Sample records for liard basin located

  1. Location of oil fields in Forest City basin as related to Precambrian tectonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, M.P. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accumulation of petroleum in the Forest City basin is strongly influenced by the tectonic framework established during the Precambrian. A series of Late Proterozoic orogenies created a fracture pattern in the northern Mid-Continent, which was emphasized by the late Keweenawan, Mid-Continent Rift System (MRS). Reactivated basement structures have created both a structural and depositional imprint on younger rocks. The Southeast Nebraska arch is defined by Middle Ordovician (Simpson) overlap of Arbuckle equivalents. Continuing differential movement along segments of the MRS within the North Kansas basin influenced the regional facies distribution of both the Late Ordovician (Viola) and the Late Devonian (Hunton). Middle Pennsylvanian compression from the Ouachita orogeny produced the Nemaha uplift and reactivated transform faulting on the MRS. Extensions of these southeast-trending fractures created offsets on the Nemaha uplift/Humboldt fault system and enhanced structures that host oil production. Fields that lie upon these wrench-fault trends within the Forest City basin have produced from the Simpson (St. Peter), Viola, and Hunton formations. The Precambrian structures and rock types produce strong geophysical signatures in contrast to the subdued anomalies of the Paleozoic sediments. Analyses of magnetic and gravity data provide an interpretation of the basement rocks and, by extrapolation, an additional exploration tool for locating Paleozoic trends related to reactivation of Precambrian tectonics.

  2. Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

  3. ahnet-north basins located: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 478 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  4. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  5. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  6. Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Christopher Charles

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nam Con Son (NCS) Basin, located offshore of SE Vietnam, is one of several Tertiary rift basins that formed during initial Eocene(?)-Oligocene rifting. Following cessation of rifting at the end of Oligocene time, these basins were subjected...

  7. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  8. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to study two Basins of the Gulf of Guinea (GoG), namely the Dahomey and the Liberian Basins. These Basins are located in the northern part of the GoG, where oil and gas exploration has significantly increased...

  9. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  11. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  12. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  13. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the 105N Basin Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, E.T. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations.

  14. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  15. Silurian of Illinois basin - a carbonate ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, G.W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Silurian of the Illinois basin has classically been defined as a shelf-basin sequence. According to the shelf-basin model, the Illinois basin is a deep-water basin in the extreme southern part (southern Illinois-Tennessee), with a slope in the south (Illinois-Indiana) and a shelf extending from central Illinois and Indiana northeast to the Michigan basin. Reef buildups are in a continuous trend along the shelf break. However, the author proposes that the silurian of the Illinois basin represents a carbonate ramp. The down-ramp position is located in southern Illinois and grades into deeper water environments south of Illinois. In this environment, reef buildups would form in the late Alexandrian of early St. Clair, and would begin in the down-ramp position. Therefore, using the new model, reef buildups are expected throughout the basin, rather than being confined to an imaginary shelf break. This model would facilitate exploration in southern Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky for reefal hydrocarbon deposits. A ramp model is indicated for the Illinois basin because: (1) the basin lacks a shelf-slope break; (2) the facies sequence is compatible with a ramp environment and incompatible with a shelf-slope environment; (3) discontinuous reef trends are typical of a ramp environment; and (4) facies changes and slope are gradual, extending over hundreds of miles as expected in a ramp environment. Modern carbonate models border on ocean basins. However, the Illinois basin is a cratonic basin, which may have affected the depositional environments. How much that environment differed from present-day models is unknown.

  16. Acoustic impedance inversion of the Lower Permian carbonate buildups in the Permian Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo, Buenafama Aleman

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate reservoirs are usually diffcult to map and identify in seismic sections due to their complex structure, lithology and diagenetic frabrics. The Midland Basin, located in the Permian Basin of West Texas, is an ...

  17. Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, James Frank

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Williston Basin is located in the northern Great Plains of the United States. This area includes eastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota, and western North Dakota. The stratigraphy and geologic history of this basin are well understood...

  18. Acoustic impedance inversion of the Lower Permian carbonate buildups in the Permian Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo, Buenafama Aleman

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate reservoirs are usually diffcult to map and identify in seismic sections due to their complex structure, lithology and diagenetic frabrics. The Midland Basin, located in the Permian Basin of West Texas, is an excellent example...

  19. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  20. Record of Decision/Remedial Alternative Selection for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  1. Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 – Location of Xinli oilfield in central Songliao Basin.a sandstone formation of Xinli oilfield in central Songliaothan 20 Members. Xinli oilfield is located in Xinmiao town,

  2. Oil and gas shows in the Salina basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D.; Lambert, M.; Berendsen, P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents data from drillers' records and other information on the Salina basin wells in north-central Kansas. A listing that includes well name, operator, location, completion date, depth intervals, and formation name for each well is included. A map showing oil and gas fields in the surrounding area and wells drilled within the basin is offered.

  3. Basin Approach to Address Bacterial Impairments in Basins 15, 16, and 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Brown, M.; Hein, K.; Skow, K.; Engling, A.; Wagner, K.; Berthold, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), the population throughout the Matagorda Bay watershed are generally rural with dispersed cities. In Basin 15 the two major cities are El Campo and Palacios with a total basin population of 58,682. This produces a population density of approximately 61... between 2010 and 2050 with the exception of Lavaca and Fayette counties. The cities of Palacios, El Campo, Flatonia, Schulenburg, Shiner, Hallettsville, Yoakum, Edna, Victoria, and Port Lavaca, all located within the Matagorda Bay watershed...

  4. The use of a distributed hydrologic model to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sameer A. (Sameer Ahmed)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of a distributed hydrology model in conjunction with a Factor of Safety (FS) algorithm to predict dynamic landslide susceptibility for a humid basin in Puerto Rico. The Mameyes basin, located ...

  5. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  6. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  7. Appendixes 159 160 Simulation of Ground-Water/Surface-Water Flow in the Santa ClaraCalleguas Ground-Water Basin, Ventura County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Calleguas Ground-Water Basin, Ventura County, California APPENDIX 1: DOCUMENTATION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE DIGITAL-Water/Surface-Water Flow in the Santa Clara­Calleguas Ground-Water Basin, Ventura County, California Figure A.1.2. Location-Water Basin, Ventura County, California Figure A1.4. Location of USGS_GWMODEL coverage. PacificOcean VENTURACO

  8. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  9. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  10. Structural evolution and petroleum productivity of the Baltic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Baltic basin is an oval depression located in the western part of the Russian craton; it occupies the eastern Baltic Sea and adjacent onshore areas. The basin contains more than 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks ranging from latest Proterozoic to Tertiary in age. These rocks consist of four tectonostratigraphic sequences deposited during major tectonic episodes of basin evolution. Principal unconformities separate the sequences. The basin is underlain by a rift probably filled with Upper Proterozoic rocks. Vendian and Lower Cambrian rocks (Baikalian sequence) form two northeast-trending depressions. The principal stage of the basin development was during deposition of a thick Middle Cambrian-Lower Devonian (Caledonian) sequence. This stage was terminated by the most intense deformations in the basin history. The Middle Devonian-Carboniferous (Hercynian) and Permian-Tertiary (Kimmerian-Alpine) tectonic and depositional cycles only slightly modified the basin geometry and left intact the main structural framework of underlying rocks. The petroleum productivity of the basin is related to the Caledonian tectonostratigraphic sequence that contains both source rocks and reservoirs. However, maturation of source rocks, migration of oil, and formation of fields took place mostly during deposition of the Hercynian sequence.

  11. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstrand, P.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  12. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  13. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  14. BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

  15. Library Locations Locations other than Main Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Library Locations Locations other than Main Library Example: Feminist Studies HQ1410 .U54 2009 University of California, Santa Barbara Library www.library.ucsb.edu Updated 3-2014 A - B.......................................6 Central M - N..................................................Arts Library (Music Building) P

  16. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  17. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  18. Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

  19. Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    70 The Illinois Basin hosts dozens of coal fired power plants which generates about 300 million Formation. We used 726 injection wells located near51 42 power plants to deliver 80 million metric tons technical constraints on the injection of CO2 into deep (>1.5 km) reservoirs under supercritical75

  20. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  1. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. Pre-Mississippian hydrocarbon potential of Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.G.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois basin is primarily a Paleozoic epeirogenic basin located in the east-central US. Taken at its broadest possible definition, this basin contains a maximum of 20,000 ft of sedimentary rocks. These represent every Phanerozoic system except the Triassic and Jurassic. Seven important tectonic episodes are recognized. These begin with the establishment of Eocambrian basement rift faults, followed by six rejuvenation events of varying magnitude. More than 3.5 billion bbl of oil have been produced from the Illinois basin, mainly from Pennsylvanian and Mississippian rocks. These rocks represent only 20% of the total basin sedimentary volume. Source rock maturation studies suggest that none of this oil is indigenous to the Pennsylvanian or Mississippian, but all has migrated upward from at least three pre-Mississippian sources. If basin sedimentary volume is taken to be roughly proportional to hydrocarbon reserves, there may be as much as 12 billion BOE remaining to be found in the largely untested pre-Mississippian of the Illinois basin. A thermal history model and Lopatin analysis suggest that oil generation began in Ordovician time and continued through the Jurassic in the deepest part of the basin. At the present stage of exploration, the Hunton Megagroup (Silurian-Devonian) is recommended as the primary pre-Mississippian drilling target. However, understanding the interplay of the pre-Middle Devonian unconformity with contemporaneous paleotopographic-paleobathymetric expression of prospective features is critical to successful Hunton porosity prediction. This interplay is demonstrated at Centralia and Sandoval fields, Clinton and Marion counties, Illinois.

  3. DESIGN OF A SYSTEM TO RETRIEVE SLUDGE FROM THE K EAST SPENT FUEL BASIN AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twitchell, A.L.; MacLean, G.T.; Ho, Q.T.; Fort, D.L.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the Sludge Retrieval System (SRS), which was designed to safely remove radioactive sludge from the K East spent fuel basin at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. Basin water and sludge have the potential to leak to the environment due to the age and condition of the basins. Since the 100 K Area spent fuel basins are located next to the Columbia River, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project mission includes the safe removal, containment, and transportation of sludge from the basins to a secure storage location. The scope of the SRS includes: A system capable of retrieving sludge from the K East basin floor, pits, and fuel canisters; Separation of debris from sludge, where debris is defined as any material greater than 0.64 cm (0.25 in.) in diameter; Collection of sludge particles in a container that can be transported away from the basin; Modifications to the K East basin to allow installation of the SRS. The SRS was designed by Fluor Federal Services. Changes to the designed system were made by Fluor Hanford as a result of full-scale testing performed after design. This paper discusses this testing, as well as operation and control of the system. Construction and startup testing was initially scheduled to be complete by the end of December 2002. Startup of the system is now expected in April 2003.

  4. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  5. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  6. Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

  7. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  8. Coal fly ash basins as an attractive nuisance to birds: Parental provisioning exposes nestlings to harmful trace elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    inhabiting settling impoundments receiving slurried ash from a coal-fired power plant located on the U. SCoal fly ash basins as an attractive nuisance to birds: Parental provisioning exposes nestlings Keywords: Coal fly ash basin Common Grackle Contaminants Quiscalus quiscala Selenium a b s t r a c t Birds

  9. OligoceneMiocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific Ocean: Evidence from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    investigated parts of the southwest Pacific Ocean. It is a region of remnant volcanic arcs, plateaus and basins of the study area in the SW Pacific Ocean, showing geographic names and dredge locations from ChurkinOligocene­Miocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific

  10. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  11. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  12. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Paradox Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Paradox Basin located in the southeastern part of Utah. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Permian Basin in Texas and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in-situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  13. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Almos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (late of Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A locator with a part support is used to hold a part onto the kinematic mount of a tooling machine so that the part can be held in or replaced in exactly the same position relative to the cutting tool for machining different surfaces of the part or for performing different machining operations on the same or different surfaces of the part. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls placed at equidistant positions around the planar surface of the locator and the kinematic mount has a plurality of magnets which alternate with grooves which accommodate the portions of the steel balls projecting from the locator. The part support holds the part to be machined securely in place in the locator. The locator can be easily detached from the kinematic mount, turned over, and replaced onto the same kinematic mount or another kinematic mount on another tooling machine without removing the part to be machined from the locator so that there is no need to touch or reposition the part within the locator, thereby assuring exact replication of the position of the part in relation to the cutting tool on the tooling machine for each machining operation on the part.

  14. Petroleum geology of the Southern Bida Basin, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braide, S.P. (Federal Univ., of Technology, Minna (Nigeria))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Bida basin is located in central Nigeria and is a major sedimentary area with a 3.5-km-thick sedimentary fill. However, it is the least understood of Nigeria's sedimentary basins because serious oil and gas exploration has not been undertaken in the basin. The surrounding Precambrian basement rocks experienced severe deformation during the Late Panafrican phase (600 {plus minus} 150 m.y.), and developed megashears that were reactivated during the Late Campanian-Maestrichtian. The ensuing wrenchfault tectonics formed the basin. The sedimentary fill, which comprises the Lokoja Formation are chiefly, if not wholly, nonmarine clastics. These have been characterized into facies that rapidly change from basin margin to basin axis, and have undergone only relatively mild tectonic distortion. Subsurface relations of the Lokoja Formation are postulated from outcrop study. The potential source rocks are most likely within the basinal axis fill and have not been deeply buried based on vitrinite reflectance of <0.65%. These findings, with the largely nonmarine depositional environment, suggest gas and condensate are the most likely hydrocarbons. Alluvial fans and deltaic facies that interfinger with lacustrine facies provide excellent reservoir capabilities. Potential traps for hydrocarbon accumulation were formed by a northwest-southeast-trending Campanian-Maestrichtian wrench system with associated northeast-southwest-oriented normal faults. The traps include strata in alluvial fans, fractured uplifted basement blocks, and arched strata over uplifted blocks. However, the size of hydrocarbon accumulations could be limited to some extent by a lack of effective hydrocarbon seal, because the dominant seals in the formation are unconformities.

  15. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  16. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  17. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  18. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  19. K-Basins design guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  20. Positive correspondence between the completeness of Late Quaternary fossiliferous lacustrine successions in Illinois and the basin index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, B.B. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basin index, defined as the ratio of the maximum area of a paleolake versus the area of the catchment (A[sub L]/A[sub C]), initially was used to compare the moisture balance of pluvial lakes in closed and semi-closed basins under arid climates. In this study the basin index also corresponds to the completeness of ostracode and pollen successions preserved in the basins. The basin indices of four breached kettles located in south-central Illinois as well as the thickness of fossiliferous zones determined from cores are compared. Collectively, the basins contain ostracode and pollen records spanning from the late Illinoian ([approx] 150 ka) to the Holocene. Hopwood Farm has the smallest index (0.03) and has a fossil record that terminates in Sangamonian clay. The fossil succession at Bald Knob Basin, with an intermediate basin index of 0.4, contains several lacuna in post-Sangamonian sediment and poorly preserved pollen in Holocene material. Raymond and Pittsburg Basins have indices > 1.0 and contain the most complete fossil records. The data indicate that the basin index is a useful guide for choosing sites with the greatest potential for yielding cores with conformable sediment successions.

  1. Operational Performance of Sedimentation Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleything, Matthew D.

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and sludge pumps and clog pipes. (Lee, 2007) Composition of grit varies widely, with moisture content ranging from 13 to 63 percent, and volatile content ranging from 1 to 56 percent. The specific gravity of clean grit particles may be as high as 2... for unobstructed flow of the inlet water into the basin when the basin was almost full to capacity with sediment. The outlet of the sediment basin is an oil/water separator. This is for oil leaks and spills from the plant island. The design called...

  2. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Permian Basin locatd in the western part of Texas. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Paradox Basin in Utah and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  3. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  4. Multi-canister overpack closure operations location study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Path Forward Project (SNF Project) has been established to develop engineered methods for the expedited removal of the irradiated uranium fuel from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. As specified by the SNF Project, the SNF will be removed from the K Basins, conditioned for dry storage and placed in a long term interim storage facility located in the 200 East Area. The SNF primarily consists of Zircaloy-2 clad uranium fuel discharged from the N-Reactor. A small portion of the SNF is Single Pass Reactor (SPR) Fuel, which is aluminum clad uranium fuel. The SNF will be loaded into Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) at the K Basins, transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility for initial fuel conditioning, and transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) for staging, final fuel conditioning, and dry storage. The MCO is a transportation, conditioning, and storage vessel. The MCO consists of a 24 inch pipe with a welded bottom closure and a top closure that is field welded after the MCO is loaded with SNF. The MCO is handled and transported in the vertical orientation during all operations. Except for operations within the CSB, the MCO is always within the transportation cask which primarily provides radiological shielding and structural protection of the MCO. The MCO closure operations location study provides a relative evaluation of location options at the K Basins and the CVD Facility and recommends that the MCO closure weld be performed, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility.

  5. Risk assessment of K basin twelve-inch drain valve failure from a postulated seismic initiating event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project will transfer metallic SNF from the Hanford 105 K-East and 105 K-West Basins to safe interim storage in the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The initial basis for design, fabrication, installation, and operation of the fuel removal systems was that the basin leak rates which could result from a postulated accident condition would not be excessive relative to reasonable recovery operations. However, an additional potential K Basin water leak path is through the K Basin drain valves. Three twelve-inch drain valves are located in the main basin bays along the north wall. The sumps containing the valves are filled with concrete which covers the drain valve body. Visual observations suggest that only the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor. It was recognized, however, that damage of the drain valve bonnet or stem during a seismic initiating event could provide a potential K Basin water leak path. The objectives of this activity are to: (1) evaluate the risk of damaging the three twelve-inch drain valves located along the north wall of the main basin from a seismic initiating event, and (2) determine the associated potential leak rate from a damaged valve.

  6. Electric current locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  7. Optimal fault location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knezev, Maja

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    are triggered. Protection system consisting of protection relays and circuit breakers (CBs) will operate in order to de-energize faulted line. Different Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) located in substations for the purpose of monitoring... in the control center by an operator who will mark fault event in a spreadsheet and inform other staff responsible for dealing with fault analysis and repair such as protection group or maintenance respectively. Protective relaying staff will be ready...

  8. Optimal fault location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knezev, Maja

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    are triggered. Protection system consisting of protection relays and circuit breakers (CBs) will operate in order to de-energize faulted line. Different Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) located in substations for the purpose of monitoring... in the control center by an operator who will mark fault event in a spreadsheet and inform other staff responsible for dealing with fault analysis and repair such as protection group or maintenance respectively. Protective relaying staff will be ready...

  9. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformance

  10. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformance

  11. FRACTURED RESERVOIR E&P IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN BASINS: A 3-D RTM MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Ortoleva; J. Comer; A. Park; D. Payne; W. Sibo; K. Tuncay

    2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Key natural gas reserves in Rocky Mountain and other U.S. basins are in reservoirs with economic producibility due to natural fractures. In this project, we evaluate a unique technology for predicting fractured reservoir location and characteristics ahead of drilling based on a 3-D basin/field simulator, Basin RTM. Recommendations are made for making Basin RTM a key element of a practical E&P strategy. A myriad of reaction, transport, and mechanical (RTM) processes underlie the creation, cementation and preservation of fractured reservoirs. These processes are often so strongly coupled that they cannot be understood individually. Furthermore, sedimentary nonuniformity, overall tectonics and basement heat flux histories make a basin a fundamentally 3-D object. Basin RTM is the only 3-D, comprehensive, fully coupled RTM basin simulator available for the exploration of fractured reservoirs. Results of Basin RTM simulations are presented, that demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Furthermore, it is shown how Basin RTM is a basis for a revolutionary automated methodology for simultaneously using a range of remote and other basin datasets to locate reservoirs and to assess risk. Characteristics predicted by our model include reserves and composition, matrix and fracture permeability, reservoir rock strength, porosity, in situ stress and the statistics of fracture aperture, length and orientation. Our model integrates its input data (overall sedimentation, tectonic and basement heat flux histories) via the laws of physics and chemistry that describe the RTM processes to predict reservoir location and characteristics. Basin RTM uses 3-D, finite element solutions of the equations of rock mechanics, organic and inorganic diagenesis and multi-phase hydrology to make its predictions. As our model predicts reservoir characteristics, it can be used to optimize production approaches (e.g., assess the stability of horizontal wells or vulnerability of fractures to production-induced formation pressure drawdown). The Piceance Basin (Colorado) was chosen for this study because of the extensive set of data provided to us by federal agencies and industry partners, its remaining reserves, and its similarities with other Rocky Mountain basins. We focused on the Rulison Field to test our ability to capture details in a well-characterized area. In this study, we developed a number of general principles including (1) the importance of even subtle flexure in creating fractures; (2) the tendency to preserve fractures due to the compressibility of gases; (3) the importance of oscillatory fracture/flow cycles in the expulsion of natural gas from source rock; and (4) that predicting fractures requires a basin model that is comprehensive, all processes are coupled, and is fully 3-D. A major difficulty in using Basin RTM or other basin simulator has been overcome in this project; we have set forth an information theory technology for automatically integrating basin modeling with classical database analysis; this technology also provides an assessment of risk. We have created a relational database for the Piceance Basin. We have developed a formulation of devolatilization shrinkage that integrates organic geochemical kinetics into incremental stress theory, allowing for the prediction of coal cleating and associated enhancement of natural gas expulsion from coal. An estimation of the potential economic benefits of the technologies developed or recommended here is set forth. All of the above findings are documented in this report.

  12. P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster presentation at EAGE conference, Leipzig 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster to the computation of re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with four boulders located in the upper bed of the coal. Tselentis, pers. comm.). The model is composed of a low velocity layer, upper bed, four boulders, coal seam

  13. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 162 Fall 2001. Date: Wednesday December 12, 2001. Time: 7:00 pm -9:00 pm. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  14. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 161 Fall 2001. Date: Friday December 14, 2001. Time: 8:00 am -10:00 am. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  15. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100LifeAnnouncementsLocations

  17. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  19. Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan Joseph K. Goode,1 the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south central Kyrgyzstan central Kyrgyzstan, Tectonics, 30, TC6009, doi:10.1029/2011TC002910. 1. Introduction [2] Deformation

  20. Evolution of the Llanos Basin and the deformation of the Eastern Cordiller, Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addison, F.; Cooper, M.; Hayward, A.; Howe, S. O'Leary, J. (BP Exploration Co. Ltd., Santafe de Bogota (Colombia))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Llanos Basin is located on the flank of the Eastern Cordillera in northeast Colombia. Basin development commenced with the deposition of a synrift Triassic and Jurassic megasequence related to the separation of North and South America in the Caribbean. Basin development continued with the Cretaceous Back Arc Megasequence deposited in a back arc basin behind the Andean subduction zone. Three major sequences can be recognized corresponding to extensional pulses in the Tithonian, Albian, and the Santonian which control thickness and facies distributions. The primary reservoir in the basin is the Late Eocene Mirandor Formation which was deposited in a fluvial system which prograded from the Guyana Shield to the west-northwest. This was deposited as part of the Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence (Bartonian to Serravallian) which developed as a result of uplift onset and deformation in the Central Cordillera. This megasequence covered the Magdalena Valley the Eastern Cordillera ad the Llanos Basin. In the foothills of the Eastern Cordillera, the Mirador Formation begins to show evidence of marine influence and was probably deposited in a series of shoreface sands and offshore bar complexes in the Cordillera. The Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence includes the Eocene-Oligocene Carbonera Formation which was deposited in a low every fluvial system that was mud dominated. Within the Carbonera Formation, a series of major, grossly coarsening upward cycles can be seen which are separated by maximum flooding surfaces that approximate to time lines. These cycles correspond to the early phases of development of the Central Cordillera with each pulse being seen as an influx of coarser clastics to the basin. The deformation style in the Eastern Cordillera is a mixture of thin-skinned thrust structures and the inversion of the thick-skinned basement involved extension faults. The inversion structures include the Cuisana field, a giant oil and gas-condensate discovery.

  1. The Climate of the South Platte Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Climate of the South Platte Basin Colorado Climate Center http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;Key Features of the Climate of the South Platte Basin #12;Temperature Cold winters Hot summers #12;Precipitation Monthly Average Precipitation for Selected Sites in the South Platte Basin 0.00 0

  2. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  3. Reserve estimates in western basins: Unita Basin. Final report, Part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde group and Wasatch formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Total in-place resource is estimated at 395.5 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 3.8 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Two plays were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources; in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. About 82.1% of the total evaluated resource is contained within sandstones that have extremely poor reservoir properties with permeabilities considered too low for commerciality using current frac technology.

  4. Relationships among sedimentology, stratigraphy, and diagenesis in the Proterozoic Thelon Basin, Nunavut, Canada: implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Eric E.

    -type uranium mineralisation and has the potential to host other economic deposits. The Thelon Formation (ca in the Thelon Basin (in the vicinity of the Kiggavik uranium deposit). D 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved-613-533-6592. www.elsevier.com/locate/jgeoexp Journal of Geochemical Exploration 80 (2003) 221­240 #12

  5. Inverse groundwater modelling in the Willunga Basin, South Australia Ian Knowles & Michael Teubner & Aimin Yan &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Ian W.

    Inverse groundwater modelling in the Willunga Basin, South Australia Ian Knowles & Michael Teubner flow, based on a functional minimization technique, has been used to calibrate a groundwater flow model is the location of extensive viticulture, irrigated primarily by groundwater, the levels and quality of which have

  6. A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling Initiative Fund, Water Sustainability Graduate Fellowship Program 2004/2005 #12;2 Introduction Located

  7. Genetic classification of petroleum basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demaison, G.; Huizinga, B.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rather than relying on a descriptive geologic approach, this genetic classification is based on the universal laws that control processes of petroleum formation, migration, and entrapment. Petroleum basins or systems are defined as dynamic petroleum-generating and concentrating physico-chemical systems functioning on a geologic space and time scale. A petroleum system results from the combination of a generative subsystem (or hydrocarbon kitchen), essentially controlled by chemical processes, and a migration-entrapment subsystem, controlled by physical processes. The generative subsystem provides a certain supply of petroleum to the basin during a given geologic time span. The migration-entrapment subsystem receives petroleum and distributes it in a manner that can lead either to dispersion and loss or to concentration of the regional charge into economic accumulations. The authors classification scheme for petroleum basins rests on a simple working nomenclature consisting of the following qualifiers: (1) charge factor: undercharged, normally charged, or supercharged, (2) migration drainage factor: vertically drained or laterally drained, and (3) entrapment factor: low impedance or high impedance. Examples chosen from an extensive roster of documented petroleum basins are reviewed to explain the proposed classification.

  8. The Cricket indoor location system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priyantha, Nissanka Bodhi, 1968-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor environments present opportunities for a rich set of location-aware applications such as navigation tools for humans and robots, interactive virtual games, resource discovery, asset tracking, location-aware sensor ...

  9. Magnetic survey of D-Area oil basin waste unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumbest, R.J.; Marcy, D.; Hango, J.; Bently, S.; Hunter, B.; Cain, B.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The D-Area Oil Basin RCRA Waste Unit is located north of D-Area on Savannah River Site. This Waste Unit was known, based on aerial photography and other historical data, to be the location for one or more trenches used for disposal of oil in steel drums and other refuse. In order to define the location of possible trenches on the site and to assess the possibility of the presence of additional buried objects a magnetic survey was conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Section/Groundwater Group during July, 1993, at the request of the Environmental Restoration Department. Prior to the conduct of the magnetic survey a Ground Penetrating Radar survey of the site consisting of several lines identified several areas of disturbed soil. Based on these data and other historical information the general orientation of the trenches could be inferred. The magnetic survey consists of a rectangular grid over the waste unit designed to maximize resolution of the trench edges. This report describes the magnetic survey of the D-Area Oil Basin Waste Unit.

  10. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. (Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France)); Richert, J.P. (Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  11. Mississippian facies relationships, eastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, H.W. (Oryx Energy, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)); Forgotson, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippian strata in the eastern Anadarko basin record a gradual deepening of the basin. Late and post-Mississippian tectonism (Wichita and Arbuckle orogenies) fragmented the single large basin into the series of paired basins and uplifts recognized in the southern half of Oklahoma today. Lower Mississippian isopach and facies trends (Sycamore and Caney Formations) indicate that basinal strike in the study area (southeastern Anadarko basin) was predominantly east-west. Depositional environment interpretations made for Lower Mississippian strata suggest that the basin was partially sediment starved and exhibited a low shelf-to-basin gradient. Upper Mississippian isopach and facies trends suggest that basinal strike within the study area shifted from dominantly east-west to dominantly northwest-southeast due to Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian uplift along the Nemaha ridge. Within the study area, the Chester Formation, composed of gray to dove-gray shales with interbedded limestones deposited on a carbonate shelf, thins depositionally into the basin and is thinnest at its facies boundary with the Springer Group and the upper portion of the Caney Formation. As basin subsidence rates accelerated, the southern edge of the Chester carbonate shelf was progressively drowned, causing a backstepping of the Chester Formation calcareous shale and carbonate facies. Springer Group sands and black shales transgressed northward over the drowned Chester Formation shelf.

  12. Vegetation and climates in the Presidio basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bruce Roahen

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with air temperatures, bu+ CPUR" TA BP. were found to nave temperatures 18 -P8 E;armor than . he ai&. Gates (19o6) had car1i ". - speculated that Lranspir tional cool' & g might reduce Lhe leaf temperature, t?ereby keeping the temperature of leaves... the movement of pesticide residue throughout i, he basin (Applegate, 1967). BTVDY AREA Presi dio County is located in West, Texas in the climatic region termed Trans-Pecos (Carr, 1967). The county is thc fourth la& gest in t' he state with an area of )&877...

  13. Sequence stratigraphy, facies architecture and reservoir distribution, Cretaceous lowstand fan reservoirs, Southern Basin, onshore Trinidad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprague, A.R.; Larue, D.K.; Faulkner, B.L. [Exxon Production Research Company, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick Albian-Campanian mass-flow sandstones in the Southern Basin Trinidad were deposited within submarine canyons incised into the northern continental slope of South America and as associated down-dip basin-floor lowstand fans. The contemporaneous slope to basin-floor break lay across the Southern Basin area with turbidity current paleoflow being to the northwest. North of this paleo-slope break graded to massive, channelized, high-density turbidite sandstones occur interstratified with shaly overbank and channel abandonment deposits. A progression of depositional sub-environments from proximal through distal lowstand fan can be recognized. All fine and thin upward but can be discriminated by the occurrence of slumps, debris flows and conglomerates, the grain-size and bedding scale of sandstones and the characteristics of low-density turbidites and mudrocks. South of the paleo-slope break mass-flow deposits comprise muddy slumps and debris flows rich in granules and pebbles deposited in slope canyons. During periods of turbidity current by-pass or fan abandonment hemipelagic settling processes predominated. Reservoir distribution maps of these lowstand fans have been constructed utilizing geometric constraints, analogs and paleoslope determinations from oriented core. The interpreted canyon locations and orientations are key to the understanding of reservoir distribution on the basin-floor tract to the north: a vital component in the exploration of the basin.

  14. Stratigraphy and depositional environments of Cherokee group (Desmoinesian, middle Pennsylvanian), Central Cherokee basin, southeast Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staton, M.D.; Brady, L.L.; Walton, A.W.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation from geophysical well logs of radioactive black shales, which extend throughout the basin and into the Sedgwick and Forest City basins, provided the basis for division of the Cherokee Group into 11 stratigraphic intervals. Black shale units below the Fort Scott Limestone and Verdigris Limestone, and above the Tebo coal are the most extensive and easily recognizable markers. The Tebo marker might be considered as a possible boundary between the Krebs and Cabaniss Formations owing to lateral extensiveness, mappability, and stratigraphic location near a distinct lithologic change. Cross sections indicate that the basin subsided during deposition of the Krebs Formation. Stratigraphic intervals in the overlying Cabaniss formation are relatively uniform in thickness, suggesting little or no subsidence during deposition. Onlap upon the Nemaha ridge occurred during Krebs and much of Cabaniss deposition. Stratigraphic markers that overlap the ridge and extend into the Sedgwick basin indicate one depositional province. Core, well-log, and well-sample studies show that lithologic characteristics within the basin appear similar to outcrop features. Basin strata are dominated by shales and sandstones with interbedded coals and thin limestones. Net-sandstone isolith maps reveal the presence of a deltaic complex characterized by both stacking and offset of major sandstone bodies. The amount of limestone significantly increases along the eastern flank of the Nemaha ridge.

  15. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  16. Fractal boundary basins in spherically symmetric $?^4$ theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethan P. Honda

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from numerical simulations of the flat-space nonlinear Klein-Gordon equa- tion with an asymmetric double-well potential in spherical symmetry. Exit criteria are defined for the simulations that are used to help understand the boundaries of the basins of attraction for Gaussian "bubble" initial data. The first exit criteria, based on the immediate collapse or expan- sion of bubble radius, is used to observe the departure of the scalar field from a static intermediate attractor solution. The boundary separating these two behaviors in parameter space is smooth and demonstrates a time-scaling law with an exponent that depends on the asymmetry of the potential. The second exit criteria differentiates between the creation of an expanding true-vacuum bubble and dispersion of the field leaving the false vacuum; the boundary separating these basins of attraction is shown to demonstrate fractal behavior. The basins are defined by the number of bounces that the field undergoes before inducing a phase transition. A third, hybrid exit criteria is used to determine the location of the boundary to arbitrary precision and to characterize the threshold behavior. The possible effects this behavior might have on cosmological phase transitions are briefly discussed.

  17. Borehole locations on seven interior salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simcox, A.C.; Wampler, S.L.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is designed as an inventory of all wells known to have been drilled within a five-mile radius of each of seven salt domes within the Interior Salt Basin in east Texas, northern Louisiana and Mississippi. There are 72 boreholes that entered salt above an elevation of -3000 feet mean sea level. For these, details of location, drilling dates, depth of casing and cement, elevation of top of caprock and salt, etc., are given on tables in the appendix. Of the seven domes, Oakwood has the largest number of boreholes, thirty-eight (including two sidetracked wells) that enter the salt stock above -3000 feet mean sea level; another dome in northeast Texas, Keechi, has eight; in northern Louisiana, Rayburn's has four and Vacherie has five; in southern Mississippi, Cypress Creek has seven, Lampton has one, and Richton has nine. In addition, all wells known outside the supra-domal area, but within a five-mile radius of the center of the 7 domes are separately catalogued.

  18. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  19. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  20. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  1. Precision zero-home locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, W.J.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

  2. 105KE Basin Area Radiation Monitor System (ARMS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KINKEL, C.C.

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure is intended for the Area Radiation Monitoring System, ARMS, that is replacing the existing Programmable Input-Output Processing System, PIOPS, radiation monitoring system in the 105KE basin. The new system will be referred to as the 105KE ARMS, 105KE Area Radiation Monitoring System. This ATP will ensure calibration integrity of the 105KE radiation detector loops. Also, this ATP will test and document the display, printing, alarm output, alarm acknowledgement, upscale check, and security functions. This ATP test is to be performed after completion of the 105KE ARMS installation. The alarm outputs of the 105KE ARMS will be connected to the basin detector alarms, basin annunciator system, and security Alarm Monitoring System, AMS, located in the 200 area Central Alarm Station (CAS).

  3. Idaho Cleanup Project CPP-603A basin deactivation waste management 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croson, D.V.; Davis, R.H.; Cooper, W.B. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPP-603A basin facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL). CPP-603A operations are part of the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) that is managed by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). Once the inventoried fuel was removed from the basins, they were no longer needed for fuel storage. However, they were still filled with water to provide shielding from high activity debris and contamination, and had to either be maintained so the basins did not present a threat to public or worker health and safety, or be isolated from the environment. The CPP-603A basins contained an estimated 50,000 kg (110,200 lbs) of sludge. The sludge was composed of desert sand, dust, precipitated corrosion products, and metal particles from past cutting operations. The sediment also contained hazardous constituents and radioactive contamination, including cadmium, lead, and U-235. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA), conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), evaluated the risks associated with deactivation of the basins and the alternatives for addressing those risks. The recommended action identified in the Action Memorandum was to perform interim stabilization of the basins. The sludge in the basins was removed and treated in accordance with the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) and disposed at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). A Non-Time Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) was conducted under CERCLA to reduce or eliminate other hazards associated with maintaining the facility. The CERCLA NTCRA included removing a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1); consolidating and mapping the location of debris objects containing Co-60; removing, treating, and disposing of the basin water; and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM). The NTCRA is an interim action that reduces the risks to human health and the environment by minimizing the potential for release of hazardous substances. The interim action does not prejudice the final end-state alternative. (authors)

  4. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  5. area sichuan basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 59 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  6. area tarim basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 65 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  7. area groundwater basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concerning aspects of petroleum geochemistry in the basin, especially in determining source rock(s) in the western part of this basin. It has been speculated that Ngimbang...

  8. urricane activity in the Atlantic basin increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with levels in the 1970s and 1980s. For example, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index in the Atlantic of disturbances. Bottom: annual number (Aug­Oct) of North Atlantic basin hurricanes (1980­2005). See figures 2, is a crucial question for the future outlook of hurricane activity in the basin. It is difficult to distinguish

  9. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  10. 6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

  11. Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

  12. Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    17 Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional domain of China and Mongolia S.A. Graham,* T Mongolia was extended during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. As noted by various authors (Li et al in southern Mongolia (Lamb and Badarch, 1997), a crushed late Paleozoic flysch basin along the China­Mongolia

  13. Geology of Alabama's Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Holmes, J.W.; Shepard, B.K.

    1983-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama continues to be an exciting area for oil and gas exploration. Several potential pay zones and a variety of petroleum traps in the basin resulted in a large number of successful test wells, helping to make the basin one of the more attractive areas for continued exploration in the US. The Upper Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin are the primary exploration targets, with the Carter and Lewis sandstones being the most prolific producers. These sanstones exhibit considerable lateral and vertical variability and no apparent regional trends for porosity and permeability development. Determining the depositional environments of the Carter and Lewis sandstones should enhance petroleum exploration in the basin by helping to identify reservoir geometry, areal extent, and quality. To date, the Carter sandstones has produced more than 700,000 bbl of oil and 100 billion CR of gas; the Lewis sandstone, over 5000 bbl of oil and 12 billion CF of gas.

  14. VENTURA BASIN LOS ANGELES BASIN CENTRAL COASTAL BASIN W Y T

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE. Great Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004VENTURA

  15. Magnetic lineations constraints for the back-arc opening of the Late Neogene South Banda Basin (eastern Indonesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyment, Jérôme

    (eastern Indonesia) F. Hinschbergera,*, J.-A. Maloda , J. Dymenta , C. Honthaasb , J.-P. ReÃ?haulta , S 05, France c Departemen Teknik Geologi, Universitas Hasanuddin, Ujung Pandang, Indonesia Abstract The South Banda Basin is located within eastern Indonesia near the triple junction between the Eurasian

  16. Simulation of the potential impacts of the proposed Sithe power plant in the Four Corners basin using CAMx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    Simulation of the potential impacts of the proposed Sithe power plant in the Four Corners basin visibility is an integral component of a visitor's experience. There is concern that the proposed power plant shown that power plants located to the east and west of the Grand Canyon can significantly contribute

  17. The paragenesis chemistry of alteration associated with the P2and fault in metamorphic rocks underlying the Athabasca Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The paragenesis chemistry of alteration associated with the P2and fault in metamorphic rocks underlying the Athabasca Basin The paragenesis chemistry of alteration associated with the P2and fault's largest high-grade uranium deposit. This deposit is classified as unconformity-type because it is located

  18. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  19. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  20. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas, Moffat County, Colorado. Structure contours are top of Mesaverde. Contour interval is 1, 000 ft ( 305 m). Modified from Whi tley (1962) Generalized subsurface section of the Upper Cretaceous formations in the Sand Wash basin depicting gross... Correlation section parallel to depositional dip, North Craig field area, showing inclined time- stratigraphic units in the Lewis shale which con- tain thick sandstone intervals. Location of section shown in Fig. 23 Strike correlation section, North Craig...

  1. Mid-Continent basin: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.R.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest unevaluated basins in the Mid-Continent is the Salina basin in Kansas and its extension into eastern Nebraska. The purpose of this study is to update all older data, reconstruct new maps, and reappraise the potential for further exploration. The last comprehensive publications on the area were in 1948 and 1956. The Salina basin includes 12,700 mi/sup 2/ (33,000 km/sup 2/) in north-central Kansas, and approximately 7000 mi/sup 2/ (18,000 km/sup 2/) in east-central Nebraska. The basin is delineated by the zero isopach of Mississippian rocks bordering the basin. The Central Kansas uplift borders the basin on the southwest and Nemaha ridge on the east; the southern limit is an ill-defined saddle in the vicinity of T17S. Boundaries of the Nebraska basin are less well defined, but the axis of the basin trends directly north from the Kansas border along the boundary of Ts10 and 11W, to 41/sup 0/N lat., and then bifurcates to the northwest toward the Siouxiana arch and northeast for an unknown distance. Conventional structure maps have been constructed on several horizons, and a series of cross sections depicts anomalous structures. Recent gravity, magnetic, and seismic reflection profiling also provide information on basement tectonics which may influence structures in the younger sediments. Basement depth ranges from 600 ft (180 m) on the northeast Nemaha ridge boundary of the basin, to a depth of 4750 ft (1450 m) or -3000 ft (-915 m) below sea-level datum in Jewell County; therefore, there may be an approximate total of 10,000 mi/sup 3/ (42,000 km/sup 3/ of sediments for future exploration.

  2. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  3. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  4. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  5. Vega field and potential of Ragusa basin, Offshore Sicily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, M. Jr.; Livraga, G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vega, the largest single oil field in the Mediterranean Sea, is located between the southeastern coast of Sicily and the Island of Malta. The field lies entirely in Italian waters. Its discovery in October 1980 was based on interpretation of a very poor-quality seismic survey which, nevertheless, roughly outlined a relatively small structure. A limestone and dolomite fractured reservoir of the Inici, or Siracusa Formation, of Late Jurasic age, may contain in excess of 1 billion bbl of heavy crude (15.5 API) within a productive area of approximately 10,000 acres (4000 ha.). Reservoir properties are excellent, with permeabilities in darcys. The field extends northwest-southeast for 8.5 mi (14 km) and averages 1.7 mi (3 km) in width, according to the 3D seismic survey (2000 km) shot soon after the discovery well was drilled. The gross oil column reaches approximately 820 ft (250 m). The southeasternmost part of the Vega structure is not yet completely defined, and an additional 3D seismic survey is in progress. Should the new seismic results confirm expectations, the Vega structure could extend over 10 mi (17 km). The overlying Inici reservoir consists of dolomite and underlain by limestone in the southwestern part of the basin, and entirely of limestone in the northwestern portion of the basin. The Inici Formation represents the platform facies of the open-sea Villagonia and Giardini sediments. The Cammarata-Pozzillo (discovered in 1959), Perla (1979), Vega (1980), and Prezioso (1983) heavy crude oil fields are related to this formation. The potential for discovery of other fields similar to Vega in the Ragusa basin is excellent.

  6. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kezunovic, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Perunicic, B. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  7. Location logistics of industrial facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, William Eugene

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of company intent1ons is not made at the correct time and in the correct manner. 6. Recommend Best Areas for Further Invest1 ations. Once the on-site evaluations have been completed, the 11st of possibilities is reduced still further and only the best... location and site selection. This data was gathered through library research, atten- dance of various industr1al development conferences, sol1citation of mater1als from individuals currently involved with industrial facil1ties location, and various...

  8. Pressure seals - Implications for deep gas exploration in Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tigert, V.A.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure seals are economically significant geological phenomena because they play an important role in deep natural gas entrapment. Pressure seals identified in basins worldwide may offer a new frontier for exploring natural gas reservoirs below {minus} 10,000 ft. Pressure seals are low-permeability envelopes that enclose abnormally pressured internal reservoirs. There are three different types of seals: basal, lateral, and top planar. Basal seals define the bottom of abnormal pressure compartments and usually follow a stratigraphic horizon. Lateral seals are usually associated with fault patterns. Top planar seals may cut across time-stratigraphic boundaries, different lithologies, and structures, and are by far the most significant type. The southeastern portion of the Anadarko basin in the Mill Creek graben area displays a layered sequence of abnormally pressured fluid compartments between {minus} 3,000 and {minus} minus 16,000 ft. These compartments are separated from each other as well as from overlying and underlying normal pressure zones by pressure seals. In McClain County, a top planar pressure seal separating two abnormal pressured compartments is located between {minus} 11,000 and {minus} 12,000 ft within the Simpson Group. Diagenetic signatures identified in the seal zone are characterized by carbonate and/or silica cemented intervals alternating with more porous and permeable units generating distinctive banded and/or laminated structures, coined zebra structures. The resulting compositional and textural heterogeneity of the Simpson sandstones may be related to diagenetic modification that occurred during the seal evolution.

  9. Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

  10. Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Building Address Locations -Assumes entire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    Building Address Locations - Assumes entire building unless noted Designation Submit through* 560, 4 BU Crosstown Center 801 Massachusetts Ave Floor 1, 2 BMC BCD Building 800 Harrison Avenue BCD BMC Biosquare III 670 Albany Floors 2, 3, 6, 7 BMC Biosquare III 670 Albany Floors 1, 4, 5, 8 BU Building

  12. Boston, Massachusetts Location: Boston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -recovery ventilation and water-source heat pumps Each unit has fresh air ducted independently. Each residence is warmed by a heat pump that taps the Trigen Energy Corporation steam lines that run underneath the street. #12;WallsBoston, Massachusetts #12;Location: Boston, MA Building type(s): Multi-unit residential, Retail 350

  13. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction fuel removal for 105-KW Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, C.B.

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document serves as a Notice of Construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.96, for the modifications, installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities at 105-KW Basin. The purpose of the activities described in this NOC is to enable the eventual retrieval and transport of the fuel for processing. The fuel retrieval and transport will require an integrated water treatment system for which performance specifications have been developed. These specifications are currently in the procurement process. Following procurement (and before installation of this system and the handling of fuel) design details will be provided to Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The 105-K West Reactor (105-KW) and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. Although the 105-KW Basin has not been known to leak, the discharge chute and associated construction joint have been isolated from the rest of the basin by metal isolation barriers. This was a precautionary measure, to mitigate the consequences of a seismic event. The proposed modifications described are scheduled to begin in calendar year 1997.

  14. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  15. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  16. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  17. Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

  18. Petroleum potential of the Libyan sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammuda, O.S.; Sbeta, A.M.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to prevailing opinion, all Libyan sedimentary basins and the Al-Jabal Al-Akhdar platform contain prolific petroleum accumulations with very high prospectivity. A systematic review of the types of traps and pays in this central part of the southern Mediterranean province reveals great variability in reservoir and source rock characteristics. The reservoir rocks are of almost all geologic ages. The thick source rock sequences also vary in nature and organic content. The organic-rich facies have accumulated in intracratonic and passive margin basins or in marginal seas. Most of the oil discovered thus far in these basins is found in large structural traps. Future discoveries of stratigraphic traps or small structural traps will require intensified efforts and detailed studies using up-to-date multidisciplinary techniques in sedimentary tectonics, biostratigraphic facies analysis, and geochemical prospecting in order to develop a better understanding of these basins, thus improving their prospectivity.

  19. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES{ampersand}H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility.

  20. The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

  1. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document(S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility

  2. Unreviewed safety question evaluation of 100K East and 100K West in-basin fuel characterization program activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwardt, L.D.

    1995-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis for answers to an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) safety evaluation of the 105K East (KE) and 105K West (KW) in-basin activities associated with the fuel characterization program as described in the characterization shipping plan. The significant activities that are common to both 105 KE and 105 KW basins are the movement of canisters from their main basin storage locations (or potentially from the 105 KE Tech View Pit if a dump table is available) to the south loadout pit transfer channel, hydrogen generation testing in the single element fuel container, loading the single element fuel container into the shipping cask, loading of the shipping cask onto a flat-bed trailer, return of the test fuel elements or element pieces from the 327 facility, placement of the fuel elements back into Mark 2 canisters, and placement of the canisters in the main storage basin. Decapping of canisters in the south loadout pit transfer channel and re-encapsulation of canisters are activities specific to the 105 KW basin. The scope of this safety evaluation includes only those characterization fuel shipment activities performed in the 105 KE and 105 KW fuel storage basin structures up to installation of the overpack. The packaging safety evaluation report governs the shipment of the fuel elements. The K Basins Plant Review Committee has determined that the in-basin activities associated with the fuel characterization program fuel shipments are bounded by the current safety envelop and do not constitute an unreviewed safety question. This determination is documented on Attachment 1.

  3. Late devonian carbon isotope stratigraphy and sea level fluctuations, Canning Basin, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reef, Canning Basin, Western Australia. Palaeontology 43,the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Loucks, R.G. ,Canning Basin, Western Australia. Ph.D Thesis, University of

  4. Joint microseismic event location with uncertain velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of the joint location of seismic events using an array of receivers. We show that locating multiple seismic events simultaneously is advantageous compared to the more traditional approaches of locating ...

  5. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  6. Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of...

  7. Asymptotic analysis of an optimal location problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Asymptotic analysis of an optimal location problem. One considers the problem of optimal location of masses(say production centers) in order to approximate a ...

  8. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Shira Mountains, central Ucayali Basin, Peru? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Alvarez, Jaime Orlando

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ucayali Basin is a Peruvian sub-Andean basin that initially formed during the extensive tectonics of the Early Paleozoic. Originally, the Ucayali Basin was part of a larger basin that extended east of the current ...

  9. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  10. Geochemical Prospecting of Hydrocarbons in Frontier Basins of India* By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kumar; D. J. Patil; G. Kalpana; C. Vishnu Vardhan

    India has 26 sedimentary basins with a basinal area of approximately 1.8x 10 6 km 2 (excluding deep waters), out of which seven are producing basins and two have proven potential. Exploration efforts in other basins, called “frontier basins ” are in progress. These basins are characterized by varied geology, age, tectonics, and depositional environments. Hydrocarbon shows in many of these basins are known, and in few basins oil and gas have flowed in commercial /non-commercial quantities. Within the framework of India Hydrocarbon Vision – 2025 and New Exploration Licensing Policy, there is a continuous increase in area under active exploration. The asset management concept with multi-disciplinary teams has created a demand for synergic application of risk-reduction technologies, including surface geochemical surveys. National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI), Hyderabad, India has initiated/planned surface geochemical surveys composed of gas chromatographic and carbon isotopic analyses in few of the frontier basins of India. The adsorbed soil gas data in one of the basins (Saurashtra basin, Gujarat) has shown varied concentrations of CH4 to C4H10. The C1 concentration varies between 3 to 766 ppb and ??C2+, 1 to 543 ppb. This basin has thin soil cover and the Mesozoic sediments (probable source rocks) are overlain by thick cover of Deccan Traps. The scope and perspective of geochemical surveys in frontier basins of India are presented here.

  11. Short range radio locator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers to sample the ether for the radar pulse. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information.

  12. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust ...

  13. active single basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  14. annapolis basin area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    geology of the Bengal Basin in relation to the regional tectonic framework and basin-fill history Geosciences Websites Summary: ; and this was followed by an increase in the...

  15. annecy basin eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  16. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  17. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust belt has proven...

  18. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , the BASIN software is combined with PRISE in the UGRA system to estimate unconventional resource potential in frontier basins. The PRISE software contains information about the resources (conventional gas, conventional oil, shale gas, coalbed methane...

  19. Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

  20. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of Mississippian (Chesterian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.B.; Meylan, M.A.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The character and reservoir quality of six different Mississippian (Chesterian) sandstone units in frontier areas of the Black Warrior basin of Mississippi have been determined by core inspection, thin-section examination, and x-ray diffractometry. A total of 113 samples from ten wells was taken from cores of the following sandstones: the Lewis, a calcareous sandstone at the top of or just above the Lewis that the authors refer to as the Lewis limestone, the Evans, the Rea, the Sanders, and the Carter. Hydrocarbon production from the basin, which is located in northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama, is mostly shallow gas (with minor gas condensate and oil) from the units. Sample depths range from about 2500 ft (762 m) in northern Chickasaw County to about 5500 ft (1676 m) in Monroe and Lowndes Counties, with the deepest samples coming from almost 11,000 ft (3353 m) in northern Clay County.

  1. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  2. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

  3. Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 1164M (run 6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, B.M.; Klinger, G.S.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the sixth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 1164 M. This element (referred to as Element 1164M) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 1164M was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

  4. Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 1990 (Run 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marschman, S.C.; Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100-Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basins have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuels in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first of those tests (Run 1), which was conducted on an N-Reactor inner fuel element (1990) that had been stored underwater in the K-West Basin (see Section 2.0). This fuel element was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The testing was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 3.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in Section 4.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 5.0. These results are further discussed in Section 6.0.

  5. Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 5744U (Run 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basins have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the fourth of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 5744U. This element (referred to as Element 5744U) was stored underwater in the K-West Basin from 1983 until 1996. Element 5744U was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The system used for the drying test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. Inspections of the fuel element before and after the test are provided in Section 4.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 5.0, and discussed in Section 6.0.

  6. Petroleum geology of the Zhu-1 depression, Pearl River Mouth Basin, People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilera, C.L.; Huizinga, B.J.; Lomando, A.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pearl River Mouth basin, located in the South China Sea between Hainan Island and Taiwan has been the focus of an intense exploration effort during the l980s. In 1979 the international oil industry, acquired over 60,000 km of seismic, gravity, and magnetic data covering an area of approximately 240,000 km{sup 2}. Three major subbasins, Zhu-1, Zhu-2, and Zhu-3 were defined. Chevron in partnership with Texaco and AGIP (ACT group), concentrated their effort on the Zhu-1 depression which was interpreted to contain as much as 7,800 m of sedimentary section. This subbasin, bounded by the Wansha and Donsha massifs to the north and south, is the most inboard of the three depressions, thereby possibly prolonging anoxic lacustrine conditions prior to the Neogene marine incursion. Additionally, the Zhu- 1 depression should have directly received Miocene sediment potentially supplying the subbasin with high-quality reservoirs. Within the Zhu-1 depression, the ACT group focused in on Block 16/08, which covered the deepest part of the Zhu-1 depression. The block was awarded to the consortium in January 1983. Structuring within the block ranges from Paleogene tensional block faulting created during the early formation of the overall Pearl River Mouth basin to draping over basement highs and carbonate buildups during the Neogene. The Pearl River Mouth basin exhibits classic rift basin geometry with early nonmarine continental fluvial/lacustrine deposition (Zhuhai Formation) during the Oligocene and capped by a lower Miocene marine incursion (Zhu Jiang Formation). Integrated interpretations, exploration drilling, and constant refinement of the geological model led to the discovery of two oil fields, Huizhou/21-1 and Huizhou/26-1, both of which are currently under development and will represent the first commercial oil production from the entire Pearl River Mouth basin.

  7. Application of Landsat imagery to hydrocarbon exploration in Niobrara Formation, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merin, I.S.; Moore, W.R.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Niobrara Formation produces commercial quantities of oil from fractures in several places in the Denver basin. The Niobrara in this basin is an oil-prone, mature source rock having as much as 3.4% TOC, and has been in the generating window since early Eocene. This implies that hydrocarbon generation from the Niobrara is partly contemporaneous with the Laramide orogeny. The Laramide was a multiple-phase orogenic event that began with compression directed to the east-northeast during the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene and ended with compression directed to the northeast during the Eocene. The authors believe the Eocene phase activated northeast-trending extension fractures that may have acted as loci for storage and migration of hydrocarbons, locally generated in the Niobrara. The auto-fracing pressures related to hydrocarbon generation in the Niobrara theoretically would preferentially open and fill this northeast-trending fracture system. Examination of Landsat imagery shows that zones of northeast-trending lineaments are present throughout the basin. Numerous northeast-trending faults are present in the basin, and many overlie older zones that were reactivated during the Laramide. This suggests that these lineaments are previously unrecognized fracture zones. The authors have defined an exploration fairway within the basin based on subsurface isopach and resistivity mapping. The authors believe that mapping of northeast-trending fractures can help identify leads (within this fairway) prospective for Niobrara production. Support of this concept is the location of several apparently productive Niobrara wells along a zone of northeast-trending lineaments.

  8. DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE 105K EAST BASIN ION EXCHANGE COLUMN MONOLITH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOCHEN, R.M.

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-K East (KE) Basin Ion Exchange Column (IXC) cells, lead caves, and the surrounding vault are to be removed as necessary components in implementing ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order'' (Ecology et al. 2003) milestone M-034-32 (Complete Removal of the K East Basin Structure). The IXCs consist of six units located in the KE Basin, three in operating positions in cells and three stored in a lead cave. Methods to remove the IXCs from the KE Basin were evaluated in KBC-28343, ''Disposal of K East Basin Ion Exchange Column Evaluation''. The method selected for removal was grouting of the six IXCs into a single monolith for disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Grout will be added to the IXC cells, IXC lead caves containing spent IXCs, and in the spaces between to immobilize the contaminants, provide self-shielding, minimize void space, and provide a structurally stable waste form. The waste to be offered for disposal is the encapsulated monolith defined by the exterior surfaces of the vault and the lower surface of the underlying slab. This document presents a summary of the data quality objective (DQO) process establishing the decisions and data required to support decision-making activities for disposition of the IXC monolith. The DQO process is completed in accordance with the seven-step planning process described in EPA QA/G-4, ''Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process'', which is used to clarify and study objectives; define the appropriate type, quantity, and quality of data; and support defensible decision-making. The DQO process involves the following steps: (1) state the problem; (2) identify the decision; (3) identify the inputs to the decision; (4) define the boundaries of the study; (5) develop a decision rule (DR); (6) specify tolerable limits on decision errors; and (7) optimize the design for obtaining data.

  9. Evolution of extensional basins and basin and range topography west of Death Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, K. V.; McKenna, L. W.; Stock, J.; Knapp, J.; Page, L.; Sternlof, K.; Silverberg, D.; Wust, G.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECTONICS, VOL. 8, NO. 3, PAGES 453-467, JUNE 1989 EVOLUTION OF EXTENSIONAL BASINS AND BASIN AND RANGE TOPOGRAPHY WEST OF DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA K.V. Hodges, L.W. McKenna, J. Stock , J. Knapp, L. Page, K. Sternlof, D. Silverberg, G. Wrist 2... of the extensional riders in this area indicates that the sole fault dips less than 15øNW beneath the Nova Formation [Hodges et al., 1989]. Detailed mapping of the structurally lowest portions of the Nova Basin south of Panamint Butte (Figure 2; K.V. Hodges...

  10. Simplified vibratory characterization of alluvial basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-François; Duval, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the analysis of seismic wave amplification, modal methods are interesting tools to study the modal properties of geological structures. Modal approaches mainly lead to information on such parameters as fundamental frequencies and eigenmodes of alluvial basins. For a specific alluvial deposit in Nice (France), a simplified modal approach involving the Rayleigh method is considered. This approach assumes a set of admissible shape functions for the eigenmodes and allows a fast estimation of the fundamental frequency of the basin. The agreement between modal numerical results and experimental ones is satisfactory. The simplified modal method then appears as an efficient mean for the global vibratory characterization of geological structures towards resonance.

  11. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  12. DEMOLISHING A COLD-WAR-ERA FUEL STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD ER; ORGILL TK; DAGAN EB

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the K East basin within six months of tumover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team implemented open-air demolition techniques to demolish the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovation that aided demolition was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building, portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by removing the CAB during demolition using heavy equipment. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates that similar open-air demolition ofcontaminated structures can be performed successfully.

  13. DEMOLISHING A COLD WARE ERA FULE STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD ER; STEVENS JM; DAGAN EB; ORGILL TK; GREEN MA; LARSON CH; ZINSLI LC

    2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the KE Basin within six months of turnover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team applied open-air demolition techniques to bring the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives during the demolition; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovative approach that made demolition easier was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building and portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple-layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by using heavy equipment to remove the CAB during demolition. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates that contaminated structures can be torn down successfully using similar open-air demolition techniques.

  14. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  15. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-03 Prepared-96.............................................. 22 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Bridge Creek basin livestock wintering area back assessment, 1996 quality in the Bridge Creek basin are assessed. These sites had been inspected in the winter and spring

  16. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  17. Exploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wild Onion & Balsamroot Gambel Oak Pinyon Pine Salina Wild Rye Sunflower Seed Great Basin Rye IndianExploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin: nutrient content, handling costs, effects of human settlement, subsistence, and sociopolitical change in Basin/Plateau #12;Problems Geophytes

  18. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

  19. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  20. K Basin sludge polychlorinated biphenyl removal technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, S.C.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The two Hanford K Basins are water-filled concrete pools that contain over 2,100 metric tons of N Reactor fuel elements stored in aluminum or stainless steel canisters. During the time the fuel has been stored, approximately 50 m3 of heterogeneous solid material have accumulated in the basins. This material, referred to as sludge, is a mixture of fuel corrosion products, metallic bits of spent fuel and zirconium clad iron and metal corrosion products and silica from migrating sands. Some of the sludges also contain PCBs. The congener group of PCBs was identified as Aroclor 1254. The maximum concentration of sludge PCBS was found to be 140 ppm (as settled wet basis). However, the distribution of the PCBs is non-uniform throughout the sludge (i.e., there are regions of high and low concentrations and places where no PCBs are present). Higher concentrations could be present at various locations. Aroclors 1016/1242, 1221, 1248, 1254, and 1260 were identified and quantified in K West (KW) Canister sludge. In some of these samples, the concentration of 1260 was higher than 1254. The sludge requires pre-treatment to meet tank farm waste acceptance criteria, Among the numerous requirements, the sludge should be retreated so that it does not contain regulated levels of Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) compounds. Because of their stable chemistry and relative insolubility in water, PCBs are difficult to treat. They also resist degradation from heat and electrical charges. This stability has resulted in environmental persistence which has prompted the development of a variety of new cleanup processes including supercritical processes, advanced oxidation, dehalogenation and others. Hopefully, most of the new processes are discussed herein. Information on new processes are being received and will be evaluated in a future revision.

  1. Multiple oil families in the west Siberian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Lee, C.Y. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Kontorovich, A.Eh. [Siberian Scientific Research Institute for Geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Moldowan, J.M. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, Richmond, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two major oil families are identified in the West Siberian basin. Twenty-six of 32 analyzed oils occur in Jurassic and cretaceous reservoirs and are derived from anoxic marine Upper Jurassic Bazhenov source rock. These oils are widely distributed both north and immediately south of the Ob River, and their biomarker ratios indicate a wide range of source rock thermal maturity from early to middle oil window (Van-Egan, Russkoye, Samotlor, Sovninsko-Sovyet, Olyenye, Ozynornoye, and Kogolym), to peak oil window (Srednekhulym, Yem-Yegov, Vostochno-Surgut, Khokhryakov, Fedorov, and Urengoi), to late oil window (Salym). Some of these oils have been mildly (e.g., Fedorov 75) to heavily (e.g., Russkoye) biodegraded in the reservoir. The Bazhenov-sourced oils show different compositions that support regional variations of organic facies in the source rock. Six nonbiodegraded, highly mature oils show geochemical characteristics that suggest they were derived from clastic-rich lacustrine or nearshore marine source rocks dominated by terrigenous higher plant input like those in the Lower to Middle Jurassic Tyumen Formation, although no correlation was observed between the oils and single rock sample (Yem-Yegov 15) from the formation. The six oils occur in the Tyumen (Taitym, Geologiche, and Cheremshan) and fractured basement/Paleozoic (Gerasimov, Yagyl Yakh, and Verchnekombar) reservoirs in positions readily accessible to any oil migrating from the Tyumen source rock. For example, at the Gerasimov locations, the Tyumen Formation lies unconformably on weathered basement-Paleozoic reservoir rocks. Most of the probable Tyumen-sourced oils are from south of the Ob River, but the occurrence of Geologiche oil to the north suggests that related oils may be widespread in the basin.

  2. Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kalwant

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue increasing the energy supply to meet global demand in the coming decades, the energy industry needs creative thinking that leads to the development of new energy sources. Unconventional gas resources, especially those in frontier basins...

  3. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  4. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  5. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  6. Introduction THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC Thelon basin, Northwest Territo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Eric E.

    Geological Evolution and Exploration Geochemistry of the Boomerang Lake Unconformity-type Uranium Prospect a prospective target for uranium exploration. The potential of the western Thelon basin at Boomerang Lake, remains underexplored for uncon- formity-related uranium deposits despite geological similari- ties

  7. Neogene stratigraphic relationships within the Nam Con Son Basin, offshore Vietnam resulting from tectonics, eustasy, and sediment flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Christine M.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of this project include: 1) Characterization of modern seafloor channel morphology and distribution on the shelf, slope and basin floor in areas dominated by clastic deposition in an effort to distinguish between fluvial channels, incised valley, slope... with locations of fluvial channels, incised valleys, canyons and turbidite channels in order to evaluate sediment dispersal since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). These data were used to investigate the areal extent and distribution of LGM shelf, slope...

  8. A geological and engineering reservoir characterization of the Caballos Formation (Cretaceous), Puerto Colon field Putumayo basin, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz Castellanos, Hector

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Santander Bucaramanga, Colombia Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas A. Blasingame The Puerto Colon field is located in the Putumayo basin in southtern Colombia, South America, and is operated by Empress Colombiana de petroleos (ECOPETROL), which... to thank Empress Colombiana de Petroleos (ECOPETROL) for providing me the opportunity and the financial support to pursue my Master of Science degree at Texas A&M University. I would also like to thank the following individuals for their contributions...

  9. Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Tracy Lynn

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

  10. Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Tracy Lynn

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

  11. Rhythmic bedding patterns for locating structural features, Niobrara Formation, United States western interior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laferriere, A.P.; Hattin, D.E.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Milankovitch-type bedding cycles are well developed in the Upper Cretaceous Fort Hays Limestone Member, Niobrara Formation. These time-equivalent cycles can be correlated across much of Colorado, Kansas, and northeastern New Mexico by combining subsurface and outcrop data. Documentation of thickness variations within the regionally persistent Fort Hays bedding sequences furnishes a basis for fine-scale analysis of Late Cretaceous crustal movements within the eastern ramp region of the Western Interior foreland basin. Regional thickness changes in groups of shale-limestone couplets were correlated and mapped in outcrop and in the subsurface to locate structural elements that influenced Fort Hays deposition. In the Denver-Julesburg basin of Colorado and western Kansas, up to 6.1 m (20 ft) of thinning of the section occurs dominantly along northeastwardly trending belts formed during Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental arch. Mapping of these small-scale thickness changes in the Fort Hays demonstrates that Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental arch was not restricted to the northern part of the Denver-Julesburg basin. Additional structures may occur as far south as the Colorado-New Mexico border. A northwestwardly thinning trend is also apparent and may have resulted from increased compaction and diagenesis, reduction of sediment input during transgression, or from uplift in the vicinity of the Colorado Front Range. 8 figures.

  12. Design of a sediment quality assessment for the tidal Christina River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, K.; Allen, R.; Williams, S. [Delaware State Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Dover, DE (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed baseline sediment study was designed and conducted within the tidal portion of the Christina River Basin, Delaware. A complementary battery of field-screening and laboratory analyses was established in order to obtain substantial coverage of the basin at reasonable cost. The approach provided for 180 sediment sample locations from a 15 mile stretch of the Christina River, the proximal reaches of its tributaries, and associated wetlands. Analytical parameters consisted of physiochemical measurements (TOC, grain size distribution, and redox potential), total metals, major anions, carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pH, and metals partitioning analysis. Toxicity indicators included in the study were: SEM/AVS analysis, IQ{reg_sign} toxicity tests, Microtox{reg_sign}, and Hyalella azteca 10-day acute toxicity tests. This basin-wide approach successfully established a database of sediment information that allowed for the determination of: contaminants of concern; contaminant spatial distribution; potential ecological impacts; contaminant/indicator relationships; and potential upland contaminant source areas. The incorporation of low cost field and analytical methods permitted the use of short-spaced systematic sampling thus eliminating stratified random sampling methods and the need to focus on localized reaches. The database was sufficiently large to allow for statistically valid analyses of the results. Additionally, it will aid in the delineation of relevant strata for subsequent monitoring, provide a comparative baseline for future investigations, and guide state decision-making.

  13. Fractal boundary basins in spherically symmetric {phi}{sup 4} theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Ethan

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from numerical simulations of the flat-space nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation with an asymmetric double-well potential in spherical symmetry. Exit criteria are defined for the simulations that are used to help understand the boundaries of the basins of attraction for Gaussian 'bubble' initial data. The first exit criterion, based on the immediate collapse or expansion of bubble radius, is used to observe the departure of the scalar field from a static intermediate attractor solution. The boundary separating these two behaviors in parameter space is smooth and demonstrates a time-scaling law with an exponent that depends on the asymmetry of the potential. The second exit criterion differentiates between the creation of an expanding true-vacuum bubble and dispersion of the field leaving the false vacuum; the boundary separating these basins of attraction is shown to demonstrate fractal behavior. The basins are defined by the number of bounces that the field undergoes before inducing a phase transition. A third, hybrid exit criterion is used to determine the location of the boundary to arbitrary precision and to characterize the threshold behavior. The possible effects this behavior might have on cosmological phase transitions are briefly discussed.

  14. Acceptance testing report of Eductor System to be installed in the 105 K Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Engineering Support group cold-tested the Eductor System a 15 horsepower multi-stage centrifugal pump manufactured by the Grunfos Corporation with the housing manufactured and sold with the pump by the Tri-Nuclear Corporation and a 3-inch diameter water jet eductor manufactured by the Fox Valve Corporation. The Eductor System was tested to gather and document information to optimize sludge retrieval operations for use in the 105 K Basins. The cold-testing took place during February 12 through February 29, 1996 in the 305 Cold Test Facility basin located in the 300 area. The pump, utilized in conjunction with the eductor, makes up the core of the Eductor System. The pumping unit consists of a 15 hp stainless steel multi-stage centrifugal Grunfos pump which is seated in a stainless steel fabricated housing. Two baskets or filter elements make up part of the housing on the suction side of the pump. The pump can be used independent of the housing but the housing has two identified purposes. The first use is to stabilize the centrifugal pump and give the pneumatic valves and pump discharge piping a solid platform so the Eductor System can be more easily mobilized within the basin as one unit. The second use for the housing presents the option to utilize the suction-side filters for capturing larger fuel pieces after the smaller fines have been removed.

  15. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  16. Evaluating DNAPL Source and Migration Zones: M-Area Settling Basin and the Western Sector of A/M Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G.

    2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to critically evaluate previous characterization and remediation data to determine the current extent and distribution of DNAPL associated with releases at the M-Area Basin within A/M Area. The primary objective of the effort is to develop an approximate recommendation for the target treatment location and volume near the M Area Settling Basin. Through this analysis the final objective is to identify those subsurface regions having specific geometry and character necessary to cost-effectively deploy DNAPL specific remediation alternatives.

  17. Strength Measurements of Archive K Basin Sludge Using a Soil Penetrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel radioactive sludge present in the K East and K West spent nuclear fuel storage basins now resides in the KW Basin in six large underwater engineered containers. The sludge will be dispositioned in two phases under the Sludge Treatment Project: (1) hydraulic retrieval into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport to interim storage in Central Plateau and (2) retrieval from the STSCs, treatment, and packaging for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In the years the STSCs are stored, sludge strength is expected to increase through chemical reaction, intergrowth of sludge crystals, and compaction and dewatering by settling. Increased sludge strength can impact the type and operation of the retrieval equipment needed prior to final sludge treatment and packaging. It is important to determine whether water jetting, planned for sludge retrieval from STSCs, will be effective. Shear strength is a property known to correlate with the effectiveness of water jetting. Accordingly, the unconfined compressive strengths (UCS) of archive K Basin sludge samples and sludge blends were measured using a pocket penetrometer modified for hot cell use. Based on known correlations, UCS values can be converted to shear strengths. Twenty-six sludge samples, stored in hot cells for a number of years since last being disturbed, were identified as potential candidates for UCS measurement and valid UCS measurements were made for twelve, each of which was found as moist or water-immersed solids at least 1/2-inch deep. Ten of the twelve samples were relatively weak, having consistencies described as 'very soft' to 'soft'. Two of the twelve samples, KE Pit and KC-4 P250, were strong with 'very stiff' and 'stiff' consistencies described, respectively, as 'can be indented by a thumb nail' or 'can be indented by thumb'. Both of these sludge samples are composites collected from KE Basin floor and Weasel Pit locations. Despite both strong sludges having relatively high iron concentrations, attribution of their high strengths to this factor could not be made with confidence as other measured sludge samples, also from the KE Basin floor and of high iron concentration, were relatively weak. The observed UCS and shear strengths for the two strong sludges were greater than observed in any prior testing of K Basin sludge except for sludge processed at 185 C under hydrothermal conditions.

  18. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  19. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  20. Exploration trends of the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wave of intense exploration activity in the Sirte Basin began after the discovery of oil in 1958, and an enormous quantity of hydrocarbon was found in less than ten years. The oil discovery rate has been gradually declining since its peak in the 1960`s, and it is now becoming increasingly difficult and more expensive to find a new reserve. This paper is an attempt to discuss briefly the past exploration cycle, to indicate the present position and to predict the future trend of our activities in the Sirte Basin. The past exploration activities in the Sirte Basin were concentrated along the particular geological trends where the possibilities of finding more reserves are now drastically reduced. Therefore, for the future healthy exploration activities, new ideas are needed to bring about some new favourable areas under further investigation. A new cycle of exploration success will emerge if our exploratory efforts are purposely directed towards the stratigraphic, stratrigraphic/structural traps and subtle type traps, along the migrational pathways and deep plays in the potential oil generative areas.

  1. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  2. Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced Resources International

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

  3. Structural analysis of late Neogene deformation in the central offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.H.; Hall, N.T.; Hamilton, D.H. (Earth Sciences Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA)); Heck, R.G. (R.G. Heck and Associates, Carpinteria, CA (USA))

    1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural analysis of the Queenie structure, a topographically prominent, southwest vergent asymmetric fold located 35 km west of Point Sal, constrains the timing and nature of late Neogene deformation in a transect across the central offshore Santa Maria Basin. Analysis of post-Miocene sediments mantling the fold indicates that the Queenie structure was formed in a relatively brief episode of NE-SW directed shortening between 5 and 3 Ma, apparently in response to the onset of compression normal to the North American/Pacific plate boundary. Retrodeformation of depth-corrected cross sections constructed from an extensive set of common depth point seismic data demonstrates that the Queenie structure overprints a Miocene extensional basin and is a fault propagation fold that formed as compression changed the normal slip on the basin margin shear zone to reverse slip. Geometric constraints and seismic data suggest that the controlling shear zone dips moderately (30{degrees} to 50{degrees}) to the northeast and is essentially nonlistric to the base of the brittle crust at a depth of about 12 km. Structural analysis of cross sections further shows that average total post-Miocene NE-SW shortening across the Queenie structure is about 3% (0.39 km across the 130km-wide zone of folding) and that related shortening across the 40-km-wide central reach of the offshore Santa Maria Basin between the Hosgri fault and the Santa Lucia Bank fault during the same period is roughly 1-2% (0.4-0.8 km). High-resolution seismic reflection data show small folds in post-early/late Pliocene sediments on the southwestern flank of the Queenie structure. These folds exhibit minor coaxial deformation along the flank of the structure, suggesting that very low rates of tectonic folding (of the order of 0.005 mm shortening per year) may continue to the present.

  4. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  5. Location theory and the location of industry along an interstate highway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James Patterson

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the significance of these locational factors among plants with different characteristics that have located in certain localities should provide pertinent information with both practical and theoretical implications. Since 1956, approximately 64... Summary of Plant Location Theory Cost Fac'tots . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ The Importance of 'the Demand Factor Greenhut's General Theory of Plant Location and the Intangible Factor Location Factors as Revealed by Empirical Study Greenhut's Case...

  6. Regenerator Location Problem in Flexible Optical Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BARIS YILDIZ

    2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 22, 2014 ... Abstract: In this study we introduce the regenerator location problem in flexible optical networks (RLP-FON). With a given traffic demand, ...

  7. Onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin: Evidence from echinoderm biostratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, J.A. (West Georgia Coll., Carrollton, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Maples, C.G. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many echinoderm taxa have limited temporal ranges and are potentially significant regional index fossils. Echinoderm endemism and size have limited the utility of echinoderms in biostratigraphy, but in particular situations, echinoderm biostratigraphy has provided the key to timing of geological events. One example is the timing of the onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin (BWB), a major Carboniferous foreland basin in Alabama and Mississippi. Physical stratigraphy indicates that basinal development in the BWB began some time during or after deposition of the Tuscumbia Limestone (TL). The TL was deposited on a broad carbonate platform on the southern passive margin of North America. In the BWB, the TL is overlain by the Pride Mountain Formation (PMF), which is a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate unit that prograded into the basin from the west. Northeast of the BWB, on the Warrior platform, the TL is Monteagle Limestone and the PMF have been difficult owing to the lack of biostratigraphic acuity in rocks of this age, which has resulted in mistaken time stratigraphic relationships between the units. The authors have collected echinoderms in the basal limestones in the PMF, which indicates a Gasperian age for all but the lowest 30 cm of the PMF. The Genevievian apparently was a time of nondeposition in the BWB because this lowermost 30 cm of PMF is temporally equivalent to tens of meters of carbonates rocks in the Monteagle Limestone on the Warrior platform. Therefore, the onset of foreland basin development in the BWB can be constrained to early during the Genevievian Stage.

  8. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  9. Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

  10. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  11. INTEGRATED BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MARCELLUS FORMATION IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slingerland, Rudy

    . of the Appalachian Basin requires accurate knowledge of their sedimentological, geochemical, and geomechanical performance is to first quantitatively relate gas content and geomechanical and petrophysical rock

  12. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. atlantic basin etude: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rifian Corridor Utrecht, Universiteit 7 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  16. analogs permian basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reservoir-analog Modeling of Upper Miocene Shallow-water and Deep-water Carbonate Deposits: Agua Amarga Basin, Southeast Spain. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  17. athabasca basin western: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Von P. 9 Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway Geosciences Websites Summary: . DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological...

  18. appalachian basin exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary...

  19. athabasca basin canada: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Stewart, Paul C. 2015-01-01 2 The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK , K Hattori1 Geosciences Websites...

  20. alluvial basin numerical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 487 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  1. artesian basins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 181 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  2. anoxic basin mariager: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 215 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  3. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  4. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  5. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  6. atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations This report provides the results of an independent oversight...

  8. appalachian basin gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Danis A. Wiloso; Eddy A. Subroto; Eddy Hermanto 2009-01-01 102 Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas Texas...

  9. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  10. Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (1 km...

  11. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  12. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  13. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  14. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  15. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  16. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  17. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  18. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  19. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  20. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  1. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  2. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  3. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  4. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Abstract Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense...

  5. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  6. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  7. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  8. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  9. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  10. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  11. Environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system technology demonstration plan for use at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R.D. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drillbit data during drilling operations. This demonstration plan presents information on the EMWD-GRS technology, demonstration design, Cs-137 contamination at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin, responsibilities of demonstration participants, and the policies and procedures for the demonstration to be conducted at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration will consist of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes will pass near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels are known. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling will be compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  12. Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotfifard, Saeed

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................................................ 88 x LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1 Multiple possible fault location estimation for a fault at node A ........................ 7 Figure 2 Simple faulted network model [1] © [2011] IEEE ............................................ 40 Figure 3... Types C and D voltage sags for different phases [51] © [2003] IEEE .............. 42 Figure 4 Rf estimation procedure [1] © [2011] IEEE ...................................................... 45 Figure 5 Flow chart of the fault location algorithm [1...

  13. RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED Batteries, toner, ink cartridges & cell phones and recycling is an important part of that effort. Below is a guide to on-campus recycling at RSMAS: Visit http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/msgso/ for map of recycling bin locations. NOTE: This is not an exhaustive list. If unauthorized items are found

  14. Optimized Fault Location Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Research Center Optimized Fault Location Concurrent Technologies Corporation Final Project Report by the Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). NeitherOptimized Fault Location Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National

  15. Locating and tracking assets using RFID 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Gak Gyu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , this research presents a math¬ematical model of using RFID (both handheld readers and stationary readers) for e?cient asset location. We derive the expected cost of locating RFID¬tagged objects in a multi¬area environment where hand¬held RF readers are used. We...

  16. Location Privacy and the Personal Distributed Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Robert C

    Location Privacy and the Personal Distributed Environment Robert C Atkinson, Swee Keow Goo, James-- The Personal Distributed Environment is a new concept being developed within the Mobile VCE Core 3 research, wherever their location: ubiquitous access. Devices are co-ordinated by Device Management Entities (DMEs

  17. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  18. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

  19. Sandstone-carbonate cycles in Tensleep Formation, eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittersbacher, D.J.; Wheeler, D.M.; Horne, J.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop and core study of the Tensleep Formation in the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin has revealed cyclic deposits of eolian sandstone and marine carbonate. These cycles, several meters to tens of meters thick, represent the rise and fall of sea level on the Wyoming shelf during Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. Falling sea level was marked by development of a sharp scour surface at the base of each cycle and progradation of eolian dunes over an exposed, shallow carbonate shelf. Subsequent sea level rise resulted in the reworking of eolian sand through wave activity and burrowing organisms. Subtidal carbonates overlies the reworked eolian sands and are sandy at the base, grading upward into fossiliferous dolomite mudstones to wackestones. The sharp scour surface, normally present directly on the subtidal carbonates, indicates that erosion eliminated any regressive marine deposits by deflation to the ground-water table during shoreline progradation or by deflation related to abrupt drop in sea level. Relative sea level changes on the low-relief Wyoming shelf affected large areas during Tensleep deposition. This resulted in widespread sandstone-carbonate cycles that provide the basis for regional correlations of the Tensleep Formation throughout the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin.

  20. 8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited. Moreover, water pollution is serious, with significant wastewater reuse for irrigation within the basin. Lastly, water is being transferred from agriculture to the urban and industrial sectors, without due

  1. Famennian microbial reef facies, Napier and Oscar Ranges, Canning Basin, western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geol. Rundsch. , Western Australia: Geologic Maps of theof the Canning basin, Western Australia. West. Aust. Geol.the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Stromatolites (Ed.

  2. Icarus 190 (2007) 203223 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bottke, William F.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are excluded from our model, we find that the PPP produces numerous South Pole-Aitken- like basins during, David Nesvorný, Luke Dones Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 400, Boulder, CO 80302 and early-Imbrium basins on the Moon with reasonably well-constrained ages were formed. Some have argued

  3. San Juan Basin EC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, search NEPA

  4. Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir Jump to:ScottsSearchSt. Louis, MissouriBasin

  5. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin Geothermal

  6. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: Energy ResourcesDenair,DennisDenver Basin Map

  7. The Construction of Locative Situations: Locative Media and the Situationist International, Recuperation or Redux?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarrigle, Conor

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    closely aligned to the SI's construction of situations. ThisG (1957) Report on the Construction of Situations and on theThe Construction of Locative Situations: Locative Media and

  8. SFSU Building Coordinators List College or Administrative Unit Location(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SFSU Building Coordinators List College or Administrative Unit Location(s) Building Coordinator81193 cathym@sfsu.edu GYM 102B Student Services Building SSB Mirel Tikkanen x53566 mtikkane@sfsu.edu SSB

  9. Genetic stratigraphic sequence analysis in terrestrial aggrading basin: sequence stratigraphy of Narrabeen Group, Sydney basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, S.A.; Galloway, W.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of event/sequence stratigraphy concepts over the past 15 years has been one of the most significant contributions to systematic stratigraphic analyses of sedimentary basins. Most of these approaches, however, have not been applied to terrestrial aggradational settings but rather were developed in marginal basin settings where progradational and transgressive units are important components of the sequence framework. The principal objective of sequence definition is the identification of genetic stratigraphic units that share a common paleogeographic, climatic, and tectonic origin. Thus, the basic premise of sequence stratigraphy should be useful in the delineation of the depositional framework for any basin. Criteria were devised to identify three genetic stratigraphic sequences within the Triassic Narrabeen Group of the Sydney basin, an aggrading basin with a terrestrial fill. Individual sequences were chosen to emphasize significant changes in tectonic and climatic conditions, as reflected in the distinguishing characteristics of depositional style, sediment composition, and paleodrainage trends. The Munmorah sequence is characterized by lithic sandstone deposits of an extensive alluvial plain sourced by the New England foldbelt to the northeast. The overlying Bulgo sequence is distinguished by changes in sediment transport direction, lithology, and depositional style. The western Lachlan foldbelt emerged as a source of a quartz-rich braid-plain system. The Bald Hill sequence lies above the Bulgo and consists of sandstones and kaolinitic claystones that were deposited in extensive, highly oxidized alluvial plains that were dissected by numerous small streams. The distinctive mineralogy and depositional style of the Bald Hill deposits suggest climatic and tectonic changes in the Lachlan foldbelt source area.

  10. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  11. Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

  12. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20.69 19.60 -5.3% 74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 13.74 16.13 17.4% 99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New...

  13. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19.73 19.64 -0.4% 81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W 14.02 W 76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W...

  14. PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA BRIAN R. TURNER AND MICHAEL J. BENTONPaleozoicsuccessionin the southeastern part ofthe Kufra Basin, Libya, comprises a sequence of sedimentary facies up to 250 m thick THEK u m BASINin southeast Libya (Figure 1)occupiesan area of about 400,000km2and is filled

  15. Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but magnetic data indicate that basement is about 10 lun deep in the progress Basin and about 3 km deep in neighboring Santa Elena Basin. AKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank the Instituto Oceanogra fico de la Armada del Ecuador for providing funding of my...

  16. Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

  17. Method of locating underground mines fires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laage, Linneas (Eagam, MN); Pomroy, William (St. Paul, MN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of locating an underground mine fire by comparing the pattern of measured combustion product arrival times at detector locations with a real time computer-generated array of simulated patterns. A number of electronic fire detection devices are linked thru telemetry to a control station on the surface. The mine's ventilation is modeled on a digital computer using network analysis software. The time reguired to locate a fire consists of the time required to model the mines' ventilation, generate the arrival time array, scan the array, and to match measured arrival time patterns to the simulated patterns.

  18. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

  19. Flexural interpretation of Mississippian stratigraphy in the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Science); Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of Mississippian rocks in the Black Warrior basin and adjacent parts of the Appalachian basin using basic viscoelastic flexural models suggests that this sequence of rocks is largely a response to deformational loading and relaxation accompany early phases of Ouachita orogeny. A Kinderhook-Valmeyer unconformity atop the Maury Shale apparently represents an initial tectophase of Ouachita orogeny too distant to affect the basin otherwise. However, a Valmeyer-Chesterian unconformity atop the Tuscumbia, along which the Genevievian Stage is absent or condensed, indicates that a second Ouachita tectophase had become localized along the southwest part of alabama promontory, close enough to generate the Black Warrior foreland basin, fill it with a flexural sequence of sediments, and alter sedimentation patterns in nearby parts of the Appalachian basin.

  20. THE PLANAR HUB LOCATION PROBLEM: A PROBABILISTIC ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 5, 2012 ... Aykin and Brown, [4]. ...... [8] J.F. Campbell, Integer programming formulations of discrete hub location problems, European J. of O.R.. 72(1994) ...

  1. Developing a theory of nightclub location choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crim, Stephen J. (Stephen Johnson)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is an investigation of the factors that influence where nightclubs locate within a city. Nightclubs, like other social spaces, provide important social and economic benefits in the urban environment. As amenities, ...

  2. Techniques for Mobile Location Estimation in UMTS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Nicholas J

    The subject area of this thesis is the locating of mobile users using the future 3rd generation spread spectrum communication system UMTS. The motivation behind this work is twofold: firstly the United States Federal ...

  3. Tectonic setting and origin of the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Whiting, B.M. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin has a triangular outline that is framed by the Ouachita thrust belt on the southwest, the Appalachian thrust belt on the southeast, and the North American craton on the north. The stratigraphy of the Black Warrior basin includes two distinct parts: a Cambrian-Mississippian passive-margin carbonate-shelf succession, and a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic succession, the lower (Mississippian) part of which grades northeastward into a carbonate-shelf facies. The provenance and dispersal system of the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic deposits have been interpreted in four different ways, each of which has significantly different implications for origin of the basin: (1) Ouachita orogenic source and northeastward prograding; (2) Alabama Appalachian orogenic source and northwestward prograding; (3) Georgia-tennessee Appalachian orogenic source and westward prograding; and (4) cratonic source and southward prograding. Subsidence history determined from calculations of decompacted thickness indicates that (1) the Black Warrior basin is an orogenic foreland basin related primarily to the Ouachita thrust load on the southwest; (2) later emplacement of the Alabama Appalachian thrust belt modified the southeastern side of the Ouachita-related Black Warrior foreland basin; and (3) a separate foreland basin, representing the southern end of the Appalachian foreland basin, formed in response to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust load. The previously used criteria do not necessarily support a unique interpretation, but synthesizing these data with subsidence history leads to the conclusion that the Black Warrior basin is a tectonically driven, orogenic foreland basin dominated by Ouachita thrusting and modified by Appalachian thrusting.

  4. A Statistical Analysis of Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective System Mountain Initiation Location Clusters in the Arkansas-Red River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, Elisabeth F.

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are the focus of this analysis since it is the convective weather category which is smallest in number but produces the highest amount of precipitation. Being able to forecast these MCSs ...

  5. Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Dawn Suzette

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Approved as to style and content by: R. Dale Huchi son (Chair of Committee) Rodger . . ppa (Member) Waymon L ohnston (M er...

  6. Driver expectancy in locating automotive controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Dawn Suzette

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major Subject: Industrial Engineering DRIVER EXPECTANCY IN LOCATING AUTOMOTIVE CONTROLS A Thesis by DAWN SUZETTE FRANCIS Approved as to style and content by: R. Dale Huchi son (Chair of Committee) Rodger . . ppa (Member) Waymon L ohnston (M er... assessment of automotive industry practices in 1971 and concluded that only 50% of controls/displays on various models could be said to have a common location. Perel (1974) reviewed prior research and found that it would be difficult to pinpoint...

  7. Locating Boosted Kerr and Schwarzschild Apparent Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mijan F. Huq; Matthew W. Choptuik; Richard A. Matzner

    2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a finite-difference method for locating apparent horizons and illustrate its capabilities on boosted Kerr and Schwarzschild black holes. Our model spacetime is given by the Kerr-Schild metric. We apply a Lorentz boost to this spacetime metric and then carry out a 3+1 decomposition. The result is a slicing of Kerr/Schwarzschild in which the black hole is propagated and Lorentz contracted. We show that our method can locate distorted apparent horizons efficiently and accurately.

  8. sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, Michael

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in the J/TR section based on neutron log porosity values. The only zones in Rizer #1 that appear to be porous were fractured diabase units where saline formation water was flowing into the borehole. Two geocellular models were created for the SC and GA study area. Flow simulation modeling was performed on the SC data set. The injection simulation used the newly acquired basin data as well as the Petrel 3-D geologic model that included geologic structure. Due to the new basin findings as a result of the newly acquired data, during phase two of the modeling the diabase unit was used as reservoir and the sandstone units were used as caprock. Conclusion are: 1) the SGR basin is composed of numerous sub-basins, 2) this study only looked at portions of two sub-basins, 3) in SC, 30 million tonnes of CO2 can be injected into the diabase units if the fracture network is continuous through the units, 4) due to the severity of the faulting there is no way of assuring the injected CO2 will not migrate upward into the overlying Coastal Plain aquifers, 5) in Georgia there appears to porous zones in the J/TR sandstones, 6) as in SC there is faulting in the sub-basin and the seismic suggest the faulting extends upward into the Coastal Plain making that area not suitable for CO2 sequestration, 7) the complex faulting observed at both study areas appear to be associated with transfer fault zones (Heffner 2013), if sub-basins in the Georgia portion of the SGR basin can be located that are far away from the transfer fault zones there is a strong possibility of sequestering CO2 in these areas, and 9) the SGR basin covers area in three states and this project only studied two small areas so there is enormous potential for CO2 sequestration in other portions the basin and further research needs to be done to find these areas.

  9. RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, G.; Millings, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of these basins. There are also several cement and ammonia plants near the basins. Sixteen coal fired power plants are present on or adjacent to the basins which could support a low pipeline transportation cost. The current geological information is not sufficient to quantify specific storage reservoirs, seals, or traps. There is insufficient hydrogeologic information to quantify the saline nature of the water present within all of the basins. Water data in the Dunbarton Basin of the Savannah River Site indicates dissolved solids concentrations of greater than 10,000 parts per million (not potential drinking water). Additional reservoir characterization is needed to take advantage of the SGFAR trend for anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage. The authors of this report believe it would be appropriate to study the reservoir potential in the deeper basins that are in close proximity to the current larger coal fired power plants (Albany-Arabi, Camilla-Ocilla, Alamo-Ehrhardt, and Jedburg basin).

  10. EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

  11. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

  12. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  13. A late Eocene palynological record of climate change and Tibetan Plateau uplift (Xining Basin, China)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    mudflat to ephemeral saline lake sedimentary succession, situated in the Xining Basin at the northeastern

  14. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

  15. Criticality evaluations of scrambled fuel in water basin storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel stored underwater in the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant basins has been subjected to the usual criticality safety evaluations to assure safe storage configurations. Certain accident or emergency conditions, caused by corrosion or a seismic event, could change the fuel configuration and environment to invalidate previous calculations. Consideration is given here to such contingencies for fuel stored in three storage basins. One basin has fuel stored in racks, on a generally flat floor. In the other two basins, the fuel is stored on yokes and in baskets suspended from a monorail system. The floor is ribbed with 30.48-cm-thick and 80-cm-high concrete barriers across the basin width and spaced 30.48 cm apart. The suspended fuel is typically down to 15 cm above the floor of the channel between the concrete barriers. These basins each have 29 channels of 18 positions maximum per channel for a total of 522 possible positions, which are presently 77 and 49% occupied. The three basins are hydraulically interconnected. Several scenarios indicate possible changes in the fuel configuration. An earthquake could rupture a basin wall or floor, allowing the water to drain from all basins. All levels of water would fall to the completely drained condition. Suspended fuel could drop and fall over within the channel. Corrosion might weaken the support systems or cause leaks in sealed fuel canisters. Calculations were made with the KENO-IV criticality program and the library of mostly Hansen-Roach 16-energy-group neutron cross sections.

  16. Completion optimization in the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin continues to be an active area for development of coalbed methane. The majority of the successful wells have been in areas with relatively high permeability. A study was initiated to determine whether stimulation results could be improved by implementing specific optimization procedures for each of the coal groups. The optimization process included extensive prefracture formation evaluation, injection/falloff testing, in-situ-stress testing, fracture modeling with a three-dimensional (3D) simulator, and radioactive tracing of individual fluid and proppant stages with time-lapse monitoring. Several practical innovations were developed during the study that will aid in the design of the optimum treatment for each well.

  17. K-Basin gel formation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, M.A.

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A key part of the proposed waste treatment for K Basin sludge is the elimination of reactive uranium metal by dissolution in nitric acid (Fkirnent, 1998). It has been found (Delegard, 1998a) that upon nitric acid dissolution of the sludge, a gel sometimes forms. Gels are known to sometimes impair solid/liquid separation and/or material transfer. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine the cause(s) of the gel formation and to determine operating parameters for the sludge dissolution that avoid formation of gel. This work and related work were planned in (Fkunent, 1998), (Jewett, 1998) and (Beck, 1998a). This report describes the results of the tests in (Beck, 1998a) with non-radioactive surrogates.

  18. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  19. Uranium geochemistry in soil and groundwater at the F and H seepage basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, W.H.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For 33 years, low activity liquid wastes from the chemical separation areas at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site were disposed of in unlined seepage basins. Soil and associated pore water samples of widely varying groundwater chemistries and contaminant concentrations were collected from the region downgradient of these basins using cone penetrometer technology. Analysis of samples using inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry has allowed the investigation of uranium partitioning between the aqueous phase and soil surfaces at this site. The distribution of uranium was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH, redox potential, cation and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation modeling. The uranium soil source term at the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB) is much smaller than has been used in previous modeling efforts. This should result in a much shorter remediation time and a greater effectiveness of a pump-and-treat design than previously predicted. Distribution coefficients at the (FHSB) were found to vary between 1.2 to 34,000 1 kg{sup {minus}1} for uranium. Differences in sorption of these elements can be explained primarily by changes in aqueous pH and the associated change in soil surface charge. Sorption models were fit directly to sorption isotherms from field samples. All models underestimated the fraction of uranium bound at low aqueous uranium concentrations. Linear models overestimated bound uranium at locations where the aqueous concentration was greater than 500 ppb. Mechanistic models provided a much better estimate of the bound uranium concentrations, especially at high aqueous concentrations. Since a large fraction of the uranium at the site is associated with the low-pH portion of the plume, consideration should be given to pumping water from the lowest pH portions of the plume in the F-Area.

  20. 183-H Basin Mixed Waste Analysis and Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis report is to provide data necessary to support treatment and disposal options for the low-level mixed waste from the 183-H solar evaporation ponds. In 1973, four of the 16 flocculation and sedimentation basins were designated for use as solar evaporation basins to provide waste reduction by natural evaporation of liquid chemical wastes from the 300 Area fuel fabrication facilities. The primary purpose of this effort is to gather chemical and bulk property data for the waste in the drums/boxes of sediment removed from the basin at Central Waste Complex.

  1. Reconstructing Spatial Distributions from Anonymized Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horey, James L [ORNL] [ORNL; Forrest, Stephanie [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque] [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Groat, Michael [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque] [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and sensors are often equipped with GPS that accurately report a person's location. Combined with wireless communication, these devices enable a wide range of new social tools and applications. These same qualities, however, leave location-aware applications vulnerable to privacy violations. This paper introduces the Negative Quad Tree, a privacy protection method for location aware applications. The method is broadly applicable to applications that use spatial density information, such as social applications that measure the popularity of social venues. The method employs a simple anonymization algorithm running on mobile devices, and a more complex reconstruction algorithm on a central server. This strategy is well suited to low-powered mobile devices. The paper analyzes the accuracy of the reconstruction method in a variety of simulated and real-world settings and demonstrates that the method is accurate enough to be used in many real-world scenarios.

  2. Location theory and the location of industry along an interstate highway 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James Patterson

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a greater gamble. This sect. ion has been devoted to s review of the fundamental factors underlying all plant location ss recognised in location theory. The next section will review some recent. empirical attempts to determine the actual... for this thesis was possible through the assistance provided )ointly by the Texas Highway Department and the Bureau of Public Roads. i. v TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page INTRODUCTION Purpose Plan of Study REVIEW OF PLANT LOCATION CONCEPTS Introduction...

  3. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  4. Utility Locating in the DOE Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark Scott; Gail Heath

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some advances have been made in utility locating in recent years and standards have been recently published to try and categorize the level of information known about the utility in the subsurface. At the same time some characterization about the level of effort or technology in the geophysicist approach to utility locating may be generalized. The DOE environment poses some added difficulties and this presentation covers these issues, costs and the technical approach that has been developed at the INEEL to prevent utility hits and how it fits into the generalized classification of effort.

  5. The use of pre- and post-stimulation well test analysis in the evaluation of stimulation effectiveness in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancaster, David Earl

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas wells throughout the Appalachian Basin. The analysis of pre-stimulation well tests from four wells in Pike County, KY illustrates the practical difficulties in obtaining analyzable data from Devonian Shale wells. Fig. 1 shows the location... and requires that the flow periods prior to shut-in be even longer. The Martin 1 well located in Martin County, KY illustrates the problem of an insufficient flow period in a more typical Devonian Shale well test. The Martin 1 well was studied as part...

  6. The use of pre- and post-stimulation well test analysis in the evaluation of stimulation effectiveness in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancaster, David Earl

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas wells throughout the Appalachian Basin. The analysis of pre-stimulation well tests from four wells in Pike County, KY illustrates the practical difficulties in obtaining analyzable data from Devonian Shale wells. Fig. 1 shows the location... and requires that the flow periods prior to shut-in be even longer. The Martin 1 well located in Martin County, KY illustrates the problem of an insufficient flow period in a more typical Devonian Shale well test. The Martin 1 well was studied as part...

  7. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

  8. Intrashelf basins: A geologic model for source-bed and reservoir facies deposition within carbonate shelves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G. Jr. (Sauid Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrashelf basins (moats, inshore basins, shelf basins, differentiated shelf, and deep-water lagoons of others) are depressions of varying sizes and shapes that occur within tectonically passive and regionally extensive carbonate shelves. Intrashelf basins grade laterally and downdip (seaward) into shallow-water carbonates of the regional shelf, are separated from the open marine basin by the shelf margin, and are largely filled by fine-grained subtidal sediments having attributes of shallow- and deeper water sedimentation. These basins are commonly fringed or overlain by carbonate sands, reefs, or buildups. These facies may mimic those that occur along the regional shelf margin, and they can have trends that are at a high angle to that of the regional shelf. Intrashelf basins are not intracratonic basins. The history of most intrashelf basins is a few million to a few tens of million of years. Examples of intrashelf basins are known throughout the Phanerozoic; the southern portion of the Holocene Belize shelf is a modern example of an intrashelf basin. Two types of intrashelf basins are recognized. Coastal basins pass updip into coastal clastics of the craton with the basin primarily filled by fine clastics. Shelf basins occur on the outer part of the shelf, are surrounded by shallow-water carbonate facies, and are filled by peloidal lime mud, pelagics, and argillaceous carbonates. Intrashelf basins are commonly the site of organic-rich, source-bed deposition, resulting in the close proximity of source beds and reservoir facies that may fringe or overlie the basin. Examples of hydrocarbon-charged reservoirs that were sourced by an intrashelf basin include the Miocene Bombay High field, offshore India; the giant Jurassic (Arab-D) and Cretaceous (Shuaiba) reservoirs of the Arabian Shelf; the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland trend, South Florida basin; and the Permian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs surrounding the Tatum basin in southeastern New Mexico.

  9. Genetic and Phenotype [Phenotypic] Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-99 Report : Populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State.

  10. Hydrocarbon accumulation on rifted Continental Margin - examples of oil migration pathways, west African salt basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwelder, B.W.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examination of the oil fields in the Gabon, Lower Congo, and Cuanza basins allows modeling of oil migration and a more accurate ranking of prospects using geologic risk factors. Oil accumulations in these basins are in strata deposited during Cretaceous rift and drift phases, thus providing a diversity of geologic settings to examine. Oil accumulations in rift deposits are located on large faulted anticlines or in truncated units atop horst features. Many of these oil fields were sourced from adjacent organic shales along short direct migration paths. In Areas where source rock is more remote to fields or to prospective structures, faulting and continuity of reservoir rock are important to the migration of hydrocarbons. Because Aptian salts separate rift-related deposits from those of the drift stage, salt evacuation and faulting of the salt residuum are necessary for oil migration from the pre-salt sequences into the post-salt section. Oil migration within post-salt strata is complicated by the presence of salt walls and faulted carbonate platforms. Hydrocarbon shows in wells drilled throughout this area provide critical data for evaluating hydrocarbon migration pathways. Such evaluation in combination with modeling and mapping of the organic-rich units, maturation, reservoir facies, structural configurations, and seals in existing fields allows assessment of different plays. Based on this information, new play types and prospective structures can be ranked with respect to geologic risk.

  11. Geochemical evaluation of oils and source rocks from the Western Siberian basin, U. S. S. R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Moldowan, J.M. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Kontorovich, A.E.; Stasova, O. (Siberian Scientific Research Institute for Geology, Geophysics and Mineral Resources, Novobsibirsk (Russian Federation)); Demaison, G.J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Western Siberian basin is among the most prolific in the world, there has been disagreement among Soviet geoscientists on the origin of the petroleum within this basin. Screening geochemical analyses were used to select several oils and potential source rocks for a preliminary study using detailed biomarker and supporting geochemistry. Possible sources for this petroleum include rocks of Middle Jurassic, Upper Jurassic, and Lower Cretaceous age. Results indicate that most of the analyzed Western Siberian oils, occurring in reservoirs from Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous in age, are derived from the Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Formation. The locations of the samples in the study generally correspond to the distribution of the most effective oil-generative parts of the Bazhenov Formation. Analyses show that the Bazhenov rock samples contain abundant marine algal and bacterial organic matter, preserved under anoxic depositional conditions. Biomarkers show that thermal maturities of the samples range from the early to late oil-generative window and that some are biodegraded. For example, the Salym No. 114 oil, which flowed directly from the Bazhenov Formation, shows a maturity equivalent to the late oil window. The Van-Egan no. 110 oil shows maturity equivalent to the early oil window and is biodegraded. This oil shows preferential microbial conversion of lower homologs of the 17{alpha}, 21{beta}(H)-hopanes to 25-nor-17{alpha}(H)-hopanes.

  12. Characterization and fluid flow simulation of naturally fractured Frontier sandstone, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harstad, H. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM (United States); Teufel, L.W.; Lorenz, J.C.; Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant gas reserves are present in low-permeability sandstones of the Frontier Formation in the greater Green River Basin, Wyoming. Successful exploitation of these reservoirs requires an understanding of the characteristics and fluid-flow response of the regional natural fracture system that controls reservoir productivity. Fracture characteristics were obtained from outcrop studies of Frontier sandstones at locations in the basin. The fracture data were combined with matrix permeability data to compute an anisotropic horizontal permeability tensor (magnitude and direction) corresponding to an equivalent reservoir system in the subsurface using a computational model developed by Oda (1985). This analysis shows that the maximum and minimum horizontal permeability and flow capacity are controlled by fracture intensity and decrease with increasing bed thickness. However, storage capacity is controlled by matrix porosity and increases linearly with increasing bed thickness. The relationship between bed thickness and the calculated fluid-flow properties was used in a reservoir simulation study of vertical, hydraulically-fractured and horizontal wells and horizontal wells of different lengths in analogous naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The simulation results show that flow capacity dominates early time production, while storage capacity dominates pressure support over time for vertical wells. For horizontal wells drilled perpendicular to the maximum permeability direction a high target production rate can be maintained over a longer time and have higher cumulative production than vertical wells. Longer horizontal wells are required for the same cumulative production with decreasing bed thickness.

  13. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  14. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  15. Locating and tracking assets using RFID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Gak Gyu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 C. Different Technologies for Asset Tracking / Locating . . . . 10 1. Hand-held Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2. Fixed Reader Installed in Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3. Fixed Reader Installed at Chokepoint... . . . . . . . . . . . 34 a. CaseofInstallingtheFixedReaderintheMost Probable Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 b. Case of Installing the Fixed Reader in the Far- thest Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 3. Extension of Experiments...

  16. Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices Metal Bins Deskside Bins with Side Saddle Rubbermaid Bins.58 for auxiliaries. And Non-Public Areas Public Offices Non-Public Recyclables Recyclables RecyclablesTrash Trash Trash #12;New Recycling Bin Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions (as of December 2008) · Why

  17. Ontology-based Disambiguation of Spatiotemporal Locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvönen, Eero

    , in the semantic portal MuseumFinland3 [7] a location parton- omy4 was used for annotating museum artifacts. #12;A problem when creating a semantic cultural heritage portal is that places, both modernFinland originate from regions that no longer exist and/or are not part of Finland but of Russia with new names

  18. Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palop del Río, Belén

    Transportation Networks and Location A Geometric Approach Belén Palop1,2 1Departamento de March 2009 Florida State University #12;Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model;Transportation Network Model Belén Palop, UVa, SUNY Outline Transportation Network Model Network placement

  19. Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaddle, John

    SSN Cell Phone Home Phone Work Phone Exact Location : Date of Accident : AM PM Date accident treatment provided? Yes No Where Was time lost from work? Yes No If yes, how long? Could this accident have the following information as soon as it relates to your work related accident/injury/illness within 72 hours

  20. analysis toluca basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEISMIC HAZARD IN THE BASIN AND RANGE PROVINCE: CASE STUDY FOR RENO, NEVADA A seismic-hazard analysis. The analysis has been conducted for the Reno-Sparks urban region...

  1. The Nile Basin Initiative in Ethiopia: Voices from Addis Ababa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulds, Kim

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agreements will give Ethiopia more negotiating power. Egypt,WaterAid, and PANOS Ethiopia. 7 I interviewed stafT at theNUe Basin Initiative in Ethiopia: Voices from Addis Ababa'

  2. INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS SHALE BADLAND extent exaggerated for display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS SHALE BADLAND R.Rondeau extent exaggerated for display ACHNATHERUM HYMENOIDES HERBACEOUS ALLIANCE Achnatherum hymenoides Shale Barren Herbaceous Vegetation ARTEMISIA BIGELOVII SHRUBLAND ALLIANCE Leymus salinus Shale Sparse Vegetation Overview: This widespread ecological system

  3. Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Rio Grande Rift and Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Range Province, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Rio Grande Rift and Basin and Range...

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  6. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brophy br Model br Moeck br Beardsmore br Type br Volume br Geothermal br Region Mean br Reservoir br Temp br Mean br Capacity Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin...

  7. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  8. Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  9. Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin: alternative approaches to deal hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide

  11. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  12. Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

  13. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  14. Gravity modeling of Cenozoic extensional basins, offshore Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauri, Steven Joseph

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Yinggehai) basins. Gravity modeling results provide important clues to the controversial tectonic development of Southeast Asia during the Tertiary. Combined Bouguer and free-air gravity maps and residual gravity anomaly maps were generated for the study...

  15. Exploration limited since '70s in Libya's Sirte basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. (Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom))

    1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Esso Standard made the first Libyan oil discovery in the western Ghadames basin in 1957. The Atshan-2 well tested oil from Devonian sandstones, and the play was a continuation of the Paleozoic trend found productive in the neighboring Edjeleh region of eastern Algeria. Exploration in the Sirte basin began in earnest in 1958. Within the next 10 years, 16 major oil fields had been discovered, each with recoverable reserves greater than 500 million bbl of oil. Libya currently produces under OPEC quota approximately 1.4 million b/d of oil, with discovered in-place reserves of 130 billion bbl of oil. The paper describes the structural framework, sedimentary basins of Libya, the Sirte basin, petroleum geology, play types, source rocks, generation and migration of hydrocarbons, oil reserves, potential, and acreage availability.

  16. Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of 150-200C have been discovered in the northern Basin and Range Province of the USA. A comparison of these high and moderate temperature systems shows considerable overlap...

  17. aquifer paris basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a site-specific basis using a static analysis does not account for present and future pumping impacts within the basin and leads to a false sense of water supply security and...

  18. Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

    been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

  19. african river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 121 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  20. amazon river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 149 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  1. arkansas river basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 191 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

  2. A systematic approach for characterizing waves in a model basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarat, Andrew Charles

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study focused upon the development of a general methodology to characterize regular and random waves in a large model basin. The objectives of the study were to both identify and quantify the various nonlinearities associated with wave...

  3. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural...

  4. amazon basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XI, Universit de 28 Causes and Impact of the 2005 Amazon Drought CiteSeer Summary: A rare drought in the Amazon basin that culminated in 2005 drew wide attention to the...

  5. alfonso basin gulf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: diapirs in the De Soto Canyon area, and a...

  6. Structural analysis of the Sheep Mountain anticline, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennier, Jeffrey Hugh

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE SHEEP MOUNTAIN ANTICLINE, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by JEFFREY HUGH HENNIER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE SHEEP MOUNTAIN ANTICLINE, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by JEFFREY HUGH HENNIER Approved as to style and content by: o n . pan (Chairman of Committee) Ear R. os sn (Member...

  7. The distribution of organic carbon in the Brazos River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, James Mark

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN A Thesis by James Nark Brooks Submitted to the Graduate College of. Texas ASYi Hniversity in partial fulfillment. of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August..., 1970 Najor Subject: Oceanography THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN A Thesis by James Mark Brooks Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Commrttee) (Head o Depa tme ) (Member) kJ. ( &. ) i & (Member...

  8. Quaternary freshwater Ostracoda from the Great Salt Lake Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lister, K. H.

    1975-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissertation Fellowship. I appreciate loans of type specimens by The Illinois State Geological Survey; The United States National Museum; and the Geological Sur- 5 vey of Canada, Saskatchewan. Specimens of the Great Salt Lake Basin ostracodes studied have been... Dissertation Fellowship. I appreciate loans of type specimens by The Illinois State Geological Survey; The United States National Museum; and the Geological Sur- 5 vey of Canada, Saskatchewan. Specimens of the Great Salt Lake Basin ostracodes studied have been...

  9. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  10. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  11. Evolutionary sequences and hydrocarbon potential of Kenya sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cregg, A.K. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Carrollton, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kenya basins have evolved primarily through extension related to episodic continental rifting. In eastern Kenya, thick accumulations of sediments formed within grabens during the prerift phase (Precambrian to Carboniferous) of the Gondwana breakup. Synrift sedimentation (Late Carboniferous to Middle Jurassic) occurred within a north-south rift system, which included the Mandera basin, South Anza basin, and Lamu embayment. During the Early Jurassic, a marine transgression invaded the margins of the eastern Kenya rift basins, resulting in the deposition of platform carbonates and shales. A Callovian-aged salt basin formed in the offshore regions of the Lamu embayment. Intermittent tectonic activity and eustatic sea-level changes controlled sedimentation, which produced marine shales, carbonates or evaporites, and fluvio-deltaic to lacustrine sandstones. From the Early Cretaceous to recent, continental sediments were deposited within the North Anza and Turkana basins. These fluvial-lacustrine sediments are similar to the Lower Cretaceous sequences that have produced oil in the Mesozoic Sudanese Abu Gabra rift. Although exploration activities began in the early 1950s, significant occurrences of potential reservoir, source, and seal lithologies as well as trapping configurations remain in many areas. Favorable structures and sequences of reservoir sandstones and carbonates overlain by potentially sealing lacustrine or marine shales, evaporites, or volcanics have been noted. Potential source beds are believed to be present within shales of the lacustrine or marine depositional environments.

  12. California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

  13. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) for the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zack, J; Natenberg, E J; Knowe, G V; Waight, K; Manobianco, J; Hanley, D; Kamath, C

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In this phase of the project the focus is on the Mid-Columbia Basin region, which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area (Figure 1) that includes the Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate the Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) observational system deployment approach in order to move closer to the overall goal: (1) Perform an Observing System Experiment (OSE) using a data denial approach. The results of this task are presented in a separate report. (2) Conduct a set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for the Mid-Colombia basin region. This report presents the results of the OSSE task. The specific objective is to test strategies for future deployment of observing systems in order to suggest the best and most efficient ways to improve wind forecasting at BPA wind farm locations. OSSEs have been used for many years in meteorology to evaluate the potential impact of proposed observing systems, determine tradeoffs in instrument design, and study the most effective data assimilation methodologies to incorporate the new observations into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (Atlas 1997; Lord 1997). For this project, a series of OSSEs will allow consideration of the impact of new observing systems of various types and in various locations.

  14. Risk assessment of drain valve failure in the K-West basin south loadout pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The drain valve located in the bottom of the K-West Basin South Loadout Pit (SLOP) could provide an additional leak path from the K Basins if the drain valve were damaged during construction, installation, or operation of the cask loading system. For the K-West Basin SLOP the immersion pail support structure (IPSS) has already been installed, but the immersion pail has not been installed in the IPSS. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the risk of damaging the drain valve during the remaining installation activities or operation of the cask loading system. Valve damage, as used in this analysis, does not necessarily imply large amounts of the water will be released quickly from the basin, rather valve damage implies that the valve's integrity has been compromised. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where best engineering judgement is used to represent each variable in the analysis. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution. The uncertainty is propagated through the analysis by Monte Carlo convolution techniques. The corresponding results are developed as a probability distribution and the risk is expressed in terms of the corresponding complementary cumulative distribution function (''risk curve''). The total risk is the area under the ''risk curve''. The risk of potentially dropping a cask into or on the IPSS and damaging the drain valve is approximately 1 x 10{sup -4} to 2 x 10{sup -5} per year. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve is 3 x 10{sup -2} to 6 x 10{sup -3} per year. Both risks are expressed as drain value failure frequencies. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve can be significantly reduced by an impact limiter and/or installing a gating or plate over the area bounded by the back of the IPSS and the wall of the SLOP. With either of these actions there is a 90 percent confidence that the frequency of drain valve failure would be less than 1 x 10{sup -6} per year.

  15. Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 3128W (run 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Marshman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Flament, T.A. [Numatec Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An N-Reactor outer fuel element that had been stored underwater in the Hanford 100 Area K-East Basin was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments. These studies are part of a series of tests being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the drying behavior of N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel elements removed from both the K-West and K-East Basins. The drying test series was designed to test fuel elements that ranged from intact to severely damaged. The fuel element discussed in this report was removed from an open K-East canister (3128W) during the first fuel selection campaign conducted in 1995, and has remained in wet storage in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) since that time. Although it was judged to be breached during in-basin (i.e., K-Basin) examinations, visual inspection of this fuel element in the hot cell indicated that it was likely intact. Some scratches on the coating covering the cladding were identified before the furnace test. The drying test was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System located in G-Cell within the PTL. This test system is composed of three basic systems: the in-cell furnace equipment, the system gas loop, and the analytical instrument package. Element 3128W was subjected to the drying processes based on those proposed under the Integrated Process Strategy, which included a hot drying step. Results of the Pressure Rise and Gas Evolution Tests suggest that most of the free water in the system was released during the extended CVD cycle (68 hr versus 8 hr for the first run). An additional {approximately}0.34 g of water was released during the subsequent HVD phase, characterized by multiple water release peaks, with a principle peak at {approximately}180 C. This additional water is attributed to decomposition of a uranium hydrate (UO{sub 4}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O/UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) coating that was observed to be covering the surface of the fuel element to a thickness of {approximately}1.6 mg/cm{sup 2}. A limited quantity of hydrogen ({approximately}9 mg) was also released during HVD, mainly at temperatures above 300 C, likely from hydride decomposition.

  16. Effect of the thermal gradient variation through geological time on basin modeling; a case study: The Paris basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toarcian black shales well known as source rocks for oil (Poulet and Espitalie, 1987, Bessereau et al basin. The numerical results were calibrated with organic matter maturity data. TherMO's simulates

  17. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  18. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  19. Evidence for an allocyclic origin of marine strata bounding the Upper Carboniferous Mary Lee coal zone, Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastaldo, R.A. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Geology); Demko, T.M. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior Basin, a triangular foreland basin of Carboniferous age, is located at the southern end of the Appalachian orogen. A southwestward wedge of Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks occurs in the basin. The generally accepted model for basin-fill involves the progradation of a single delta, or multiple deltas (the Pottsville Formation), over an offshore carbonate bank (the Bangor Limestone). The Pottsville Formation is typical of Euramerican Carboniferous strata and is composed of the cyclical alternation of marine and terrestrial facies. The deposition of marine facies overlying terrestrial facies has been interpreted to have been the result of delta lobe switching and the compaction of underlying sediments, hence, autocyclic processes. Sedimentological features associated with the marine strata bounding the Mary Lee coal zone, the informal Jagger bedrock sandstone below and the Morris Shale above, are not indicative of circumstances generated by autocyclic processes. Rather, the marine strata highlight features resulting from allocyclic processes. The Jagger bedrock sandstone is a thick (> 15 m) sublitharenite interpreted as representing subtidal, shore-parallel bars. It is a sandstone body that was stranded on the shoreline during regional regression. The terrestrial coal-bearing strata are truncated by an erosional surface, marking the base of the Morris Shale. This ravinement surface is overlain by a ravinement bed representing a substrate developed by regional transgressive erosion that was subsequently colonized by open-marine macroinvertebrates. The ravinement bed is interpreted as a condensed section that accumulated under maximum water depth. Both of these features are indicative of development in response to extrinsic causes rather than intrinsic ones.

  20. Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

  1. RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY UC Davis-Caltrans Air control measure. #12;RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY.......................................................... 3 2.2 The Role of Residential Location Choice

  2. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  3. Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

  4. VCSEL fault location apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeler, Gordon A. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for locating a fault within an optical fiber is disclosed. The apparatus, which can be formed as a part of a fiber-optic transmitter or as a stand-alone instrument, utilizes a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to generate a test pulse of light which is coupled into an optical fiber under test. The VCSEL is subsequently reconfigured by changing a bias voltage thereto and is used as a resonant-cavity photodetector (RCPD) to detect a portion of the test light pulse which is reflected or scattered from any fault within the optical fiber. A time interval .DELTA.t between an instant in time when the test light pulse is generated and the time the reflected or scattered portion is detected can then be used to determine the location of the fault within the optical fiber.

  5. Sedimentation and tectonics in the southern Bida Basin, Nigeria: depositional response to varying tectonic context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braide, S.P. (Federal Univ. of Technology, Minna (Nigeria))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Bida basin of central Nigeria is sandwiched between the Precambrian schist belts of the Northern Nigerian massif and the West African craton. Of interest is the southern part of the basin, which developed in continental settings, because the facies architecture of the sedimentary fill suggests a close relation between sedimentation dynamics and basin margin tectonics. This relationship is significant to an understanding of the basin's origin, which has been controversial. A simple sag and rift origin has been suggested, and consequently dominated the negative thinking on the hydrocarbon prospects of the basin which were considered poor. This detailed study of the facies indicates rapid basin-wide changes from various alluvial fan facies through flood-basin and deltaic facies to lacustrine facies. Paleogeographic reconstruction suggests lacustrine environments were widespread and elongate. Lacustrine environments occurred at the basin's axis and close to the margins. This suggests the depocenter must have migrated during the basin's depositional history and subsided rapidly to accommodate the 3.5-km-thick sedimentary fill. Although distinguishing pull-apart basins from rift basins, based solely on sedimentologic grounds, may be difficult, the temporal migration of the depocenter, as well as the basin architecture of upward coarsening cyclicity, show a strong tectonic and structural overprint that suggests a tectonic framework for the Southern Bida basin similar in origin to a pull-apart basin.

  6. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

  7. Automated Fault Location In Smart Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotfifard, Saeed

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Quality Meters (PQM), are installed to capture harmonics and certain disturbances for analyzing the power quality indices. Digital Protective Relays are utilized to detect occurrence of the faults and isolate faulted section as fast as possible. Digital... Protective Relays) use synchronous methods [28]. Therefore, if the available data is provided by RTUs, fault location methods that operate based on direct comparison of the input samples cannot be 17 utilized. However, if the data could be gathered from...

  8. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  9. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  10. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  11. Evaluation of workplace air monitoring locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Cicotte, G.R.; Lynch, T.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Aldrich, L.K. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current federal guidance on occupational radiation protection recognizes the importance of conducting air flow studies to assist in the placement of air sampling and monitoring equipment. In support of this, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has provided technical assistance to Westinghouse Hanford Company for the purpose of evaluating the adequacy of air sampling and monitoring locations at selected Hanford facilities. Qualitative air flow studies were performed using smoke aerosols to visually determine air movement. Three examples are provided of how air flow studies results, along with information on the purpose of the air sample being collected, were used as a guide in placing the air samplers and monitors. Preparatory steps in conducting an air flow study should include: (1) identifying type of work performed in the work area including any actual or potential release points; (2) determining the amounts of radioactive material available for release and its chemical and physical form; (3) obtaining accurate work area descriptions and diagrams; (4) identifying the location of existing air samplers and monitors; (5) documenting physical and ventilation configurations; (6) notifying appropriate staff of the test; and (7) obtaining necessary equipment and supplies. The primary steps in conducting an air flow study are measurements of air velocities in the work area, release of the smoke aerosol at selected locations in the work area and the observation of air flow patterns, and finally evaluation and documentation of the results. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  12. RESULTS OF IONSIV® IE-95 STUDIES FOR THE REMOVAL OF RADIOACTIVE CESIUM FROM K-EAST BASIN SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL POOL DURING DECOMMISSIONING ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; BURKE SP

    2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report delineates the results obtained from laboratory testing of IONISIV{reg_sign} IE-95 to determine the efficacy of the zeolite for the removal of radioactive cesium from the KE Basin water prior to transport to the Effluent Treatment Facility, as described in RPP-PLAN-36158, IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-95 Studies for the removal of Radioactive Cesium from KE Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool during Decommissioning Activities. The spent nuclear fuel was removed from KE Basin and the remaining sludge was layered with a grout mixture consisting of 26% Lehigh Type I/II portland cement and 74% Boral Mohave type F fly ash with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.43. The first grout pour was added to the basin floor to a depth of approximately 14 in. covering an area of 12,000 square feet. A grout layer was also added to the sludge containers located in the attached Weasel and Technical View pits.

  13. EIS-0463: Notice of Public Meeting Location Change | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Location Change EIS-0463: Notice of Public Meeting Location Change Presidential Permit Application for Northern Pass Transmission, New Hampshire On September 6, 2013, DOE...

  14. Optimization Online - p-facility Huff location problem on networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Blanquero

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 30, 2014 ... Abstract: The p-facility Huff location problem aims at locating facilities on a competitive environment so as to maximize the market share.

  15. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  16. Utilizing Divers in Support of Spent Fuel Basin Closure Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen Nellesen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of nuclear facilities in the world are aging and with this comes the fact that we have to either keep repairing them or decommission them. At the Department of Energy Idaho Site (DOEID) there are a number of facilities that are being decommissioned, but the facilities that pose the highest risk to the large aquifer that flows under the site are given highest priorities. Aging spent nuclear fuel pools at DOE-ID are among the facilities that pose the highest risk, therefore four pools were targeted for decommissioning in Fiscal Year 2004. To accomplish this task the Idaho Completion Project (ICP) of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, put together an integrated Basin Closure Subproject team. The team was assigned a goal to look beyond traditional practices at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to find ways to get the basin closure work done safer and more efficiently. The Idaho Completion Project (ICP) was faced with a major challenge – cleaning and preparing aging spent nuclear fuel basins for closure by removing sludge and debris, as necessary, and removing water to eliminate a potential risk to the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The project included cleaning and removing water from four basins. Two of the main challenges to a project like this is the risk of contamination from the basin walls and floors becoming airborne as the water is removed and keeping personnel exposures ALARA. ICP’s baseline plan had workers standing at the edges of the basins and on rafts or bridge cranes and then using long-handled tools to manually scrub the walls of basin surfaces. This plan had significant risk of skin contamination events, workers falling into the water, or workers sustaining injuries from the awkward working position. Analysis of the safety and radiation dose risks presented by this approach drove the team to look for smarter ways to get the work done.

  17. Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

  18. South Atlantic sag basins: new petroleum system components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, S.G. [GeoLearn, Houston, TX (United States)] Mohriak, W.U. [Petroleo Brasileiro, S.A., Exploration and Production, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mello, M.R. [Petroleo Brasieiro, S.A., Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newly discovered pre-salt source rocks, reservoirs and seals need to be included as components to the petroleum systems of both sides of the South Atlantic. These new components lie between the pre-salt rift strata and the Aptian salt layers, forming large, post-rift, thermal subsidence sag basins. These are differentiated from the older rift basins by the lack of syn-rift faulting and a reflector geometry that is parallel to the base salt regional unconformity rather than to the Precambrian basement. These basins are observed in deep water regions overlying areas where both the mantle and the crust have been involved in the extension. This mantle involvement creates post-rift subsiding depocenters in which deposition is continuous while proximal rift-phase troughs with little or no mantle involvement are bypassed and failed to accumulate potential source rocks during anoxic times. These features have been recognized in both West African Kwanza Basin and in the East Brasil Rift systems. The pre-salt source rocks that are in the West African sag basins were deposited in lacustrine brackish to saline water environment and are geochemically distinct from the older, syn-rift fresh to brackish water lakes, as well as from younger, post-salt marine anoxic environments of the drift phase. Geochemical analyses of the source rocks and their oils have shown a developing source rock system evolving from isolated deep rift lakes to shallow saline lakes, and culminating with the infill of the sag basin by large saline lakes to a marginally marine restricted gulf. Sag basin source rocks may be important in the South Atlantic petroleum system by charging deep-water prospects where syn-rift source rocks are overmature and the post-salt sequences are immature.

  19. Fractal and Wada exit basin boundaries in tokamaks Jefferson S. E. Portela, Iber^e L. Caldas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    Fractal and Wada exit basin boundaries in tokamaks Jefferson S. E. Portela, Iber^e L. Caldas an involved fractal structure. If three or more exit basins are considered, the respective basins exhibit

  20. Pattern Alteration: Location of Bust Fullness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Figure 1. Bodice with Darts Darts should point toward the fullest part of the bust, ending ? to 1 ? inches (1 to 4 cm) from its tip. This depends on the garment style, your fi gure and personal preference. The Personal Measurement Chart (line 6) can... help you deter- mine the position of your bust point on the pattern. If your measurement and the pattern bust point location differ, you need an alteration. 1. To fi nd the bust point on a basic pattern, extend the center lines of the darts until...

  1. Location of laccase in ordered mesoporous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayoral, Álvaro [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas, Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, Edificio I - D, Mariano Esquillor, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Gascón, Victoria; Blanco, Rosa M.; Márquez-Álvarez, Carlos; Díaz, Isabel, E-mail: idiaz@icp.csic.es [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, c/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The functionalization with amine groups was developed on the SBA-15, and its effect in the laccase immobilization was compared with that of a Periodic Mesoporous Aminosilica. A method to encapsulate the laccase in situ has now been developed. In this work, spherical aberration (C{sub s}) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with high angle annular dark field detector and electron energy loss spectroscopy were applied to identify the exact location of the enzyme in the matrix formed by the ordered mesoporous solids.

  2. GE Global Research Locations | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,Dioxide and MethaneLocations GE

  3. Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeedingthisOur HistoryHistoryLocations |

  4. Location-Tracking Applications ecent technological advances in wireless loca-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruteser, Marco

    areas they have visited. #12;Location-Tracking Applications broker as part of their service contract

  5. Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Libin

    Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill Department of Economics) 677-3374. #12;2 Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Abstract: The present paper considers a municipality that has a landfill (fixed in location) and plans to optimally locate a "recycling

  6. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES ........................................................................................................ 2 2.2 Net Basin Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table lb.--Lag-Zero Cross Covariances and Cross Correlations Among Great Lakes Annual Connecting

  7. Efficient Irrigation for Water conservation in the Rio Grande Basin: 2010-2011 Progress and Accomplishments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, D.; Harris, B.L.; Runyan, C.; DeMouche, L.

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2001, the Efficient Irrigation for Water Conservation in the Rio Grande Basin Federal Initiative— known as the Rio Grande Basin Initiative (RGBI)—has saved more than 5 million acre-feet of water. Researchers, Extension specialists, and county...

  8. AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehran, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J:''-~orraation v Piceance Creek Basin v Colorado r and 9 p'C~b Tract, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado," Report to Oc~for Piceance and Yellow Creek Watersheds," Environmental

  9. SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA Biniam Biruk Ashagre #12;ABSTRACT Ethiopia is known for its wealth of natural resources. These result Basin, Ethiopia) #12;iv This study is dedicated to my

  10. Glacier Meltwater Contributions and Glaciometeorological Regime of the Illecillewaet River Basin, British Columbia,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dan

    Glacier Meltwater Contributions and Glaciometeorological Regime of the Illecillewaet River Basin This study characterizes the meteorological parameters influencing glacier runoff and quantifies recent glacier contributions to streamflow in the Illecillewaet River basin, British Columbia. The Illecillewaet

  11. Pliocene to recent stratigraphy of the Cuu Long and Nam Con Son Basins, offshore Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarbrough, Christopher Neil

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cuu Long and Nam Con Basins, offshore Vietnam, contain sediment dispersal systems, from up-dip fluvial environments to down-dip deep-water slope and basinal environments that operated along the southern continental margin of Vietnam during...

  12. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

  13. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  14. The use of turbulent jets to destratify the Charles River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, Jeffrey H. (Jeffrey Harrison)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the feasibility of using turbulent jets to destratify the Lower Charles River Basin between the Longfellow and Craigie Bridges between Boston and Cambridge. The basin is currently filled with salt water ...

  15. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

  16. Functions and requirements for 105-KE Basin sludge retrieval and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge, and the clouding due to sludge, interferes with basin operation and maintenance activities. This document defines the overall functions and requirements for sludge retrieval and packaging activities to be performed in the 105-KE Basin.

  17. Syn-tectonic sedimentary evolution of the Miocene atallar Basin, southwestern Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and sedimentological data are now presented. The Çatallar Basin lies in paraconformity on the Bey Dalari carbonate: Sedimentology; Biostratigraphy; Source of detritals; Miocene; Basin analyses; Lycian Nappes 1. Introduction

  18. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

  19. Heat flow and thermotectonic problems of the central Ventura Basin, southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Rito, R.F.; Lachenbruch, A.H.; Moses, T.H. Jr.; Munroe, R.J. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ventura Basin, southern Califronia, is located near the Big Bend area of the San Andreas fault system, within the Transverse Ranges physiographic province. Continuous equilibrium temperature logs were measured in 12 idle oil wells located within the onshore Ventura Avenue, San Miguelito, Filmore, Oxnard, and West Montalvo fields to an average depth of about 3100 m (10,200 feet). Thermal conductivities were measured on all available samples. Heat flows were calculated with the aid of a thermostratigraphic scheme based on correlative gradient intervals and average thermal conductivity for the appropriate units. Negative curvature of the Ventura Avenue temperature profiles may be explained by an increase in thermal conductivity associated with tectonic compaction of the underlying Pliocene clastic sequence. Temperature profiles at Fillmore are enigmatic but suggest highly unusual geotectonic conditions. Basinwide, heat flow averages about 48 mW/m{sup 2}, a value which is low relative to most of southern California. As heat flow does not vary systematically to the maximum measured depth of about 4 km, this anomaly is not easily explained in terms of hydrologic effect or recent uplift and erosion. However, a diminution of heat flow is an expectable consequence of the accumulation of cold sediments (up to 12 km) since Eocene time. If 70 mW/m{sub 2} is accepted as the background heat flow, then the sedimentation effect is probably sufficient to explain the anomaly.

  20. The thermal and structural properties of a Hanna Basin Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, R.E.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to understand the cavity growth mechanisms occurring during an Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) test, a study of the thermomechanical effects has been initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase of this study has been the determination of the intrinsic thermal and structural properties of the Hanna Basin Coal that was utilized in a series of four UCG tests near the town of Hanna, Wyoming. The result of this study is a consistent set of thermal and structural properties of a Hanna Basin coal. This set has been used in a model that successfully simulated the growth of the cavity observed during the Hanna II UCG test.

  1. Mineralogy and diagenesis of sediments in Yamato Basin, Japan Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Pei-Hua

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analytical Methods TEXTURE OF YAMATO BASIN SEDIMENTS . . MINERALOGICAL VARIATIONS . Unit VI (646. 9-900. 1 mbsf). Unit V (426. 6-627. 3 mbsf). Unit IV (301. 5-426. 6 mbsf). Unit III (224-301. 5 mbsf) and Unit II (119. 9-224 mbsf) . . . Semiquantitative... distribution of 34 samples selected from Site 797, ODP Leg 127 in the Yamato Basin, Japan Sea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6A. Photomicrograph of a sandy sample from Unit VI, in which chlorite forms as a matrix occuping all intergranular...

  2. Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Eric E.

    Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits potential as a guide for exploration of uranium and other types of deposits in basins of any age. Isotope of sedimentary basins hosting unconformity-type uranium deposits. In addition, these techniques have great

  3. Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil A. B profile across the Parnaiba cratonic basin in NorthEast Brazil. The purpose of this project is to acquire margin of Parnaíba Basin, Brazil. Geophysics 64: 337-356. Ussami N, Cogo de Sa N, Molina EC. 1993

  4. Chronostratigraphic framework and evolution of the Fortuna basin (Eastern Betics) since the Late Miocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Chronostratigraphic framework and evolution of the Fortuna basin (Eastern Betics) since the Late, Spain ABSTRACT A Tortonian to Pliocene magnetostratigraphy of the Fortuna basin supports a new Betics in SE Spain. The Neogene Fortuna basin is an elongated trough which formed over a left

  5. Original article On the Late Miocene continentalization of the Guadix Basin: More evidence for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    connection existed through the Guadix-Baza, Fortuna and Lorca basins during the Messinian (Mu¨ ller and Hsu of the sedimentary fill of the Fortuna (Garce´s et al., 1998, 2001) and Lorca Basins (Krijgsman et al., 2000). These studies revealed that the marine-continental transition in the Fortuna and Lorca basins occurred

  6. Impact of climate change on the hydroclimatology of Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of climate change on the hydroclimatology of Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia Shimelis G. Setegn,1 investigated the sensitivity of water resources to climate change in the Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia, using on the hydroclimatology of Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia, Water Resour. Res., 47, W04511, doi:10.1029/2010WR009248. 1

  7. Regional tree growth and inferred summer climate in the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Michael N.

    changes in summer climate within the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783. The basin drains parts the center of their range usually exhibit a more complex relationship with climate (Hughes, 2002Regional tree growth and inferred summer climate in the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783

  8. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200880000 ISRP FAN1B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Accords) are ten-year agreements between the federal action agencies and states and tribes. The Accords supplement the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and are intended substantial biological benefits for Columbia Basin fish. The Accords also acknowledge the tribes' and states

  9. THE CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF ORIENTALE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR BASIN FORMATION. J. C. Andrews-Hanna1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    loading in the basin interiors [4]. It is shown that the super-isostatic state of the basin floors axis, such as an impact basin with radial symmetry, the un- certainty in the mean profiles (represented in mean gravity and topography profiles of improved accuracy. The averaged gravity and topography profiles

  10. Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer, including defining within a tree network of the parallel computer two or more sets of non-overlapping test levels of compute nodes of the network that together include all the data communications links of the network, each non-overlapping test level comprising two or more adjacent tiers of the tree; defining test cells within each non-overlapping test level, each test cell comprising a subtree of the tree including a subtree root compute node and all descendant compute nodes of the subtree root compute node within a non-overlapping test level; performing, separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, an uplink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels; and performing, separately from the uplink tests and separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, a downlink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels.

  11. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  12. Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

  13. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  14. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

  15. Tectonophysics 315 (1999) 145162 www.elsevier.com/locate/tecto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Egypt; exhumation of core complexes; intramontane basin formation oblique convergence in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: magmatically versus tectonically induced subsidence H final exhumation of core complexes. Enhanced relief energy and high sediment delivery rates suggest

  16. MobiEyes: A Distributed Location Monitoring Service Using Moving Location Queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    , distributed algorithms, mobile data management. Ç 1 INTRODUCTION WITH the growing availability of mobile-sensitive resource management. The former uses location data to tailor the information delivered to the mobile users traffic and weather. Examples include systems for fleet manage- ment, mobile workforce management

  17. Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for installation. Because of some testing problems with the Zenergy fault current limiter, installation was delayed until early 2009 with it being put into operation on March 6, 2009. A malfunction of the FCL controller caused the DC power supply to the superconducting magnet to be turned off. This inserted the FCL impedance into the circuit while it was in normal operation causing a voltage resonance condition. While these voltages never reached a point where damage would occur on customer equipment, steps were taken to insure this would not happen again. The FCL was reenergized with load on December 18, 2009. A fault was experienced on the circuit with the FCL in operation on January 14, 2010. The FCL operated properly and reduced the fault current by about 8%, what was expected from tests and modeling. As of the end of the project, the FCL was still in operation on the circuit. The third phase of the project involved the exploration of several advanced protection ideas that might be at a state where they could be applied to the Circuit of the Future and elsewhere in the SCE electrical system. Based on the work done as part of the literature review and survey, as well as a number of internal meetings with engineering staff at SCE, a number of ideas were compiled. These ideas were then evaluated for applicability and ability to be applied on the Circuit of the Future in the time remaining for the project. Some of these basic ideas were implemented on the circuit including measurement of power quality before and after the FCL. It was also decided that we would take what was learned as part of the Circuit of the Future work and extend it to the next generation circuit protection for SCE. Also at this time, SCE put in a proposal to the DOE for the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration using ARRA funding. SCE was successful in obtaining funding for this proposal, so it was felt that exploration of new protection schemes for this Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration would be a good use of the project resources. With this in mind, a protection system that uses fault interrupting switches, hi

  18. Coupon Surveillance For Corrosion Monitoring In Nuclear Fuel Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Murphy, T. R.; Deible, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum and stainless steel coupons were put into a nuclear fuel basin to monitor the effect of water chemistry on the corrosion of fuel cladding. These coupons have been monitored for over ten years. The corrosion and pitting data is being used to model the kinetics and estimate the damage that is occurring to the fuel cladding.

  19. POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW: BASIN-SCALE MODELING AND SALINITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . If not, please email us at work-at-iwmi@cgiar.org The International Water Management Institute (wwwPOSTDOCTORAL FELLOW: BASIN-SCALE MODELING AND SALINITY MANAGEMENT Tashkent, Uzbekistan Please note: The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) (www.iwmi.org) is looking for a person with a PhD in hydrology

  20. Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin Eric J. Holweg eholweg.navy.mil/data/oceans/gulfstream.html Hurricane Preparedness & Tracks: http://www.fema.gov/fema/trop.htm Time Zone Conversions: http.....................................................................................................2 · Tropical Wave · Tropical Disturbance · Tropical Depression · Tropical Storm · Hurricane

  1. An entropy-based morphological analysis of river basin networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorentino, Mauro; Claps, Pierluigi; Singh, Vijay P.

    related to the logarithm of the magnitude of the basin network. This relation leads to a nonlinear relation between the network diameter and magnitude, where the exponent is found to be related to the fractal dimension of the drainage network. Also...

  2. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  3. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  4. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  5. Geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth for each basin, is tabulated. Background heat flow in the Wind River Basin is generally insufficient to produce high conductive gradients. Only where hydrologic systems re-distribute heat through mass movement of water will high temperatures occur at shallow depths. Aquifers which may have the confinement and structural characteristics necessary to create such geothermal systems are the Lance/Fort Union, Mesa Verde, Frontier, Muddy, Cloverly, Sundance, Nugget, Park City, Tensleep, Amsden, Madison, Bighorn, and Flathead Formations. Of these the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison Limestone are the most attractive in terms of both productivity and water quality. Most of the identified geothermal anomalies in the Wind River Basin occur along complex structures in the southwest and south. The most attractive geothermal prospects identified are anomalous Areas 2 and 3 north of Lander, Sweetwater Station Springs west of Jeffrey City, and the thermal springs southwest of Dubois. Even in these areas, it is unlikely temperatures in excess of 130 to 150/sup 0/F can be developed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  6. Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    irradiated fuel prior to Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing. In 1980, irradiated N-Reactor fuel was placed products and uranium. This sludge must be removed and disposed as part of the basin decommissioning) and the definition of High Level Waste (HLW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

  7. Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources Gary Stone, Extension Educator, University://www.wrds.uwyo.edu/wrds/nrcs/snowprec/snowprec.html - the University of Wyoming Water Resources Data System - scroll down to the Upper and Lower North Platte River. Seminoe is the first reservoir on the North Platte River in central Wyoming. Glendo is the second

  8. History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Colorado State University 25th South Platte Forum Longmont, CO October 22, 2014 #12;Acknowledgment: Thanks is it -- the History Annual Peak Flows S. Platte River at Julesburg 1902-2013 #12;#12;#12;Now, let's head upstream

  9. Beta Advection-Diffusion Model Columbia Basin Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Beta Advection-Diffusion Model Jim Norris Columbia Basin Research University of Washington Box Model (SSM) is loosely called a Beta Advection-Diffusion model. The SSM estimates a single parameter this single parameter characterized fish migration. The purpose of this note is to define the Beta Advection

  10. Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang Institute of Information Security, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract. This paper presents our experience of knowledge and technology transfer within the lessons learned and what we would do differently in future technology transfer projects. Keywords

  11. Fates of Eroded Soil Organic Carbon: Mississippi Basin Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. V.; Sleezer, R. O.; Renwick, W. H.; Buddemeier, Robert W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a mass balance analysis of organic carbon (OC) across the five major river subsystems of the Mississippi (MS) Basin (an area of 3.2 3 106 km2). This largely agricultural landscape undergoes a bulk soil erosion rate of ;480 t·km22...

  12. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Project Number 200845800 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposes to take advantage of iteroparity in natural-origin (NOR) steelhead populations to increase,000 fish) between 1941-1954 (Mullan et al. 1992). Subsequent to this dramatic increase, wild stock escapements to the Columbia Basin have fluctuated widely. Wild stock productivity and abundance declined again

  13. Origin of Park City (Phosphoria) cycles in Bighorn basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inden, R.; Dean, J.S.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Franson and Ervay cycles of the Permian Park City Formation in the Bighorn basin developed in response to both eustatic fluctuations and the changing climatic regimes associated with these fluctuations. The basal phosphatic shales (Meade Park and Retort members) and cherty siltstones (Rex and Tosi cherts) in these cycles were deposited during major transgressive events under the influence of cold, upwelling, deep oceanic currents and semitropical/tropical climatic conditions. The overlying carbonate units (Franson and Ervay Members) were deposited during sea level stabilization and regional marine regressions in warm marine waters and under hot, arid climatic conditions. During these periods of carbonate deposition, shallow marine ramp systems developed. Widespread, low-energy, restricted-marine environments extends across most of the Bighorn basin, except to the southwest, where normal marine environments existed, and along the east flank of the basin, where peritidal carbonates and lagoonal/salina red beds and evaporites developed. The smaller clastic/carbonate cycles that comprise the Franson and Ervay members developed during minor sea level changes and as a result of shifts in the major water currents in the basin and the normal short-term processes involved in shoal development and destruction. The imprint of the varying climatic conditions on these sequences is manifest in the vertical decrease in clastic content and gradation from more normal marine to restricted marine carbonate facies upward through all cycles, the development of tepee structures and then dissolution features in peritidal deposits, and the precipitation of evaporites in the lagoonal sequences.

  14. book reviews Climate Changeon the Great Lakes Basin. 1992.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,personal communication). The second paper, "Effects of Climate Change on the Water Resources of the Great is a compilation of five papers presented at the Symposium of Climate Change on the Great Lakes Basin held as part- ested in learning more a out climate change issues andstudiesintheGreatL kesisadvisedtoconsultthe

  15. Greater Platte River Basins Symposium PROGRAM Thursday, October 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of the Niobrara River in the National Scenic Reach, Nebraska ­ Jason Alexander, US Geological Survey ­ Nebraska and Computational Investigations of Sandbar Dynamics ­ Paul Kinzel, U.S. Geological Survey ­ Colorado Water Science and Values in the Niobrara Basin: Does Water Flow to Money? ­ Steven Shultz, University of Nebraska-Omaha 2

  16. Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

  17. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  18. Operability test report for K east basin canister cleaning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1997-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes test data computed during the operability test procedure for the K East Basin Canister Cleaning System. Test Results show that the canister cleaning system successfully lowered the dose of each canister tested so that each canister could be disposed of as low level waste.

  19. Structural transect across Ventua basin and western Transverse Ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namson, J.S.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A retrodeformable cross section that integrates surface and subsurface data across the Ventura basin and western Transverse Ranges illustrates the structural style and evolution of Oligocene to Holocene age structures. Three deformational events are recognized: Oligocene to early Miocene compression, late Miocene through Pliocene normal faulting, and Pleistocene to Holocene compression. Oligocene to early Miocene compression caused uplift and formation of a large antiform north of the Santa Ynez fault in the central part of the range. This antiform is interpreted to be a ramp-related fold associated with movement on a southwest-verging blind thrust fault. Late Miocene through Pliocene age normal faulting along the Oak Ridge fault formed the southern boundary of the Ventura basin. The basin formed by simple block rotation along the normal fault and was filled by up to 6 km of Pliocene and Pleistocene clastic sediment. During Pleistocene to Holocene compression, the Ventura basin and western Transverse Ranges were deformed by both north- and south-verging thrust faults and related folds. The Ventura Avenue anticline is interpreted to be the result of imbricate thrust faulting in the Rincon and Monterey formations. Along the Oak Ridge trend, thrust-related folds rotated and reactivated the late Miocene and Pliocene age normal faults. A restoration of the regional transect documents 34% or 35 km of shortening by thrusting and folding during the Pleistocene to Holocene phase of compression.

  20. Structural deformation in the offshore Santa Maria basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willingham, C.R. (Explorametrics, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (R.G. Heck and Associates, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Rietman, J.M. (Rietman Consultants, Santa Ana, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors divide the offshore Santa Maria basin into the southern, central, and northern provinces based on the pattern, style, and timing of late Cenozoic deformation. From their analyses of over 2,000 km of CDP seismic data and offshore well data they prepared time structure contour maps for three basin-wide unconformities: top of basement, top of Miocene, and the unconformity between early and late Pliocene chronostratigraphic units. Isochron maps were constructed between these horizons and between the early/late Pliocene unconformity and the sea floor to evaluate timing of the deformation. All maps were converted to depth and isopach values based on a three-dimensional velocity model. The regional structure contour and isopach maps show that the offshore Santa Maria basin is characterized by localized crustal shortening orthogonal to the Pacific/North America plate margin and indications of post-Miocene to recent lateral slip along the eastern basin boundary, the San Simeon/Hosgri fault system.

  1. SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE DENVER BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter SD SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE DENVER BASIN, COLORADO By D. J. Nichols in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal

  2. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  3. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

  4. SAPLE: Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Procopio, Michael J.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine (SAPLE) web application, a directory search application for use by Sandia National Laboratories personnel. SAPLE's purpose is to return Sandia personnel 'results' as a function of user search queries, with its mission to make it easier and faster to find people at Sandia. To accomplish this, SAPLE breaks from more traditional directory application approaches by aiming to return the correct set of results while placing minimal constraints on the user's query. Two key features form the core of SAPLE: advanced search query interpretation and inexact string matching. SAPLE's query interpretation permits the user to perform compound queries when typing into a single search field; where able, SAPLE infers the type of field that the user intends to search on based on the value of the search term. SAPLE's inexact string matching feature yields a high-quality ranking of personnel search results even when there are no exact matches to the user's query. This paper explores these two key features, describing in detail the architecture and operation of SAPLE. Finally, an extensive analysis on logged search query data taken from an 11-week sample period is presented.

  5. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

  6. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

  7. Etherthreads : an infrastructure for location-based messages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lassey, Bradford, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes an infrastructure for location-based services for Bluetooth enabled cellular phones. Specifically, it explores the use of this architecture in a location-based messaging application. A user can send ...

  8. Provable and practical location privacy for vehicular and mobile systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popa, Raluca Ada

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, there has been a rapid evolution of location-based vehicular and mobile services (e.g., electronic tolling, congestion pricing, traffic statistics, insurance pricing, location-based social applications), ...

  9. A unified Bayesian framework for relative microseismic location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    We study the problem of determining an unknown microseismic event location relative to previously located events using a single monitoring array in a monitoring well. We show that using the available information about the ...

  10. A unified Bayesian framework for relative microseismic location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of determining an unknown microseismic event location relative to previously located events using a single monitoring array in a monitoring well. We show that using the available information about the ...

  11. Holdout transshipment policy in two-location inventory systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jiaqi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In two-location inventory systems, unidirectional transshipment policies are considered when an item is not routinely stocked at a location in the system. Unlike the past research in this area which has concentrated on ...

  12. Policy-aware sender anonymity in Location-based services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyas, Avinash

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBS Server Location Server CSP Sender Figure 1.1: LBS ModelService Provider, denoted as CSP, the Location Server,is either the MPC in the CSP’s network or an Over-The-Top (

  13. Locating a semi-obnoxious facility with repelling polygonal regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 30, 2007 ... Page 1 ... For the last years, the location of semi-desirable facilities has been a widely studied topic by the researchers in location theory (see [1 ...

  14. Urban land-use effects on groundwater phosphate distribution in a shallow aquifer, Nanfei River basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    basin, China Jiazhong Qian & Lulu Wang & Hongbin Zhan & Zhou Chen Abstract Groundwater, surface water

  15. Crustal rifting and subsidence of Sirte basin, Libya: a mature hydrocarbon Province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumati, Y.; Schamel, S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex rifting and subsidence history of the Sirte basin serves as an instructive case study of the tectonic evolution of an intercratonic extensional basin. The Sirte basin formed by collapse of the Sirte arch in the mid-Cretaceous. Marine sediments accumulated following initial crustal arching and rifting as the basin was flooded from the north. Upper Cretaceous strata lie unconformably on igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian basement complex, Cambrian-Ordovician Gargaf Group, or the pre-Cretaceous continental Nubian Sandstone. The most rapid subsidence and accumulation of basinal strata occurred in the early Cenozoic; however, the basin has been relatively stable since the Oligocene. The basin is floored by a northwest-southeast-trending mosaic of narrow horsts and grabens, an important structural characteristic that distinguishes it from the adjacent intracratonic Kufra, Murzuk, and Ghadames basins. The details of basin subsidence, sediment accumulation rates, and facies variations have been reconstructed for the northern Sirte basin from a suite of approximately 100 well logs and numerous seismic lines. Subsidence-rate maps for short time intervals from the mid-Cretaceous through the Eocene show a continual shifting of the loci of maximum and minimum subsidence. The nonsteady character of basin subsidence may reflect a periodicity of movement on the major basement-rooted growth faults bounding the underlying horsts and grabens.

  16. Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction 1 Seismic Wave of alluvial deposits have a major influence on seismic wave propagation and amplification. However influence seismic wave propagation near the free surface. In this paper, the influence of surface structures

  17. Risks of using AP locations discovered through war driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotz, David

    Risks of using AP locations discovered through war driving Minkyong Kim, Jeffrey J. Fielding the actual locations are often unavailable, they use estimated locations from war driving estimated through war driving. War driving is the process of collecting Wi-Fi beacons by driving or walking

  18. Accurate Eye Center Location through Invariant Isocentric Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Theo

    1 Accurate Eye Center Location through Invariant Isocentric Patterns Roberto Valenti, Student Member, IEEE, and Theo Gevers, Member, IEEE, Abstract--Locating the center of the eyes allows for valuable information to be captured and used in a wide range of applications. Accurate eye center location

  19. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  20. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

  1. Basin Analysis of Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest Mancini

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE for review. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. The information on the source rocks is being prepared for inclusion in the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern and western parts of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis continues. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Two underdeveloped Smackover reservoirs have been identified. They are the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - This task has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock information will continue to be prepared for the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Study of Smackover underdeveloped reservoirs will continue with focus on the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs.

  2. Location, Reprocessing, and Analysis of Two Dimensional Seismic Reflection Data on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico, Final Report, September 1, 1997-February 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, Jennie; Taylor, David J.; Huffman, Jr., A. Curtis

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Multichannel surface seismic reflection data recording is a standard industry tool used to examine various aspects of geology, especially the stratigraphic characteristics and structural style of sedimentary formations in the subsurface. With the help of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe and the Bureau of Indian Affairs we were able to locate over 800 kilometers (500 miles) of multichannel seismic reflection data located on the Jicarilla Apache Indian reservation. Most of the data was received in hardcopy form, but there were data sets where either the demultiplexed digital field data or the processed data accompanied the hardcopy sections. The seismic data was acquired from the mid 1960's to the early 1990's. The most extensive seismic coverage is in the southern part of the reservation, although there are two good surveys located on the northeastern and northwestern parts of the reservation. Most of the data show that subsurface formations are generally flat-lying in the southern and western portion of the reservation. There is, however, a significant amount of structure imaged on seismic data located over the San Juan Basin margin along the east-central and northern part of the reservation. Several west to east trending lines in these areas show a highly faulted monoclinal structure from the deep basin in the west up onto the basin margin to the east. Hydrocarbon exploration in flat lying formations is mostly stratigraphic in nature. Where there is structure in the subsurface and indications are that rocks have been folded, faulted, and fractured, exploration has concentrated on structural traps and porosity/permeability "sweet spots" caused by fracturing. Therefore, an understanding of the tectonics influencing the entire section is critical in understanding mechanisms for generating faults and fractures in the Cretaceous. It is apparent that much of the hydrocarbon production on the reservation is from fracture porosity in either source or reservoir sequences. Therefore it is important to understand the mechanism that controls the location and intensity of the fractures. A possible mechanism may be deep seated basement faulting that has been active through time. Examining the basement fault patterns in this part of the basin and their relation to fracture production may provide a model for new plays on the Jicarilla Indian Reservation. There are still parts of the reservation where the subsurface has not been imaged geophysically with either conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional reflection seismic techniques. These methods, especially 3-D seismic, would provide the best data for mapping deep basement faulting. The authors would recommend that 3-D seismic be acquired along the Basin margin located along the eastern edge of the reservation and the results be used to construct detailed fault maps which may help to locate areas with the potential to contain highly fractured zones in the subsurface.

  3. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  4. To cite this document: Pizarro, Francisco and Pascaud, Romain and Pascal, Olivier and Callegari, Thierry and Liard, Laurent Evaluation of microplasma discharges as active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    in the RF domain. A plasma medium is an ionized gas, with the particularity that it can behave as a low conditions. On the other hand, when the gas is not ionized (so the discharge is not present), the medium medium depends on the plasma density and collision frequency, which depend on the type of gas, its

  5. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  6. Lithofacies distribution in Smackover/Haynesville (Oxfordian) depositional sequence, MAFLA Area, northeastern Gulf Coast Basin, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boronow, T.C. (Shell Western Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (USA)); Prather, B.E. (Shell Offshore Inc., New Orleans, LA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation of a basal carbonate unit a downlap or maximum flooding surface, and approximated time lines in a prograding unit provide the time-stratigraphic framework for mapping the distribution of reservoir, seal, and source lithofacies within the Smackover/Haynesville depositional sequence. Seismic sequence analysis of offshore data core control, onshore to offshore regional stratigraphic sections, and time-slice lithofacies maps show this depositional sequence to consist of a deepening-upward transgressive system tract (TST) and a shallowing-upward highstand systems tract (HST). The TST is composed of predominantly lime mudstones and microlaminated mudstones. These mudstones are source rocks for Norphlet and Smackover accumulations and top seals for some Norphlet accumulations. Reservoir rocks in the TST were deposited in high-energy environments localized over paleotopographic highs and around basin margins. The HST over most of offshore MAFLA is dominated by siliciclastic deposition. In these areas, the HST is characterized by sigmoid clinoform seismic character. The clinoforms result from interbedded carbonates. Source rocks occur in bottomsets and foresets, and grainstones are located in the topsets of these carbonate interbeds. The source rocks are part of a condensed zone deposited in a starved basin and grainstones were deposited at the paleostrandline. Sandstone reservoirs deposited by turbidity currents are found in bottomsets and shoreface sandstones occur in topsets of siliciclastic beds. The HST in onshore and offshore areas not affected by siliciclastic influx consists of shoaling-upward carbonate to evaporite parasequence sets. Here, grainstone reservoirs are capped by Buckner anhydrite top seals.

  7. Radiation damage in the LHCb Vertex Locator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Affolder; K. Akiba; M. Alexander; S. Ali; M. Artuso; J. Benton; M. van Beuzekom; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; G. Bogdanova; S. Borghi; T. J. V. Bowcock; H. Brown; J. Buytaert; G. Casse; P. Collins; S. De Capua; D. Dossett; L. Eklund; C. Farinelli; J. Garofoli; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; H. Gordon; J. Harrison; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; D. Hutchcroft; E. Jans; M. John; T. Ketel; G. Lafferty; T. Latham; A. Leflat; M. Liles; D. Moran; I. Mous; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; C. Parkes; G. D. Patel; S. Redford; M. M. Reid; K. Rinnert; E. Rodrigues; M. Schiller; T. Szumlak; C. Thomas; J. Velthuis; V. Volkov; A. D. Webber; M. Whitehead; E. Zverev

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector designed to reconstruct charged particle trajectories and vertices produced at the LHCb interaction region. During the first two years of data collection, the 84 VELO sensors have been exposed to a range of fluences up to a maximum value of approximately $\\rm{45 \\times 10^{12}\\,1\\,MeV}$ neutron equivalent ($\\rm{1\\,MeV\\,n_{eq}}$). At the operational sensor temperature of approximately $-7\\,^{\\circ}\\rm{C}$, the average rate of sensor current increase is $18\\,\\upmu\\rm{A}$ per $\\rm{fb^{-1}}$, in excellent agreement with predictions. The silicon effective bandgap has been determined using current versus temperature scan data after irradiation, with an average value of $E_{g}=1.16\\pm0.03\\pm0.04\\,\\rm{eV}$ obtained. The first observation of n-on-n sensor type inversion at the LHC has been made, occurring at a fluence of around $15 \\times 10 ^{12}$ of $1\\,\\rm{MeV\\,n_{eq}}$. The only n-on-p sensors in use at the LHC have also been studied. With an initial fluence of approximately $\\rm{3 \\times 10^{12}\\,1\\,MeV\\,n_{eq}}$, a decrease in the Effective Depletion Voltage (EDV) of around 25\\,V is observed, attributed to oxygen induced removal of boron interstitial sites. Following this initial decrease, the EDV increases at a comparable rate to the type inverted n-on-n type sensors, with rates of $(1.43\\pm 0.16) \\times 10 ^{-12}\\,\\rm{V} / \\, 1 \\, \\rm{MeV\\,n_{eq}}$ and $(1.35\\pm 0.25) \\times 10 ^{-12}\\,\\rm{V} / \\, 1 \\, \\rm{MeV\\,n_{eq}}$ measured for n-on-p and n-on-n type sensors, respectively. A reduction in the charge collection efficiency due to an unexpected effect involving the second metal layer readout lines is observed.

  8. Investigation of MAGMA chambers in the Western Great Basin. Final report, 9 June 1982-31 October 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppin, W.A.

    1986-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes efforts made by the Seismological Laboratory toward the detection and delineation of shallow crustal zones in the western Great Basin, and toward the development of methods to accomplish such detection. The work centers around the recently-active volcanic center near Long Valley, California. The work effort is broken down into three tasks: (1) network operations, (2) data analysis and interpretation, and (3) the study of shallow crustal amomalies (magma bodies). Section (1) describes the efforts made to record thousand of earthquakes near the Long Valley caldera, and focusses on the results obtained for the November 1984 round Valley earthquake. Section (2) describes the major effort of this contract, which was to quantify the large volume of seismic data being recorded as it pertains to the goals of this contract. Efforts described herein include (1) analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms, and (2) the classification, categorization, and interpretation of unusual seismic phases in terms of reflections and refractions from shallow-crustal anomalous zones. Section (3) summarizes the status of our research to date on the locations of magma bodies, with particular emphasis on a location corresponding to the map location of the south end of Hilton Creek fault. Five lines of independent evidence suggest that magma might be associated with this spot. Finally, new evidence on the large magma bodies within the Long Valley caldera, of interest to the DOE deep drilling project, is presented.

  9. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-2001 Report : Populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan and Methow River Drainages.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project was to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-2001 was year three (and final year) of a project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-2001 we worked in collaboration with the Wenatchee National Forest to catalog populations in the Wenatchee, Entiat, Lake Chelan, and Methow River drainages of Washington State.

  10. Preliminary analyses of matrix properties of Silurian and Devonian carbonate rocks in the Indiana and Ohio parts of the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-Systems Analysis (RASA) in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region is investigating the Silurian and Devonian carbonate-rock aquifer in parts of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois. Core samples from the carbonate-rock aquifer in Indiana and Ohio were analyzed for horizontal permeability and porosity. These matrix properties were used to describe the hydrogeologic aspects of the carbonate-rock aquifer throughout the regional study area. Core descriptions by the Indiana and Ohio State Geological surveys, were used for sub-dividing the core into the various lithostratigraphic groups. The lithostratigraphic groups are: the Brassfield/Sexton Creek Limestone, the Sublockport (including the Dayton Limestone and the Rochester Shale Equivalent), the Lockport Dolomite or the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, the lower section of the Muscatatuck Group and the upper section of the Muscatatuck Group. The porosities and horizontal permeabilities determined from the 38 samples were analyzed by nonparametric statistical methods. The data were grouped by lithologic unit, well location, and position within a depositional basin (the Appalachian, Michigan and Illinois Basins). In each case, all groups of data had identical distributions. These results show that the horizontal permeability and porosity of the matrix in the Silurian and Devonian carbonate rocks that were sampled are statistically similar and that variation between the groups is not statistically important.

  11. Gravity modeling of the Song Hong basin: an insight into its crustal structure and implication for the formation of the basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Vu Giang

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3-D gravity inversion and rift stretching models are used in the Song Hong basin to determine the general configuration of the upper mantle and the mechanism for its formation in the region. The basin approximately 200 km wide by 600 km in length...

  12. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  13. Horizontal well successfully drilled in Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.R. [Mississippi Valley Gas Co., Jackson, MS (United States); Skeen, B. [Sperry-Sun Drilling Services, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The first horizontal well successfully drilled and completed in the very abrasive Black Warrior basin required the use of several state-of-the-art drilling technologies and quick decision making at the well site. Mississippi Valley Gas Co.`s first horizontal well in the Goodwin natural gas storage field has a deliverability about six times that of a conventional vertical well in the same reservoir. The MVG Howard 35-4 No. 1 was drilled in 23 days during September and October 1995. The well reached 1,805 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 3,660 ft measured depth. The horizontal section length was 1,650 ft. The well reached the target, and the economics were favorable. The paper describes the geology of the basin, Goodwin field, the decision for a horizontal well, the difficulties encountered, and evaluation of the technologies used.

  14. Test reports for K Basins vertical fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical fuel handling tools, for moving N Reactor fuel elements, were tested in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility (CTF) in the 300 Area. After fabrication was complete, the tools were functionally tested in the CTF using simulated N Reactor fuel rods (inner and outer elements). The tools were successful in picking up the simulated N Reactor fuel rods. These tools were also load tested using a 62 pound dummy to test the structural integrity of each assembly. The tools passed each of these tests, based on the performance objectives. Finally, the tools were subjected to an operations acceptance test where K Basins Operations personnel operated the tool to determine its durability and usefulness. Operations personnel were satisfied with the tools. Identified open items included the absence of a float during testing, and documentation required prior to actual use of the tools in the 100 K fuel storage basin.

  15. Test plan for K-Basin fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the test plan and procedures for the acceptance testing of the handling tools enveloped for the removal of an N-Reactor fuel element from its storage canister in the K-Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single fuel Element Can for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N-Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. New hand tools were required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. The 305 Building Cold Test Facility will be used to conduct the acceptance testing of the Fuel Handling Tools. Upon completion of this acceptance testing and any subsequent training of operators, the tools will be transferred to the 105 KW Basin for installation and use.

  16. Petroleum geology of Benue trough and southeastern Chad basin, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petters, S.W.; Ekweozor, C.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cretaceous cyclic sedimentation in the southern Benue trough, together with unconformities, provide a tripartite subdivision of the sedimentary succession into (1) the Albian Asu River Group, (2) the late Cenomanian to early Santonian Cross River Group (new name) and interfingering marginal marine sandstones, and (3) the post-Santonian coal measures sequence. Most of the Albian to Eocene marine shales in the Benue trough and the Turonian shales in the southern Chad basin contain well over 0.5% total organic carbon, with values of up to 7.4% in Turonian anaerobic shales. Based on the high content of soluble organic matter, thermal maturity, and the predominantly terrigenous character of the Late Cretaceous shales, mostly natural gas was probably generated in both basins. The late Santonian folding and uplift would have disrupted petroleum reservoirs. Also, crude oil accumulations which were not dissipated by tectonism would be relocated at relatively shallow depths and hence become accessible to invading meteoric waters.

  17. Gas Geochemistry of the Dogger Geothermal Aquifer (Paris Basin, France)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C.; Marty, B.; Brach, M.; Wei, H.F.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The low enthalpy program developed in the Paris Basin provides the opportunity for studying the gas geochemistry of the calcareous aquifer of the Dogger. Hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} are mainly biogenic, He displays high concentrations. He, Ar and N{sub 2} have multiple origins (radioactive decay, atmospheric migration, biochemical processes). The distribution of the gases in the zones of the basin varies in relation to the general chemistry, sedimentology and hydrodynamics. The gas geothermometers do not apply to this environment but useful estimations of the redox potential of the fluid can be derived from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratios. H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are involved in corrosion processes and scaling in the pipes. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Evaluation of Cask Drop Criticality Issues at K Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOLDMANN, L.H.

    2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of ability of Multi-canister Overpack (MCO) to withstand drops at K Basin without exceeding the criticality design requirements. Report concludes the MCO will function acceptably. The spent fuel currently residing in the 105 KE and 105 KW storage basins will be placed in fuel storage baskets which will be loaded into the MCO cask assembly. During the basket loading operations the MCO cask assembly will be positioned near the bottom of the south load out pit (SLOP). The loaded MCO cask will be lifted from the SLOP transferred to the transport trailer and delivered to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). In the wet condition there is a potential for criticality problems if significant changes in the designed fuel configurations occur. The purpose of this report is to address structural issues associated with criticality design features for MCO cask drop accidents in the 105 KE and 105 KW facilities.

  19. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  20. INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

  1. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  2. The geochemistry of uranium in the Orca Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Frederick Fewell

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as uranium concentrations dzop to an average of 2. dppm, indicative of relatively low uranium bearing pelagic particle deposition. Furthermore, the 13 C values become heavier in this region, lacking a large terrest. rial component. This evidence suggests... 39 the basin walls. It may be possible that these particles at the brine/seawater interface incorporate any uranium reduced in this zone and carry it to the brine perimeter where it is deposited. Unfortunately, attempts to accurately core...

  3. Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility.

  4. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN By R.M. Flores,1 C.W. Keighin,1 A.M. Ochs,2 P.D. Warwick,1 L.R. Bader,1 and E.C. Murphy3 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 3 North

  5. Energy development and water options in the Yellowstone River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayanan, R.; MacIntyre, D.D.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a mixed-integer programming model, the impacts of institutional constraints on the marginal capacity for energy development in the Yellowstone River Basin and consequent hydrologic changes were examined. Under average annual flow conditions, energy outputs in the Yellowstone Basin can increase roughly nine times by 1985 and 12 to 18 times by 2000. In contrast, water availability is limiting energy development in the Tongue and Powder River Basins in Wyoming. Variability in hydrologic regime causes model solutions to change drastically. If flows decrease to 80 and 60% of average annual levels, the energy production is decreased by 17 and 95%, respectively. If development strategies in the basin are followed on the basis of 80% average annual flows, the Buffalo Bill enlargement (271,300 acre-ft), Tongue River Modification (58,000 acre-ft), and the two reservoirs at Sweetgrass Creek (each 27,000 acre-ft) will be necessary, in addition to several small storage facilities, to best meet the instream flow needs in Montana and to deliver the waters apportioned by compact between Wyoming and Montana. Furthermore, the results indicate that relaxing the instream flow requirements from recommended levels by 10% could increase regional energy output by 19% in 1985 and 35% in 2000. This model illustrates that modifications in institutional restrictions to achieve greater water mobility between users in a given state, as well as flexible practices for transferring water between states, can assist economic growth. Thus, the probability for restricted energy development at this juncture appears to be affected to a greater degree by institutional constraints than by water availability constraints.

  6. K Basins sludge removal temporary sludge storage tank system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mclean, M.A.

    1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipment of sludge from the K Basins to a disposal site is now targeted for August 2000. The current path forward for sludge disposal is shipment to Tank AW-105 in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). Significant issues of the feasibility of this path exist primarily due to criticality concerns and the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) in the sludge at levels that trigger regulation under the Toxic Substance Control Act. Introduction of PCBs into the TWRS processes could potentially involve significant design and operational impacts to both the Spent Nuclear Fuel and TWRS projects if technical and regulatory issues related to PCB treatment cannot be satisfactorily resolved. Concerns of meeting the TWRS acceptance criteria have evolved such that new storage tanks for the K Basins sludge may be the best option for storage prior to vitrification of the sludge. A reconunendation for the final disposition of the sludge is scheduled for June 30, 1997. To support this decision process, this project was developed. This project provides a preconceptual design package including preconceptual designs and cost estimates for the temporary sludge storage tanks. Development of cost estimates for the design and construction of sludge storage systems is required to help evaluate a recommendation for the final disposition of the K Basin sludge.

  7. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

  8. Characterization of the surface properties of Illinois Basin Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demir, I.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research project is to provide fundamental data on the physical and chemical surface properties of Illinois coals, specifically those of the Illinois Basin Coal Sample Program (IBCSP). This will help coal researchers achieve an optimal match between Illinois Basin coals and potential coal cleaning and conversion processes (or at least reduce the number of coals suitable for a particular process) and may lead to improved desulfurization and increased utilization of Illinois Basin coals. The specific tasks scheduled to meet our objective are: (1) Physical Characterization: Determine total surface area, porosity, pore size and volume distributions of IBCSP coals crushed to two particle sizes, {minus}100 and {minus}400 mesh (exclusive of IBC-108 which is available only in {minus}400 mesh form), in both an unoxidized and oxidized state. (2) Chemical Characterization: Determine the surface charge (electrokinetic mobility) as a function of pH by electrophoresis and analyze the surface chemical structure of the above samples using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIS). (3) Multivariate Statistical Analyses: Explore possible relationships among the newly determined surface properties and other available characterization data, including chemical and petrographic compositions, vitrinite reflectance, free swelling index, ash yield, sulfur forms, and other relevant properties.

  9. Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

  10. Diagenesis and reservoir characterization of the Block V-Lamar field, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, C.; Gustavo, F. (INTEVEP, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Block V-Lamar field, located in the central portion of Maracaibo basin, Venezuela, is the subject of this study. The sedimentary section corresponds to a section of the Misoa Formation of early to middle Eocene age. These sediments were deposited in the upper delta plain as stacked distributary channel bars and associated facies and consist of relatively clean sandstones, fine to medium grained, with a sublitharenitic to subarkosic composition. The clay mineral assemblage is mainly composed of kaolinite, followed by chlorite and subordinate amounts of discrete smectite, discrete illite, and mixed-layer illite/smectite with order stratification with 20-30% of expandable layers, all of diagenetic origin. Even though there is a remnant of primary porosity reduced by silica cement, most porosity is secondary as a result of cement, matrix, and unstable grain dissolution. The petrographic XRD and SEM data obtained allow the authors to define the following paragenetic sequences: (1) mechanical compaction; (2) silica cementation; (3) patchy calcite cementation; (4) dissolution of matrix, cements, feldspars, and rock fragments; (5) kaolinite precipitation at or near feldspar intragranular pores; (6) matrix recrystallization to chlorite; (7) precipitation of second generation of kaolinite; and (8) precipitation of smectite. The porosity and permeability distribution in the reservoirs is the result of the net effect of the different diagenetic events that include early diagenesis, medium to late diagenesis, and telodiagenesis, mainly in response to basinwide tectonism.

  11. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Stuart F [Colorado School of Mines; Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Sonnenthal, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  12. Current use of limited-entry hydraulic fracturing in the Codell/Niobrara Formations -- DJ Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhard, M.J.; Schlosser, D.E.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last several years, limited-entry perforating has been used for hydraulically fracturing the Codell and Niobrara formations in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) Basin. Limited-entry perforating reduces stimulation costs with no apparent effect on production. Several papers have presented guidelines for designing a limited-entry treatment. A primary concern for treating multiple intervals is to ensure that both zones receive the necessary treatment. Currently, some operators simply ratio the number of perforations in each interval to the volume of treatment required for each interval. To ensure that both zones are being treated, a minimum pressure drop of 700 to 1,000 psi is usually used for limited-entry design. Changes in the perforation discharge coefficient and diameter during the treatment, combined with changes in the net treating pressure, affect the perforation pressure drop calculation. To determine the actual pressure drop across the perforations, designers use a real-time spreadsheet calculation. This paper reviews limited-entry treatments pumped in 34 wells that verify spreadsheet calculations. Changes in the perforation discharge coefficient and diameter will be presented, as well as the effect of proppant concentration and velocity through the perforation. The current spreadsheet calculation used on location to calculate the pressure drop across the perforations is also discussed.

  13. Production characteristics and economics of the Denver Julesburg basin Codell/Niobrara play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J.D. (Colorado School of Mines (US)); Fields, R.A. Jr. (Colorado Interstate Gas Co. (US))

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active development of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara and Codell reservoirs in the Denver-Julesburg basin has resulted in about 2,000 completions since 1981. A detailed evaluation of the producing characteristics and economics of wells in this 800,000-acre (323 760-ha) play show that high-GOR wells and wells in the top one-third percentile will yield a positive discounted net cash flow with today's cost and prices. Reservoir heterogeneity and varying completion techniques used to date will make it difficult to predict with a high degree of certainty the location of future top one-third wells. Ultimate reserves for an average Codell or Codell/Niobrara well are estimated to be 13,000 STB (2067 stock-tank m/sup 3/) oil and 110 MMscf (3.1 x 10/sup 6/ std m/sup 3/) gas. With drilling and completion costs of /185,000, oil and gas prices will have to rise some 40% above current levels to yield acceptable rates of return. A sensitivity analysis is presented to show how changes in well costs, production profiles, and the other variables will affect net present value (NPV).

  14. Information technology and decision support tools for stakeholder-driven river basin salinity management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T; Cozad, D.B.; Lee, G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative strategies for effective basin-scale salinity management have been developed in the Hunter River Basin of Australia and more recently in the San Joaquin River Basin of California. In both instances web-based stakeholder information dissemination has been a key to achieving a high level of stakeholder involvement and the formulation of effective decision support salinity management tools. A common element to implementation of salinity management strategies in both river basins has been the concept of river assimilative capacity for controlling export salt loading and the potential for trading of the right to discharge salt load to the river - the Hunter River in Australia and the San Joaquin River in California. Both rivers provide basin drainage and the means of exporting salt to the ocean. The paper compares and contrasts the use of monitoring, modeling and information dissemination in the two basins to achieve environmental compliance and sustain irrigated agriculture in an equitable and socially and politically acceptable manner.

  15. A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

  16. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  17. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohd, Shukri [Nondestructive Testing Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys [Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen's Buildings, The Parade, CARDIFF CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  18. Automated detection and location of indications in eddy current signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brudnoy, David M. (Albany, NY); Oppenlander, Jane E. (Burnt Hills, NY); Levy, Arthur J. (Schenectady, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

  19. Oil and gas basins in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pripyat basin is a Late Devonian rift characterized by a typical fault-block structure. Two synrift salt formations separate the Devonian stratigraphic succession into the subsalt, intersalt, and postsalt sections. Oil is produced from carbonate reservoirs of the subsalt and intersalt sections. Traps are controlled by crests of tilted fault blocks. We analyzed 276 shale and carbonate-rock samples and 21 oils to determine oil-source bed relationships in the basin. Maturities of the oils are from very immature, heavy (9[degrees] API), to very mature, light (42[degrees] API). All fields are in a narrow band on the north side of the basin, and only shows of immature, heavy oil have been obtained from the rest of the basin. Three genetic oil types are identified. Oil type A has high pristane/phytane ratios (>1.0), high amounts of C[sub 29] 18[alpha] (H) trisnorneohopane, and [delta]13C of hydrocarbons in the range of -31 to -27%. Oil types B and C contain very high amounts of gammacerane, which suggests that the oils were derived from carbonate-evaporite source facies. Type B oils are isotopically similar to type A, whereas type C oils are isotopically light (about -33%). Organic carbon content is as much as 5%, and kerogen types range from I to IV. Our data indicate that rocks within the intersalt carbonate formation are the source of the type B oils of low maturity. Thermally mature rocks that might be the source for the mature oils have not been found. Such rocks may occur in depressions adjacent to tilted fault blocks. Higher levels of thermal maturity on the north part of the basin in the vicinity of the most mature oils may be related to higher heat flow during and soon after rifting or to a suspected recently formed magmatic body in the crust below the northern zone. Present-day high temperatures in parts of the northern zone may support the latter alternative.

  20. Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the location of all projects created with funding from the Smart Grid Demonstration and Energy Storage Project, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act....