an analogy, we argue that it might not be valid to expect

  12. Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weck, Philippe F; Tikare, Veena; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Clark, B (SNL); Mitchell, J (SNL); Glazoff, Michael V.; Homer, Eric R.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride ?-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. In this work, a model to numerically simulate hydride precipitation at the microstructural scale, in a wide variety of Zr-based claddings, under dry-storage conditions is being developed. It will be used to aid in the evaluation of the mechanical integrity of used fuel rods during dry storage and transportation by providing the structural conditions from the microstructural scale to the continuum scale to engineering component scale models to predict if the used fuel rods will perform without failure under normal and off-normal conditions. The microstructure, especially, the hydride structure is thought to be a primary determinant of cladding failure, thus this component of UFD’s storage and transportation analysis program is critical. The model development, application and validation of the model are documented and the limitations of the current model are discussed. The model has been shown to simulate hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding with correct morphology, thermodynamics and kinetics. An unexpected insight obtained from simulations hydride formation in Zircaloy-4 is that small (sub-micron) precipitates need to order themselves to form the larger hydrides typically described as radially-reoriented precipitates. A limitation of this model is that it does not currently solve the stress state that forms dynamically in the precipitate or matrix surrounding the precipitate. A method to overcome the limitations is suggested and described in detail. The necessary experiments to provide key materials physics and to validate the model are also recommended.

  13. Adaptive Accelerated ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics with Validation from Simulating Hydrogen Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Adaptive Accelerated ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics with Validation from Simulating Hydrogen Combustion concept (BB), which we validate here for describing hydrogen combustion. The bond order, undercoordination determined the detailed sequence of reactions for hydrogen combustion with and without the BB. We validate

  14. God Does Play Dice: Diagnosis and Validation for Autonomous Systems Tim Menzies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzies, Tim

    God Does Play Dice: Diagnosis and Validation for Autonomous Systems S. Bayana David Owen ¡ Tim for validating and diagnosing autonomous intelligent systems. Such techniques provide efficient approximate of LURCH, a random- ized inference engine that we have developed in validating and diagnosing autonomous

  15. Evaluation of the DHCE Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Baldwin, David L.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) experiment was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 12, which was completed in 1992. The purpose of the experiment was to enhance helium generation in vanadium alloys to simulate fusion reactor helium-to-dpa ratios with a target goal of 4-5 appm He/dpa. The Fusion Materials Science Program is considering mounting another experiment in hopes of gathering additional data on the effect of helium on the mechanical and physical properties of vanadium structural materials. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was assigned the task of evaluating the feasibility of conducting another DHCE experiment by carefully evaluating the results obtained of the first DHCE experiment. This report summarizes the results of our evaluation and presents recommendations for consideration by the Materials Science Coordinators Organization.

  16. IN-DRIFT MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES MODEL VALIDATION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. Jolley

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to create the appropriate parameter input for MING 1.0 (CSCI 30018 V1.0, CRWMS M&O 1998b) that will allow the testing of the results from the MING software code with both scientific measurements of microbial populations at the site and laboratory and with natural analogs to the site. This set of calculations provides results that will be used in model validation for the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' model (CRWMS M&O 2000) which is part of the Engineered Barrier System Department (EBS) process modeling effort that eventually will feed future Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models. This calculation is being produced to replace MING model validation output that is effected by the supersession of DTN M09909SPAMINGl.003 using its replacement DTN M00106SPAIDMO 1.034 so that the calculations currently found in the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000) will be brought up to date. This set of calculations replaces the calculations contained in sections 6.7.2, 6.7.3 and Attachment I of CRWMS M&O (2000) As all of these calculations are created explicitly for model validation, the data qualification status of all inputs can be considered corroborative in accordance with AP-3.15Q. This work activity has been evaluated in accordance with the AP-2.21 procedure, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', and is subject to QA controls (BSC 2001). The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12 procedure, Calculations, and prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For EBS Department Modeling FY 01 Work Activities'' (BSC 200 1) which includes controls for the management of electronic data.

  17. Benchmark for evaluation and validation of reactor simulations (BEAVRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horelik, N.; Herman, B.; Forget, B.; Smith, K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in parallel computing have made possible the development of high-fidelity tools for the design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores, and such tools require extensive verification and validation. This paper introduces BEAVRS, a new multi-cycle full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) depletion benchmark based on two operational cycles of a commercial nuclear power plant that provides a detailed description of fuel assemblies, burnable absorbers, in-core fission detectors, core loading patterns, and numerous in-vessel components. This benchmark enables analysts to develop extremely detailed reactor core models that can be used for testing and validation of coupled neutron transport, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel isotopic depletion. The benchmark also provides measured reactor data for Hot Zero Power (HZP) physics tests, boron letdown curves, and three-dimensional in-core flux maps from fifty-eight instrumented assemblies. Initial comparisons between calculations performed with MIT's OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code and measured cycle 1 HZP test data are presented, and these results display an average deviation of approximately 100 pcm for the various critical configurations and control rod worth measurements. Computed HZP radial fission detector flux maps also agree reasonably well with the available measured data. All results indicate that this benchmark will be extremely useful in validation of coupled-physics codes and uncertainty quantification of in-core physics computational predictions. The detailed BEAVRS specification and its associated data package is hosted online at the MIT Computational Reactor Physics Group web site (http://crpg.mit.edu/), where future revisions and refinements to the benchmark specification will be made publicly available. (authors)

  18. Validation of the Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, Mark P [ORNL

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA) is an energy audit tool designed specifically to identify recommended weatherization measures for mobile homes as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program. A field validation of MHEA was performed using billing/delivery data collected on 86 mobile homes heated primarily by electricity, natural gas, or propane to assess the audit's accuracy and the validity of its recommendations. The validation found that MHEA overpredicts the annual space-heating energy savings of weatherization measures to be installed in mobile homes, which leads to low realization rates, primarily because of its large overprediction of annual pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption. However, MHEA's annual space-heating energy savings estimates and realization rates can be improved considerably using MHEA's built-in billing adjustment feature. In order to improve the accuracy of MHEA's annual space-heating energy savings estimates and realization rate, the cause of MHEA's overprediction of annual pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption needs to be further investigated and corrected. Although MHEA's billing adjustment feature improved MHEA's annual space-heating energy savings estimates, alternative methods of making the correction that may provide improved performance should be investigated. In the interim period before permanent improvements to MHEA can be made, the following recommendations should be followed: (a) do not enter into MHEA insulation thicknesses of 1 in. or less and especially zero (0 in.) unless such low levels have been verified through visual inspection of several parts of the envelope area in question; (b) use MHEA's billing adjustment feature to develop a list of recommended measures based on adjusted energy savings if possible, especially in mobile homes that have several major energy deficiencies; and (c) do not use MHEA's "evaluate duct sealing" option at this time (although certainly seal all duct leaks and use diagnostics as appropriate to find leakage sites and quantify improvements).

  19. Short Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katori, Teppei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Series of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments provided unexpected results, and now they are called short baseline anomalies, and all indicates an existence of sterile neutrinos with a mass scale around 1~eV. The signals of short baseline anomalies are reported from 4 different classes of experiments. However, at this moment, there is no convincing theoretical model to explain such sterile neutrinos, and a single experiment to confirm 1~eV sterile neutrinos may be challenging. In this short note, we describe classes of short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and their goals.

  20. Early strong interaction counter experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 17 /sup 0/ beam and some ..pi..-p two body scattering experiments run in the beginning years of the ZGS are discussed. (AIP)