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1

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: LIDAR of Newberry Volcano 2012

Jaffe, Todd

2

NESTED HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION AND LIDAR VALIDATION OF A LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NESTED HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION AND LIDAR VALIDATION OF A LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION by GIJS DE BOER local forcing. A wide range of scales is simulated using the nesting capability of the University

Eloranta, Edwin W.

3

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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4

Simple Doppler Wind Lidar adaptive observation experiments with 3D-Var and an ensemble Kalman filter in a global primitive equations model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the next few years, the first Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) will be deployed in space by the European Space1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Simple Doppler Wind Lidar adaptive Experiments, we compare several adaptive observation strategies designed to subsample Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL

Maryland at College Park, University of

5

Master thesis: "Validation of wake-simulation models based on long-range lidar measurements."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REpower 6M wind turbines with rotor blades of different designs installed in the Ellhöft/Westre wind farm developed by the wind turbine manufacturer. Work plan 2011 2012 Task 11 12 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 Figure 1: Simulation of lidar measurements in the wake of a wind turbine using a LES generated wind field

Peinke, Joachim

6

Experiments for foam model development and validation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F. (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rise-R.495 A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and Dose Models S. P. Nielsen* S Roskilde, Denmark May 1986 #12;RIS�-R-495 DOUBLE TRACER EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT Pollution Laboratory, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark Abstract. Two tracers

8

Lidar Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

Wollpert.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Validation studies using joint USDOE/PNC critical experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validation studies have been performed in the United States and Japan using the SCALE-2 computer code system with benchmark data obtained from 46 critical experiments. The experiments spanned the range of neutron spectra from a very undermoderated condition (H/Pu ratio = 22) to a very overmoderated condition (H/Pu ratio = 2220). The experiments are divided into four sets: (1) heterogeneous mixed-oxide fuel pin arrays moderated by organic and aqueous solutions, (2) limiting critical concentration experiments, (3) basic cylinder and slab geometries with various reflection conditions, and (4) annular cylinder with various fixed-geometry poisons. Based on computations performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the KENO code and a 27 energy-group cross-section library, the average calculated k-effective for the 46 experiments was found to be 1.004. Calculated k-effectives ranged from 0.991 to 1.018, and the standard deviation of these results was 0.006. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) staff have obtained similar k-effective results in their validation studies. The good agreement between experiment and calculation gives confidence that the calculation methods and cross-section data can be applied to similar plant conditions. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Smolen, G.R.; Whitesides, G.E.; Matsumoto, T.; Funabashi, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Measures of agreement between computation and experiment:validation metrics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increasing role of computational modeling in engineering design, performance estimation, and safety assessment, improved methods are needed for comparing computational results and experimental measurements. Traditional methods of graphically comparing computational and experimental results, though valuable, are essentially qualitative. Computable measures are needed that can quantitatively compare computational and experimental results over a range of input, or control, variables and sharpen assessment of computational accuracy. This type of measure has been recently referred to as a validation metric. We discuss various features that we believe should be incorporated in a validation metric and also features that should be excluded. We develop a new validation metric that is based on the statistical concept of confidence intervals. Using this fundamental concept, we construct two specific metrics: one that requires interpolation of experimental data and one that requires regression (curve fitting) of experimental data. We apply the metrics to three example problems: thermal decomposition of a polyurethane foam, a turbulent buoyant plume of helium, and compressibility effects on the growth rate of a turbulent free-shear layer. We discuss how the present metrics are easily interpretable for assessing computational model accuracy, as well as the impact of experimental measurement uncertainty on the accuracy assessment.

Barone, Matthew Franklin; Oberkampf, William Louis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Experiments for calibration and validation of plasticity and failure material modeling: 304L stainless steel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data for material plasticity and failure model calibration and validation were obtained from 304L stainless steel. Model calibration data were taken from smooth tension, notched tension, and compression tests. Model validation data were provided from experiments using thin-walled tube specimens subjected to path dependent combinations of internal pressure, extension, and torsion.

Lee, Kenneth L.; Korellis, John S.; McFadden, Sam X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Validation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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13

Bachelor thesis: "Validation of an engineering model of the near wake wind field of wind turbines based on nacelle based lidar measurements"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor thesis: "Validation of an engineering model of the near wake wind field of wind turbines, in an early stage of wind farm layout optimisation and wind turbine loading calculation in wind farms developed/validated indirectly. Mainly, based on power measurements of downstream wind turbines, instead

Peinke, Joachim

14

Validating  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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15

Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

Kogi, Y., E-mail: kogi@fit.ac.jp; Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-0811 (Japan); Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for MOX Fuel Based on the IFA-597 Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The IFA-597 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the thermal behavior of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and the effects of an annulus on fission gas release in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for MOX fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the first 20 time steps ( 6 GWd/MT(iHM)) for explicit comparison between the codes. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole, dish, and chamfer. The analysis demonstrated relative agreement for both solid (rod 1) and annular (rod 2) fuel in the experiment, demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for MOX fuel, while also revealing a small energy loss artifact in how gap conductance is currently handled in Exnihilo for chamfered fuel pellets. The within-pellet power shape was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for MOX fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

Phillippe, Aaron M [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Banfield, James E [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank by application to a well-controlled, large-scale tank experiment with 9 m length, 6 m width, and 4.5 m depth, and by data interpretation from a field-scale test. The tank experiment imitates an advection-influenced TRT

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

19

SAS4A validation and analysis of inpile experiments for slow ramp TOP's. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the licensing process for an LMFBR, the margins for safety are determined by considering many accident sequences that are within the design basis for the plant. However, to establish the safety margin beyond the design basis, also considered are accidents that have an extremely low probability of occurrence but the potential for significant consequences - such as hypothetical core-disruptive accidents (HCDAs). Assessments of the potential for HCDAs that would severely disrupt the reactor system and release radioactive material to the reactor containment (and possibly to the atmosphere) rely heavily on large-scale integrated computer codes such as SAS. The latest version of the SAS LMFBR accident analysis code, SAS4A, has recently been completed and released. One important activity which has been a part of SAS development is code validation for which a comprehensive plan has been formulated. Analysis of In Pile Experiments, mainly TREAT, form a large part of this.

Hill, D.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Recent validation experience with multigroup cross-section libraries and scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the results obtained and lessons learned from an extensive validation of new ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI multigroup cross-section libraries using analyses of critical experiments. The KENO V. a Monte Carlo code in version 4.3 of the SCALE computer code system was used to perform the critical benchmark calculations via the automated SCALE sequence CSAS25. The cross-section data were processed by the SCALE automated problem-dependent resonance-processing procedure included in this sequence. Prior to calling KENO V.a, CSAS25 accesses BONAMI to perform resonance self-shielding for nuclides with Bondarenko factors and NITAWL-II to process nuclides with resonance parameter data via the Nordheim Integral Treatment.

Bowman, S.M.; Wright, R.Q.; DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Petrie, L.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Monte Carlo validation experiments for the gas Cherenkov detectors at the National Ignition Facility and Omega  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas Cherenkov detectors at NIF and Omega measure several ICF burn characteristics by detecting multi-MeV nuclear ? emissions from the implosion. Of primary interest are ? bang-time (GBT) and burn width defined as the time between initial laser-plasma interaction and peak in the fusion reaction history and the FWHM of the reaction history respectively. To accurately calculate such parameters the collaboration relies on Monte Carlo codes, such as GEANT4 and ACCEPT, for diagnostic properties that cannot be measured directly. This paper describes a series of experiments performed at the High Intensity ? Source (HI?S) facility at Duke University to validate the geometries and material data used in the Monte Carlo simulations. Results published here show that model-driven parameters such as intensity and temporal response can be used with less than 50% uncertainty for all diagnostics and facilities.

Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J. [Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; McEvoy, A.; Caldwell, S. E. [Plasma Physics Department, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Department, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Grafil, E.; Stoeffl, W. [Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Milnes, J. S. [Photek Limited UK, 26 Castleham Road, St. Leonards-on-sea TN38 9NS (United Kingdom)] [Photek Limited UK, 26 Castleham Road, St. Leonards-on-sea TN38 9NS (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Experiments to populate and validate a processing model for polyurethane foam :  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing computational models to elucidate the expansion and dynamic filling process of a polyurethane foam, PMDI. The polyurethane of interest is chemically blown, where carbon dioxide is produced via the reaction of water, the blowing agent, and isocyanate. The isocyanate also reacts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. Here we detail the experiments needed to populate a processing model and provide parameters for the model based on these experiments. The model entails solving the conservation equations, including the equations of motion, an energy balance, and two rate equations for the polymerization and foaming reactions, following a simplified mathematical formalism that decouples these two reactions. Parameters for the polymerization kinetics model are reported based on infrared spectrophotometry. Parameters describing the gas generating reaction are reported based on measurements of volume, temperature and pressure evolution with time. A foam rheology model is proposed and parameters determined through steady-shear and oscillatory tests. Heat of reaction and heat capacity are determined through differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal conductivity of the foam as a function of density is measured using a transient method based on the theory of the transient plane source technique. Finally, density variations of the resulting solid foam in several simple geometries are directly measured by sectioning and sampling mass, as well as through x-ray computed tomography. These density measurements will be useful for model validation once the complete model is implemented in an engineering code.

Mondy, Lisa Ann; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Shelden, Bion; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Grillet, Anne; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Russick, Edward Mark; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hileman, Michael Bryan; Urquhart, Alexander; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Smith, David Michael

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The micropulse lidar (MPL) is a ground-based optical remote sensing system designed primarily to determine the altitude of clouds overhead. The physical principle is the same as for radar. Pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is infered. Besides real-time detection of clouds, post-processing of the lidar return can also characterize the extent and properties of aerosol or other particle-laden regions.

Mendoza, A; Flynn, C

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density between the 2003 and 2009 did not affect the biomass estimates. Overall, LiDAR data coupled with field reference data offer a powerful method for calculating pools and changes in aboveground carbon in forested systems. The results of our study suggest that multitemporal LiDAR-based approaches are likely to be useful for high quality estimates of aboveground carbon change in conifer forest systems.

Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Micro-chamber filling experiments for validation of macro models with applications in capillary driven microfluidics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of bubble formation during filling of microchambers is often critical for determining the efficacy of microfluidic devices in various applications. In this study experimental validation is performed to verify the predictions from a...

Gauntt, Stephen Byron

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

A validation study of existing neutronics tools against ZPPR-21 and ZPPR-15 critical experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was performed to validate the existing tools for fast reactor neutronics analysis against previous critical experiments. The six benchmark problems for the ZPPR-21 critical experiments phases A through F specified in the Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were analyzed. Analysis was also performed for three loading configurations of the ZPPR-15 Phase A experiments. As-built core models were developed in XYZ geometries using the reactor loading records and drawer master information. Detailed Monte Carlo and deterministic transport calculations were performed, along with various modeling sensitivity analyses. The Monte Carlo simulations were carried out with the VIM code with continuous energy cross sections based on the ENDF/B-V.2 data. For deterministic calculations, region-dependent 230-group cross sections were generated using the ETOE-2/MC-2/SDX code system, again based on the ENDF/B-V.2 data. Plate heterogeneity effects were taken into account by SDX unit cell calculations. Core calculations were performed with the TWODANT discrete ordinate code for the ZPPR-21 benchmarks, and with the DIF3D nodal transport option for the ZPPR-15 experiments. For all six ZPPR-21 configurations where the Pu-239 concentration varies from 0 to 49 w/o and the U-235 concentration accordingly varies from 62 to 0 w/o, the core multiplication factor determined with a 230-group TWODANT calculation agreed with the VIM Monte Carlo solution within 0.20 %{Delta}k, and there was no indication of any systematic bias. The quality of principal cross sections generated with the MC-2 code was comparable to that of VIM cross sections. The overall reactivity effect due to the errors in the 230-group principal cross sections was estimated to be less than 0.05 %{Delta}k. The statistics of the differences between calculated values and specified benchmark experimental values showed similar bias (from -0.28 %{Delta}k to 0.33 %{Delta}k) for MC{sup 2}-2/TWODANT and VIM. This result suggests that the criticality prediction accuracy of MC{sup 2}-2/TWODANT is comparable to VIM. Investigation of group collapsing methods showed that direct generation of broad-group cross sections from MC{sup 2}-2 calculations was not adequate for analysis of ZPPR-21 assemblies. Scalar flux weighting for all cross sections, including anisotropic cross sections, was not sufficiently accurate, either. The use of higher flux moments for anisotropic scattering cross section collapsing reproduced the fine-group results with broad-group calculations. The ZPPR-15 analyses, starting from detailed as-built plate geometries, showed that the plate heterogeneity effect was as large as 1.3 %{Delta}k. Through a series of sensitivity studies, a procedure to generate effective cross sections was developed based on one-dimensional SDX unit cell calculations. With this procedure to account for the plate heterogeneity effect, the core multiplication factor determined with a 230-group DIF3D nodal transport calculation agreed with the VIM Monte Carlo solution within 0.12 %{Delta}k. It was however observed that the calculated values consistently underestimated the criticality by 0.32 %{Delta}k to 0.43 %{Delta}k. The sodium void worths determined from VIM Monte Carlo and DIF3D nodal transport calculations were also very close to each other, but both predictions overestimated the measured void worth by {approx}0.1 %{Delta}k, which amounted to {approx}40% of the measured value. Further investigation is needed to identify the reason for this discrepancy between calculated and measured sodium void worths. In summary, for all nine core configurations of ZPPR-21 and ZPPR-15 analyzed in this study, the deterministic transport solutions showed good agreement with Monte Carlo results. These results indicate that the existing deterministic methods for multigroup cross section generation and core calculation are adequate to use in the initial design stage of Advanced Burner Reactors, for which the startup fuel is expected to be conventional plutonium fuel. However, further verifica

Yang, W.S.; Kim, S.J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reactivity loss validation of high burn-up PWR fuels with pile-oscillation experiments in MINERVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALIX experimental program relies on the experimental validation of the spent fuel inventory, by chemical analysis of samples irradiated in a PWR between 5 and 7 cycles, and also on the experimental validation of the spent fuel reactivity loss with bum-up, obtained by pile-oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor. These latter experiments provide an overall validation of both the fuel inventory and of the nuclear data responsible for the reactivity loss. This program offers also unique experimental data for fuels with a burn-up reaching 85 GWd/t, as spent fuels in French PWRs never exceeds 70 GWd/t up to now. The analysis of these experiments is done in two steps with the APOLLO2/SHEM-MOC/CEA2005v4 package. In the first one, the fuel inventory of each sample is obtained by assembly calculations. The calculation route consists in the self-shielding of cross sections on the 281 energy group SHEM mesh, followed by the flux calculation by the Method Of Characteristics in a 2D-exact heterogeneous geometry of the assembly, and finally a depletion calculation by an iterative resolution of the Bateman equations. In the second step, the fuel inventory is used in the analysis of pile-oscillation experiments in which the reactivity of the ALIX spent fuel samples is compared to the reactivity of fresh fuel samples. The comparison between Experiment and Calculation shows satisfactory results with the JEFF3.1.1 library which predicts the reactivity loss within 2% for burn-up of {approx}75 GWd/t and within 4% for burn-up of {approx}85 GWd/t. (authors)

Leconte, P.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Eschbach, R.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

30

Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

Newsom, RK

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Well-characterized open pool experiment data and analysis for model validation and development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four Well-Characterized Open Pool fires were conducted by Fire Science and Technology Department. The focus of the Well-Characterized Open Pool fire series was to provide environmental information for open pool fires on a physics first principal basis. The experiments measured the burning rate of liquid fuel in an open pool and the resultant heat flux to a weapon-sized object and the surrounding environment with well-characterized boundary and initial conditions. Results presented in this report include a general description of test observation (pre- and post-test), wind measurements, fire plume topology, average fuel recession and heat release rates, and incident heat flux to the pool and to the calorimeters. As expected, results of the experiments show a strong correlation between wind conditions, fuel vaporization (mass loss) rate, and incident heat flux to the fuel and ground surface and calorimeters. Numerical fire simulations using both temporally- and spatially-dependant wind boundary conditions were performed using the Vulcan fire code. Comparisons of data to simulation predictions showed similar trends; however, simulation-predicted incident heat fluxes were lower than measured.

Sundberg, David W.; Brown, Alexander L.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Post irradiation experiment analysis using the APOLLO2 deterministic tool. Validation of JEFF-3.1.1 thermal and epithermal actinides neutron induced cross sections through MELUSINE experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two different experiments performed in the 8 MWth MELUSINE experimental power pool reactor aimed at analyzing 1 GWd/t spent fuel pellets doped with several actinides. The goal was to measure the averaged neutron induced capture cross section in two very different neutron spectra (a PWR-like and an under-moderated one). This paper summarizes the combined deterministic APOLLO2-stochastic TRIPOLI4 analysis using the JEFF-3.1.1 European nuclear data library. A very good agreement is observed for most of neutron induced capture cross section of actinides and a clear underestimation for the {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}) as an accurate validation of its associated isomeric ratio are emphasized. Finally, a possible huge resonant fluctuation (factor of 2.7 regarding to the 1=0 resonance total orbital momenta) is suggested for isomeric ratio. (authors)

Bernard, D.; Fabbris, O. [CEA, DEN, SPRC, Laboratoire d'Etudes de Physique, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for UO2 Fuel Based on the IFA-432 Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IFA-432 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the effects of gap size, fuel density, and fuel densification on fuel centerline temperature in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for uranium dioxide (UO$_2$) fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the densification stage (2.2 \\unitfrac{GWd}{MT(UO$_{2}$)}). In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole. The analysis demonstrated excellent agreement for rods 1, 2, 3, and 5 (varying gap thicknesses and density with traditional fuel), demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for traditional fuel. For rod 6, which contained unstable fuel that densified an order of magnitude more than traditional, stable fuel, the magnitude of densification was over-predicted and the temperatures were outside of the experimental uncertainty. The radial power shape within the fuel was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures, whereas modeling the fuel at the thermocouple location as either annular or solid was relatively negligible. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for UO$_2$ fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

Phillippe, Aaron M [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Banfield, James E [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Hamilton, Steven P [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Master Thesis: Dual-Doppler technique applied to scanning lidars for the characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of single wind turbines for the validation or tuning of wake models [1]. Recent full-field campaigns showed the opportunity to apply ground based scanning lidar or radar measurements to evaluate the wind field in the wake the correlated wind field. The scope of this master thesis is to study the interaction of wakes on the basis

Peinke, Joachim

36

airborne oceanographic lidar: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Channels Landslides Spatial Cognition The emergence of airborne lidar data cognition and perception, we also explore the notion that the ongoing use of lidar enables...

37

University of Wisconsin High Spectral Lidar operations during MPACE: Examples of AHSRL-MMCR particle size retrievals E.W.Eloranta, I.A.Razenkov, J.P.Garcia, and J.P.Hedrick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where valid lidar and radar measurements were obtained. 6) Lidar and radar data were averaged and altitude bins.Measurements within 6 dBZ of the radar's minimum detectable reflectivity are removed along signal-to-noise level can also be specified to exclude noisy data points AHSRL data was used extensively

Eloranta, Edwin W.

38

Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

Ferrare, R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

FERRARE,R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Validation of the BERT Point Source Inversion Scheme Using the Joint Urban 2003 Tracer Experiment Dataset - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A terrorist attack in a U.S. city utilizing biological weapons could have severe consequences. A biological agent could be aerosolized and emitted into the air in the middle of a city, invisibly traveling with the winds, and dosing an unknowing populace. The magnitude of the problem would only be revealed as sick people started arriving several days later at hospitals with symptoms, many already too ill to be saved. A national program has deployed a network of biological agent collectors in U.S. cities to provide early detection of a bio-weapon attack, thereby hastening medical intervention and potentially saving many thousands of lives. In fact, the most effective treatment takes place prior to infection or in its early stages and early warning might reduce the disease progression and, consequently, the possibility of an outbreak. If a biological attack were to occur in a city, one or more collectors may register hits with specific dosages and the city would be alerted that an attack had taken place. This piece of information alone, however, would not be enough to determine how serious the attack was, i.e., how much biological agent was released into the air and where the bio-plume traveled. The first responders and public health communities will want to know what regions were impacted, how many persons might get sick, which people most need medical supplies, and where to clean up. The law enforcement community will want to look for forensic evidence at the release location. The Bio-Agent Event Reconstruction Tool (BERT) has been developed in order to recreate what might have happened during an airborne biological agent attack based on biological agent collector measurements and wind collectors mounted around a city. The tool can be used to estimate possible release areas while eliminating other areas, and can estimate bounds on the amount of material released. The tool can then be used to project forward from the possible source areas to estimate potential hazard zones. Due to a unique source inversion technique - called the upwind collector footprint approach - the tool runs fast and the source regions can be determined in a few minutes. In this report, we provide an overview of the BERT framework, followed by a description of the source inversion technique. The Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment held in Oklahoma City that was used to validate BERT is then described. Subsequent sections describe the metrics used for evaluation, the comparison of the experimental data and BERT output, and under what conditions the BERT tool succeeds and performs poorly. Results are aggregated in different ways (e.g., daytime vs. nighttime releases, 1 vs. 2 vs. 3 hit collectors) to determine if BERT shows any systematic errors. Finally, recommendations are given for how to improve the code and procedures for optimizing performance in operational mode.

Brambilla, Sara [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SIMULTANEOUS AND COMMON-VOLUME LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE MESOSPHERIC FE AND NA LAYERS AT BOULDER (40N, 105W)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inputs can reproduce some large-scale characteristics but are challenged in simulating small- scale the general structures more precisely as well as simulating the challenging small scale features. In Aug. The Fe Boltzmann temperature lidar was under upgrading and validating at Boulder before its deployment

Chu, Xinzhao

42

LIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Lake-Induced Convection Experiments (Lake-ICE), on December 21, 1997 the University of Wisconsin VolumeLIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT G circulation over Lake Michigan. Backscatter returns revealed a steady offshore flow extending 1.5 to 4 km

Eloranta, Edwin W.

43

Improved forecasts of extreme weather events by future space borne Doppler wind lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive areas. To answer these questions simulation experiments with state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) models have proved great value to test future meteorological observing systems a prioriImproved forecasts of extreme weather events by future space borne Doppler wind lidar Gert

Marseille, Gert-Jan

44

Lidar characterization of crystalline silica generation and gravel plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lidar vertical pro?les and wind speed data were used toof wind speed and concentration (based on lidar verticalvertical plane at a given height, z, was calculated as the product of the wind speed

Trzepla-Nabaglo, K.; Shiraki, R.; Holm'en, B. A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Verification and validation of the maximum entropy method for reconstructing neutron flux, with MCNP5, Attila-7.1.0 and the GODIVA experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification and validation of reconstructed neutron flux based on the maximum entropy method is presented in this paper. The verification is carried out by comparing the neutron flux spectrum from the maximum entropy method with Monte Carlo N Particle 5 version 1.40 (MCNP5) and Attila-7.1.0-beta (Attila). A spherical 100% 235U critical assembly is modeled as the test case to compare the three methods. The verification error range for the maximum entropy method is 15–21% where MCNP5 is taken to be the comparison standard. Attila relative error for the critical assembly is 20–35%. Validation is accomplished by comparing a neutron flux spectrum that is back calculated from foil activation measurements performed in the GODIVA experiment (GODIVA). The error range of the reconstructed flux compared to GODIVA is 0–10%. The error range of the neutron flux spectrum from MCNP5 compared to GODIVA is 0–20% and the Attila error range compared to the GODIVA is 0–35%. The maximum entropy method is shown to be a fast reliable method, compared to either Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) or 30 multienergy group methods (Attila) and with respect to the GODIVA experiment.

Douglas S. Crawford; Tony Saad; Terry A. Ring

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Macrophysical Properties of Tropical Cirrus Clouds from the CALIPSO Satellite and from Ground-based Micropulse and Raman Lidars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and In- frared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while the MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cy- cle is significantly different than zero only below about 11 km; where it is the opposite sign (i.e. more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geomet- rical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both datasets have signficantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the vast im- provement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds as well as a valuable ground-based lidar dataset for the validation of CALIPSO observations and to help im- prove our understanding of tropical cirrus clouds.

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, D.; Turner, David D.

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

Ferrare, Richard

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

Ferrare, Richard

49

An Attempt to Calibrate and Validate a Simple Ductile Failure Model Against Axial-Torsion Experiments on Al 6061-T651.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details a work in progress. We have attempted to calibrate and validate a Von Mises plasticity model with the Johnson-Cook failure criterion ( Johnson & Cook , 1985 ) against a set of experiments on various specimens of Al 6061-T651. As will be shown, the effort was not successful, despite considerable attention to detail. When the model was com- pared against axial-torsion experiments on tubes, it over predicted failure by 3 x in tension, and never predicted failure in torsion, even when the tube was twisted by 4 x further than the experiment. While this result is unfortunate, it is not surprising. Ductile failure is not well understood. In future work, we will explore whether more sophisticated material mod- els of plasticity and failure will improve the predictions. Selecting the appropriate advanced material model and interpreting the results of said model are not trivial exercises, so it is worthwhile to fully investigate the behavior of a simple plasticity model before moving on to an anisotropic yield surface or a similarly complicated model.

Reedlunn, Benjamin; Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Systematic Sampling of Scanning Lidar Swaths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Popescu Proof of concept lidar research has, to date, examined wall-to-wall models of forest ecosystems. While these studies have been important for verifying lidars efficacy for forest surveys, complete coverage is likely not the most cost effective... year of my graduate studies. Also, to Jin Zhu and the other members of the Aerial Photography project at the Texas Forest Service for opening my eyes to the practical uses of GIS and remote sensing, their encouragement for me to obtain a graduate...

Marcell, Wesley Tyler

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lidar backscattered signal is a useful tool for identifying vertical cloud structure in the atmosphere in optically thin clouds. Cloud boundaries derived from lidar signals are a necessary input for popular ARM data products, such as the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) product. An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been implemented for use with the ARM Micropulse Lidar (MPL) systems. In addition to retrieving cloud boundaries above 500 m, the value-added product (VAP) named Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask (MPLCMASK) applies lidar-specific corrections (i.e., range-square, background, deadtime, and overlap) as described in Campbell et al. (2002) to the measured backscattered lidar. Depolarization ratio is computed using the methodology developed by Flynn et al. (2007) for polarization-capable MPL systems. The cloud boundaries output from MPLCMASK will be the primary lidar cloud mask for input to the ARSCL product and will be applied to all MPL systems, including historical data sets.

Sivaraman, C; Comstock, J

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

Elements of a pragmatic approach for dealing with bias and uncertainty in experiments through predictions : experiment design and data conditioning; %22real space%22 model validation and conditioning; hierarchical modeling and extrapolative prediction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explores some important considerations in devising a practical and consistent framework and methodology for utilizing experiments and experimental data to support modeling and prediction. A pragmatic and versatile 'Real Space' approach is outlined for confronting experimental and modeling bias and uncertainty to mitigate risk in modeling and prediction. The elements of experiment design and data analysis, data conditioning, model conditioning, model validation, hierarchical modeling, and extrapolative prediction under uncertainty are examined. An appreciation can be gained for the constraints and difficulties at play in devising a viable end-to-end methodology. Rationale is given for the various choices underlying the Real Space end-to-end approach. The approach adopts and refines some elements and constructs from the literature and adds pivotal new elements and constructs. Crucially, the approach reflects a pragmatism and versatility derived from working many industrial-scale problems involving complex physics and constitutive models, steady-state and time-varying nonlinear behavior and boundary conditions, and various types of uncertainty in experiments and models. The framework benefits from a broad exposure to integrated experimental and modeling activities in the areas of heat transfer, solid and structural mechanics, irradiated electronics, and combustion in fluids and solids.

Romero, Vicente Jose

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne lidar measurements Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

airborne INSAR is 2-5 m over... . However, LIDAR has potential as a complementary measurement to INSAR. The LIDAR data used in this study... estimate and the adjacent LIDAR ......

54

Lidar techniques for search and rescue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four techniques for using LIDAR in Search and Rescue Operations will be discussed. The topic will include laser retroreflection, laser-induced fluorescence in the visible, laser-induced fluorescence during daylight hours, and laser-induced fluorescence in the uv. These techniques use high-repetition rate lasers at a variety of frequencies to induce either fluorescence in dye markers or retroreflection from plastic corner cubes on life preservers and other emergency markers.

Cabral, W.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ris-PhD-Report Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAs;#12;Author: Ferhat Bingöl Title: Complex terrain and wind lidars Division: Wind Energy Division Risø-PhD-52 and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated

56

EN-025 Tools & Applications December 2008 Lidar Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IS LIDAR? Lidar (light detection and ranging system) is a relatively new type of active remote sensing are small-footprint, discrete return systems that record two to five returns for each emitted laser pulse fashion as an aerial photography camera. · An inertial measurement unit that records the pitch, yaw

57

Ris {R{1127(EN) Lidar data used in the COFIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.1 Generation of arti cial smoke 7 4 Data processing 8 4.1 The lidar equation 8 4.2 Backscatter, see below. In FLADIS the smoke were added to an initial heavy gas plume. 2 Experimental design Figures response. However, the Lidar does have a averaging volume due to the leng

58

Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvanExecutiveSRD-13Experiences with

59

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

60

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

62

ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

63

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

64

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

65

Raman lidar and MPL Measurements during ALIVE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323Program2Raftopoulos takesBridges.Raman lidar

66

Micropulse Lidar The ARM Program studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1 Micropulse Lidar The ARM Program

67

Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Atmospheric Data, Images, and Animations from Lidar Instruments used by the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Space Science and Engineering Center is a research and development center affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Graduate School. Its primary focus is on geophysical research and technology to enhance understanding of the atmosphere of Earth, the other planets in the Solar System, and the cosmos. SSEC develops new observing tools for spacecraft, aircraft, and ground-based platforms, and models atmospheric phenomena. The Center receives, manages and distributes huge amounts of geophysical data and develops software to visualize and manipulate these data for use by researchers and operational meteorologists all over the world.[Taken from About SSEC at http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/overview/] A huge collection of data products, images, and animations comes to the SSEC from the University of Wisconsin Lidar Group. Contents of this collection include: • An archive of thousands of Lidar images acquired before 2004 • Arctic HSRL, MMCR, PAERI, MWR, Radiosonde, and CRAS forecast data Data after May 1, 2004 • MPEG animations and Lidar Multiple Scattering Models

69

airborne lidar mapping: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A minimum height of 1 m was applied to define woody understorey. Critical to this process were a Digital Terrain Model (extracted from the leaf-off last return LiDAR data)...

70

URBAN MODELING FROM LIDAR DATA IN AN INTEGRATED GIS ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are analyzed and possible solutions are proposed by fusing lidar data with other image data. Study shows: it allows rapid generation large-scale DTM (digital terrain model); is daylight independent; is relatively

Shan, Jie

71

absorption lidar dial: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic Index 1 Development of an eye-safe diode-laser-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (MP-dial) for atmospheric water-vapor and aerosol studies. Open Access Theses...

72

A motor drive control system for the Lidar Polarimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A MOTOR DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LIDAR POLARIMETER A Thesis by Waiming Leung Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A/M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF, May 1977 Major... Subject: Electrical Engineering A MOTOR DRIVE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE LIDAR POLARIMETER A Thesis by Waiming Leung Approved as to style and content by: Chairman o Comm' ee ea o epartment Member Mem er May 1977 ABSTRACT A Motor Drive Control...

Leung, Waiming

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Verification and validation benchmarks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of achievement in V&V activities, how closely related the V&V benchmarks are to the actual application of interest, and the quantification of uncertainties related to the application of interest.

Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

SANSMIC Validation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SANSMIC is solution mining software that was developed and utilized by SNL in its role as geotechnical advisor to the US DOE SPR for planning purposes. Three SANSMIC leach modes - withdrawal, direct, and reverse leach - have been revalidated with multiple test cases for each mode. The withdrawal mode was validated using high quality data from recent leach activity while the direct and reverse modes utilized data from historical cavern completion reports. Withdrawal results compared very well with observed data, including the location and size of shelves due to string breaks with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 10% and relative radius differences from 1.5 - 3%. Profile comparisons for the direct mode were very good with relative leached volume differences ranging from 6 - 12% and relative radius differences from 5 - 7%. First, second, and third reverse configurations were simulated in order to validate SANSMIC over a range of relative hanging string and OBI locations. The first-reverse was simulated reasonably well with relative leached volume differences ranging from 1 - 9% and relative radius differences from 5 - 12%. The second-reverse mode showed the largest discrepancies in leach profile. Leached volume differences ranged from 8 - 12% and relative radius differences from 1 - 10%. In the third-reverse, relative leached volume differences ranged from 10 - 13% and relative radius differences were ~4 %. Comparisons to historical reports were quite good, indicating that SANSMIC is essentially the same as documented and validated in the early 1980's.

Weber, Paula D.; Rudeen, David Keith; Lord, David

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mapping surface fuels using LIDAR and multispectral data fusion for fire behavior modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, LIDAR derived data provides accurate estimates of surface fuel parameters efficiently and accurately over extensive areas of forests. This study demonstrates the importance of using accurate maps of fuel models derived using new LIDAR remote sensing...

Mutlu, Muge

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal densities; therefore, geospatial analysis, when applied to decadal lidar time series, needs to address

Mitasova, Helena

78

Alternate spatial sampling approaches for ecosystem structure inventory using spaceborne lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in aircraft lidar remote sensing where power, heat, and reliability are less of a concern since January 2011 Accepted 29 January 2011 Available online 23 March 2011 Keywords: Lidar Remote sensing Laser collected in transects and should be considered for future lidar remote sensing missions. © 2011 Elsevier

Lefsky, Michael

79

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

80

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

82

ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

83

Monte-Carlo Simulation of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of Neutral Beam Ions and Effects on MHD Stability: Validation With Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimentally, during fast wave (FW) radio frequency (rf) heating in DIII-D L-mode discharges, strong acceleration of neutral beam (NB) deuterium beam ions has been observed. Significant effects on the n/m = 1/1 sawtooth stability are also seen. Simulations using the Monte-Carlo Hamiltonian code ORBIT-RF, coupled to the TORIC full wave code, predict beam ion tails up to a few hundred keV, in agreement with the experiment. The simulations and experiment both clearly show a much greater efficiency for 4th harmonic FW heating than for 8th harmonic heating. Simple analyses of the kinetic contribution to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) potential energy from energetic beam ions generated by FW heating yields reasonable consistency with the observations. A more detailed analysis shows a more complicated picture, however. Other physics effects such as geometry, plasma rotation, and the presence of a free boundary, play a significant role.

Chan, V. S.; Turnbull, A. D.; Choi, M.; Chu, M. S.; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbine-mounted lidars provide preview measurements of the incoming wind field. By reducing loads on critical components and increasing the potential power extracted from the wind, the performance of wind turbine controllers can be improved [2]. As a result, integrating a light detection and ranging (lidar) system has the potential to lower the cost of wind energy. This paper presents an evaluation of turbine-mounted lidar availability. Availability is a metric which measures the proportion of time the lidar is producing controller-usable data, and is essential when a wind turbine controller relies on a lidar. To accomplish this, researchers from Avent Lidar Technology and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory first assessed and modeled the effect of extreme atmospheric events. This shows how a multirange lidar delivers measurements for a wide variety of conditions. Second, by using a theoretical approach and conducting an analysis of field feedback, we investigated the effects of the lidar setup on the wind turbine. This helps determine the optimal lidar mounting position at the back of the nacelle, and establishes a relationship between availability, turbine rpm, and lidar sampling time. Lastly, we considered the role of the wind field reconstruction strategies and the turbine controller on the definition and performance of a lidar's measurement availability.

Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon, M.; Vercherin, B.; Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Ris-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the spinner axis's vertical tilt and the wind turbine's yaw relative to the mean wind speed direction: Data Files 54 Appendix B: Wind Speed Vertical Profile 55 Appendix C: Sonic Cup Comparison 59Risø-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a Rotating Spinner: "SpinnerEx 2009" Nikolas

88

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

Kerekes, John

89

Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars James Whiteway,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cameron Dickinson,1 Leonce Komguem,1 and Clive Cook1 Received 30 August 2007; revised 9 March 2008 of backscattered laser light from airborne dust and clouds. These observations will be coordinated with solar, and C. Cook (2008), Lidar on the Phoenix mission to Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E00A08, doi:10

Duck, Thomas J.

90

absorption lidar performance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption lidar performance First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a...

91

absorption lidar sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption lidar sensitivity First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a...

92

absorption lidar system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

absorption lidar system First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Development of a differential...

93

INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

101 INTEGRATED LIDAR & PHOTOGRAMMETRIC DOCUMENTATION OF THE RED GULCH DINOSAUR TRACKSITE (WYOMING Resource Technology Section, National Operations Center, Bu- reau of Land Management, Bldg. 50 Denver, CO of successful schemes is testament to the advances made in attitudes and approaches to fossil site management

Falkingham, Peter

94

Assessment and Optimization of Lidar Measurement Availability for Wind Turbine Control (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating Lidar to improve wind turbine controls is a potential breakthrough for reducing the cost of wind energy. By providing undisturbed wind measurements up to 400m in front of the rotor, Lidar may provide an accurate update of the turbine inflow with a preview time of several seconds. Focusing on loads, several studies have evaluated potential reductions using integrated Lidar, either by simulation or full scale field testing.

Scholbrock, F. A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Davoust, S.; Jehu, A.; Bouillet, M.; Bardon M.; Vercherin, B.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Conference: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint Citation Details In-Document...

96

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

97

Comparison of temperature and humidity profiles with elastic-backscatter lidar data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution analyzes elastic-backscatter lidar data and temperature and humidity profiles from radiosondes acquired in Barcelona in July 1992. Elastic-backscatter lidar data reveal the distribution of aerosols within the volume of atmosphere scanned. By comparing this information with temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere at a similar time, we are able to asses de relationship among aerosol distribution and atmospheric stability or water content, respectively. Comparisons have shown how lidar`s revealed layers of aerosols correspond to atmospheric layers with different stability condition and water content.

Soriano, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buttler, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baldasano, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Informational validity of Fechtner's experiments outcomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paper also focuses on the significance of the used investigation method and its influence onto research results. ... white rectangles with ratios of sides from 1:1 to 2:5 were presented to all the participants of. “Fechner's .... Final discussion. Summarizing .... http://plus.maths.org/issue22/features/golden/2pdf/index.html/op.

David

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ARM: ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

102

LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights Alfredo Peña1 , Sven at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm. The influence of atmospheric stability on the surface layer wind shear: Charnock, LiDAR, Marine boundary layer, Offshore, Surface layer, Wind profile. 1 Introduction There is

103

Turbine Reliability and Operability Optimization through the use of Direct Detection Lidar Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this Department of Energy (DOE) project is to increase wind turbine efficiency and reliability with the use of a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system. The LIDAR provides wind speed and direction data that can be used to help mitigate the fatigue stress on the turbine blades and internal components caused by wind gusts, sub-optimal pointing and reactionary speed or RPM changes. This effort will have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs of turbines across the industry. During the course of the project, Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) modified and tested a prototype direct detection wind LIDAR instrument; the resulting LIDAR design considered all aspects of wind turbine LIDAR operation from mounting, assembly, and environmental operating conditions to laser safety. Additionally, in co-operation with our partners, the National Renewable Energy Lab and the Colorado School of Mines, progress was made in LIDAR performance modeling as well as LIDAR feed forward control system modeling and simulation. The results of this investigation showed that using LIDAR measurements to change between baseline and extreme event controllers in a switching architecture can reduce damage equivalent loads on blades and tower, and produce higher mean power output due to fewer overspeed events. This DOE project has led to continued venture capital investment and engagement with leading turbine OEMs, wind farm developers, and wind farm owner/operators.

Johnson, David K; Lewis, Matthew J; Pavlich, Jane C; Wright, Alan D; Johnson, Kathryn E; Pace, Andrew M

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Geospatial revolution and remote sensing LiDAR in Mesoamerican archaeology Arlen F. Chasea,1. The impor- tance of this geospatial innovation is demonstrated with newly acquired LiDAR data from in the remote geospatial imaging of cultural landscapes, including ancient communities and their anthropogenic

Weishampel, John F.

105

A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new cloud and aerosol layer detection method based on micropulse lidar measurements Chuanfeng algorithm to detect aerosols and clouds based on micropulse lidar measurements. A semidiscretization is then introduced. Combined with empirical threshold values, we determine if the signal waves indicate clouds

Li, Zhanqing

106

Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Residential Urban Areas from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou and Ulrich models for residential areas from aerial LiDAR scans. The key differ- ence between downtown area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually contains rich vegetation. Thus, we propose a robust

Shahabi, Cyrus

107

Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually con- tains rich vegetation. Thus representing the 3D urban reality of residential areas. Keywords: urban modeling, LiDAR, residential area

Shahabi, Cyrus

108

Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report A Protat  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser TheLessons LearnedLibraryTeamingLidar

109

High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the “grand tour” of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004. More specifically, our major achievements for ARM include 1. Development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) to function like a satellite on the ground for ARM, providing a steady stream of accurately calibrated spectral radiances for Science Team clear sky and cloud applications (Knuteson et al. 2004a), 2. Detailed radiometric calibration and characterization of AERI radiances, with uncertainty estimates established from complete error analyses and proven by inter-comparison tests (Knuteson et al. 2004b), 3. AERI data quality assessment and maintenance over the extended time frames needed to support ARM (Dedecker et al., 2005) 4. Key role in the radiative transfer model improvements from the AERI/LBLRTM QME (Turner et al. 2004) and AERI-ER especially from the SHEBA experiment (Tobin et al. 1999), 5. Contributed scientific and programmatic leadership leading to significant water vapor accuracy improvements and uncertainty assessments for the low to mid troposphere (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003), 6. Leadership of the ARM assessment of the accuracy of water vapor observations from radiosondes, Raman Lidar and in situ aircraft observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (Tobin et al. 2002, Ferrare et al. 2004), 7. New techniques for characterizing clouds from AERI (DeSlover et al. 1999, Turner 2003b, Turner et al. 2003b), 8. Initial design and development of the Scanning-HIS aircraft instrument and application to ARM UAV Program missions (Revercomb et al. 2005), and 9. Coordinated efforts leading to the use of ARM observations as a key validation tool for the high resolution Atmospheric IR Sounder on the NASA Aqua platform (Tobin et al. 2005a) 10. Performed ARM site and global clear sky radiative closure studies that shows closure of top-of-atmosphere flux at the level of ~1 W/m2 (Moy et al 2008 and Section 3 of this appendix) 11. Performed studies to characterize SGP site cirrus cloud property retrievals and assess impacts on computed fluxes and heating rate profiles (Borg et al. 2008 and Section 2 of this appendix).

Henry Revercomb, David Tobin, Robert Knuteson, Lori Borg, Leslie Moy

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement Shuang Gao,1,2 Maurice O’Sullivan,3 and Rongqing Hui2,* 1Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Science, University of Science and Technology of China... lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in- phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation...

Gao, Shuang; Sullivan, Maurice O.; Hui, Rongqing

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Roll-up of validation results to a target application.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suites of experiments are preformed over a validation hierarchy to test computational simulation models for complex applications. Experiments within the hierarchy can be performed at different conditions and configurations than those for an intended application, with each experiment testing only part of the physics relevant for the application. The purpose of the present work is to develop methodology to roll-up validation results to an application, and to assess the impact the validation hierarchy design has on the roll-up results. The roll-up is accomplished through the development of a meta-model that relates validation measurements throughout a hierarchy to the desired response quantities for the target application. The meta-model is developed using the computation simulation models for the experiments and the application. The meta-model approach is applied to a series of example transport problems that represent complete and incomplete coverage of the physics of the target application by the validation experiments.

Hills, Richard Guy

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Verification and Validation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

include modeling simulation (which is a form of Test, Demonstration, and Analysis). INL system engineers specialize in helping projects through the Verification and Validation...

113

Validated SCR Concept Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* CAE package study (urea tank, exhaust line) * Kinetic aftertreatment modeling (1D -> 3D) -> Validated model chain SCR concept development: * Optimization of SCR concept: *...

114

Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and Backscatter Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison of mineral dust aerosol retrievals from two instruments, MODIS and CALIPSO lidar. And, we implement and evaluate a new mineral dust detection algorithm based on the analysis of thin dust radiative signature. In comparison, three commonly used...

Cho, Hyoun-Myoung

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Accessing the Energy Department’s Lidar Buoy Data off Virginia Beach  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In December 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) deployed the Energy Department’s floating lidar buoy off of Virginia Beach, Virginia, in less than 30 meters (m) of water,...

116

SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a...

117

Development of a lidar polarimeter technique of measuring suspended solids in water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W. PRESLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject; Electrical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE OF MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER A Thesis by DAVID W, PRESLEY Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committee H d of Department...

Presley, David W

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when ? approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Model Validation Status Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M&O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and engineered barriers, plus the TSPA model itself Description of the model areas is provided in Section 3, and the documents reviewed are described in Section 4. The responsible manager for the Model Validation Status Review was the Chief Science Officer (CSO) for Bechtel-SAIC Co. (BSC). The team lead was assigned by the CSO. A total of 32 technical specialists were engaged to evaluate model validation status in the 21 model areas. The technical specialists were generally independent of the work reviewed, meeting technical qualifications as discussed in Section 5.

E.L. Hardin

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

120

Technology Validation Sig Gronich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, validate stationary fuel cell and hydrogen ICE systems that co- produce hydrogen and electricity from non electrolyzer to hydrogen system to produce hydrogen for $3.30/kg at the plant gate (untaxed and unpressurized

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Deriving a Framework for Estimating Individual Tree Measurements with Lidar for Use in the TAMBEETLE Southern Pine Beetle Infestation Growth Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. TAMBEETLE was used to compare spot growth between a lidar-derived forest map and a forest map generated by TAMBEETLE, based on sample plot characteristics. The lidar-derived forest performed comparably to the TAMBEETLE generated forest. Using lidar to map...

Stukey, Jared D.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

122

Criticality Safety Code Validation with LWBR’s SB Cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first set of critical experiments from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Program included eight, simple geometry critical cores built with 233UO2-ZrO2, 235UO2-ZrO2, ThO2, and ThO2-233UO2 nuclear materials. These cores are evaluated, described, and modeled to provide benchmarks and validation information for INEEL criticality safety calculation methodology. In addition to consistency with INEEL methodology, benchmark development and nuclear data are consistent with International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project methodology.Section 1 of this report introduces the experiments and the reason they are useful for validating some INEEL criticality safety calculations. Section 2 provides detailed experiment descriptions based on currently available experiment reports. Section 3 identifies criticality safety validation requirement sources and summarizes requirements that most affect this report. Section 4 identifies relevant hand calculation and computer code calculation methodologies used in the experiment evaluation, benchmark development, and validation calculations. Section 5 provides a detailed experiment evaluation. This section identifies resolutions for currently unavailable and discrepant information. Section 5 also reports calculated experiment uncertainty effects. Section 6 describes the developed benchmarks. Section 6 includes calculated sensitivities to various benchmark features and parameters. Section 7 summarizes validation results. Appendices describe various assumptions and their bases, list experimenter calculations results for items that were independently calculated for this validation work, report other information gathered and developed by SCIENTEC personnel while evaluating these same experiments, and list benchmark sample input and miscellaneous supplementary data.

Putman, Valerie Lee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Introduction As part of the LAKE-ICE experiment the University of Wisconsin Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction As part of the LAKE-ICE experiment the University of Wisconsin Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL) observed a land-breeze circulation along the western shore of Lake Michigan. During the classic structure of a density current along with gravity waves forced by the front. The University

Eloranta, Edwin W.

124

Remote control and telescope auto-alignment system for multiangle LIDAR under development at CEILAP, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET), a multiangle LIDAR is under development to monitor aerosol extinction coefficients in the frame of the CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) Project. This is an initiative to build the next generation of ground-based instruments to collect very high energy gamma-ray radiation (>10 GeV). The atmospheric conditions are very important for CTA observations, and LIDARs play an important role in the measurement of the aerosol optical depth at any direction. The LIDAR being developed at CEILAP was conceived to operate in harsh environmental conditions during the shifts, and these working conditions may produce misalignments. To minimize these effects, the telescopes comprising the reception unit are controlled by a self-alignment system. This paper describes the self-alignment method and hardware automation.

Pallotta, Juan; Otero, Lidia; Chouza, Fernando; Raul, Delia; Gonzalez, Francisco; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Quel, Eduardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Primer on Validation and Accreditation D. E. Stevenson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, examples being nuclear winter and the maintenance of the U. S. nuclear weapons stockpile. While the above time you trip and fall, you are performing one more experiment 1 #12; which validates the universal law

Hallstrom, Jason

126

Draft: A Primer on Validation and Accreditation D. E. Stevenson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or completely impossible to carry out: nuclear winter and the maintenance of the U. S. nuclear weapons stockpile, you are performing one more experiment which validates the universal law of gravity. Due

Stevenson, D. E. "Steve"

127

Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radionuclide migration laboratory studies for validation of batch sorption data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advective and diffusive migration experiments (within the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project) involve utilizing crushed material, intact, and fractured tuff in order to test and improve (if necessary) transport models by experimentally observing the migration of sorbing and non-sorbing radionuclides on a laboratory scale. Performing a validation of the sorption data obtained with batch techniques (within the Batch Sorption Study) is an integral part of the mission of the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies. In this paper the work scope of the radionuclide migration laboratory experiments (as they apply to validation of batch sorption data) is reviewed.

Triay, I.R.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

CIPS Validation Data Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

Nam Dinh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Validating Energy Measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13-14, 1994 Table 1 _. Measurement Schedule Description Type of Measurement Tool Raw Material Input Throughput rate Company hourly record Product Output Throughput rale Company hourly record Extruder Drive Demand and Energy kW and kWh meter... MEASUREMENTS The energy measurements are as important to a business decision maker as valid news sources are to the chief editor of a newspaper. The energy measurements become all the more important in industrial audits because of the following...

Chari, S.; Thomas, D.

131

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass and Bioenergy 31 (2007) 646­655 Estimating biomass of individual pine trees using airborne biomass and bio-energy feedstocks. The overall goal of this study was to develop a method for assessing aboveground biomass and component biomass for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings

132

Using LIDAR in Highway Rock Cuts Norbert H. Maerz, Ph. D., P. Eng,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the data needed to begin the process of modeling the rock raveling process. INTRODUCTION LIDAR damage, injury, and even death. Highways impeded by even small spills of rock material by blasting techniques to facilitate the highway construction. A constant danger to the motoring public

Maerz, Norbert H.

133

Measuring forest structure and biomass in New England forest stands using Echidna ground-based lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring forest structure and biomass in New England forest stands using Echidna ground Accepted 12 March 2010 Available online 14 May 2011 Keywords: Ground-based lidar Forest structure Biomass biomass with very good accuracy in six New England hardwood and conifer forest stands. Comparing forest

Ni-Meister, Wenge

134

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIDAR measurements of wind turbine wake dyn_amics and comparison with an engineering model 1 dynamics, lIre performed at four diameters behind a 95 kW wind turbine. The wake 111eaeasurement technique allows esti111ation of qUClsiinstantancou~ two dimensional wind fields in an area

135

A geometric framework for channel network extraction from lidar: Nonlinear diffusion and geodesic paths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A geometric framework for channel network extraction from lidar: Nonlinear diffusion and geodesic extraction. Following this preprocessing, channels are defined as curves of minimal effort, or geodesics and geodesic paths, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F01002, doi:10.1029/2009JF001254. 1. Introduction [2] The detection

Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

136

Topographic accuracy assessment of bare earth lidar-derived unstructured meshes Matthew V. Bilskie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Shallow water equations Unstructured mesh Lidar DEM Storm surge Accuracy a b s t r a c t This study water equations model. A methodology is developed to compute root mean square error (RMSE) and the 95th, urban regions, etc.) and have coarse mesh resolution in areas outside the focus region (e.g. deep water

Central Florida, University of

137

Metal uorescence lidar (light detection and ranging) and the middle atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lidar takes advantage of the naturally occurring sodium atoms between 80 and 110 km above sea level (the though it is exposed to constant solar radiation. The hope of explaining a region strongly coupled as the `-pause' of the layer below them (see ®gure 1). Radiative absorption and emission are dominating eects

138

Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingöl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike Courtney, Gunner Larsen, Ebba Dellwik Juan Jose Trujillo* and Hans E. Jørgensen Wind Energy Department Risø of the presentation · Introduction to wind energy · Accurate profiles of the mean wind speed · Wakes behind turbines

139

Remote sensing the wind using Lidars and Sodars Ioannis Antoniou (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the met masts increases rapidly with height. The evolution of new multi-MW wind turbines has resulted), as met towers increase in height, increases rapidly. The second reason is the measurement of the windRemote sensing the wind using Lidars and Sodars Ioannis Antoniou (1) , Mike Courtney(1) , Hans E

140

Impact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation in the Tropics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecast errors of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. Tropical mass­windImpact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation, De Bilt, Netherlands CHRISTOPHE ACCADIA AND PETER SCHL�SSEL European Organisation

Stoffelen, Ad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

Rodney Frehlich

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

Danny L. Anderson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Estimating forest structural characteristics with airborne lidar scanning and a near-real time profiling laser systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) directly measures canopy vertical structures, and provides an effective remote sensing solution to accurate and spatiallyexplicit mapping of forest characteristics, such as canopy height and Leaf Area Index...

Zhao, Kaiguang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Method to determine and adjust the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a LIDAR system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to determine the alignment of the transmitter and receiver fields of view of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system. This method can be employed to determine the far-field intensity distribution of the transmitter beam, as well as the variations in transmitted laser beam pointing as a function of time, temperature, or other environmental variables that may affect the co-alignment of the LIDAR system components. In order to achieve proper alignment of the transmitter and receiver optical systems when a LIDAR system is being used in the field, this method employs a laser-beam-position-sensing detector as an integral part of the receiver optics of the LIDAR system.

Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Henson, Tammy D. (Albuquerque, NM); Krumel, Leslie J. (Cedar Crest, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

AIRBORNE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The second major experiment was the Texas Air Quality Union 2007 Joint Assembly Acapulco, Mexico May 22-25, 2007 Environmental Sciences Department Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX

147

HiRes camera and LIDAR ranging system for the Clementine mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a space-qualified High Resolution (HiRes) imaging LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system for use on the DoD Clementine mission. The Clementine mission provided more than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth, and stars, including the first ever complete systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to near-infrared spectral regions. This article describes the Clementine HiRes/LIDAR system, discusses design goals and preliminary estimates of on-orbit performance, and summarizes lessons learned in building and using the sensor. The LIDAR receiver system consists of a High Resolution (HiRes) imaging channel which incorporates an intensified multi-spectral visible camera combined with a Laser ranging channel which uses an avalanche photo-diode for laser pulse detection and timing. The receiver was bore sighted to a light-weight McDonnell-Douglas diode-pumped ND:YAG laser transmitter that emmitted 1.06 {micro}m wavelength pulses of 200 mJ/pulse and 10 ns pulse-width, The LIDAR receiver uses a common F/9.5 Cassegrain telescope assembly. The optical path of the telescope is split using a color-separating beamsplitter. The imaging channel incorporates a filter wheel assembly which spectrally selects the light which is imaged onto a custom 12 mm gated image intensifier fiber-optically-coupled into a 384 x 276 pixel frame transfer CCD FPA. The image intensifier was spectrally sensitive over the 0.4 to 0.8 {micro}m wavelength region. The six-position filter wheel contained 4 narrow spectral filters, one broadband and one blocking filter. At periselene (400 km) the HiRes/LIDAR imaged a 2.8 km swath width at 20-meter resolution. The LIDAR function detected differential signal return with a 40-meter range accuracy, with a maximum range capability of 640 km, limited by the bit counter in the range return counting clock.

Ledebuhr, A.G.; Kordas, J.F.; Lewis, I.T. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experiment Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-2, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs. 29 refs., 6 figs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

Red-Horse, J.R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

Wang, Zhien

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM Raman lidars are semi-autonomous ground-based systems that transmit at a wavelength of 355 nm with 300 mJ, {approx}5 ns pulses, and a pulse repetition frequency of 30Hz. Signals from the various detection channels are processed to produce time- and height-resolved estimates of several geophysical quantities, such as water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, aerosol scattering ratio, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization ratio. Data processing is currently handled by a suite of six value-added product (VAP) processes. Collectively, these processes are known as the Raman Lidar Profiles VAP (RLPROF). The top-level best-estimate (BE) VAP process was introduced in order to bring together the most relevant information from the intermediate-level VAPs. As such, the BE process represents the final stage in data processing for the Raman lidar. Its principal function is to extract the primary variables from each of the intermediate-level VAPs, perform additional quality control, and combine all of this information into a single output file for the end-user. The focus of this document is to describe the processing performed by the BE VAP process.

Newson, R

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. This project will test smartdiffusive tracers for measuring heat exchange.

156

Experiments in validating formal semantics for C Sandrine Blazy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1]. Another example is Cyclone, a type-safe dialect of C that makes programs in- vulnerable, separation logic has been defined as an extension of Hoare logic for reasoning about programs that manipulate and memory footprints, such as non overlapping (i.e. separation) between memory regions. Contrary to Hoare

Blazy, Sandrine

157

Experimental validation of XRF inversion code for Chandrayaan-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed an algorithm (x2abundance) to derive the lunar surface chemistry from X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data for the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) experiment. The algorithm converts the observed XRF line fluxes to elemental abundances with uncertainties. We validated the algorithm in the laboratory using high Z elements (20 XRF experiments performed on Lunar simulant (JSC-1A) and anorthosite using a synchrotron beam excitation. We also discuss results from the validation of x2abundance using Monte Carlo simulation (GEANT4 XRF simulation).

Athiray, P S; Tiwari, M K; Narendranath, S; Lodha, G S; Deb, S K; Sreekumar, P; Dash, S K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Meas. Sci. Technol. 10 (1999) 11781184. Printed in the UK PII: S0957-0233(99)06575-3 Submarine lidar for seafloor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the detection of dissolved and sunken pollutants. One of these instruments is the submarine lidar, combining: fluorescence lidar, range-gating video, seafloor monitoring 1. Submarine sensor network for pollution of Oldenburg, Laser Remote Sensing Group), · an acoustic sensor for measuring the acoustic impedance

Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

159

The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Experimental methodology for computational fluid dynamics code validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. Typically, CFD code validation is accomplished through comparison of computed results to previously published experimental data that were obtained for some other purpose, unrelated to code validation. As a result, it is a near certainty that not all of the information required by the code, particularly the boundary conditions, will be available. The common approach is therefore unsatisfactory, and a different method is required. This paper describes a methodology developed specifically for experimental validation of CFD codes. The methodology requires teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the validation process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. The methodology employs a novel uncertainty analysis technique which helps to define the experimental plan for code validation wind tunnel experiments, and to distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of surface pressure measurements over a model of varying geometrical complexity in laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow.

Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Validation of the G-PASS code : status report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validation is the process of determining whether the models in a computer code can describe the important phenomena in applications of interest. This report describes past work and proposed future work for validating the Gas Plant Analyzer and System Simulator (G-PASS) code. The G-PASS code was developed for simulating gas reactor and chemical plant system behavior during operational transients and upset events. Results are presented comparing code properties, individual component models, and integrated system behavior against results from four other computer codes. Also identified are two experiment facilities nearing completion that will provide additional data for individual component and integrated system model validation. The main goal of the validation exercise is to ready a version of G-PASS for use as a tool in evaluating vendor designs and providing guidance to vendors on design directions in nuclear-hydrogen applications.

Vilim, R. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

XML Document XML Document Types and Validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 April, 2010 #12;XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives Learning Objectives Understand: The need for validation Two ways to specify validity: Document Type Definitions (DTDs) XML Schemas #12;XML

Weber, Gregory D.

163

Strategy for experimental validation of waste package performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strategy for the experimental validation of waste package performance assessment has been developed as part of a program supported by the Repository Technology Program. The strategy was developed by reviewing the results of laboratory analog experiments, in-situ tests, repository simulation tests, and material interaction tests. As a result of the review, a listing of dependent and independent variables that influence the ingress of water into the near-field environment, the reaction between water and the waste form, and the transport of radionuclides from the near-field environment was developed. The variables necessary to incorporate into an experimental validation strategy were chosen by identifying those which had the greatest effect of each of the three major events, i.e., groundwater ingress, waste package reactions, and radionuclide transport. The methodology to perform validation experiments was examined by utilizing an existing laboratory analog approach developed for unsaturated testing of glass waste forms. 185 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Gerding, T.J.; Seils, C.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

165

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborne Visible/InfraredProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

166

The SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data - VALID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) at ORNL contains high quality, independently reviewed models and results that improve confidence in analysis. VALID is developed and maintained according to a procedure of the SCALE quality assurance (QA) plan. This paper reviews the origins of the procedure and its intended purpose, the philosophy of the procedure, some highlights of its implementation, and the future of the procedure and associated VALID library. The original focus of the procedure was the generation of high-quality models that could be archived at ORNL and applied to many studies. The review process associated with model generation minimized the chances of errors in these archived models. Subsequently, the scope of the library and procedure was expanded to provide high quality, reviewed sensitivity data files for deployment through the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Sensitivity data files for approximately 400 such models are currently available. The VALID procedure and library continue fulfilling these multiple roles. The VALID procedure is based on the quality assurance principles of ISO 9001 and nuclear safety analysis. Some of these key concepts include: independent generation and review of information, generation and review by qualified individuals, use of appropriate references for design data and documentation, and retrievability of the models, results, and documentation associated with entries in the library. Some highlights of the detailed procedure are discussed to provide background on its implementation and to indicate limitations of data extracted from VALID for use by the broader community. Specifically, external users of data generated within VALID must take responsibility for ensuring that the files are used within the QA framework of their organization and that use is appropriate. The future plans for the VALID library include expansion to include additional experiments from the IHECSBE, to include experiments from areas beyond criticality safety, such as reactor physics and shielding, and to include application models. In the future, external SCALE users may also obtain qualification under the VALID procedure and be involved in expanding the library. The VALID library provides a pathway for the criticality safety community to leverage modeling and analysis expertise at ORNL.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations with SCALE 6.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SCALE 6.2 provides numerous updates in nuclear data, nuclear data processing, and computational tools utilized in the criticality safety calculational sequences relative to SCALE 6.1. A new 252-group ENDF/B-VII.0 multigroup neutron library, improved ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy data, as well as the previously deployed 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron library are included in SCALE 6.2 for criticality safety analysis. The performance of all three libraries for keff calculations is examined with a broad sampling of critical experiment models covering a range of fuels and moderators. Critical experiments from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE) that are available in the SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) are used in this validation effort. Over 300 cases are used in the validation of KENO V.a, and a more limited set of approximately 50 configurations are used for KENO-VI validation. Additionally, some KENO V.a cases are converted to KENO-VI models so that an equivalent set of experiments can be used to validate both codes. For continuous-energy calculations, SCALE 6.2 provides improved performance relative to SCALE 6.1 in most areas with notable improvements in fuel pin lattice cases, particularly those with mixed oxide fuel. Multigroup calculations with the 252-group library also demonstrate improved performance for fuel lattices, uranium (high and intermediate enrichment) and plutonium metal experiments, and plutonium solution systems. Overall, SCALE 6.2 provides equivalent or smaller biases than SCALE 6.1, and the two versions of KENO provide similar results on the same suite of problems.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL] [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reviews and Validations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reviews and Validations Reviews and Validations External Independent Review (EIR) Procedures Under DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital...

169

Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

170

Verification and Validation of Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verification and Validation of Simulation Model 1 Verification and Validation 2 #12;Verification · Examples ­ simulation model: open networks with exponential interarrival time distribution and uniform

Shihada, Basem

171

GCFR thermal-hydraulic experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal-hydraulic experimental studies performed and planned for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies are described. The experiments consist of basic studies performed to obtain correlations, and bundle experiments which provide input for code validation and design verification. These studies have been performed and are planned at European laboratories, US national laboratories, Universities in the US, and at General Atomic Company

Schlueter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Dalle Donne, M.; Gat, U.; Fenech, H.; Hanson, D.; Hudina, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor N. Petra1, J. Zweck1, S. E optothermoacoustic sensor is validated by comparison with experiments performed with 0.5% acetylene in nitrogen Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 300.6430, 300.6340. 1. Introduction Quartz-Enhanced Photo

Minkoff, Susan E.

174

Validation and Calibration in ACE Models: An Investigation on the CATS model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation and Calibration in ACE Models: An Investigation on the CATS model. Carlo Bianchi deal with some validation (and a ...rst calibration) experiments on the CATS model proposed whether the simulation model is an acceptable representation of the real system are available (Sar- gent

Tesfatsion, Leigh

175

Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Validation of NCSSHP for highly enriched uranium systems containing beryllium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the validation of KENO V.a using the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross section library for highly enriched uranium and beryllium neutronic systems, and is in accordance with ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983(R1988) requirements for calculational methods. The validation has been performed on a Hewlett Packard 9000/Series 700 Workstation at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Department using the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Software code package. Critical experiments from LA-2203, UCRL-4975, ORNL-2201, and ORNL/ENG-2 have been identified as having the constituents desired for this validation as well as sufficient experimental detail to allow accurate construction of KENO V.a calculational models. The results of these calculations establish the safety criteria to be employed in future calculational studies of these types of systems.

Krass, A.W.; Elliott, E.P.; Tollefson, D.A.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting Magnet). Current user: LBNE ­ materials for Project X. · Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment ­ Abandoned gold mine

McDonald, Kirk

179

Sedimentological Reinterpretation of Surficial Unconsolidated Debris Flows and Stream Deposits of the Southern Flanks of Grand Mesa, CO: An Integrated LiDAR Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This study developed a sedimentological description and interpretation of these deposits and tested the capabilities of terrestrial LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) for use in sedimentological studies. This research addressed the origin of the deposits...

Blakeley, Mitchell W.

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Model Validation with Hybrid Dynamic Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract—Model validation has been one of the central topics in power engineering studies for years. As model validation aims at obtaining reasonable models to represent actual behavior of power system components, it has been essential to validate models against actual measurements or known benchmark behavior. System-wide model simulation results can be compared with actual recordings. However, it is difficult to construct a simulation case for a large power system such as the WECC system and to narrow down to problematic models in a large system. Hybrid dynamic simulation with its capability of injecting external signals into dynamic simulation enables rigorous comparison of measurements and simulation in a small subsystem of interest. This paper presents such a model validation methodology with hybrid dynamic simulation. Two application examples on generator and load model validation are presented to show the validity of this model validation methodology. This methodology is further extended for automatic model validation and dichotomous subsystem model validation.

Huang, Zhenyu; Kosterev, Dmitry; Guttromson, Ross T.; Nguyen, Tony B.

2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NEAMS Experimental Support for Code Validation, INL FY2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Whereas the Verification part of the process does not rely on experiment, the Validation part, on the contrary, necessitates as many relevant and precise experimental data as possible to make sure the models reproduce reality as closely as possible. Hence, this report presents a limited selection of experimental data that could be used to validate the codes devoted mainly to Fast Neutron Reactor calculations in the US. Emphasis has been put on existing data for thermal-hydraulics, fuel and reactor physics. The principles of a new “smart” experiment that could be used to improve our knowledge of neutron cross-sections are presented as well. In short, it consists in irradiating a few milligrams of actinides and analyzing the results with Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy to infer the neutron cross-sections. Finally, the wealth of experimental data relevant to Fast Neutron Reactors in the US should not be taken for granted and efforts should be put on saving these 30-40 years old data and on making sure they are validation-worthy, i.e. that the experimental conditions and uncertainties are well documented.

G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatore; C. Rabiti

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Validation needs of seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods applied to nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An effort to validate seismic PRA methods is in progress. The work concentrates on the validation of plant response and fragility estimates through the use of test data and information from actual earthquake experience. Validation needs have been identified in the areas of soil-structure interaction, structural response and capacity, and equipment fragility. Of particular concern is the adequacy of linear methodology to predict nonlinear behavior. While many questions can be resolved through the judicious use of dynamic test data, other aspects can only be validated by means of input and response measurements during actual earthquakes. A number of past, ongoing, and planned testing programs which can provide useful validation data have been identified, and validation approaches for specific problems are being formulated.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Experimental validation of lead cross sections for scale and MCNP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moving spent nuclear fuel between facilities often requires the use of lead-shielded casks. Criticality safety that is based upon calculations requires experimental validation of the fuel matrix and lead cross section libraries. A series of critical experiments using a high-enriched uranium-aluminum fuel element with a variety of reflectors, including lead, has been identified. Twenty-one configurations were evaluated in this study. The fuel element was modelled for KENO V.a and MCNP 4a using various cross section sets. The experiments addressed in this report can be used to validate lead-reflected calculations. Factors influencing calculated k{sub eff} which require further study include diameters of styrofoam inserts and homogenization.

Henrikson, D.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Rayleigh LIDAR and satellite (HALOE, SABER, CHAMP and COSMIC) measurements of stratosphere-mesosphere temperature over a southern sub-tropical site, Reunion (20.8° S; 55.5° E): climatology and comparison study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climatology of the mid- dle atmosphere from long-termLIDAR measurements at mid- dle and low latitudes, J.Over the southern tropics, mid- dle atmosphere temperature

Sivakumar, V.; Vishnu Prasanth, P.; Kishore, P.; Bencherif, H.; Keckhut, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Verification and Validation Strategy for LWRS Tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One intension of the Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is to create advanced computational tools for safety assessment that enable more accurate representation of a nuclear power plant safety margin. These tools are to be used to study the unique issues posed by lifetime extension and relicensing of the existing operating fleet of nuclear power plants well beyond their first license extension period. The extent to which new computational models / codes such as RELAP-7 can be used for reactor licensing / relicensing activities depends mainly upon the thoroughness with which they have been verified and validated (V&V). This document outlines the LWRS program strategy by which RELAP-7 code V&V planning is to be accomplished. From the perspective of developing and applying thermal-hydraulic and reactivity-specific models to reactor systems, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.203 gives key guidance to numeric model developers and those tasked with the validation of numeric models. By creating Regulatory Guide 1.203 the NRC defined a framework for development, assessment, and approval of transient and accident analysis methods. As a result, this methodology is very relevant and is recommended as the path forward for RELAP-7 V&V. However, the unique issues posed by lifetime extension will require considerations in addition to those addressed in Regulatory Guide 1.203. Some of these include prioritization of which plants / designs should be studied first, coupling modern supporting experiments to the stringent needs of new high fidelity models / codes, and scaling of aging effects.

Carl M. Stoots; Richard R. Schultz; Hans D. Gougar; Thomas K Larson; Michael Corradini; Laura Swiler; David Pointer; Jess Gehin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Modeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on-Chip design process. Many existing approaches employ a bottom-up approach to pipeline validation, where description language (ADL) constructs, and thus allows a powerful top-down approach to pipeline validationModeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications PRABHAT MISHRA and NIKIL DUTT University

Mishra, Prabhat

188

Criticality Safety Validation of SCALE 6.1 with ENDF/B-VII.0 Libraries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ANSI/ANS-8.1-1998;2007, Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Material Outside Reactors, and ANSI/ANS-8.24-2007, Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations, require validation of a computer code and the associated data through benchmark evaluations based on physical experiments. The performance of the code and data are validated by comparing the calculated and the benchmark results. A SCALE procedure has been established to generate a Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID). This procedure provides a framework for preparing, peer reviewing, and controlling models and data sets derived from benchmark definitions so that the models and data can be used with confidence. The procedure ensures that the models and data were correctly generated using appropriate references with documented checks and reviews. Configuration management is implemented to prevent inadvertent modification of the models and data or inclusion of models that have not been subjected to the rigorous review process. VALID entries for criticality safety are based on critical experiments documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). The findings of a criticality safety validation of SCALE 6.1 utilizing the benchmark models vetted in the VALID library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are summarized here.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

TRIO experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Analysis and Calibration of CRF Raman Lidar Cloud Liquid Water Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Raman lidar (RL), located at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF), is a unique state-of-the-art active remote sensor that is able to measure profiles of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud properties at high temporal and vertical resolution throughout the diurnal cycle. In October 2005, the capability of the RL was extended by the addition of a new detection channel that is sensitive to the Raman scattering of liquid water. This new channel permits the system, in theory, to measure profiles of liquid water content (LWC) by the RL. To our knowledge, the ARM RL is the only operation lidar with this capability. The liquid water Raman backscattering cross-section is a relatively weak and spectrally broad feature, relative to the water vapor Raman backscatter signal. The wide bandpass required to achieve reasonable signal-to-noise in the liquid water channel essentially eliminates the ability to measure LWC profiles during the daytime in the presence of large solar background, and thus all LWC observations are nighttime only. Additionally, the wide bandpass increases the probability that other undesirable signals, such as fluorescence from aerosols, may contaminate the observation. The liquid water Raman cross-section has a small amount of overlap with the water vapor Raman cross-section, and thus there will be a small amount of ‘cross-talk’ between the two signals, with water vapor contributing a small amount of signal to the LWC observation. And finally, there is significant uncertainty in the actual strength of the liquid water Raman cross-section in the literature. The calibrated LWC profiles, together with the coincident cloud backscatter observations also made by the RL, can be used to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius. By combining these profiles of effective radius in the lower portion of the cloud with the aerosol extinction measurements made below the cloud by the RL, the first aerosol indirect effect can be investigated using a single instrument, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with aligning the different sampling periods and fields of view of multiple instruments. We have applied a “first principles” calibration to the LWC profiles. This approach requires that the relative differences in optical efficiency between the water vapor and liquid water channels be known; this relative difference is easily computed using the efficiency values of the beam splitters and interference filters in the lidar that were provided by the vendors of these components. The first principles approach then transfers the calibration from the water vapor mixing ratio to the LWC using the difference in the optical efficiency and an interpolated value of the liquid water Raman cross section from the literature, and the better established water vapor Raman cross section. After accounting for all known error sources, the vertical integral of LWC was compared against a similar value retrieved from a co-located ground-based infrared radiometer. The RL and infrared radiometer have significantly different fields of view; thus to compare the two sensors the data were averaged to 5 min intervals where only cloudy samples were included in the average of each. While there is fair scatter in the data (r=0.47), there is also a clear indication of a positive correlation between the infrared and the RL values. The value of the slope of the regression is 0.49, which indicates a tendency of the RL measurements to underestimate the total liquid amount with respect to the infrared retrieval. Research continues to investigate the source of the bias, but the most likely candidate is the large uncertainty in the liquid water Raman cross-section as there have been no direct measurements made of this parameter at the lidar’s laser wavelength of 355 nm. The calibrated LWC profile was then used together with the cloud backscatter coefficient profile from the RL to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number density. These profiles o

Turner, D.D.

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related to VHTRs, sodium-cooled fast reactors, and light-water reactors. These experiments range from relatively low-cost benchtop experiments for investigating individual phenomena to large electrically-heated integral facilities for investigating reactor accidents and transients.

Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Validation of Geant4 Hadronic Generators versus Thin Target Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GEANT4 toolkit is widely used for simulation of high energy physics (HEP) experiments, in particular, those at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The requirements of robustness, stability and quality of simulation for the LHC are demanding. This requires an accurate description of hadronic interactions for a wide range of targets over a large energy range, from stopped particle reactions to low energy nuclear interactions to interactions at the TeV energy scale. This is achieved within the Geant4 toolkit by combining a number of models, each of which are valid within a certain energy domain. Comparison of these models to thin target data over a large energy range indicates the strengths and weaknesses of the model descriptions and the energy range over which each model is valid. Software has been developed to handle the large number of validation tests required to provide the feedback needed to improve the models. An automated process for carrying out the validation and storing/displaying the results is being developed and will be discussed.

Banerjee, S.; /Fermilab; Folger, G.; /CERN; Ivanchenko, A.; /CERN /CENBG, Gradignan; Ivanchenko, V.N.; /CERN /NeurOK, Moscow /Metz U.; Kossov, M.; /CERN; Quesada, J.M.; /Seville U.; Schalicke, A.; /DESY, Zeuthen; Uzhinsky, V.; /CERN; Wenzel, H.; /Fermilab; Wright, D.H.; /SLAC; Yarba, J.; /Fermilab

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

D&D Waste Estimate Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Closure Project (Site) includes several multi-year decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects which, over the next four years, will dismantle and demolish four major plutonium facilities, four major uranium facilities, and over 400 additional facilities of different types. The projects are currently generating large quantities of transuranic, low-level, mixed, hazardous, and sanitary wastes. A previous paper described the initial conceptual estimates and methods, and the evolution of these methods based on the actual results from the decommissioning of a ''pilot'' facility. The waste estimating method that resulted from that work was used for the waste estimates incorporated into the current Site baseline. This paper discusses subsequent developments on the topic of waste estimating that have occurred since the baseline work. After several months of operation under the current Site baseline, an effort was initiated to either validate or identify improvements to the waste basis-of-estimate. Specific estimate and estimating method elements were identified for additional analysis based on the element's potential for error and the impact of that error on Site activities. The analysis took advantage of actual, more detailed data collected both from three years additional experience in decommissioning a second plutonium facility and from experience in deactivating certain non-plutonium facilities. It compared the actual transuranic and low-level waste generation against their respective estimates based on overall distribution and for individual media (i.e. equipment type), and evaluated trends. Finally, it projected the quantity of lead-characteristic low-level mixed waste that will be generated from plutonium building decommissioning and upgraded the decommissioning waste estimates of the non-plutonium buildings.

Sanford, P. C.; Templeton, J. H.; Stevens, J. L.; Dorr, K.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Model Validation with Hybrid Dynamic Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract—Model validation has been one of the central topics in power engineering studies for years. As model validation aims at obtaining reasonable models to represent actual behavior of power system components, it has been essential to validate models against actual measurements or known benchmark behavior. System-wide model simulation results can be compared with actual recordings. However, it is difficult to construct a simulation case for a large power system such as the WECC system and to narrow down to problematic models in a large system. Hybrid dynamic simulation with its capability of injecting external signals into dynamic simulation enables rigorous comparison of measurements and simulation in a small subsystem of interest. This paper presents such a model validation methodology with hybrid dynamic simulation. Two application examples on generator and load model validation are presented to show the validity of this model validation methodology. This methodology is further extended for automatic model validation and dichotomous subsystem model validation. A few methods to define model quality indices have been proposed to quantify model error for model validation criteria development.

Huang, Zhenyu; Kosterev, Dmitry; Guttromson, Ross T.; Nguyen, Tony B.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evolving desiderata for validating engineered-physics systems without full-scale testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theory and principles of engineered-physics designs do not change over time, but the actual engineered product does evolve. Engineered components are prescient to the physics and change with time. Parts are never produced exactly as designed, assembled as designed, or remain unperturbed over time. For this reason, validation of performance may be regarded as evolving over time. Desired use of products evolves with time. These pragmatic realities require flexibility, understanding, and robustness-to-ignorance. Validation without full-scale testing involves engineering, small-scale experiments, physics theory and full-scale computer-simulation validation. We have previously published an approach to validation without full-scale testing using information integration, small-scale tests, theory and full-scale simulations [Langenbrunner et al. 2008]. This approach adds value, but also adds complexity and uncertainty due to inference. We illustrate a validation example that manages evolving desiderata without full-scale testing.

Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booker, Jane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Timothy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Computer Simulation and Experimental Validation on the Oxidation and Sulfate Corrosion Resistance of Novel Chromium Based High Temperature Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio molecular dynamics inter-atomic potentials development on dilute rare earth element yttrium (Y) etc. doped chromium (Cr) alloy systems, its applications in oxidation and corrosion resistance simulation, and experiment validation on the candidate systems. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

Yang, Shizhong

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

198

Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-Safe Scanning Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for Monitoring/Verification/Accounting at Geologic Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for monitoring carbon dioxide has been developed. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto- optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 {micro}J, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 {micro}m. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL instrument has been operated from a laboratory environment on the campus of Montana State University, at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site located in the agricultural research area on the western end of the Montana State University campus, and at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership site located in north-central Montana. DIAL data has been collected and profiles have been validated using a co-located Licor LI-820 Gas Analyzer point sensor.

Repasky, Kevin

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

FIMS Data Validation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FIMS Data Validation The Facility Information Management System (FIMS) is the Department's official repository of real property data. The Department relies on the FIMS data for...

200

HEV, PHEV, BEV Test Standard Validation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BEV Test Standard Validation 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 10, 2011 Michael Duoba Argonne National Laboratory Sponsored by Lee Slezak...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing OilGas Wells in Texas Technical Demonstration and Economic...

202

OSHPD Postpartum Maternal Outcomes Validation Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may far exceed that of birth certificate data for severalAdams M. Validity of birth certificate data for the outcomemedical record and birth certificate data. Health Services

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Calibration and Validation of Measurement System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+45 98 14 25 55 Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering No. 2 Calibration and Validation of Measurement ......................................................................................................................................11 9. SIPHON TURBINE ......................................................................................................................................12 10. DUMMY TURBINES

204

Fuel Cell Backup Power Technology Validation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about fuel cell backup power technology validation activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

FACILITIES INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (FIMS) DATA VALIDATION...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

not scored xii) Year Acquired - Validated not scored xiii) Disposition Date (Archived data) xiv) Disposition Method (Archived data) xv) Net Proceeds (Archived data) b) The...

206

Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Modeling and Simulation SHARE Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation and Validation Reactor physics depletion model for the Advanced Test Reactor Reactor physics depletion...

207

PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories This...

208

Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols at the US Southern Great Plains Climate Study Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program, Southern Great Plains CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site in northern Oklahoma. Research conducted at several laboratories has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We have developed and installed a ruggedized Raman lidar system that resides permanently at the CART site, and that is computer automated to eliminate the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar provides quantitative characterizations of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies.

Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Blair, F.H.; Bisson, S.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development and Implementation of the SPHERES-Slosh Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding fluid slosh in a microgravity environment has the potential to make liquid-fueled spacecraft more effective. The SPHERES-Slosh Experiment gathers benchmarking data that can be used to validate computational ...

Hayhurst, Dustin Luke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Reactor simulation for antineutrino experiments using DRAGON and MURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulations to predict reactor fission rates. Here we present results from the DRAGON and MURE ...

Jones, Christopher LaDon

211

experiment, collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Departamento Energias Renovables, Plataforma Solar de Almeria, E-04080 Almeria, Spain Departamento de Lenguajes y ca. factor 10 less complex then imaging solar Cerenkov exp.:smaller cost, fewer systematic errors #12; 5 Rainer Plaga The GRAAL experiment, ECRS Lodz July 2000 Location of GRAAL " Plataforma Solar de

212

A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

214

A Design Experiment for Blending Knowledge Community And Inquiry in Secondary School Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Design Experiment for Blending Knowledge Community And Inquiry:00-1:15 Education Building 2010 Abstract. This presentation describes a design experiment objectives. Drawing on data from two design cycles, I examine the validity

Stanford, Kyle

215

Detailed validation of an empirical model for viscous fingering with gravity effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper extends to two-dimensional (2D) flows the derivation and validation of an empirical model for viscous fingering previously developed. Fine-scale numerical simulations are used to provide basic data for validating the approximations, and these fingering results are also checked against a range of experiments. The flow rate dependence of gravity segregation in vertical section experiments conducted by van der Poel is examined, where the broadly acceptable agreement of the empirical model is limited by some identified additional features.

Fayers, F.J.; Newley, T.M.J.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Validation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of APIs in the directory and shows that REST1 [3] is in the majority and is growing faster than any other validation. 1ProgrammableWeb API styles are self-reported by the API owners, and APIs reported as RESTful mayValidation and Interactivity of Web API Documentation Peter J. Danielsen and Alan Jeffrey Bell Labs

Jeffrey, Alan

217

A joint study of the lower ionosphere by radar, lidar, and spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics and associated phenomena occurring in the lower ionospheric-E region, especially the mesopause region between 80 km to 110 km at low latitude, are studied. In particular, incoherent scatter radar (ISR), sodium lidar and airglow spectrometry are used to study the ionospheric structure and neutral sodium structure. The simultaneous study of the ionospheric plasma and neutral atomic sodium is unprecedented in scope and detail. The joint study of the mesopause region reveals that plasma, neutral densities and temperature are interconnected through the same atmospheric dynamics. The theme of the thesis is to explain the formation of the controversial sporadic sodium layer (SSL) events. Strong correlation is established between the average total ion and sodium concentrations, and between sporadic-E and SSL events. The mechanism proposed in the thesis, which invokes temperature fluctuations induced by tides and gravity waves, finds good agreement with observations. Tides and gravity waves can converge ions into thin layers through the windshear mechanisms and can influence the concentration of atomic sodium through temperature fluctuations. Sodium abundance is shown to augment rapidly when the temperature is increased. Gravity wave theory states that the ion convergence node coincides with a temperature maximum for a westward propagating gravity wave, and coincides with a temperature minimum for an eastward propagating wave. Because tidal winds propagate westward, the ion layer coincides with the temperature maximum which consequently induces higher sodium concentration. This can account for the general correlation between sodium and total ion concentration and is supported by the O2(0-1) rotational temperature. Gravity waves and their interaction with tidal winds are believed to be responsible for the close association between sudden sodium layers and sporadic-E layers.

Zhou, Qihou.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

CFD Validation of Gas Injection into Stagnant Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigations in the area of two-phase flow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility are progressing. It is expected that the target vessel lifetime could be extended by introducing gas into the liquid mercury target. As part of an effort to validate the two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, simulations and experiments of gas injection in stagnant water have been completed. The volume of fluid (VOF) method as implemented in ANSYS-CFX was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection into stagnant water. Flow visualization data were obtained with a high-speed camera for the comparison of predicted and measured bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth, detachment, and gravitational rise. The CFD model is validated with these experimental measurements at different gas flow rates. The acoustic waves emitted at the time of detachment and during subsequent oscillations of the bubble were recorded with a microphone. The acoustic signature aspect of this validation is particularly interesting since it has applicability to the injection of gas into liquid mercury, which is opaque.

Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment … ALIVE 1Schmid, B., 2Ferrare, R., 3Turner,D., 4Flynn, C., 5Cairns, B., 6Dominguez, R., 6Gore, W., 7Groff, D., 8Herman, B., 9Hovelman, B., 10Jefferson, A., 6Johnson, R., 5Knobelspiesse, K., 4Mendoza, A., 10Ogren, J., 4Petty, D., ?Russell, E., 6Russell, P., 4Roeder, L., 6Truong, N. 1BAER Institute, 2NASA Langley Res. Center, 3Univ. Of Wisconsin-Madison, 4Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., 5Columbia Univ., 6NASA Ames Res. Center, 7ARM SGP, 8City Univ. of New York, 9Sky Research, Inc., 10NOAA CMDL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004 North Slope

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA’s High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

Hogan, Robin

223

Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Cloud-Phase Retrieval Methods for SEVIRI on Meteosat-8 Using Ground-Based Lidar and Cloud Radar Data ERWIN L. A. WOLTERS, ROBERT A. ROEBELING, AND ARNOUT J. FEIJT Royal Netherlands 2007) ABSTRACT Three cloud-phase determination algorithms from passive satellite imagers are explored

Stoffelen, Ad

224

A comparison of automated land cover/use classification methods for a Texas bottomland hardwood system using lidar, spot-5, and ancillary data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decisions affecting these disappearing systems. SPOT-5 imagery from 2005 was combined with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data from 2006 and several ancillary datasets to map a portion of the bottomland hardwood system found in the Sulphur River Basin...

Vernon, Zachary Isaac

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

SilviLaser 2011, Oct. 16-19, 2011 Hobart, Australia Towards automated and operational forest inventories with T-Lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inventories with T-Lidar A. Othmani1 , A. Piboule2 , M. Krebs3 , C. Stolz1 and L.F.C. Lew Yan Voon1 1 Cluny, France, michael.krebs@ensam.eu Keywords: terrestrial laser scanning, forest inventory, tree detection, DBH. Abstract Forest inventory automation has become a major issue in forestry. The complexity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Modeling conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain with WAsP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the vertical wind speed W changes linearly with the downwind position x. This could crudely mimic the flow over to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured

227

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 10-year project conducted by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to determine the feasibility of coproducing hydrogen with electricity. The primary objective was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. This four-phase project had intermediate go/no-go decisions and the following specific goals: �¢���¢ Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis of the use of high-temperature fuel cells, including solid oxide and molten carbonate, for the co-production of power and hydrogen (energy park concept). �¢���¢ Build on the experience gained at the Las Vegas H2 Energy Station and compare/contrast the two approaches for co-production. �¢���¢ Determine the applicability of co-production from a high-temperature fuel cell for the existing merchant hydrogen market and for the emerging hydrogen economy. �¢���¢ Demonstrate the concept on natural gas for six months at a suitable site with demand for both hydrogen and electricity. �¢���¢ Maintain safety as the top priority in the system design and operation. �¢���¢ Obtain adequate operational data to provide the basis for future commercial activities, including hydrogen fueling stations. Work began with the execution of the cooperative agreement with DOE on 30 September 2001. During Phase 1, Air Products identified high-temperature fuel cells as having the potential to meet the coproduction targets, and the molten carbonate fuel cell system from FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FuelCell Energy) was selected by Air Products and DOE following the feasibility assessment performed during Phase 2. Detailed design, construction and shop validation testing of a system to produce 250 kW of electricity and 100 kilograms per day of hydrogen, along with site selection to include a renewable feedstock for the fuel cell, were completed in Phase 3. The system also completed six months of demonstration operation at the wastewater treatment facility operated by Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD, Fountain Valley, CA). As part of achieving the objective of operating on a renewable feedstock, Air Products secured additional funding via an award from the California Air Resources Board. The South Coast Air Quality Management District also provided cost share which supported the objectives of this project. System operation at OCSD confirmed the results from shop validation testing performed during Phase 3. Hydrogen was produced at rates and purity that met the targets from the system design basis, and coproduction efficiency exceeded the 50% target set in conjunction with input from the DOE. Hydrogen production economics, updated from the Phase 2 analysis, showed pricing of $5 to $6 per kilogram of hydrogen using current gas purification systems. Hydrogen costs under $3 per kilogram are achievable if next-generation electrochemical separation technologies become available.

Edward C. Heydorn

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Vehicle Technologies Office: Integration and Validation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Once vehicle components and subsystems prove out in the initial modeling and simulation research phases, it is time to build, integrate, and validate prototypes of those components and subsystems....

230

Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines Print In the struggle to keep up with microbes whose rapid mutations outpace our ability to produce vaccines, the human race has...

231

Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

List of Assumptions and Draft Workshop Agenda for the Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop, February 3-4, 2014, Golden, Colorado, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office.

232

Tools for event generator tuning and validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I describe the current status of MCnet tools for validating the performance of event generator simulations against data, and for tuning their phenomenological free parameters. For validation, the Rivet toolkit is now a mature and complete system, with a large library of prominent benchmark analyses. For tuning, the Professor system has recently completed its first tunes of Pythia 6, with substantial improvements on the existing default tune and potential to greatly aid the setup of new generators for LHC studies.

Andy Buckley

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

233

Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys Douglas A. Gemme1 are presented for numerical simulations and field experiments using point absorption ocean wave energy and experimental data. Index Terms ­ energy conversion, wave energy harvesting, linear generator, ocean energy

Grilli, Stéphan T.

234

Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost saving purposes by showing further testing wold not enhance the quality of the validation of predictive tools. The proposed methodology is at a conceptual level. When matured and if considered favorably by the stakeholders, it could serve as a new framework for the next generation of the best estimate plus uncertainty licensing methodology that USNRC developed previously. In order to come to that level of maturity it is necessary to communicate the methodology to scientific, design and regulatory stakeholders for discussion and debates. This paper is the first step to establish this communication.

Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clure, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ralph A [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mixing layer (ML) heights inferred from radiosondes, wind profilers, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler (MTP), and in-situ aircraft data were compared during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study in the Houston area...

Smith, Christina Lynn

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

236

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon...

237

Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration Design, Modeling, and Validation of a Flame Reformer for LNT External Bypass Regeneration...

238

HEV, PHEV, EV Test Standard Development and Validation | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HEV, PHEV, EV Test Standard Development and Validation HEV, PHEV, EV Test Standard Development and Validation 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

239

T-649: Red Hat Network Satellite Server Request Validation Flaw...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

49: Red Hat Network Satellite Server Request Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks T-649: Red Hat Network Satellite Server Request Validation Flaw Permits...

240

In Search of a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross- section of volatility and expected returns, Theof a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor (revised)of a Statistically Valid Volatility Risk Factor Robert M.

Anderson, Robert M.; Bianchi, Stephen W.; Goldberg, Lisa R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U-031: Microsoft Active Directory CRL Validation Flaw Lets Remote...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Microsoft Active Directory CRL Validation Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication U-031: Microsoft Active Directory CRL Validation Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass...

242

U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September...

243

Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates...

244

T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

245

Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for...

246

Data Validation Using Data Descriptors Data validation is often defined by six data descriptors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX N Data Validation Using Data Descriptors Data validation is often defined by six data descriptors: 1) reports to decision maker 2) documentation 3) data sources 4) analytical method and detection limit 5) data review 6) data quality indicators The decision maker or reviewer examines the data

247

Marketing Plan for Demonstration and Validation Assets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), is to be sustained by various programs, including technology demonstration and evaluation (DEMVAL). This project assists companies in developing technologies under the National Security Technology Incubator program (NSTI) through demonstration and validation of technologies applicable to national security created by incubators and other sources. The NSPP also will support the creation of an integrated demonstration and validation environment. This report documents the DEMVAL marketing and visibility plan, which will focus on collecting information about, and expanding the visibility of, DEMVAL assets serving businesses with national security technology applications in southern New Mexico.

None

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Validation Data Plan Implementation: Subcooled Flow Boiling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II FieldVacancy-Induced NanoscaleValidatingValidation

249

Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates byUserUtility-ScaleValidatingValidating

250

Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

CUORE crystal validation runs: results on radioactive contamination and extrapolation to CUORE background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CUORE Crystal Validation Runs (CCVRs) have been carried out since the end of 2008 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories, in order to test the performances and the radiopurity of the TeO$_2$ crystals produced at SICCAS (Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for the CUORE experiment. In this work the results of the first 5 validation runs are presented. Results have been obtained for bulk contaminations and surface contaminations from several nuclides. An extrapolation to the CUORE background has been performed.

Alessandria, F; Ardito, R; Arnaboldi, C; Avignone, F T; Balata, M; Bandac, I; Banks, T I; Bari, G; Beeman, J W; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Bloxham, T; Brofferio, C; Bryant, A; Bucci, C; Cai, X Z; Canonica, L; Capelli, S; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Carrettoni, M; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Dafinei, I; Dally, A; De Biasi, A; Decowski, M P; Deninno, M M; de Waard, A; Di Domizio, S; Ejzak, L; Faccini, R; Fang, D Q; Farach, H; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Foggetta, L; Freedman, S; Frossati, G; Giachero, A; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Guardincerri, E; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Han, K; Heeger, K M; Huang, H Z; Ichimura, K; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Keppel, G; Kogler, L; Kolomensky, Y G; Kraft, S; Lenz, D; Li, Y L; Liu, X; Longo, E; Ma, Y G; Maiano, C; Maier, G; Martinez, C; Martinez, M; Maruyama, R H; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Newman, S; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Ouellet, J; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Rampazzo, V; Rimondi, F; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Salvioni, C; Sangiorgio, S; Schaeffer, D; Scielzo, N D; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Stivanello, F; Taffarello, L; Terenziani, G; Tian, W D; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Ventura, G; Vignati, M; Wang, B; Wang, H W; Whitten, C A; Wise, T; Woodcraft, A; Xu, N; Zanotti, L; Zarra, C; Zhu, B X; Zucchelli, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

CUORE crystal validation runs: results on radioactive contamination and extrapolation to CUORE background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CUORE Crystal Validation Runs (CCVRs) have been carried out since the end of 2008 at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories, in order to test the performances and the radiopurity of the TeO$_2$ crystals produced at SICCAS (Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for the CUORE experiment. In this work the results of the first 5 validation runs are presented. Results have been obtained for bulk contaminations and surface contaminations from several nuclides. An extrapolation to the CUORE background has been performed.

F. Alessandria; E. Andreotti; R. Ardito; C. Arnaboldi; F. T. Avignone III; M. Balata; I. Bandac; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. W. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; T. Bloxham; C. Brofferio; A. Bryant; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; L. Canonica; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; A. De Biasi; M. P. Decowski; M. M. Deninno; A. de Waard; S. Di Domizio; L. Ejzak; R. Faccini; D. Q. Fang; H. Farach; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; L. Foggetta; S. Freedman; G. Frossati; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; E. Guardincerri; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; H. Z. Huang; K. Ichimura; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; L. Kogler; Y. G. Kolomensky; S. Kraft; D. Lenz; Y. L. Li; X. Liu; E. Longo; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; G. Maier; C. Martinez; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; S. Newman; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; F. Rimondi; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; C. Salvioni; S. Sangiorgio; D. Schaeffer; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; F. Stivanello; L. Taffarello; G. Terenziani; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. Wang; H. W. Wang; C. A. Whitten Jr; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; N. Xu; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

253

Reliability and Validity: One Factor and Third Factor Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 7 Reliability and Validity: One Factor and Third Factor Tests D. White and A. Korotayev 26 Sept 2003 Html links are live Reliability and validity are crucial issues in research. Reliability may have high validity but low reliability, in which case its correlations with other high validity

White, Douglas R.

254

Validation Test of Geant4 Simulation of Electron Backscattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Backscattering is a sensitive probe of the accuracy of electron scattering algorithms implemented in Monte Carlo codes. The capability of the Geant4 toolkit to describe realistically the fraction of electrons backscattered from a target volume is extensively and quantitatively evaluated in comparison with experimental data retrieved from the literature. The validation test covers the energy range between approximately 100 eV and 20 MeV, and concerns a wide set of target elements. Multiple and single electron scattering models implemented in Geant4, as well as preassembled selections of physics models distributed within Geant4, are analyzed with statistical methods. The evaluations concern Geant4 versions from 9.1 to 10.1. Significant evolutions are observed over the range of Geant4 versions, not always in the direction of better compatibility with experiment. Goodness-of-fit tests complemented by categorical analysis tests identify a configuration based on Geant4 Urban multiple scattering model in Geant4 vers...

Kim, Sung Hun; Basaglia, Tullio; Han, Min Cheol; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Saracco, Paolo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Validation fo the International Code Compliant Calculator (IC3) v3. 10.3 Using the RESNET Verification Procedures (No. 07-003)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.E., FASHRAE December 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System IC3 RESNET Validation Report, p.i December 2011 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M... state or reflect those of the Texas Engineering Experiment Station or the Energy Systems Laboratory. IC3 RESNET Validation Report, p.ii December 2011 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report presents results...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

256

1 Validation of the CERTS Microgrid Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—The development of test plans to validate the CERTS Microgrid concept is discussed, including the status of a testbed. Increased application of Distributed Energy Resources on the Distribution system has the potential to improve performance, lower operational costs and create value

Microgrid Testbed; David K. Nichols; John Stevens; Robert H. Lasseter; Joseph H. Eto; Harry T. Vollkommer; Islanding Microgrid Microturbine

257

Validating Collective Classification Using Cohorts , Abdullah Sonmez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecology to the cycles of energy and chemistry that drive weather and environmental change. We build]. General analysis of network data started with a statistical approach based on random graphs [5]. Work toolkit [15], and a book that covers several aspects in depth [16]. Recent work on validation

Pratt, Vaughan

258

RELAP-7 SOFTWARE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

Smith, Curtis L [Idaho National Laboratory; Choi, Yong-Joon [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Validating Complex Agent Behavior Scott A. Wallace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavior by Scott A. Wallace Chair: John E. Laird Developing software agents that replicate human behaviorValidating Complex Agent Behavior by Scott A. Wallace A dissertation submitted in partial) in The University of Michigan 2003 Doctoral Committee: Professor John E. Laird, Chair Associate Professor William P

Wallace, Scott

260

Sequence Assembly Validation by Restriction Digest Fingerprint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequence Assembly Validation by Restriction Digest Fingerprint Comparison Eric C. Rouchka and David examines the use of restriction digest analysis as a method for testing the fidelity of sequence assembly. Restriction digest fingerprint matching is an established technology for high resolution physical map

Rouchka, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

GRIMHX verification and validation action matrix summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WSRC-RP-90-026, Certification Plan for Reactor Analysis Computer Codes, describes a series of action items to be completed for certification of reactor analysis computer codes used in Technical Specifications development and for other safety and production support calculations. Validation and verification of the code is an integral part of this process. This document identifies the work performed and documentation generated to satisfy these action items for the Reactor Physics computer code GRIMHX. Each action item is discussed with the justification for its completion. Specific details of the work performed are not included in this document but are found in the references. The publication of this document signals the validation and verification effort for the GRIMHX code is completed.

Trumble, E.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

NASA Remote Sensing Validation Data: Saudi Arabia  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Since 1995, the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have co-operated to establish a 12 station network of high quality solar radiation monitoring installations across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. NREL and KACST realized the value of accurate surface solar radiation flux measurements for validation of satellite derived surface and atmospheric solar radiation flux measurements, and is making this data available to support validation of satellite data products related to the NASA Mission to Planet Earth component of the Earth Science Enterprise Earth Observing System (EOS) project to evaluate long term climate trends based on measuements from EOS Terra Platforms. A CIMEL 8 channel sunphotometer for measuring aerosol optical depth at 6 wavelengths and total column water has been deployed at the Solar Village station since February 24, 1999. [Taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/new_data/Saudi_Arabia/

Myers, Daryl R. (NREL); Al-Abbadi,Naif (King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Energy Research Institite); Wilcox, Steve (NREL)

264

Guide to verification and validation of the SCALE-4 criticality safety software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whenever a decision is made to newly install the SCALE nuclear criticality safety software on a computer system, the user should run a set of verification and validation (V&V) test cases to demonstrate that the software is properly installed and functioning correctly. This report is intended to serve as a guide for this V&V in that it specifies test cases to run and gives expected results. The report describes the V&V that has been performed for the nuclear criticality safety software in a version of SCALE-4. The verification problems specified by the code developers have been run, and the results compare favorably with those in the SCALE 4.2 baseline. The results reported in this document are from the SCALE 4.2P version which was run on an IBM RS/6000 workstation. These results verify that the SCALE-4 nuclear criticality safety software has been correctly installed and is functioning properly. A validation has been performed for KENO V.a utilizing the CSAS25 criticality sequence and the SCALE 27-group cross-section library for {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu fissile, systems in a broad range of geometries and fissile fuel forms. The experimental models used for the validation were taken from three previous validations of KENO V.a. A statistical analysis of the calculated results was used to determine the average calculational bias and a subcritical k{sub eff} criteria for each class of systems validated. Included the statistical analysis is a means of estimating the margin of subcriticality in k{sub eff}. This validation demonstrates that KENO V.a and the 27-group library may be used for nuclear criticality safety computations provided the system being analyzed falls within the range of the experiments used in the validation.

Emmett, M.B.; Jordan, W.C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Validation of Hadronic Models in GEANT4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geant4 is a software toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. It has abundant hadronic models from thermal neutron interactions to ultra relativistic hadrons. An overview of validations in Geant4 hadronic physics is presented based on thin target measurements. In most cases, good agreement is available between Monte Carlo prediction and experimental data; however, several problems have been detected which require some improvement in the models.

Koi, Tatsumi; Wright, Dennis H.; /SLAC; Folger, Gunter; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Starkov, Nikolai; /CERN; Heikkinen, Aatos; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Truscott,; Lei, Fan; /QinetiQ; Wellisch, Hans-Peter

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

PV array simulator development and validation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to harvest all available energy from a photovoltaic (PV) array is essential if new system developments are to meet levelized cost of energy targets and achieve grid parity with conventional centralized utility power. Therefore, exercising maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms, dynamic irradiance condition operation and startup and shutdown routines and evaluating inverter performance with various PV module fill-factor characteristics must be performed with a repeatable, reliable PV source. Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with Ametek Programmable Power to develop and demonstrate a multi-port TerraSAS PV array simulator. The simulator will replicate challenging PV module profiles, enabling the evaluation of inverter performance through analyses of the parameters listed above. Energy harvest algorithms have traditionally implemented methods that successfully utilize available energy. However, the quantification of energy capture has always been difficult to conduct, specifically when characterizing the inverter performance under non-reproducible dynamic irradiance conditions. Theoretical models of the MPPT algorithms can simulate capture effectiveness, but full validation requires a DC source with representative field effects. The DC source being developed by Ametek and validated by Sandia is a fully integrated system that can simulate an IV curve from the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) module data base. The PV simulator allows the user to change the fill factor by programming the maximum power point voltage and current parameters and the open circuit voltage and short circuit current. The integrated PV simulator can incorporate captured irradiance and module temperature data files for playback, and scripted profiles can be generated to validate new emerging hardware embedded with existing and evolving MPPT algorithms. Since the simulator has multiple independent outputs, it also has the flexibility to evaluate an inverter with multiple MPPT DC inputs. The flexibility of the PV simulator enables the validation of the inverter's capability to handle vastly different array configurations.

Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Lucca, Roberto (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA); Deuel, Don (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Radiography Facility - Building 239 Independent Validation Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this task was to perform an Independent Validation Review to evaluate the successful implementation and effectiveness of Safety Basis controls, including new and revised controls, to support the implementation of a new DSA/TSR for B239. This task addresses Milestone 2 of FY10 PEP 7.6.6. As the first IVR ever conducted on a LLNL nuclear facility, it was designated a pilot project. The review follows the outline developed for Milestone 1 of the PEP, which is based on the DOE Draft Guide for Performance of Independent Verification Review of Safety Basis Controls. A formal Safety Basis procedure will be developed later, based on the lessons learned with this pilot project. Note, this review is termed a ''Validation'' in order to be consistent with the PEP definition and address issues historically raised about verification mechanisms at LLNL. Validation is intended to confirm that implementing mechanisms realistically establish the ability of TSR LCO, administrative control or safety management program to accomplish its intended safety function and that the controls are being implemented. This effort should not, however, be confused with a compliance assessment against all relevant DOE requirements and national standards. Nor is it used as a vehicle to question the derivation of controls already approved by LSO unless a given TSR statement simply cannot be implemented as stated.

Altenbach, T J; Beaulieu, R A; Watson, J F; Wong, H J

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

269

Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results for the 10- and 15-min averaging periods. For these cases, correlation coefficients exceeded 0.9. As a part of the analysis, Eulerian integral time scales ({tau}) were estimated for the four high-wind nights. Time series of {tau} through each night indicated erratic behavior consistent with the nonstationarity. Histograms of {tau} showed a mode at 4-5 s, but frequent occurrences of larger {tau} values, mostly between 10 and 100 s.

Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Generator Dynamic Model Validation and Parameter Calibration Using Phasor Measurements at the Point of Connection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disturbance data recorded by phasor measurement units (PMU) offers opportunities to improve the integrity of dynamic models. However, manually tuning parameters through play-back events demands significant efforts and engineering experiences. In this paper, a calibration method using the extended Kalman filter (EKF) technique is proposed. The formulation of EKF with parameter calibration is discussed. Case studies are presented to demonstrate its validity. The proposed calibration method is cost-effective, complementary to traditional equipment testing for improving dynamic model quality.

Huang, Zhenyu; Du, Pengwei; Kosterev, Dmitry; Yang, Steve

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Thermodynamics for Single-Molecule Stretching Experiments J. M. Rubi,*, D. Bedeaux, and S. Kjelstrup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics for Single-Molecule Stretching Experiments J. M. Rubi,*, D. Bedeaux, and S to construct nonequilibrium thermodynamics for systems too small to be considered thermodynamically be viewed as a large thermodynamic system, we discuss the validity of nonequilibrium thermodynamics

Kjelstrup, Signe

272

Verification and Validation of Carbon-Fiber Laminate Low Velocity Impact Simulations.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented is a model verification and validation effort using low - velocity impact (LVI) of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate experiments. A flat cylindrical indenter impacts the laminate with enough energy to produce delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. Included in the experimental efforts are ultrasonic scans of the damage for qualitative validation of the models. However, the primary quantitative metrics of validation are the force time history measured through the instrumented indenter and initial and final velocities. The simulations, whi ch are run on Sandia's Sierra finite element codes , consist of all physics and material parameters of importance as determined by a sensitivity analysis conducted on the LVI simulation. A novel orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model that is cap able of predicting progressive composite damage and failure is described in detail and material properties are measured, estimated from micromechanics or optimized through calibration. A thorough verification and calibration to the accompanying experiment s are presented. Specia l emphasis is given to the four - point bend experiment. For all simulations of interest, the mesh and material behavior is verified through extensive convergence studies. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter unc ertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating this phenomenon in structures of interest.

English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle; Briggs, Timothy; Brown, Arthur

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Solar Energy Research Institute Validation Test House Site Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Validation Test House at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado, is being used to collect performance data for analysis/design tool validation as part of the DOE Passive Solar Class A Performance Evaluation Program.

Burch, J.; Wortman, D.; Judkoff, R.; Hunn, B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2.3.3.216 Addthis Related Articles U-252: Barracuda Web Filter Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits...

275

Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline silicon test structures, as well as uncontrolled nonuniform changes in this quantity over time and during operation.

Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

All Sky Camera, LIDAR and Electric Field Meter: auxiliary instruments for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRI SST-2M is the end-to-end prototype telescope of the Italian National Institute of Astro- physics, INAF, designed to investigate the 10-100 TeV band in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope has been installed in Italy in September 2014, at the INAF ob- serving station located at Serra La Nave on Mount Etna. The telescope is foreseen to be completed and fully operative in spring 2015 including auxiliary instrumentation needed to support both operations and data anal- ysis. In this contribution we present the current status of a sub-set of the auxiliary instruments that are being used at the Serra La Nave site, namely an All Sky Camera, an Electric Field Meter and a Raman Lidar devoted, together with further instrumentation, to the monitoring of the atmospheric and environmental conditions. The data analysis techniques under development for these instruments could be applied at the CTA sites, where similar auxiliary instrumentation will be installed.

Leto, Giuseppe; Bellassai, Giancarlo; Bruno, Pietro; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Martinetti, Eugenio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Validation of the Monte Carlo Criticality Program KENO V. a for highly-enriched uranium systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of calculations based on critical experiments have been performed using the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Criticality Program for the purpose of validating KENO V.a for use in evaluating Y-12 Plant criticality problems. The experiments were reflected and unreflected systems of single units and arrays containing highly enriched uranium metal or uranium compounds. Various geometrical shapes were used in the experiments. The SCALE control module CSAS25 with the 27-group ENDF/B-4 cross-section library was used to perform the calculations. Some of the experiments were also calculated using the 16-group Hansen-Roach Library. Results are presented in a series of tables and discussed. Results show that the criteria established for the safe application of the KENO IV program may also be used for KENO V.a results.

Knight, J.R.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Integrated performance validation facility for KNICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the application of new digital control and monitoring systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs), it is required to satisfy the proven technology requirements. They should have at least three years of documented, satisfactory service as modules of subsystems in power plant applications similar to that of NPP, or it should have three years of documented, satisfactory service in other plant applications which are similar to the use in NPP (EPRI-URD's first option). However, tlte digital control and monitoring systems developed by Korea Nuclear Instrumentation A Control System (KNICS) R and D Center, due to the nature of the firstly developed system, have had no prior application in any NPPs as well as industrial and fossil power plants. Therefore, well defined program using 'Integrated Performance Validation Facility (IPVF) 'for prototype testing has been prepared to verify their performance, operability and reliability according to EPRI-URD's second option: It has satisfactorily completed a defined program of prototype testing which has been designed to verify its performance. The IPVF for KNICS is being designed to justify that new control systems are proven to meet utility's requirements. The IPVF comprises Virtual Operating Crew (VOC) and Test Commander (TC). Human System Interface (HIS). Evaluation System, and Simulator and Interface System. PLC and DCS developed by KNICS are connected with IPVF. Control logics and HIS of real NPP are implemented in the KNICS PLC and DCS, which are the validation object. Finally. IPVF will be extremely valuable for other activities in addition to the validation of the new control system equipment, including the testing and evaluation of plant control algorithms, personnel training, and support for long-term maintenance of the control systems. (authors)

Kim, D. G.; Choi, J. J.; Choi, M. J.; Choe, I. N. [I and C Engineering Dept., Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9, Mabuk-Dong, Yongin-Si. Gyeonggi-Do. 446-713 (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Y. H.; Kim, K. H. [KNICS R and D Center, 28-1, Seongju-Dong, Changwon-Si. 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

On the Practicality of Abductive Validation Tim Menzies 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Practicality of Abductive Validation Tim Menzies 1 Abstract. An abductive framework is described for validating the- ories using a library of known or desired behaviour. Abduction is known. The computational limits of the framework is therefore explored. We find that abductive validation is a practical

Menzies, Tim

280

Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II FieldVacancy-Induced NanoscaleValidating

282

Validating Computer-Designed Proteins for Vaccines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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283

The MichelsonMorley Experiment as a Primer on Validation 1 March 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Bandelier National Forest near Los Alamos, New Mexico, in May, 2000 is an example. Los Alamos National Laboratory had had a forest fire in 1996. The Laboratory and the U. S. National Park Service developed

Stevenson, D. E. "Steve"

284

ORDINATEUR QUANTIQUE: UN MODELE THEORIQUE GENEVOIS VALIDE PAR UNE EXPERIENCE ALLEMANDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'atomes (doublon) , en laissant derrière eux une «boîte» vide ou un trou (holon). Ce doublon et ce holon forment un propagation des pairs doublon/holon intriqués. En 0.0025 #12;Presse Information Publications 24 rue du Général, doublons et holons ont parcouru une distance équivalente à dix atomes voisins. Toutes les données obtenues

Schibler, Ueli

285

70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-December 2013Lamps;5SUMMARIES |2DepartmentDavid.070 MPa

286

DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S. Department of Energy0606891

287

Airborne Multiwavelength High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) Observations During TCAP 2012: Vertical Proles of Optical and Microphysical Properties of a Smoke/Urban Haze Plume Over the Northeastern Coast of the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present rst measurements with the rst airborne multiwavelength High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2), developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument was operated during the Department of Energy (DOE) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in July 2012. We observed out ow of urban haze and fresh biomass burning smoke from the East Coast of the US out over the West Atlantic Ocean. Lidar ratios at 355 and 532 nm were ... sr indicating moderately absorbing aerosols. Extinctionrelated Angstrom exponents were 1.5{2 pointing at comparably small particles. Our novel automated, unsupervised data inversion algorithm retrieves particle e*ective radii of approximately 0.2 *m, which is in agreement with the large Angstrom exponents. We nd reasonable agreement to particle size parameters obtained from situ measurements carried out with the DOE G-1 aircraft that ew during the lidar observations.

Muller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Kolgotin, A.; Hair, John; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David; Rogers, R. R.; Hare, Rich; Cleckner, Craig; Obland, Michael; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Berg, Larry K.; Schmid, Beat

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

An investigation of the depolarization of backscattered electromagnetic waves using a lidar polarimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the samples was varied from a very rough to a moderately rough surface. Using these targets, polarized and depolarized backscatter measurements were recorded using both horizon- tal and vertical transmit polarization for angles of in- cidence between 0...' . . . . . . . . . . . 48 III -3 III-4 II I- 5 III-6 Intensity pattern for p /p a s Intensity pattern for p /p a s Intensity pattern for p /p a s 2. 0 x 10 1. 0 x 10 2. 62 x 10 Experimental arrangement for collimated beam experiment 49 50 51 53 III- 7...

Wilhelmi, Gary Joe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of double beta decay experiments are reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments, NEMO-3 and CUORICINO, are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments are considered. In these experiments sensitivity for the effective neutrino mass will be on the level of (0.1-0.01) eV.

A. S. Barabash

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

CASL Validation Data: An Initial Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study aims to establish a comprehensive view of “data” needed for supporting implementation of the Consortium of Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL). Insights from this review (and its continual refinement), together with other elements developed in CASL, should provide the foundation for developing the CASL Validation Data Plan (VDP). VDP is instrumental to the development and assessment of CASL simulation tools as predictive capability. Most importantly, to be useful for CASL, the VDP must be devised (and agreed upon by all participating stakeholders) with appropriate account for nature of nuclear engineering applications, the availability, types and quality of CASL-related data, and novelty of CASL goals and its approach to the selected challenge problems. The initial review (summarized on the January 2011 report version) discusses a broad range of methodological issues in data review and Validation Data Plan. Such a top-down emphasis in data review is both needed to see a big picture on CASL data and appropriate when the actual data are not available for detailed scrutiny. As the data become available later in 2011, a revision of data review (and regular update) should be performed. It is expected that the basic framework for review laid out in this report will help streamline the CASL data review in a way that most pertinent to CASL VDP.

Nam Dinh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for fuel cycle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DARWIN package, developed by the CEA and its French partners (AREVA and EDF) provides the required parameters for fuel cycle applications: fuel inventory, decay heat, activity, neutron, {gamma}, {alpha}, {beta} sources and spectrum, radiotoxicity. This paper presents the DARWIN2.3 experimental validation for fuel inventory and decay heat calculations on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). In order to validate this code system for spent fuel inventory a large program has been undertaken, based on spent fuel chemical assays. This paper deals with the experimental validation of DARWIN2.3 for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel inventory calculation, focused on the isotopes involved in Burn-Up Credit (BUC) applications and decay heat computations. The calculation - experiment (C/E-1) discrepancies are calculated with the latest European evaluation file JEFF-3.1.1 associated with the SHEM energy mesh. An overview of the tendencies is obtained on a complete range of burn-up from 10 to 85 GWd/t (10 to 60 GWcVt for MOX fuel). The experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for decay heat calculation is performed using calorimetric measurements carried out at the Swedish Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies, covering a large burn-up (20 to 50 GWd/t) and cooling time range (10 to 30 years). (authors)

San-Felice, L.; Eschbach, R.; Bourdot, P. [DEN, DER, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 ST Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsilanizara, A.; Huynh, T. D. [DEN, DM2S, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ourly, H. [EDF, R and D, 1 av. General de Gaulle, F-92131 Clamart Cedex (France); Thro, J. F. [AREVA, Tour AREVA, F-92084 Paris la Defense (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Blazar Sequence: Validity and Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The "blazar sequence" posits that the most powerful BL Lacertae objects and flat-spectrum radio quasars should have relatively small synchrotron peak frequencies, nu_peak, and that the least powerful such objects should have the highest nu_peak values. This would have strong implications for our understanding of jet formation and physics and the possible detection of powerful, moderately high-redshift TeV blazars. I review the validity of the blazar sequence by using the results of very recent surveys and compare its detailed predictions against observational data. I find that the blazar sequence in its simplest form is ruled out. However, powerful flat-spectrum radio quasars appear not to reach the nu_peak typical of BL Lacs. This could indeed be related to some sort of sequence, although it cannot be excluded that it is instead due to a selection effect.

P. Padovani

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Model Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project “Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology” at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube-based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report discusses the validation studies performed to establish the degree of accuracy of the computer modeling methods current used to simulate the response of boron-lined tubes. This is the precursor to developing models for the uranium neutron coincidence collar under Task 2 of this project.

Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Real-World Hydrogen Technology Validation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, the Department of Defense's Defense Logistics Agency, and the Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration have funded learning demonstrations and early market deployments to provide insight into applications of hydrogen technologies on the road, in the warehouse, and as stationary power. NREL's analyses validate the technology in real-world applications, reveal the status of the technology, and facilitate the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, manufacturing, and operations. This paper presents the maintenance, safety, and operation data of fuel cells in multiple applications with the reported incidents, near misses, and frequencies. NREL has analyzed records of more than 225,000 kilograms of hydrogen that have been dispensed through more than 108,000 hydrogen fills with an excellent safety record.

Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Eudy, L.; Saur, G.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Validation and Testing of ENDF/B-VII Decay Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear decay library developed for the ORIGEN code was upgraded from ENDF/B-VI.8 to -VII.0 and released in the SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system in 2011. Experience with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library identified serious errors and performance issues in the evaluated decay sublibrary. Initially, errors were identified in the decay scheme for the 238U series, leading to large discrepancies in the gamma emission rate for uranium. Further testing of the fission product decay data revealed significant performance issues with ENDF/B-VII.0 relative to the previous release of ENDF/B-VI. To address the performance issues, the decay data library in SCALE was upgraded to ENDF/B-VII.1 and released as an update for users in 2013. This paper describes the practical impact of the ENDF/B-VII.0 decay data performance issues on common code applications, and the validation and testing performed on the updated ORIGEN libraries developed from the ENDF/B-VII.1 sublibrary.

Gauld, Ian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Pigni, Marco T [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A proposed framework for computational fluid dynamics code calibration/validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the terminology and methodology that have been introduced during the last several years for building confidence n the predictions from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CID) codes. Code validation terminology developed for nuclear reactor analyses and aerospace applications is reviewed and evaluated. Currently used terminology such as ``calibrated code,`` ``validated code,`` and a ``validation experiment`` is discussed along with the shortcomings and criticisms of these terms. A new framework is proposed for building confidence in CFD code predictions that overcomes some of the difficulties of past procedures and delineates the causes of uncertainty in CFD predictions. Building on previous work, new definitions of code verification and calibration are proposed. These definitions provide more specific requirements for the knowledge level of the flow physics involved and the solution accuracy of the given partial differential equations. As part of the proposed framework, categories are also proposed for flow physics research, flow modeling research, and the application of numerical predictions. The contributions of physical experiments, analytical solutions, and other numerical solutions are discussed, showing that each should be designed to achieve a distinctively separate purpose in building confidence in accuracy of CFD predictions. A number of examples are given for each approach to suggest methods for obtaining the highest value for CFD code quality assurance.

Oberkampf, W.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Validation of SCALE-4 criticality sequences using ENDF/B-V data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SCALE code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contains criticality safety analysis sequences that include the KENO V.a Monte Carlo code for calculation of the effective multiplication factor. These sequences are widely used for criticality safety analyses performed both in the United States and abroad. The purpose of the current work is to validate the SCALE-4 criticality sequences with an ENDF/B-V cross-section library for future distribution with SCALE-4. The library used for this validation is a broad-group library (44 groups) collapsed from the 238-group SCALE library. Extensive data testing of both the 238-group and the 44-group libraries included 10 fast and 18 thermal CSEWG benchmarks and 5 other fast benchmarks. Both libraries contain approximately 300 nuclides and are, therefore, capable of modeling most systems, including those containing spent fuel or radioactive waste. The validation of the broad-group library used 93 critical experiments as benchmarks. The range of experiments included 60 light-water-reactor fuel rod lattices, 13 mixed-oxide fuel rod lattice, and 15 other low- and high-enriched uranium critical assemblies.

Bowman, S.M.; Wright, R.Q.; DeHart, M.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taniuchi, H. [Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

Kahler, Albert C. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Double beta decay experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

A. S. Barabash

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Validating agent based models through virtual worlds.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the US continues its vigilance against distributed, embedded threats, understanding the political and social structure of these groups becomes paramount for predicting and dis- rupting their attacks. Agent-based models (ABMs) serve as a powerful tool to study these groups. While the popularity of social network tools (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) has provided extensive communication data, there is a lack of ne-grained behavioral data with which to inform and validate existing ABMs. Virtual worlds, in particular massively multiplayer online games (MMOG), where large numbers of people interact within a complex environ- ment for long periods of time provide an alternative source of data. These environments provide a rich social environment where players engage in a variety of activities observed between real-world groups: collaborating and/or competing with other groups, conducting battles for scarce resources, and trading in a market economy. Strategies employed by player groups surprisingly re ect those seen in present-day con icts, where players use diplomacy or espionage as their means for accomplishing their goals. In this project, we propose to address the need for ne-grained behavioral data by acquiring and analyzing game data a commercial MMOG, referred to within this report as Game X. The goals of this research were: (1) devising toolsets for analyzing virtual world data to better inform the rules that govern a social ABM and (2) exploring how virtual worlds could serve as a source of data to validate ABMs established for analogous real-world phenomena. During this research, we studied certain patterns of group behavior to compliment social modeling e orts where a signi cant lack of detailed examples of observed phenomena exists. This report outlines our work examining group behaviors that underly what we have termed the Expression-To-Action (E2A) problem: determining the changes in social contact that lead individuals/groups to engage in a particular behavior. Results from our work indicate that virtual worlds have the potential for serving as a proxy in allocating and populating behaviors that would be used within further agent-based modeling studies.

Lakkaraju, Kiran; Whetzel, Jonathan H.; Lee, Jina [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Bier, Asmeret Brooke; Cardona-Rivera, Rogelio E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Bernstein, Jeremy Ray Rhythm [Gaikai, Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures (VMM) Libby Berger (General Motors), Omar Faruque (Ford) Co-Principal Investigators US Automotive...

304

Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aleks Obabko, Paul Fischer, and Tim Tautges, Argonne National Laboratory Thermal Hydraulic Modeling: Cross-Verification, Validation and Co-design PI Name: Paul F. Fischer PI...

305

Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylation Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis. In: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols, M.Segal: Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylationpackage and applications to genomics. Bioinformatics and

Segal, Mark R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

HEV, PHEV, EV Test Standard Development and Validation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EV Test Standard Development and Validation 2013 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 13-17, 2013 Michael Duoba, Henning Lohse-Busch, Kevin...

307

V-139: Cisco Network Admission Control Input Validation Flaw...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sensitive Information U-270:Trend Micro Control Manager Input Validation Flaw in Ad Hoc Query Module Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands U-015: CiscoWorks Common...

308

Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of created fractures." State Colorado Objectives Develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create...

309

U-219: Symantec Web Gateway Input Validation Flaws Lets Remote...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Symantec Web Gateway Input Validation Flaws Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands, Execute Arbitrary Commands, and Change User Passwords U-219: Symantec Web Gateway Input...

310

Report on a workshop concerning code validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of wind turbine components is becoming more critical as turbines become lighter and more dynamically active. Computer codes that will reliably predict turbine dynamic response are, therefore, more necessary than before. However, predicting the dynamic response of very slender rotating structures that operate in turbulent winds is not a simple matter. Even so, codes for this purpose have been developed and tested in North America and in Europe, and it is important to disseminate information on this subject. The purpose of this workshop was to allow those involved in the wind energy industry in the US to assess the progress invalidation of the codes most commonly used for structural/aero-elastic wind turbine simulation. The theme of the workshop was, ``How do we know it`s right``? This was the question that participants were encouraged to ask themselves throughout the meeting in order to avoid the temptation of presenting information in a less-than-critical atmosphere. Other questions posed at the meeting are: What is the proof that the codes used can truthfully represent the field data? At what steps were the codes tested against known solutions, or against reliable field data? How should the designer or user validate results? What computer resources are needed? How do codes being used in Europe compare with those used in the US? How does the code used affect industry certification? What can be expected in the future?

none,

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Validation procedures used in the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is (1) to document the data validation process developed for the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP); (2) to offer members of other project teams and potential data users the benefit of the experience gained in the BSCP in the area of developing project-specific data validation criteria and procedures based on best available guidance and technical information; and (3) to provide input and guidance to the efforts under way within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to develop standard operating procedures to streamline and optimize the analytical laboratory data validation process for general use by making it more technically rigorous, consistent, and cost effective. Lessons learned from the BSCP are also provided to meet this end (Sect. 1.3).

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

PXIE: Project X Injector Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are planning a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of the Project X. This program is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. Integrated systems testing, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), will be accomplished with a new test facility under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-16. PXIE will include an H{sup -} ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne; Holmes, S.D.; Kephart, R.D.; Kerby, J.S.; Lebedev, V.A.; Mishra, C.S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Solyak, N.; Stanek, R.P.; /Fermilab; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses--Criticality (keff) Predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most significant remaining challenges associated with expanded implementation of burnup credit in the United States is the validation of depletion and criticality calculations used in the safety evaluation - in particular, the availability and use of applicable measured data to support validation, especially for fission products. Applicants and regulatory reviewers have been constrained by both a scarcity of data and a lack of clear technical basis or approach for use of the data. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff have noted that the rationale for restricting their Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) to actinide-only is based largely on the lack of clear, definitive experiments that can be used to estimate the bias and uncertainty for computational analyses associated with using burnup credit. To address the issue of validation, the NRC initiated a project with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to (1) develop and establish a technically sound validation approach (both depletion and criticality) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) criticality safety evaluations based on best-available data and methods and (2) apply the approach for representative SNF storage and transport configurations/conditions to demonstrate its usage and applicability, as well as to provide reference bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the criticality (k{sub eff}) validation approach, and resulting observations and recommendations. Validation of the isotopic composition (depletion) calculations is addressed in a companion paper at this conference. For criticality validation, the approach is to utilize (1) available laboratory critical experiment (LCE) data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC) program to support validation of the principal actinides and (2) calculated sensitivities, nuclear data uncertainties, and the limited available fission product LCE data to predict and verify individual biases for relevant minor actinides and fission products. This paper (1) provides a detailed description of the approach and its technical bases, (2) describes the application of the approach for representative pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor safety analysis models to demonstrate its usage and applicability, (3) provides reference bias results based on the prerelease SCALE 6.1 code package and ENDF/B-VII nuclear cross-section data, and (4) provides recommendations for application of the results and methods to other code and data packages.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ris-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore Wind Speed Maps to In-Situ Data, Microscale project goal is to develop a method for utilizing the satellite wind speed maps for offshore wind resources, e.g. in future planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysis

315

Experimental validation of finite element codes for welding deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental validation of finite element codes for welding deformations H. M. Aarbogha,b, , M Institute for Energy Technology, N-2027 Kjeller, Norway. Abstract A single pass Metal Inert Gas welding which numerical codes quantifying welding stresses can be validated. It includes a mov- ing heat source

Boyer, Edmond

316

Validation of the Window Model of the Modelica Buildings Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-5735E Validation of the Window Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Thierry Stephane MODEL OF THE MODELICA BUILDINGS LIBRARY Thierry Stephane Nouidui, Michael Wetter, and Wangda Zuo the validation of the window model of the free open-source Modelica Buildings library. This paper starts

317

PDF Approach Hybrid Methodology Validation DEVELOPMENT OF A HYBRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PDF Approach Hybrid Methodology Validation DEVELOPMENT OF A HYBRID EULERIAN-LAGRANGIAN METHOD CNRS / INPT / UPS PhD Defense X. PIALAT Hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian Method (HELM) #12;PDF Approach Hybrid Methodology Validation Introduction Gas-Particle Flows Applications pollutant dispersion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Validating Process Refinement with Ontologies , Gerd Groener2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validating Process Refinement with Ontologies Yuan Ren1 , Gerd Groener2 , Jens Lemcke3 , Tirdad University of Koblenz-Landau, 3 SAP AG Abstract. A crucial task in process management is the validation of process refinements. A process refinement is a process description in a more fine-grained representation

Staab, Steffen

319

Irish Potato Fertilizer Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO 101 January, 1908. ish Potato Fertilizer Experiments - Postoffice, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors... was sc Be Irish Potato Fl nents W. S. Hotchkiss and E. J. Kyle. e fertilizer work with the Irish potato at Troupe was first planned fall of 1902. The results which were gotten upon harvesting the the spring of 1903 were so opposed, especially...

Hotchkiss, W.S.; Kyle, E. J. (Edwin Jackson)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Double Beta Decay Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Monte Carol-based validation of neutronic methodology for EBR-II analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous-energy Monte Carlo code VIM (Ref. 1) has been validated extensively over the years against fast critical experiments and other neutronic analysis codes. A high degree of confidence in VIM for predicting reactor physics parameters has been firmly established. This paper presents a numerical validation of two conventional multigroup neutronic analysis codes, DIF3D (Ref. 4) and VARIANT (Ref. 5), against VIM for two Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) core loadings in detailed three-dimensional hexagonal-z geometry. The DIF3D code is based on nodal diffusion theory, and it is used in calculations for day-today reactor operations, whereas the VARIANT code is based on nodal transport theory and is used with increasing frequency for specific applications. Both DIF3D and VARIANT rely on multigroup cross sections generated from ENDF/B-V by the ETOE-2/MC[sup 2]-II/SDX (Ref. 6) code package. Hence, this study also validates the multigroup cross-section processing methodology against the continuous-energy approach used in VIM.

Liaw, J.R.; Finck, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Development and validation of detailed controls models of the Nelson River Bipole 1 HVDC system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nelson River Bipole 1 mercury arc valve group replacement project and planning for the expansion of the Nelson River HVDC system with a third bipole underway, it was decided to pursue a program to develop and validate detailed models of the existing HVDC transmission facilities and their associated ac systems for use in system studies. The first phase of the program concentrated on the development of detailed controls models associated with the Bipole 1 transmission facility. Based on previous experience at Manitoba Hydro with the Electromagnetic Transient DC simulation program (EMTDC), it was decided that model development and validation would use this program. This paper presents the reasons behind the development of detailed models, the methods used in developing models related to Bipole 1, results of validation tests, difficulties encountered during the process, and the overall benefits resulting from the project. An example of applying the models to investigate a low frequency oscillation which has occurred on the dc system in the past is also presented.

Kuffel, P.; Kent, K.L.; Mazur, G.B.; Weekes, M.A. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg (Canada))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Conference: Synergy Between Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaxiras (Harvard) Synopsis ­ Society's ceaseless demand for clean, renewable energy resources on rapidly developing areas of nanoscale computation, will hold a conference on energy research, experimentAn NNIN/C Conference: Synergy Between Experiment and Computation in Energy ­ Looking to 2030. Yu

Heller, Eric

324

Site tests validate benefits of cavern probes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 5 years` experience with downhole probes has allowed TransGas Ltd., Regina, to monitor and evaluate cavern integrity. The devices access natural-gas storage caverns` pressures and temperatures. Acquired data have helped determine gas-in-place inventory volumes, confirm spatial volumes, and assess changes in spatial volumes that may have resulted from cavern creep (shrinkage or closure) or downhole abnormality such as fluid infill or collapse of the side walls or roof areas. This conclusion of two articles presents details and results of a specific storage-site. The first article presented background and many of the details and lessons of TransGas` cavern gas-storage probe program.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Undergraduate reactor control experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise.

Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Economic, organizational, and institutional impact of the survivability validation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses some of the key economic, organizational, and institutional issues associated with the development and use of survivability validation protocols. It discusses factors affecting protocols, considerations for protocol selection, test- bed/simulator/analysis tool availability, organizational issues affecting protocol use, deviations precluding adherence to validated protocols, and protocol advantages. Knowledge of these factors will assist developers of survivability validation protocols in designing more flexible protocols that can be tailored for differing circumstances without losing the fidelity or assurance that the protocol will produce the desired survivability level.

Brock, G. [Kaman Sciences Corp., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Neutron EDM Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron EDM experiment has played an important part over many decades in shaping and constraining numerous models of CP violation. This review article discusses some of the techniques used to calculate EDMs under various theoretical scenarios, and highlights some of the implications of EDM limits upon such models. A pedagogical introduction is given to the experimental techniques employed in the recently completed ILL experiment, including a brief discussion of the dominant systematic uncertainties. A new and much more sensitive version of the experiment, which is currently under development, is also outlined.

P. G. Harris

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

Laser-direct-driven quasi-isentropic experiments on aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments were performed on long temporally shaped laser pulses based on an analytical isentropic compression model. Upper pressure limits, the ablation pressure scaling law, and stress-density curves were studied. The validity of the analytical model used, the ablation pressure scaling law, and the phenomena of missing line-imaging velocity interferometer (VISAR) fringes in the experimental results are discussed.

Xue, Quanxi, E-mail: quanxixue@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Wang, Feng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Xisheng; Liu, Jingru [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

A proposed methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification, calibration, and validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification, calibration, and validation (VCV) of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. The exact manner in which code VCV activities are planned and conducted, however, is critically important. It is suggested that the way in which code validation, in particular, is often conducted--by comparison to published experimental data obtained for other purposes--is in general difficult and unsatisfactory, and that a different approach is required. This paper describes a proposed methodology for CFD code VCV that meets the technical requirements and is philosophically consistent with code development needs. The proposed methodology stresses teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the VCV process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. A novel approach to uncertainty analysis is described which can both distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error, and whose attributes are used to help define an appropriate experimental design for code VCV experiments. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow over a sliced sphere/cone of varying geometrical complexity.

Aeschliman, D.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development and validation of scale nuclear analysis methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ORNL is updating the nuclear analysis methods and data in the SCALE code system to support modeling of HTGRs. Development activities include methods used for reactor physics, criticality safety, and radiation shielding. This paper focuses on the nuclear methods in support of reactor physics, which primarily include lattice physics for cross-section processing of both prismatic and pebble-bed designs, Monte Carlo depletion methods and efficiency improvements for double heterogeneous fuels, and validation against relevant experiments. These methods enhancements are being validated using available experimental data from the HTTR and HTR-10 startup and initial criticality experiments. Results obtained with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models of the HTTR initial core critical configurations with SCALE6/KENO show excellent agreement between the continuous energy and multigroup methods and the results are consistent with results obtained by others. A three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo model for the initial critical core of the HTR-10 has been developed with SCALE6/KENO based on the benchmark specifications included in the IRPhE Handbook. The core eigenvalue obtained with this model is in very good agreement with the corresponding value obtained with a consistent continuous energy MCNP5 core model.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, Deokjung [ORNL] [ORNL; Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL] [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Steve A [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Hudson, N. [RES Div., U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Validation of Transient Cooling Modeling for Hypersonic Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation of Transient Cooling Modeling for Hypersonic Application Nicolas Gascoin and Philippe and Youssoufi Touré§ Université d'Orléans, 18000 Bourges, France DOI: 10.2514/1.26022 Hypersonic flight

Boyer, Edmond

335

Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual Private Environments for Multiphysics Code Validation on Computing Grids Toan Nguyen-based computing environments and deploys, tests and analyzes multiphysics codes. A second approach executes model coupling, error correlations, alert definitions, best usage practices, code verification and code

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

Verification and validation of RADMODL Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RADMODL is a system of linked computer codes designed to calculate the radiation environment following an accident in which nuclear materials are released. The RADMODL code and the corresponding Verification and Validation (V&V) calculations (Appendix A), were developed for Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) by EGS Corporation (EGS). Each module of RADMODL is an independent code and was verified separately. The full system was validated by comparing the output of the various modules with the corresponding output of a previously verified version of the modules. The results of the verification and validation tests show that RADMODL correctly calculates the transport of radionuclides and radiation doses. As a result of this verification and validation effort, RADMODL Version 1.0 is certified for use in calculating the radiation environment following an accident.

Kimball, K.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Technology Validation Hydrogen and fuel cells are a critical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). Technology validation does not certify marketability, but rather Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration The Energy Department's National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle cell technologies against targets such as fuel cell durability and efficiency, vehicle range

338

System development & validation process for emerging growing organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis has the main purpose of presenting the Development and Validation phase of the product development system from the point of view of an emerging and growing product development organization, denoting the obstacles ...

Almazán López, José Antonio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Validated Constraint Compilation Timothy J. Hickey David K. Wittenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validated Constraint Compilation Timothy J. Hickey David K. Wittenberg Technical Report CS­99 on minimizing it [Wil63, Act96, Tay97]. By using interval constraints, we don't eliminate roundoff error, but we

Hickey, Timothy J.

340

SURVEY, ANALYSIS AND VALIDATION OF INFORMATION FOR BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVEY, ANALYSIS AND VALIDATION OF INFORMATION FOR BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING Nuno Castela Escola, Business Processes, Informational Resources, Activities, UML Abstract: Business processes modeling became a fundamental task for organizations. To model business processes is necessary to know all the activities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

U-144:Juniper Secure Access Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The vendor has issued a fix (7.0R9, 7.1R). Addthis Related Articles V-193: Barracuda SSL VPN Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-701: Citrix Access...

342

V-192: Symantec Security Information Manager Input Validation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Input Validation Flaws U-129: RSA enVision Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting, SQL Injection, and Directory Traversal Attacks T-731:Symantec IM Manager Code Injection Vulnerability...

343

VALIDATION OF MASSIVELY PARALLEL SIMULATIONS OF DYNAMIC FRACTURE AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VALIDATION OF MASSIVELY PARALLEL SIMULATIONS OF DYNAMIC FRACTURE AND FRAGMENTATION OF BRITTLE element simulations of dynamic fracture and fragmentation of brittle solids are presented. Fracture the results of massively parallel numerical simulations of dynamic fracture and fragmentation in brittle

Barr, Al

344

Psychometric validation of the Hispanic Bilingual Gifted Screening Instrument (HBGSI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

found that the HBGSI has evidence of high reliability coefficients using Guttman, Spearman-Brown and Cronbach??s alpha ranging from .93 to .97. Concurrent validity was computed using Pearson correlation coefficient r =.39. Additionally, an exploratory...

Fultz, Monica V.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

Particulate dispersion apparatus for the validation of plume models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

improved sampling equipment and provide a reliable, reproducible basis for experimental validation of predictions from plume dispersion models. The device constructed and demonstrated in this project is a controllable point source able to disperse dry...

Bala, William D

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Field validation of monitoring method for ditertiary butylperoxide (DTBP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions. The procedure was designed to identify any concerns which may be related to plant interferences, sample handling, storage and shipment. The field validation involved preliminary sampling to determine the concentration of DTBP present in the work...

Stansbury, Anna Michelle

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Bibliography for Verification and Validation in Computational Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bibliography has been compiled dealing with the verification and validation of computational simulations. The references listed in this bibliography are concentrated in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, references from the following fields are also included: operations research, heat transfer, solid dynamics, software quality assurance, software accreditation, military systems, and nuclear reactor safety. This bibliography, containing 221 references, is not meant to be comprehensive. It was compiled during the last ten years in response to the author's interest and research in the methodology for verification and validation. The emphasis in the bibliography is in the following areas: philosophy of science underpinnings, development of terminology and methodology, high accuracy solutions for CFD verification, experimental datasets for CFD validation, and the statistical quantification of model validation. This bibliography should provide a starting point for individual researchers in many fields of computational simulation in science and engineering.

Oberkampf, W.L.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Experimental validation of quasi-one-dimensional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the mechanical modelling of the vocal fold tissues, the description of the glottal orifice shape or the modelling by an experimental approach [26] to evaluate the benefit, in terms of accuracy of the predictions and validity

Luo, Xiaoyu

349

APPLICATION FOR THE RECOGNITION / VALIDATION OF FOREIGN CERTIFICATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eingang APPLICATION FOR THE RECOGNITION / VALIDATION OF FOREIGN CERTIFICATES for the purpose as in passport) Surname Forename(s) GRADUATE SCHOOLOF EXCELLENCE Date of birth Gender Nationality All certificates concerning studies at an instituion of higher education (university) must

Kaus, Boris

350

Implicit attitude measures: Consistency, stability, and convergent validity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, several techniques have been developed to measure implicit social cognition. Despite their increased use, little attention has been devoted to their reliability and validity. This article undertakes a ...

Cunningham, W. A.; Preacher, K. J.; Banaji, M. R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Challenge Paper: Validation of Forensic Techniques for Criminal Prosecution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Challenge Paper: Validation of Forensic Techniques for Criminal Prosecution Robert F. Erbacher that digital forensics analysts would benefit from the extension, development and application of advanced techniques in performing large scale and heterogeneous data analysis. Modern digital forensics analysis

Erbacher, Robert F.

352

ARM - Measurement - Lidar polarization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddropletgovMeasurementsIsotope

353

Raman Lidar Receives Improvements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323Program2Raftopoulos takes

354

Simulated pion photoproduction experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: In this paper, I will be assessing the capabilities of the Neutral Meson Spectrometer (NMS) detector in a planned experiment at the High Intensity Gamma Source at Duke University. I will review the relevant ...

Howe, Ethan (Ethan Gabriel Grief)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

General relativity and experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

T. Damour

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program helps to prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends by sharing performance information, lessons learned and good practices across the DOE complex.

357

The MAJORANA Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MAJORANA collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR.

The MAJORANA Collaboration

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Majorana Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

Aguayo, E.; Fast, J. E.; Hoppe, E. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Kephart, J. D.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Back, H. O. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Barabash, A. S.; Konovalov, S. I.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bergevin, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Detwiler, J. A.; Loach, J. C. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

The MAJORANA Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay ({beta}{beta}(0{nu})-decay) experiment. The current, primary focus is the construction of the Majorana Demonstrator experiment, an R and D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, John; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-II, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-II, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Verification and Validation of RADTRAN 5.5.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains a description of the verification and validation process used for the RADTRAN 5.5 code. The verification and validation process ensured the proper calculational models and mathematical and numerical methods were used in the RADTRAN 5.5 code for the determination of risk and consequence assessments. The differences between RADTRAN 5 and RADTRAN 5.5 are the addition of tables, an expanded isotope library, and the additional User-Defined meteorological option for accident dispersion. 3

Osborn, Douglas.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Mills, George Scott; Hamp, Steve C.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) is a full scholarship, professional development program for Syracuse University

Crowston, Kevin

364

Development of a test system for verification and validation of nuclear transport simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification and validation of nuclear data is critical to the accuracy of both stochastic and deterministic particle transport codes. In order to effectively test a set of nuclear data, the data must be applied to a wide variety of transport problems. Performing this task in a timely, efficient manner is tedious. The nuclear data team at Los Alamos National laboratory in collaboration with the University of Florida has developed a methodology to automate the process of nuclear data verification and validation (V and V). This automated V and V process can efficiently test a number of data libraries using well defined benchmark experiments, such as those in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP). The process is implemented through an integrated set of Pyton scripts. Material and geometry data are read from an existing medium or given directly by the user to generate a benchmark experiment template file. The user specifies the choice of benchmark templates, codes, and libraries to form a V and V project. The Python scripts generate input decks for multiple transport codes from the templates, run and monitor individual jobs, and parse the relevant output automatically. The output can then be used to generate reports directly or can be stored into a database for later analysis. This methodology eases the burden on the user by reducing the amount of time and effort required for obtaining and compiling calculation results. The resource savings by using this automated methodology could potentially be an enabling technology for more sophisticated data studies, such as nuclear data uncertainty quantification. Once deployed, this tool will allow the nuclear data community to more thoroughly test data libraries leading to higher fidelity data in the future.

White, Morgan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Triplett, Brian S [GENERAL ELECTRIC; Anghaie, Samim [UNIV OF FL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

Depken, J.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Reliability and validity of brief psychosocial measures related to dietary behaviors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as: Norman et al. , Reliability and validity of brief46. 31. Shrout PE: Measurement reliability and agreement inRESEARCH Open Access Reliability and validity of brief

Norman, Gregory J; Carlson, Jordan A; Sallis, James F; Wagner, Nicole; Calfas, Karen J; Patrick, Kevin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytically validated highly Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Group Collection: Materials Science 2 Verification and Validation of Simulation Model Summary: is consistent with known analytic results 5 Validation Model should...

369

Standardization and validation of a cytometric bead assay to assess antibodies to multiple Plasmodium falciparum recombinant antigens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as: Ondigo et al. : Standardization and validation of aMETHODOLOGY Open Access Standardization and validation of ais available on standardization and validation of antibody

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A demonstration mobility experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corporation, Albuquerque& New Nhxico& for his assl. stance and advice in the preparation of the crystslsl snd my wife, Ellen, who corrected gram&asr& typed, proofread& and offered sncouragesmnt throughout the comple- tion of this thesis, I I I 8 I w... Shockley Haynes mobil. ty experiment. Tp Fig, 2. Sketch of oscilloscope trace from asr1y version of tha Shoo'klay Hagrnes momlity experiment, drift toward the eollsotor point with e velocity~? whereMLO the h ~ ability of a boles Ths Current tlsw...

Martin, Howard Lawrence

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Survivability validation protocol issues for a system-of-systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper illuminates the various issues confronting a protocol developer as he attempts to construct a system-of-systems (SOS) survivability validation protocol. These issues are considered in the context of a Battle Management Command, Control, and Communications (BMC{sup 3}) network in the form of a Hypothetical System Architecture consisting of air, sea, ground, and space platforms. The purpose of the protocol of concem is to validate the nuclear survivability of the BMC{sup 3} SOS. To achieve this validation, the combined susceptibilities of the SOS platforms and communications links must be considered. A basic SOS simulation concept is described, which assumes individual platform survivability. The nuclear environments to be considered in the simulation are outlined with a discussion of the relationship to basic system susceptibility. Various validation concepts for the SOS protocol are summarized in relation to the life cycle phase during which they would be utilized. Computer simulation issues are discussed, including the environments to be modeled, validation of the codes, documentation, and configuration control. Concluding remarks center on the most likely way of simulating nuclear effects and on treating simulation tools like mission critical items.

Brock, G.; Ianacone, K.J.; Stringer, T.A. [Kaman Sciences Corp., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The MAJORANA Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

Guiseppe, V.E. [Univ S Dakota; Keller, C. [Univ S Dakota; Mei, D-M [Univ S Dakota; Perevozchikov, O. [Univ S Dakota; Perumpilly, G. [Univ S Dakota; Thomas, K. [Univ S Dakota; Xiang, W. [Univ S Dakota; Zhang, C. [Univ S Dakota; Aalseth, C.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Aguayo, E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Ely, J. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Fast, J.E. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hoppe, E.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Hossbach, T.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Keillor, M. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kephart, J.D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Kouzes, R. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Miley, H.S. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Mizouni, L. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Myers, A.W. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Reid, D. [Pacific NW Natl Lab Richland, WA; Amman, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bergevin, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chan, Y-D [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Detwiler, J.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loach, J.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Luke, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, R.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Poon, A.W.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Prior, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Yaver, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Avignone, F.T. III [University of South Carolina; Creswick, R. [University of South Carolina; Farach, H. [University of South Carolina; Mizouni, L. [University of South Carolina; Avignone, Frank Titus [ORNL; Bertrand Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Capps, Gregory L [ORNL; Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Wilkerson, John F [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL; Back, H.O. [University of North Carolina; Leviner, L. [North Carolina State University; Young, A.R. [North Carolina State University; Back (et al.), H.O. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC; Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Hong, H. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Howard, S. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Medlin, D. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Sobolev, V. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology; Barabash, A.S. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Konovalov, S.I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Vanyushin, I. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Yumatov, V. [Inst Theort & Expt Phys, Moscow, Russia; Barbeau, P.S. [University of Chicago; Collar, J.I. [University of Chicago; Fields, N. [University of Chicago; Boswell (et al.), M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brudanin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Egorov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Gusey, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Kochetov, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shirchenko, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Timkin, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Yakushev, E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Efremenko, M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Ctr Expt Nucle Phys & Astrophys; Burritt (et al.), T.H. [University of Washington, Dept Phys, Seattle, WA; Busch, M. [Duke University; Esterline, J. [Duke University; Swift, G. [Duke University; Tornow, W. [Duke University/TUNL; Ejiri, H. [Osaka University; Hazama, R. [Osaka University; Nomachi, M. [Osaka University; Shima, T. [Osaka University; Finnerty (et al.), P. [University of North Carolina; et al.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The OLYMPUS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collected over two running periods in 2012. This paper provides details on the accelerator, target, detectors, and operation of the experiment.

R. Milner; D. K. Hasell; M. Kohl; U. Schneekloth; N. Akopov; R. Alarcon; V. A. Andreev; O. Ates; A. Avetisyan; D. Bayadilov; R. Beck; S. Belostotski; J. C. Bernauer; J. Bessuille; F. Brinker; B. Buck; J. R. Calarco; V. Carassiti; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; N. D'Ascenzo; R. De Leo; J. Diefenbach; T. W. Donnelly; K. Dow; G. Elbakian; D. Eversheim; S. Frullani; Ch. Funke; G. Gavrilov; B. Gläser; N. Görrissen; J. Hauschildt; B. S. Henderson; Ph. Hoffmeister; Y. Holler; L. D. Ice; A. Izotov; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; J. Kelsey; D. Khaneft; P. Klassen; A. Kiselev; A. Krivshich; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; D. Lenz; S. Lumsden; Y. Ma; F. Maas; H. Marukyan; O. Miklukho; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; Y. Naryshkin; C. O'Connor; R. Perez Benito; R. Perrino; R. P. Redwine; D. Rodríguez Piñeiro; G. Rosner; R. L. Russell; A. Schmidt; B. Seitz; M. Statera; A. Thiel; H. Vardanyan; D. Veretennikov; C. Vidal; A. Winnebeck; V. Yeganov

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Majorana Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge-76. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

V. E. Guiseppe; for the Majorana Collaboration

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

ATA beam director experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

1986-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Majorana Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Majorana Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. Initially, Majorana aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype Demonstrator module are presented.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, Henning O.; Bai, Xinhua; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hong, H.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Medlin, D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Perevozchikov, O.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Reid, Douglas J.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Ronquest, M. C.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Sobolev, V.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [ed.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis] [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

POLARIZED TARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Experiment 61 at Fermilab, which is a large collaborationBernie Sandler, From From Fermilab. Alan Jonckheere andTARGET EXPERIMENT AT FERMILAB Owen Chamberlain January 1977

Chamberlain, O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Application of the SCALE TSUNAMI Tools for the Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations Involving 233U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiochemical Development Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been storing solid materials containing 233U for decades. Preparations are under way to process these materials into a form that is inherently safe from a nuclear criticality safety perspective. This will be accomplished by down-blending the {sup 233}U materials with depleted or natural uranium. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, a study has been performed using the SCALE sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools to demonstrate how these tools could be used to validate nuclear criticality safety calculations of selected process and storage configurations. ISOTEK nuclear criticality safety staff provided four models that are representative of the criticality safety calculations for which validation will be needed. The SCALE TSUNAMI-1D and TSUNAMI-3D sequences were used to generate energy-dependent k{sub eff} sensitivity profiles for each nuclide and reaction present in the four safety analysis models, also referred to as the applications, and in a large set of critical experiments. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was used together with the sensitivity profiles and the cross-section uncertainty data contained in the SCALE covariance data files to propagate the cross-section uncertainties ({Delta}{sigma}/{sigma}) to k{sub eff} uncertainties ({Delta}k/k) for each application model. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was also used to evaluate the similarity of each of the 672 critical experiments with each application. Results of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment are presented in this report. A total of 142 experiments were judged to be similar to application 1, and 68 experiments were judged to be similar to application 2. None of the 672 experiments were judged to be adequately similar to applications 3 and 4. Discussion of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment is provided for each of the four applications. Example upper subcritical limits (USLs) were generated for application 1 based on trending of the energy of average lethargy of neutrons causing fission, trending of the TSUNAMI similarity parameters, and use of data adjustment techniques.

Mueller, Don [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Atmospheric Monitoring with a LIDAR and an Infra-red Camera at Black Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, the US atmospheric standard model is used so far, and a radio sonde data is also used COLLABORATION 1 Department of Physics, Kinki University 2 Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University 3 for cosmic rays experiment. The aims of atmospheric moni- toring are to calibrate observed energy

382

PV Validation and Bankability Workshop: San Jose, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). The report provides feedback from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Program PV Validation and Bankability Workshop in San Jose, California on August 31, 2011. It focuses on the current state of PV in the United States, private funding to fund U.S. PV industry growth, roles and functions of the regional test center program, and ways to improve the current validation and bankability practices.

Granata, J.; Howard, J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VUQ) Strategy, Revision 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates byUserUtility-ScaleValidatingValidating

384

Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Gross decontamination experiment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Electronics for Satellite Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tracking detector for the LAT science instrument on the GLAST mission is an example of a large-scale particle detection system built primarily by particle physicists for space flight within the context of a NASA program. The design and fabrication model in most ways reflected practice and experience from particle physics, but the quality assurance aspects were guided by NASA. Similarly, most of the electronics in the LAT as a whole were designed and built by staff at a particle physics lab. This paper reports on many of the challenges and lessons learned in the experience of designing and building the tracking detector and general LAT electronics for use in the NASA GLAST mission.

Johnson, Robert P.; /UC, Santa Cruz

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Bolund Experiment Design of Measurement Campaign using CFD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determination of mean wind, wind gradients and turbulence intensity on potential wind turbine positions complex terrain for reliable estimation of power production and wind turbine loads. · Development of remote sensing techniques (Lidar) for measuring wind conditions in complex terrain, including

388

Airspace Management Decision Tool Validating the Behavior and Structure of Software Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................34 LTSA Code ...........................................................................................................36 MATLAB Validation with LTSA--50 iterations ...................................................37

Austin, Mark

389

Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet on Validation of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Technology activities at NREL.

390

The OLYMPUS Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2.01~GeV electron and positron beams incident on an internal hydrogen gas target. The experiment used a toroidal magnetic spectrometer instrumented with drift chambers and time-of-flight detectors to measure rates for elastic scattering over the polar angular range of approximately $25^\\circ$--$75^\\circ$. Symmetric M{\\o}ller/Bhabha calorimeters at $1.29^\\circ$ and telescopes of GEM and MWPC detectors at $12^\\circ$ served as luminosity monitors. A total luminosity of approximately 4.5~fb$^{-1}$ was collect...

Milner, R; Kohl, M; Schneekloth, U; Akopov, N; Alarcon, R; Andreev, V A; Ates, O; Avetisyan, A; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Belostotski, S; Bernauer, J C; Bessuille, J; Brinker, F; Buck, B; Calarco, J R; Carassiti, V; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; D'Ascenzo, N; De Leo, R; Diefenbach, J; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Elbakian, G; Eversheim, D; Frullani, S; Funke, Ch; Gavrilov, G; Gläser, B; Görrissen, N; Hauschildt, J; Henderson, B S; Hoffmeister, Ph; Holler, Y; Ice, L D; Izotov, A; Kaiser, R; Karyan, G; Kelsey, J; Khaneft, D; Klassen, P; Kiselev, A; Krivshich, A; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Lenz, D; Lumsden, S; Ma, Y; Maas, F; Marukyan, H; Miklukho, O; Movsisyan, A; Murray, M; Naryshkin, Y; O'Connor, C; Benito, R Perez; Perrino, R; Redwine, R P; Piñeiro, D Rodríguez; Rosner, G; Russell, R L; Schmidt, A; Seitz, B; Statera, M; Thiel, A; Vardanyan, H; Veretennikov, D; Vidal, C; Winnebeck, A; Yeganov, V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments using DRAGON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulation to predict reactor rates. First, DRAGON was developed to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions,235U,238U,239Pu and141Pu, and it was validated for PWRs using the Takahama benchmark. The fission fraction calculation function was validated through comparing our calculation results with MIT's results. we calculate the fission fraction of the Daya Bay reactor core, and compare its with those calculated by the commercial reactor simulation program SCIENCE, which is used by the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, and the results was consist with each other. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was studied, and the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

X. B. Ma; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

Depken, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Experimental validation of GADRAS's coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of {alpha}-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee T.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Testing Platform for Validation of Overhead Conductor Aging Models and Understanding Thermal Limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power system equipment manufacturers and researchers continue to experiment with novel overhead electric conductor designs that support better conductor performance and address congestion issues. To address the technology gap in testing these novel designs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory constructed the Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing (PCAT) facility to evaluate the performance of novel overhead conductors in an accelerated fashion in a field environment. Additionally, PCAT has the capability to test advanced sensors and measurement methods for accessing overhead conductor performance and condition. Equipped with extensive measurement and monitoring devices, PCAT provides a platform to improve/validate conductor computer models and assess the performance of novel conductors. The PCAT facility and its testing capabilities are described in this paper.

Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL; Young II, Marcus Aaron [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Stovall, John P [ORNL; Overholt, Philip N [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Experimental and Model Validation Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Experimental and Model Validation Study M. Mench, J. Scott, S. Thynell boundary Fuel cell performance Current density distribution measurements Conclusions #12;3 Method, flow rate, species inlet and fuel cell temperature, and humidity. Transparent polycarbonate windows

Wang, Chao-Yang

398

Guide to Using the WIND Toolkit Validation Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of using 20% wind energy by 2030, the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was created to provide information on wind speed, wind direction, temperature, surface air pressure, and air density on more than 126,000 locations across the United States from 2007 to 2013. The numerical weather prediction model output, gridded at 2-km and at a 5-minute resolution, was further converted to detail the wind power production time series of existing and potential wind facility sites. For users of the dataset it is important that the information presented in the WIND Toolkit is accurate and that errors are known, as then corrective steps can be taken. Therefore, we provide validation code written in R that will be made public to provide users with tools to validate data of their own locations. Validation is based on statistical analyses of wind speed, using error metrics such as bias, root-mean-square error, centered root-mean-square error, mean absolute error, and percent error. Plots of diurnal cycles, annual cycles, wind roses, histograms of wind speed, and quantile-quantile plots are created to visualize how well observational data compares to model data. Ideally, validation will confirm beneficial locations to utilize wind energy and encourage regional wind integration studies using the WIND Toolkit.

Lieberman-Cribbin, W.; Draxl, C.; Clifton, A.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

GEOSTATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF VALIDATION DATA OF AN AIR POLLUTION SIMULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOSTATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF VALIDATION DATA OF AN AIR POLLUTION SIMULATOR JEAN-PAUL CHILÃ?S 1 , SERGE SÃ?GURET 1 and PIERRE-MARC RIBOUD 2 1 MINES ParisTech, Fontainebleau, France 2 EDF R&D, Chatou, France ABSTRACT Chemistry-transport models for air quality forecasting are affected by the uncertainty

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

400

DOCKING METHODS, LIGAND DESIGN, AND VALIDATING DATA SETS IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

27 DOCKING METHODS, LIGAND DESIGN, AND VALIDATING DATA SETS IN THE STRUCTURAL GENOMICS ERA Natasja and identify the active component in extracts from natural products that were used. A number of developments in the equilibrium toward the best-fitting conformers for both, resulting in binding (Foote and Milstein, 1994

Bourne, Philip E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Intercomparison and validation of continental water level products derived  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Satellite radar altimeter measurements of lake and reservoir water levels complement in situIntercomparison and validation of continental water level products derived from satellite radar water level products derived from satellite radar altimetry Martina Ricko,a Charon M. Birkett,b James A

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

402

Qualifying geospatial workflow models for adaptive controlled validity and accuracy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Qualifying geospatial workflow models for adaptive controlled validity and accuracy Didier Leibovici, Gobe Hobona, Kristin Stock and Mike Jackson Centre for Geospatial Sciences, University.leibovici@nottingham.ac.uk Abstract--Sharing geospatial data and geoprocessing models within a system like GEOSS (Global Earth

Stock, Kristin

403

Browser Interfaces and Extended Validation SSL Certificates: An Empirical Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Browser Interfaces and Extended Validation SSL Certificates: An Empirical Study Robert Biddle provided by SSL certificates and browser interfaces in the face of var- ious attacks. As one response, basic SSL server certificates are being demoted to second-class status in conjunction

Van Oorschot, Paul

404

Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that energy savings of between 15% and 40% could be made in commercial buildings by closer monitoring and supervision of energy-usage and related data. An earlier study by Kao and Pierce (1983) showed that sensor1 Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation Tim Salsbury and Rick

Diamond, Richard

405

Predicting Vehicle Crashworthiness: Validation of Computer Models for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Vehicle Crashworthiness: Validation of Computer Models for Functional and Hierarchical. Cafeo, Chin-Hsu Lin, and Jian Tu Abstract The CRASH computer model simulates the effect of a vehicle colliding against different barrier types. If it accurately represents real vehicle crash- worthiness

Berger, Jim

406

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review - 2010. Project summary: To effectively combine numerous exploration technologies to gather important data. Once information is combined into 3-D models, a target drilling location will be determined. Deep well capable of finding commercial quantities of geothermal resource will be drilled to validate methodology.

407

APPLICATION FOR THE RECOGNITION/ VALIDATION OF FOREIGN CERTIFICATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eingang APPLICATION FOR THE RECOGNITION/ VALIDATION OF FOREIGN CERTIFICATES to study ____________________________________ Other Subject 2. PERSONAL DETAILS (exactly as in passport) Surname Forename(s) Date of birth Gender OF PREVIOUS EDUCATION All certificates must be presented with official accreditation and officially certified

Kaus, Boris

408

Formal definition of POTENTIAL ENERGY (valid for conservative forces only)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

page - 16 Formal definition of POTENTIAL ENERGY (valid for conservative forces only) Given one type of conservative force F UB - UA= - = - Definition of 'Potential energy difference" conserv #12;page - 17 the definition of the "potential energy difference UB - UA " as equal to negative value of the work W done

409

Ladder Metamodeling & PLC Program Validation through Time Petri Nets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ladder Metamodeling & PLC Program Validation through Time Petri Nets Darlam Fabio Bender1,2, Benoît for Programmable Logical Controllers (PLCs). A PLC is a special purpose industrial computer used to automate the sequential, state-dependent logic in- herent in the program design [1]. Not found bugs in PLC programs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Web Service Composition as a Planning Task: Experiments using Knowledge-Based Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), in this paper, we present some empirical evidence to validate the effectiveness of us- ing knowledge-based planning techniques for solving WSC problems. In our experiments we utilize the PKS (Planning users to register/login prior to browsing resources. Some work has addressed the problem of planning un

Lespérance, Yves

412

Thin and thick cloud top height retrieval algorithm with the Infrared Camera and LIDAR of the JEM-EUSO Space Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin of cosmic rays have remained a mistery for more than a century. JEM-EUSO is a pioneer space-based telescope that will be located at the International Space Station (ISS) and its aim is to detect Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) and Extremely High Energy Cosmic Rays (EHECR) by observing the atmosphere. Unlike ground-based telescopes, JEM-EUSO will observe from upwards, and therefore, for a properly UHECR reconstruction under cloudy conditions, a key element of JEM-EUSO is an Atmospheric Monitoring System (AMS). This AMS consists of a space qualified bi-spectral Infrared Camera, that will provide the cloud coverage and cloud top height in the JEM-EUSO Field of View (FoV) and a LIDAR, that will measure the atmospheric optical depth in the direction it has been shot. In this paper we will explain the effects of clouds for the determination of the UHECR arrival direction. Moreover, since the cloud top height retrieval is crucial to analyze the UHECR and EHECR events under cloudy conditions, the ret...

Sáez-Cano, G; del Peral, L; Neronov, A; Wada, S; Frías, M D Rodríguez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

2169 steel waveform experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe - phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mm-thick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

APT radionuclide production experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D. [and others

1994-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fundamental experiments in velocimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hull, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Water Vapor Experiment Concludes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 Water Vapor Experiment Concludes The

417

BNL | Active ATF Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperiment Start-up ATFScienceActive

418

BNL | Completed ATF Experiments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperiment Start-upCFN People

419

Sharing Smart Grid Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback

420

The majorana experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAJORANA Collaboration is assembling an array of HPGe detectors to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. Initially, MAJORANA aims to construct a prototype module to demonstrate the potential of a future 1-tonne experiment. The design and potential reach of this prototype DEMONSTRATOR module are presented. Our proposed method uses the well-established technique of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in high purity Ge-diode radiation detectors that play both roles of source and detector. The use of P-PC Ge detectors present advances in background rejection and a Significantly lower energy threshold than conventional Ge detector technologies. The lower energy threshold opens up a broader and exciting physics program including searches for dark matter and axions concurrent with the double-beta decay search. The DEMONSTRATOR should establish that the backgrounds are low enough to justify scaling to tonne-scale experiment, probe the neutrino effective mass region above 100 meV, and search the low energy region with a sensitivity to dark matter. The DEMONSTRATOR will be sited at the 4850-ft level (4200 m.w.e) of the Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake and preparations for construction are currently underway.

Rielage, Keith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boswell, Melissa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gehman, Victor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kidd, Mary F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Roque, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ronquest, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Harry [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steele, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Ground validation of an intermittent flow visualization system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the smoke from one exit port to another, and one in which the valve is used to completely block the flow of smoke. In addition, a model of the system has been developed and validated. It can be used to predict the pressure build-up in the system when... Flow Visualization System. . . . . DESIGN DEVELOPMENT System Requirements . Preliminary Design . Detailed Design. . Instrumentation . Data Collection . . . Signal Conditioning Cartridge Ignition. . . . . . . . Valve Control. PRESSURE...

Myatt, James Harold

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

Stottler, Gary

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Scalar tensor theory : validity of Cosmic no hair conjecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper deals with cosmic no hair conjecture in scalar tensor theory of gravity. Here we have considered both Jordan frame and Einstein frame to examine the conjecture. In Jordan frame, one should restrict both the coupling function of the scalar field and the coupling parameter in addition to the ususal energy conditions for the the matter field for the validity of CNHC while in Einstein frame the restrictions are purely on the energy conditions.

Sudeshna Mukerji; Nairwita Mazumder; Ritabrata Biswas; Subenoy Chakraborty

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

425

Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Verification and validation of COBRA-SFS transient analysis capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides documentation of the verification and validation testing of the transient capability in the COBRA-SFS code, and is organized into three main sections. The primary documentation of the code was published in September 1995, with the release of COBRA-SFS, Cycle 2. The validation and verification supporting the release and licensing of COBRA-SFS was based solely on steady-state applications, even though the appropriate transient terms have been included in the conservation equations from the first cycle. Section 2.0, COBRA-SFS Code Description, presents a capsule description of the code, and a summary of the conservation equations solved to obtain the flow and temperature fields within a cask or assembly model. This section repeats in abbreviated form the code description presented in the primary documentation (Michener et al. 1995), and is meant to serve as a quick reference, rather than independent documentation of all code features and capabilities. Section 3.0, Transient Capability Verification, presents a set of comparisons between code calculations and analytical solutions for selected heat transfer and fluid flow problems. Section 4.0, Transient Capability Validation, presents comparisons between code calculations and experimental data obtained in spent fuel storage cask tests. Based on the comparisons presented in Sections 2.0 and 3.0, conclusions and recommendations for application of COBRA-SFS to transient analysis are presented in Section 5.0.

Rector, D.R.; Michener, T.E.; Cuta, J.M.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Validation and Comparison of One-Dimensional Graound Motion Methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both point- and finite-source stochastic one-dimensional ground motion models, coupled to vertically propagating equivalent-linear shear-wave site response models are validated using an extensive set of strong motion data as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. The validation and comparison exercises are presented entirely in terms of 5% damped pseudo absolute response spectra. The study consists of a quantitative analyses involving modeling nineteen well-recorded earthquakes, M 5.6 to 7.4 at over 600 sites. The sites range in distance from about 1 to about 200 km in the western US (460 km for central-eastern US). In general, this validation demonstrates that the stochastic point- and finite-source models produce accurate predictions of strong ground motions over the range of 0 to 100 km and for magnitudes M 5.0 to 7.4. The stochastic finite-source model appears to be broadband, producing near zero bias from about 0.3 Hz (low frequency limit of the analyses) to the high frequency limit of the data (100 and 25 Hz for response and Fourier amplitude spectra, respectively).

B. Darragh; W. Silva; N. Gregor

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Robust design and model validation of nonlinear compliant micromechanisms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the use of compliance or elastic flexibility in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) helps eliminate friction, wear, and backlash, compliant MEMS are known to be sensitive to variations in material properties and feature geometry, resulting in large uncertainties in performance. This paper proposes an approach for design stage uncertainty analysis, model validation, and robust optimization of nonlinear MEMS to account for critical process uncertainties including residual stress, layer thicknesses, edge bias, and material stiffness. A fully compliant bistable micromechanism (FCBM) is used as an example, demonstrating that the approach can be used to handle complex devices involving nonlinear finite element models. The general shape of the force-displacement curve is validated by comparing the uncertainty predictions to measurements obtained from in situ force gauges. A robust design is presented, where simulations show that the estimated force variation at the point of interest may be reduced from {+-}47 {micro}N to {+-}3 {micro}N. The reduced sensitivity to process variations is experimentally validated by measuring the second stable position at multiple locations on a wafer.

Howell, Larry L. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Baker, Michael Sean; Wittwer, Jonathan W. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

SAS4A simulation of the OPERA-15 two-dimensional voiding experiment. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major effort is currently being pursued to validate the SAS4A LMFBR accident analysis code. Part of this effort involves SAS4A analysis of both in-pile and out-of-pile safety experiments. Such an experiment is the fifteen-pin Out-of-Pile Explusion and Reentry Apparatus (OPERA) test run at Argonne National Laboratory. This test uses a fifteen-pin triangular-shaped bundle of simulant fuel pins to demonstrate two-dimensional voiding behavior in a LMFBR subassembly during a Loss-of-Flow (LOF) accident. This experiment was chosen for SAS4A analysis both for its value in code validation and its usefulness in evaluating the limitations of the one-dimensional SAS4A sodium voiding model in accident analysis.

Briggs, L.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Validation of the thermospheric vector spherical harmonic (VSH) computer model. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semi-empirical computer model of the lower thermosphere has been developed that provides a description of the composition and dynamics of the thermosphere (Killeen et al., 1992). Input variables needed to run the VSH model include time, space and geophysical conditions. One of the output variables the model provides, neutral density, is of particular interest to the U.S. Air Force. Neutral densities vary both as a result of change in solar flux (eg. the solar cycle) and as a result of changes in the magnetosphere (eg. large changes occur in neutral density during geomagnetic storms). Satellites in earth orbit experience aerodynamic drag due to the atmospheric density of the thermosphere. Variability in the neutral density described above affects the drag a satellite experiences and as a result can change the orbital characteristics of the satellite. These changes make it difficult to track the satellite's position. Therefore, it is particularly important to insure that the accuracy of the model's neutral density is optimized for all input parameters. To accomplish this, a validation program was developed to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the model's density output by comparing it to SETA-2 (satellite electrostatic accelerometer) total mass density measurements.

Davis, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Validation of the new code package APOLLO2.8 for accurate PWR neutronics calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the Qualification work performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the new APOLLO2.S/SHEM-MOC package based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file for the prediction of PWR neutronics parameters. This experimental validation is based on PWR mock-up critical experiments performed in the EOLE/MINERVE zero-power reactors and on P.I. Es on spent fuel assemblies from the French PWRs. The Calculation-Experiment comparison for the main design parameters is presented: reactivity of UOX and MOX lattices, depletion calculation and fuel inventory, reactivity loss with burnup, pin-by-pin power maps, Doppler coefficient, Moderator Temperature Coefficient, Void coefficient, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} poisoning worth, Efficiency of Ag-In-Cd and B4C control rods, Reflector Saving for both standard 2-cm baffle and GEN3 advanced thick SS reflector. From this qualification process, calculation biases and associated uncertainties are derived. This code package APOLLO2.8 is already implemented in the ARCADIA new AREVA calculation chain for core physics and is currently under implementation in the future neutronics package of the French utility Electricite de France. (authors)

Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D.; Blaise, P.; Leconte, P.; Palau, J. M.; Roque, B.; Vaglio, C.; Vidal, J. F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Current Status and Experience of WAMS Implementation in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 15 years of successful implementation of Wide-Area Measurement Systems (WAMS) in the WECC power grid have shown significant value of WAMS data in system dynamic modeling and validation, FACTS control validation and pilot implementations of wide area protection schemes. The August 14 2003 blackout in the eastern interconnection of the North America revealed the urgent need for wide-area information acquisition for better power grid operations. The Eastern Interconnection Phasor Project (EIPP) was launched in 2003 to deploy a WAMS system in the eastern interconnection. Development of IEEE C37.118, a standard for phasor data acquisition and transmission, will aid in deployment of phasor measurement systems for WAMS applications. Technologies of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) with high precision time synchronization and Phasor Data Concentrators (PDCs) for phasor data aggregation and event recording are key to the success of WAMS implementation. This paper reviews the WAMS development in the North America and presents current and potential WAMS applications including dynamic modeling and validation and wide-area control. Past experience shows a promising future of WAMS in improving power system planning, operation and control. However, there remain challenges to make phasor measurement consistent and to meet both slow and fast data application needs.

Cai, Jim Y.; Huang, Zhenyu; Hauer, John F.; Martin, Kenneth E.

2005-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Tokamak Physics Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) [Nevins {ital et} {ital al}., {ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion}, Wuerzburg (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1992), Vol. 3, p. 279] is to develop the scientific basis for an economically competitive and continuously operating tokamak fusion power source. This complements the primary mission of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER Document Ser. No. 18 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991)], the demonstration of ignition and long-pulse burn, and the integration of nuclear technologies. The TPX program is focused on making the demonstration power plant that follows ITER as compact and attractive as possible, and on permitting ITER to achieve its ultimate goal of steady-state operation. This mission of TPX requires the development of steady-state regimes with high beta, good confinement, and a high fraction of a self-driven bootstrap current. These regimes must be compatible with plasma stability, strong heat-flux dispersion in the divertor region, and effective particle control.

Davidson, R.C.; Goldston, R.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Neilson, G.H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Thomassen, K.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ultrafast gas switching experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Validation of KENO V.a with ENDF/B-V cross sections for {sup 233}U systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multigroup Monte Carlo code KENO V.a and the 238- and 44-energy-group ENDF/B-V cross-section libraries were validated for {sup 233}U systems. Fifty-one critical experiments involving {sup 233}UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, {sup 233}UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}, or {sup 233}U metal were selected for the validation. The H/{sup 233}U ratios for the experiments range from 0 to 1986. Each experiment was modeled with KENO V.a, and the effective multiplication factor k{sub eff} was calculated for each system using the 44- and 238-group ENDF/B-V, the 27- and 218-group ENDF/B-IV, and the 16-group Hansen-Roach cross-section libraries. The mean calculated k{sub eff} for all experiments using the 44- and 238-group libraries is 1.0090 {+-} 0.0021 and 1.0064 {+-} 0.0020, respectively. For comparison, the mean calculated k{sub eff} using the 27-, 218-, and 16-group libraries is 1.0142 {+-} 0.0038, 1.0125 {+-} 0.0038, and 0.9991 {+-} 0.0019, respectively. In general, an improvement exists in the agreement between the calculated k{sub eff}`s and the experimental results (i.e., k{sub eff} = 1.0) obtained with the newer ENDF/B-V libraries relative to ENDF/B-IV. This study is pertinent to {sup 233}U storage outside of the reactor.

Dunn, M.E.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Plaster, M.J.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Haught, C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

U-270:Trend Micro Control Manager Input Validation Flaw in Ad...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0:Trend Micro Control Manager Input Validation Flaw in Ad Hoc Query Module Lets Remote Users Inject SQL Commands U-270:Trend Micro Control Manager Input Validation Flaw in Ad Hoc...

438

An Examination of the Predictive Validity of Curriculum-Embedded Measures for Kindergarten Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of the present research was to examine the predictive validity of curriculum-embedded mastery-check measures (CEMs) for kindergarten students in Tier 2 intervention. Two studies examined the predictive validity, parsimony, and changing...

Oslund, Eric

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 28, 2013 -...

440

V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-168: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks May 31, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-124: Splunk Web Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks April 2, 2013 - 1:13am Addthis...

442

T-602: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation Flaw in...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

02: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation Flaw in BlackBerry Web Desktop Manager Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-602: BlackBerry Enterprise Server Input Validation...

443

Comparison and Validation of Compressible Flow Simulations of Laser-Induced Cavitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison and Validation of Compressible Flow Simulations of Laser-Induced Cavitation Bubbles)). The validation is performed for the case of laser-induced cavitation bubbles collapsing in an infinite medium

444

Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT. "Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: A Validation of VENT

445

NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in two- and three-dimensional room geometries. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment performed at LBL. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. It is found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface. This study implies that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may have substantial errors as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure.

Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Kammerud, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the parent aluminum skin must experience significant yield strains before any damage to the doubler will occur.

Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Bayes Factor of Model Selection Validates FLMP Dominic W. Massaro, Michael M. Cohen,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, using Newton's law of universal gravitation as an analogy, we argue that it might not be valid to expect

Cohen, Michael M.

449

Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2008.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Technology Validation of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Their Hydrogen Infrastructure (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL's analysis and validation of fuel cell electric vehicles and hydrogen fueling infrastructure technologies.

Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Statistical validation and an empirical model of hydrogen production enhancement found by utilizing passive flow disturbance in the steam-reformation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A passive flow disturbance has been proven to enhance the conversion of fuel in a methanol-steam reformer. This study presents a statistical validation of the experiment based on a standard 2{sup k} factorial experiment design and the resulting empirical model of the enhanced hydrogen producing process. A factorial experiment design was used to statistically analyze the effects and interactions of various input factors in the experiment. Three input factors, including the number of flow disturbers, catalyst size, and reactant flow rate were investigated for their effects on the fuel conversion in the steam-reformation process. Based on the experimental results, an empirical model was developed and further evaluated with an uncertainty analysis and interior point data. (author)

Erickson, Paul A.; Liao, Chang-hsien [Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride ?-ZrH1.5 precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. In this work, a model to numerically simulate hydride precipitation at the microstructural scale, in a wide variety of Zr-based claddings, under dry-storage conditions is being developed. It will be used to aid in the evaluation of the mechanical integrity of used fuel rods during dry storage and transportation by providing the structural conditions from the microstructural scale to the continuum scale to engineering component scale models to predict if the used fuel rods will perform without failure under normal and off-normal conditions. The microstructure, especially, the hydride structure is thought to be a primary determinant of cladding failure, thus this component of UFD’s storage and transportation analysis program is critical. The model development, application and validation of the model are documented and the limitations of the current model are discussed. The model has been shown to simulate hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding with correct morphology, thermodynamics and kinetics. An unexpected insight obtained from simulations hydride formation in Zircaloy-4 is that small (sub-micron) precipitates need to order themselves to form the larger hydrides typically described as radially-reoriented precipitates. A limitation of this model is that it does not currently solve the stress state that forms dynamically in the precipitate or matrix surrounding the precipitate. A method to overcome the limitations is suggested and described in detail. The necessary experiments to provide key materials physics and to validate the model are also recommended.

Veena Tikare; Philippe Weck; Peter Schultz; Blythe Clark; John Mitchell; Michael Glazoff; Eric Homer

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Final Report on NPS/CIRPAS support of DOE Classic Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy conducted the Cloud-Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) in Poncha City Oklahoma, in June 2007. The purpose of the experiment was to study the influence of different surface conditions on properties of small cumulus clouds. The Oklahoma site provided climatologically arid surface in the western part of the state, and lush green conditions in the eastern part. The summer of 2007, however, was exceptionally wet, with flooded fields and rivers flowing over their banks. This had seriously adverse effect on the experiment. CIRPAS participated in this with its instrumented Twin Otter aircraft, flight crew and scientist. The CIRPAS instruments measured temperature, dewpoint temperature, pressure, winds, aerosol particle concentrations, aerosol size distribution, cloud droplet concentration, cloud droplet size spectra, total scatter coefficients and absorption coefficients at three different wavelengths. Additionally, CIRPAS provided measurements of aircraft location, velocity and attitude. CIRPAS reduced all the data to engineering units, quality assured the data, and submitted a coherent data set to the project’s archive. The Twin Otter flew 15 sorties from the airport in Ponca City, and characterized meteorological, aerosol and cloud conditions as well as the temperature of the underlying surface in a wide variety of conditions. Conditions ranged from deep convection and thunderstorms, to totally clear sky and stable atmosphere. Some flights were coordinated with other aircraft, such as the DOE’s G-1, which was in Ponca City simultaneously doing the CHAPS mission, the NASA King Air, which used lidar to characterize underlying aerosol and clouds, and a helicopter from Duke University, which was characterizing turbulence. Other flights were coordinated with satellite overpasses, ground-based observation sites. The field campaign took place during the month of June, 2007, and all CIRPAS data had been delivered by October that same year.

Haflidi H Jonsson

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

Validation of the Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA) is an energy audit tool designed specifically to identify recommended weatherization measures for mobile homes as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program. A field validation of MHEA was performed using billing/delivery data collected on 86 mobile homes heated primarily by electricity, natural gas, or propane to assess the audit's accuracy and the validity of its recommendations. The validation found that MHEA overpredicts the annual space-heating energy savings of weatherization measures to be installed in mobile homes, which leads to low realization rates, primarily because of its large overprediction of annual pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption. However, MHEA's annual space-heating energy savings estimates and realization rates can be improved considerably using MHEA's built-in billing adjustment feature. In order to improve the accuracy of MHEA's annual space-heating energy savings estimates and realization rate, the cause of MHEA's overprediction of annual pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption needs to be further investigated and corrected. Although MHEA's billing adjustment feature improved MHEA's annual space-heating energy savings estimates, alternative methods of making the correction that may provide improved performance should be investigated. In the interim period before permanent improvements to MHEA can be made, the following recommendations should be followed: (a) do not enter into MHEA insulation thicknesses of 1 in. or less and especially zero (0 in.) unless such low levels have been verified through visual inspection of several parts of the envelope area in question; (b) use MHEA's billing adjustment feature to develop a list of recommended measures based on adjusted energy savings if possible, especially in mobile homes that have several major energy deficiencies; and (c) do not use MHEA's "evaluate duct sealing" option at this time (although certainly seal all duct leaks and use diagnostics as appropriate to find leakage sites and quantify improvements).

Ternes, Mark P [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Benchmark for evaluation and validation of reactor simulations (BEAVRS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in parallel computing have made possible the development of high-fidelity tools for the design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores, and such tools require extensive verification and validation. This paper introduces BEAVRS, a new multi-cycle full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) depletion benchmark based on two operational cycles of a commercial nuclear power plant that provides a detailed description of fuel assemblies, burnable absorbers, in-core fission detectors, core loading patterns, and numerous in-vessel components. This benchmark enables analysts to develop extremely detailed reactor core models that can be used for testing and validation of coupled neutron transport, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel isotopic depletion. The benchmark also provides measured reactor data for Hot Zero Power (HZP) physics tests, boron letdown curves, and three-dimensional in-core flux maps from fifty-eight instrumented assemblies. Initial comparisons between calculations performed with MIT's OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code and measured cycle 1 HZP test data are presented, and these results display an average deviation of approximately 100 pcm for the various critical configurations and control rod worth measurements. Computed HZP radial fission detector flux maps also agree reasonably well with the available measured data. All results indicate that this benchmark will be extremely useful in validation of coupled-physics codes and uncertainty quantification of in-core physics computational predictions. The detailed BEAVRS specification and its associated data package is hosted online at the MIT Computational Reactor Physics Group web site (http://crpg.mit.edu/), where future revisions and refinements to the benchmark specification will be made publicly available. (authors)

Horelik, N.; Herman, B.; Forget, B.; Smith, K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Trip Report: AMPS Validations and User Feedback Conducted at McMurdo and South Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in stronger weather conditions, be it winds or precipitation which do not always validate. Ken Edele did note, interacting with the forecasters and conducting some real-time validations of the AMPS products, particularly moisture prediction, to validate the new pseudo-satellite product generated here at Ohio State, to better

Howat, Ian M.

457

God Does Play Dice: Diagnosis and Validation for Autonomous Systems Tim Menzies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

God Does Play Dice: Diagnosis and Validation for Autonomous Systems S. Bayana David Owen ¡ Tim for validating and diagnosing autonomous intelligent systems. Such techniques provide efficient approximate of LURCH, a random- ized inference engine that we have developed in validating and diagnosing autonomous

Menzies, Tim

458

Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG FOR IMAGING SCIENCE Title of Dissertation: Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems. Signature Date 3 #12;Validation of 3D Radiative Transfer in Coastal-Ocean Water Systems as Modeled by DIRSIG

Salvaggio, Carl

459

Adaptive Accelerated ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics with Validation from Simulating Hydrogen Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Accelerated ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics with Validation from Simulating Hydrogen Combustion concept (BB), which we validate here for describing hydrogen combustion. The bond order, undercoordination determined the detailed sequence of reactions for hydrogen combustion with and without the BB. We validate

Goddard III, William A.

460

Compton scattering from positronium and validity of the impulse approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for Compton scattering from positronium are calculated in the range from 1 to 100 keV incident photon energy. The calculations are based on the A{sup 2} term of the photon-electron or photon-positron interaction. Unlike in hydrogen, the scattering occurs from two centers and the interference effect plays an important role for energies below 8 keV. Because of the interference, the criterion for validity of the impulse approximation for positronium is more restrictive compared to that for hydrogen.

Kaliman, Z.; Pisk, K.; Pratt, R. H. [Department of Physics, University of Rijeka, Rijeka (Croatia); Rudjer Boskovic Institute, P. O. Box 180, Zagreb (Croatia) and University of Dubrovnik, Dubrovnik (Croatia); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Validity and failure of some entropy inequalities for CAR systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic properties of von Neumann entropy such as the triangle inequality and what we call MONO-SSA are studied for CAR systems. We show that both inequalities hold for any even state. We construct a certain class of noneven states giving counter examples of those inequalities. It is not always possible to extend a set of prepared states on disjoint regions to some joint state on the whole region for CAR systems. However, for every even state, we have its `symmetric purification' by which the validity of those inequalities is shown. Some (realized) noneven states have peculiar state correlations among subsystems and induce the failure of those inequalities.

Hajime Moriya

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

462

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOffice - 201420122 DOEServicesThisValidation:

463

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia-EFDC validation test case  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking Work on CriegeeElectronics in WellsSandia-EFDC validation

464

Validation of Innovation Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwoVulnerabilities | Department of|VTA, SamTransValidation of

465

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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466

Evaluation of the DHCE Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) experiment was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 12, which was completed in 1992. The purpose of the experiment was to enhance helium generation in vanadium alloys to simulate fusion reactor helium-to-dpa ratios with a target goal of 4-5 appm He/dpa. The Fusion Materials Science Program is considering mounting another experiment in hopes of gathering additional data on the effect of helium on the mechanical and physical properties of vanadium structural materials. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was assigned the task of evaluating the feasibility of conducting another DHCE experiment by carefully evaluating the results obtained of the first DHCE experiment. This report summarizes the results of our evaluation and presents recommendations for consideration by the Materials Science Coordinators Organization.

Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Baldwin, David L.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Lessons learned from applying VIM to fast reactor critical experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code first developed around 1970 for the analysis of plate-type, fast-neutron, zero-power critical assemblies. In most respects, VIM is functionally equivalent to the MCNP code but it has two features that make uniquely suited to the analysis of fast reactor critical experiments: (1) the plate lattice geometry option, which allows efficient description of and neutron tracking in the assembly geometry, and (2) a statistical treatment of neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance range. Since its inception, VIM`s capabilities have expanded to include numerous features, such as thermal neutron cross sections, photon cross sections, and combinatorial and other geometry options, that have allowed its use in a wide range of neutral-particle transport problems. The earliest validation work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) focused on the validation of VIM itself. This work showed that, in order for VIM to be a ``rigorous`` tool, extreme detail in the pointwise Monte Carlo libraries was needed, and the required detail was added. The emphasis soon shifted to validating models, methods, data and codes against VIM. Most of this work was done in the context of analyzing critical experiments in zero power reactor (ZPR) assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the lessons learned from using VIM in ZPR analysis work. This involves such areas as uncovering problems in deterministic methods and models, pitfalls in using Monte Carlo codes, and improving predictions. The numerical illustrations included here were taken from the extensive documentation cited as references.

Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

Future Cosmic Microwave Background Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarise some aspects of experiments currently being built or planned, and indulge in wild speculation about possibilities on the more distant horizon.

Mark Halpern; Douglas Scott

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

469

Analytical thermal model validation for Cassini radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft is designed to rely, without precedent, on the waste heat from its three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to warm the propulsion module subsystem, and the RTG end dome temperature is a key determining factor of the amount of waste heat delivered. A previously validated SINDA thermal model of the RTG was the sole guide to understanding its complex thermal behavior, but displayed large discrepancies against some initial thermal development test data. A careful revalidation effort led to significant modifications and adjustments of the model, which result in a doubling of the radiative heat transfer from the heat source support assemblies to the end domes and bring up the end dome and flange temperature predictions to within 2 C of the pertinent test data. The increased inboard end dome temperature has a considerable impact on thermal control of the spacecraft central body. The validation process offers an example of physically-driven analytical model calibration with test data from not only an electrical simulator but also a nuclear-fueled flight unit, and has established the end dome temperatures of a flight RTG where no in-flight or ground-test data existed before.

Lin, E.I. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m{sup 2} for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m{sup 2} for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

Schneider, Nadine; Schroeder, Marc; Stengel, Martin [Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD), KU22, Frankfurter Str. 135, 63067 Offenbach a. M (Germany); Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene [Freie Universitaet Berlin (FUB), Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6-10, 12165 Berlin (Germany); Collaboration: ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

471

Experiments in Physics Physics 1291  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Conservation of Energy 97 1-9 Standing Waves 105 1-10 Specific Heat and Mechanical Equivalent of Heat 115 #12;#12;Introduction 1-0 General Instructions 1 Purpose of the Laboratory The laboratory experiments described in this manual are an important part of your physics course. Most of the experiments are designed to illustrate

Columbia University

472

Work Experience Guidance for Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work Experience Guidance for Managers When approached with a request for work experience, managers. Any queries regarding CRB checks should be directed to your designated HR Manager. When a work any work, paid or unpaid: Before 7am or after 7pm For more than two hours on a school day or Sunday

473

Uncertainties analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactor antineutrino experiment are used to study neutrino oscillation, search for signatures of nonstandard neutrino interaction, and monitor reactor operation for safeguard application. Reactor simulation is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. Commercial code is used for reactor simulation to evaluate fission fraction in Daya Bay neutrino experiment, but the source code doesn't open to our researcher results from commercial secret. In this study, The open source code DRAGON was improved to calculate the fission rates of the four most important isotopes in fissions, $^{235}$U,$^{238}$U,$^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu, and then was validated for PWRs using the Takahama-3 benchmark. The fission fraction results are consistent with those of MIT's results. Then, fission fraction of Daya Bay reactor core was calculated by using improved DRAGON code, and the fission fraction calculated by DRAGON agreed well with these calculated by SCIENCE. The average deviation less than 5\\% for all the four isotopes. The correlation coefficient matrix between $^{235}$U,$^{238}$U,$^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu were also studied using DRAGON, and then the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction was calculated by using the correlation coefficient matrix. The uncertainty of the antineutrino flux by the fission fraction simulation is 0.6\\% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment. The uncertainties source of fission fraction calculation need further to be studied in the future.

X. B. Ma; F. Lu; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; W. L. Zhong; F. P. An

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

474

DHS Research Experience Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to represent four common classes of pesticides that are currently used in the US. Permethrin (a pyrethrin insecticide), dichlorvos and malathion (organophosphates), imidacloprid (a chloronicotinyl pesticide), and carbaryl (a carbamate) were selected for analysis. Samples were aerosolized either in water (using a plastic nebulizer) or in ethanol (using a glass nebulizer), and the particles entered the SPAMS instrument through a focusing lens stack. The particles then passed through a stage with three tracking lasers that were used to determine each particle's velocity. This velocity was used to calculate when to fire a desorption/ionization (D/I) laser in order to fragment the particle for analysis in a dual polarity time of flight mass spectrometer. Signals were digitized, and then analyzed using LLNL-developed software. We obtained chemical mass spectral signatures for each pesticide, and assigned peaks to the mass spectra based on our knowledge of the pesticides chemical structures. We then proved the robustness of our detection method by identifying the presence of pesticides in two real-world matrices: Raid{trademark} Ant Spray and a flea collar. To sample these, we simply needed to direct aerosolized particles into the SPAMS instrument. The minimal sample preparation required makes SPAMS very attractive as a detector. Essentially, we were able to show that SPAMS is a reliable and effective method for detecting pesticides at extremely low concentrations in a variety of matrices and physical states. The other project that I had the opportunity to be a part of did not involve data collection in the lab; it consisted of analyzing a large amount of data that had already been collected. We got to look at data collected over the course of about two months, when the SPAMS instrument was deployed to a public place. The machine sampled the air and collected spectra for over two months, storing all the spectra and associated data; we then looked at an approximately two-month subset of this data to search for patterns in the types of particles being detected. Essentially, we we

Venkatachalam, V

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

475

Fracture path in an anisotropic material in the light of a friction experiment. D. Chateau and J.-C. Geminard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture path in an anisotropic material in the light of a friction experiment. D. Chateau and J is generally used to predict the path of a fracture even if the validity of the principle is difficult. INTRODUCTION Fractures are ubiquitous in everyday life. Examples range, from the harmless, annoying but maybe

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

476

Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality assurance with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure 6-year-experience with 14 solar thermal the confidence in solar thermal energy. The so called Input/Output-Procedure is controlling the solar heat systems. The simulation model was validated with measured data and a lot of failures in 11 solar thermal

477

Formulation, Implementation and Validation of a Two-Fluid model in a Fuel Cell CFD Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water management is one of the main challenges in PEM Fuel Cells. While water is essential for membrane electrical conductivity, excess liquid water leads to ooding of catalyst layers. Despite the fact that accurate prediction of two-phase transport is key for optimal water management, understanding of the two-phase transport in fuel cells is relatively poor. Wang et. al. [1], [2] have studied the two-phase transport in the channel and diffusion layer separately using a multiphase mixture model. The model fails to accurately predict saturation values for high humidity inlet streams. Nguyen et. al. [3] developed a two-dimensional, two-phase, isothermal, isobaric, steady state model of the catalyst and gas diffusion layers. The model neglects any liquid in the channel. Djilali et. al. [4] developed a three-dimensional two-phase multicomponent model. The model is an improvement over previous models, but neglects drag between the liquid and the gas phases in the channel. In this work, we present a comprehensive two- fluid model relevant to fuel cells. Models for two-phase transport through Channel, Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) and Channel-GDL interface, are discussed. In the channel, the gas and liquid pressures are assumed to be same. The surface tension effects in the channel are incorporated using the continuum surface force (CSF) model. The force at the surface is expressed as a volumetric body force and added as a source to the momentum equation. In the GDL, the gas and liquid are assumed to be at different pressures. The difference in the pressures (capillary pressure) is calculated using an empirical correlations. At the Channel-GDL interface, the wall adhesion affects need to be taken into account. SIMPLE-type methods recast the continuity equation into a pressure-correction equation, the solution of which then provides corrections for velocities and pressures. However, in the two-fluid model, the presence of two phasic continuity equations gives more freedom and more complications. A general approach would be to form a mixture continuity equation by linearly combining the phasic continuity equations using appropriate weighting factors. Analogous to mixture equation for pressure correction, a difference equation is used for the volume/phase fraction by taking the difference between the phasic continuity equations. The relative advantages of the above mentioned algorithmic variants for computing pressure correction and volume fractions are discussed and quantitatively assessed. Preliminary model validation is done for each component of the fuel cell. The two-phase transport in the channel is validated using empirical correlations. Transport in the GDL is validated against results obtained from LBM and VOF simulation techniques. The Channel-GDL interface transport will be validated against experiment and empirical correlation of droplet detachment at the interface. References [1] Y. Wang S. Basu and C.Y. Wang. Modeling two-phase flow in pem fuel cell channels. J. Power Sources, 179:603{617, 2008. [2] P. K. Sinha and C. Y. Wang. Liquid water transport in a mixed-wet gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Chem. Eng. Sci., 63:1081-1091, 2008. [3] Guangyu Lin and Trung Van Nguyen. A two-dimensional two-phase model of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 153(2):A372{A382, 2006. [4] T. Berning and N. Djilali. A 3d, multiphase, multicomponent model of the cathode and anode of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 150(12):A1589{A1598, 2003.

Kunal Jain, Vernon Cole, Sanjiv Kumar and N. Vaidya

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling Validation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software tool that performs detailed analysis of both system performance and system financing for a variety of renewable energy technologies. This report provides detailed validation of the SAM flat plate photovoltaic performance model by comparing SAM-modeled PV system generation data to actual measured production data for nine PV systems ranging from 75 kW to greater than 25 MW in size. The results show strong agreement between SAM predictions and field data, with annualized prediction error below 3% for all fixed tilt cases and below 8% for all one axis tracked cases. The analysis concludes that snow cover and system outages are the primary sources of disagreement, and other deviations resulting from seasonal biases in the irradiation models and one axis tracking issues are discussed in detail.

Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Kaffine, L.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Validation of Power Output for the WIND Toolkit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy integration studies require wind data sets of high quality with realistic representations of the variability, ramping characteristics, and forecast performance for current wind power plants. The Wind Integration National Data Set (WIND) Toolkit is meant to be an update for and expansion of the original data sets created for the weather years from 2004 through 2006 during the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and the Eastern Wind Integration Study. The WIND Toolkit expands these data sets to include the entire continental United States, increasing the total number of sites represented, and it includes the weather years from 2007 through 2012. In addition, the WIND Toolkit has a finer resolution for both the temporal and geographic dimensions. Three separate data sets will be created: a meteorological data set, a wind power data set, and a forecast data set. This report describes the validation of the wind power data set.

King, J.; Clifton, A.; Hodge, B. M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Tank waste source term inventory validation. Volume 1. Letter report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sample data for selection of 11 radionuclides and 24 chemical analytes were extracted from six separate sample data sets, were arranged in a tabular format and were plotted on scatter plots for all of the 149 single-shell tanks, the 24 double-shell tanks and the four aging waste tanks. The solid and liquid sample data was placed in separate tables and plots. The sample data and plots were compiled from the following data sets: characterization raw sample data, recent core samples, D. Braun data base, Wastren (Van Vleet) data base, TRAC and HTCE inventories. This document is Volume I of the Letter Report entitled Tank Waste Source Term Inventory Validation.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lidar validation experiment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of groundwater withdrawal activities in the area. The conceptual and numerical models were developed based upon regional hydrogeologic investigations conducted in the 1960s, site characterization investigations (including ten wells and various geophysical and geologic studies) at Shoal itself prior to and immediately after the test, and two site characterization campaigns in the 1990s for environmental restoration purposes (including eight wells and a year-long tracer test). The new wells are denoted MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3, and are located to the northnortheast of the nuclear test. The groundwater model was generally lacking data in the north-northeastern area; only HC-1 and the abandoned PM-2 wells existed in this area. The wells provide data on fracture orientation and frequency, water levels, hydraulic conductivity, and water chemistry for comparison with the groundwater model. A total of 12 real-number validation targets were available for the validation analysis, including five values of hydraulic head, three hydraulic conductivity measurements, three hydraulic gradient values, and one angle value for the lateral gradient in radians. In addition, the fracture dip and orientation data provide comparisons to the distributions used in the model and radiochemistry is available for comparison to model output. Goodness-of-fit analysis indicates that some of the model realizations correspond well with the newly acquired conductivity, head, and gradient data, while others do not. Other tests indicated that additional model realizations may be needed to test if the model input distributions need refinement to improve model performance. This approach (generating additional realizations) was not followed because it was realized that there was a temporal component to the data disconnect: the new head measurements are on the high side of the model distributions, but the heads at the original calibration locations themselves have also increased over time. This indicates that the steady-state assumption of the groundwater model is in error. To test the robustness of the model d

A. Hassan; J. Chapman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

484