National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for leventis theo covary

  1. Theos J. Thompson, 1964 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Theos J. Thompson, 1964 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony...

  2. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  3. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  4. Progress on Nuclear Data Covariances: AFCI-1.2 Covariance Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblozinsky,P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Pigni,M.T.; Talou,P.; Hale,G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G

    2009-09-28

    Improved neutron cross section covariances were produced for 110 materials including 12 light nuclei (coolants and moderators), 78 structural materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Improved covariances were organized into AFCI-1.2 covariance library in 33-energy groups, from 10{sup -5} eV to 19.6 MeV. BNL contributed improved covariance data for the following materials: {sup 23}Na and {sup 55}Mn where more detailed evaluation was done; improvements in major structural materials {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Ni; improved estimates for remaining structural materials and fission products; improved covariances for 14 minor actinides, and estimates of mubar covariances for {sup 23}Na and {sup 56}Fe. LANL contributed improved covariance data for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu including prompt neutron fission spectra and completely new evaluation for {sup 240}Pu. New R-matrix evaluation for {sup 16}O including mubar covariances is under completion. BNL assembled the library and performed basic testing using improved procedures including inspection of uncertainty and correlation plots for each material. The AFCI-1.2 library was released to ANL and INL in August 2009.

  5. Low-Fidelity Covariances: Neutron Cross Section Covariance Estimates for 387 Materials

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Low-fidelity Covariance Project (Low-Fi) was funded in FY07-08 by DOEÆs Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The project was a collaboration among ANL, BNL, LANL, and ORNL. The motivation for the Low-Fi project stemmed from an imbalance in supply and demand of covariance data. The interest in, and demand for, covariance data has been in a continual uptrend over the past few years. Requirements to understand application-dependent uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest have led to the development of sensitivity / uncertainty and data adjustment software such as TSUNAMI [1] at Oak Ridge. To take full advantage of the capabilities of TSUNAMI requires general availability of covariance data. However, the supply of covariance data has not been able to keep up with the demand. This fact is highlighted by the observation that the recent release of the much-heralded ENDF/B-VII.0 included covariance data for only 26 of the 393 neutron evaluations (which is, in fact, considerably less covariance data than was included in the final ENDF/B-VI release).[Copied from R.C. Little et al., "Low-Fidelity Covariance Project", Nuclear Data Sheets 109 (2008) 2828-2833] The Low-Fi covariance data are now available at the National Nuclear Data Center. They are separate from ENDF/B-VII.0 and the NNDC warns that this information is not approved by CSEWG. NNDC describes the contents of this collection as: "Covariance data are provided for radiative capture (or (n,ch.p.) for light nuclei), elastic scattering (or total for some actinides), inelastic scattering, (n,2n) reactions, fission and nubars over the energy range from 10(-5{super}) eV to 20 MeV. The library contains 387 files including almost all (383 out of 393) materials of the ENDF/B-VII.0. Absent are data for (7{super})Li, (232{super})Th, (233,235,238{super})U and (239{super})Pu as well as (223,224,225,226{super})Ra, while (nat{super})Zn is replaced by (64,66,67,68,70{super})Zn

  6. Conformal killing tensors and covariant Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cariglia, M.; Gibbons, G. W.; Holten, J.-W. van; Horvathy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2014-12-15

    A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order 1 and 2 in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant G(t), motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the Hénon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six.

  7. Covariant functional diffusion equation for Polyakov's bosonic string

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botelho, L. C. L.

    1989-07-15

    I write a covariant functional diffusion equation for Polyakov's bosonic string with the string's world-sheet area playing the role of proper time.

  8. Development of covariance capabilities in EMPIRE code (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The model-based covariances can be obtained using deterministic (Kalman) or stochastic (Monte Carlo) propagation of model parameter uncertainties. We show that these two procedures ...

  9. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in themore » $$\\Omega_m$$-$$\\sigma_8$$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $$\\gtrsim 85\\%$$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $$\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $$\\sim 90\\%$$ of the true uncertainty.« less

  10. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in the $\\Omega_m$-$\\sigma_8$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $\\gtrsim 85\\%$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $\\sim 90\\%$ of the true uncertainty.

  11. Development of covariance capabilities in EMPIRE code (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended to provide evaluation capabilities for neutron cross section covariances in the thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance ...

  12. Covariant Spectator Theory: Foundations and Applications A Mini-Review of the Covariant Spectator Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Stadler, Franz Gross

    2010-10-01

    We provide a short overview of the Covariant Spectator Theory and its applications. The basic ideas are introduced through the example of a {phi}{sup 4}-type theory. High-precision models of the two-nucleon interaction are presented and the results of their use in calculations of properties of the two- and three-nucleon systems are discussed. A short summary of applications of this framework to other few-body systems is also presented.

  13. Progress of Covariance Evaluation at the China Nuclear Data Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, R.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, T.; Ge, Z.; Lu, H.; Sun, Z.; Yu, B.; Tang, G.

    2015-01-15

    Covariance evaluations at the China Nuclear Data Center focus on the cross sections of structural materials and actinides in the fast neutron energy range. In addition to the well-known Least-squares approach, a method based on the analysis of the sources of experimental uncertainties is especially introduced to generate a covariance matrix for a particular reaction for which multiple measurements are available. The scheme of the covariance evaluation flow is presented, and an example of n+{sup 90}Zr is given to illuminate the whole procedure. It is proven that the accuracy of measurements can be properly incorporated into the covariance and the long-standing small uncertainty problem can be avoided.

  14. Are the invariance principles really truly Lorentz covariant?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1994-02-01

    It is shown that some sections of the invariance (or symmetry) principles such as the space reversal symmetry (or parity P) and time reversal symmetry T (of elementary particle and condensed matter physics, etc.) are not really truly Lorentz covariant. Indeed, I find that the Dirac-Wigner sense of Lorentz invariance is not in full compliance with the Einstein-Minkowski reguirements of the Lorentz covariance of all physical laws (i.e., the world space Mach principle).

  15. Low-Fidelity Covariances: Neutron Cross Section Covariance Estimates for 387 Materials

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    "Covariance data are provided for radiative capture (or (n,ch.p.) for light nuclei), elastic scattering (or total for some actinides), inelastic scattering, (n,2n) reactions, fission and nubars over the energy range from 10(-5{super}) eV to 20 MeV. The library contains 387 files including almost all (383 out of 393) materials of the ENDF/B-VII.0. Absent are data for (7{super})Li, (232{super})Th, (233,235,238{super})U and (239{super})Pu as well as (223,224,225,226{super})Ra, while (nat{super})Zn is replaced by (64,66,67,68,70{super})Zn."[http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/lowfi/index.jsp?z=7

  16. Judith Kimling1, Theo Gerhardt1, ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... < > C for 30 min, and exposed with a scanning electron microscope at 10kV. After development, ... imaged by transmission soft x-ray microscopy at the XM-1 full field microscope at ...

  17. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  18. Covariance matrices for use in criticality safety predictability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1997-09-01

    Criticality predictability applications require as input the best available information on fissile and other nuclides. In recent years important work has been performed in the analysis of neutron transmission and cross-section data for fissile nuclei in the resonance region by using the computer code SAMMY. The code uses Bayes method (a form of generalized least squares) for sequential analyses of several sets of experimental data. Values for Reich-Moore resonance parameters, their covariances, and the derivatives with respect to the adjusted parameters (data sensitivities) are obtained. In general, the parameter file contains several thousand values and the dimension of the covariance matrices is correspondingly large. These matrices are not reported in the current evaluated data files due to their large dimensions and to the inadequacy of the file formats. The present work has two goals: the first is to calculate the covariances of group-averaged cross sections from the covariance files generated by SAMMY, because these can be more readily utilized in criticality predictability calculations. The second goal is to propose a more practical interface between SAMMY and the evaluated files. Examples are given for {sup 235}U in the popular 199- and 238-group structures, using the latest ORNL evaluation of the {sup 235}U resonance parameters.

  19. JENDL Actinoid File 2008 and Plan of Covariance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwamoto, O. Nakagawa, T.; Otuka, N.; Chiba, S.; Okumura, K.; Chiba, G.

    2008-12-15

    JENDL Actinoid File 2008 (JENDL/AC-2008), which is one of JENDL special purpose files, was released in March 2008. It provides nuclear data for neutron induced nuclear reactions for actinoid nuclides from Ac (Z=89) to Fm (Z=100). The data for 62 nuclides in JENDL-3.3 were revised and newly evaluated data were added for 17 nuclides that have a half-life longer than 1 day. The energy range of incident neutrons is from 10{sup -5} eV to 20 MeV. The nuclear reaction model code CCONE was widely used for the evaluation of cross sections and energy-angular distributions of secondary neutrons in the fast energy region. Covariance data for the fission and capture cross sections and the number of neutrons per fission will be evaluated for important nuclides in JENDL/AC-2008. The evaluation methods and the preliminary results of estimated covariances are presented.

  20. Covariance Applications in Criticality Safety, Light Water Reactor Analysis, and Spent Fuel Characterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, M. L.; Wiarda, D.; Ilas, G.; Marshall, W. J.; Rearden, B. T.

    2014-06-15

    Recently, we processed a new covariance data library based on ENDF/B-VII.1 for the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. The multigroup covariance data are discussed here, along with testing and application results for critical benchmark experiments. Moreover, the cross section covariance library, along with covariances for fission product yields and decay data, is used to compute uncertainties in the decay heat produced by a burned reactor fuel assembly.

  1. Bilinear covariants and spinor fields duality in quantum Clifford algebras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ab?amowicz, Rafa?; Gonalves, Icaro; Rocha, Roldo da

    2014-10-15

    Classification of quantum spinor fields according to quantum bilinear covariants is introduced in a context of quantum Clifford algebras on Minkowski spacetime. Once the bilinear covariants are expressed in terms of algebraic spinor fields, the duality between spinor and quantum spinor fields can be discussed. Thus, by endowing the underlying spacetime with an arbitrary bilinear form with an antisymmetric part in addition to a symmetric spacetime metric, quantum algebraic spinor fields and deformed bilinear covariants can be constructed. They are thus compared to the classical (non quantum) ones. Classes of quantum spinor fields classes are introduced and compared with Lounesto's spinor field classification. A physical interpretation of the deformed parts and the underlying Z-grading is proposed. The existence of an arbitrary bilinear form endowing the spacetime already has been explored in the literature in the context of quantum gravity [S. W. Hawking, The unpredictability of quantum gravity, Commun. Math. Phys. 87, 395 (1982)]. Here, it is shown further to play a prominent role in the structure of Dirac, Weyl, and Majorana spinor fields, besides the most general flagpoles and flag-dipoles. We introduce a new duality between the standard and the quantum spinor fields, by showing that when Clifford algebras over vector spaces endowed with an arbitrary bilinear form are taken into account, a mixture among the classes does occur. Consequently, novel features regarding the spinor fields can be derived.

  2. A class of group covariant signal sets and its necessary and sufficient condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usuda, Tsuyoshi Sasaki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Shiromoto, Keisuke

    2014-12-04

    (G,χ-hat)-covariant quantum state signals, which is a generalization of the narrow sense group covariant signals, are defined. Then a necessary and sufficient condition for (G,χ-hat)-covariant signals is given and examples of the signals are shown.

  3. Role of Experiment Covariance in Cross Section Adjustments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giuseppe Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2014-06-01

    This paper is dedicated to the memory of R. D. McKnight, which gave a seminal contribution in establishing methodology and rigorous approach in the evaluation of the covariance of reactor physics integral experiments. His original assessment of the ZPPR experiment uncertainties and correlations has made nuclear data adjustments, based on these experiments, much more robust and reliable. In the present paper it has been shown with some numerical examples the actual impact on an adjustment of accounting for or neglecting such correlations.

  4. Adaptive error covariances estimation methods for ensemble Kalman filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen, Yicun; Harlim, John

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a computationally fast algorithm for estimating, both, the system and observation noise covariances of nonlinear dynamics, that can be used in an ensemble Kalman filtering framework. The new method is a modification of Belanger's recursive method, to avoid an expensive computational cost in inverting error covariance matrices of product of innovation processes of different lags when the number of observations becomes large. When we use only product of innovation processes up to one-lag, the computational cost is indeed comparable to a recently proposed method by Berry–Sauer's. However, our method is more flexible since it allows for using information from product of innovation processes of more than one-lag. Extensive numerical comparisons between the proposed method and both the original Belanger's and Berry–Sauer's schemes are shown in various examples, ranging from low-dimensional linear and nonlinear systems of SDEs and 40-dimensional stochastically forced Lorenz-96 model. Our numerical results suggest that the proposed scheme is as accurate as the original Belanger's scheme on low-dimensional problems and has a wider range of more accurate estimates compared to Berry–Sauer's method on L-96 example.

  5. Neutrinoless double-beta decay in covariant density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, P.; Yao, J. M.; Song, L. S.; Hagino, K.; Meng, J.

    2015-10-15

    We use covariant density functional theory beyond mean field in order to describe neutrinoless double-beta decay in a fully relativistic way. The dynamic effects of particle-number and angular-momentum conservations as well as shape fluctuations of quadrupole character are taken into account within the generator coordinate method for both initial and final nuclei. The calculations are based on the full relativistic transition operator. The nuclear matrix elements (NME’s) for a large number of possible transitions are investigated. The results are compared with various non-relativistic calculations, in particular also with the density functional theory based on the Gogny force. We find that the non-relativistic approximation is justified and that the total NME’s can be well approximated by the pure axial-vector coupling term. This corresponds to a considerable reduction of the computational effort.

  6. Covariance of Neutron Cross Sections for {sup 16}O through R-matrix Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.; Paris, M.; Hale, G.M.; Shibata, K.; Fukahori, T.

    2015-01-15

    Through the R-matrix analysis, neutron cross sections as well as the covariance are estimated for {sup 16}O in the resolved resonance range. Although we consider the current results are still preliminary, we present the summary of the cross section analysis and the results of data uncertainty/covariance, including those for the differential cross sections. It is found that the values obtained highlight consequences of nature in the theory as well as knowledge from measurements, which gives a realistic quantification of evaluated nuclear data covariances.

  7. Extremal covariant positive operator valued measures: The case of a compact symmetry group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Pellonpaeae, Juha-Pekka; Toigo, Alessandro

    2008-06-15

    Given a unitary representation U of a compact group G and a transitive G-space {omega}, we characterize the extremal elements of the convex set of all U-covariant positive operator valued measures.

  8. PUFF-III: A Code for Processing ENDF Uncertainty Data Into Multigroup Covariance Matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M.E.

    2000-06-01

    PUFF-III is an extension of the previous PUFF-II code that was developed in the 1970s and early 1980s. The PUFF codes process the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) covariance data and generate multigroup covariance matrices on a user-specified energy grid structure. Unlike its predecessor, PUFF-III can process the new ENDF/B-VI data formats. In particular, PUFF-III has the capability to process the spontaneous fission covariances for fission neutron multiplicity. With regard to the covariance data in File 33 of the ENDF system, PUFF-III has the capability to process short-range variance formats, as well as the lumped reaction covariance data formats that were introduced in ENDF/B-V. In addition to the new ENDF formats, a new directory feature is now available that allows the user to obtain a detailed directory of the uncertainty information in the data files without visually inspecting the ENDF data. Following the correlation matrix calculation, PUFF-III also evaluates the eigenvalues of each correlation matrix and tests each matrix for positive definiteness. Additional new features are discussed in the manual. PUFF-III has been developed for implementation in the AMPX code system, and several modifications were incorporated to improve memory allocation tasks and input/output operations. Consequently, the resulting code has a structure that is similar to other modules in the AMPX code system. With the release of PUFF-III, a new and improved covariance processing code is available to process ENDF covariance formats through Version VI.

  9. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  10. PRACTICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES IN THE RESONANCE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y.S.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.

    2010-04-30

    Recent evaluations of neutron cross section covariances in the resolved resonance region reveal the need for further research in this area. Major issues include declining uncertainties in multigroup representations and proper treatment of scattering radius uncertainty. To address these issues, the present work introduces a practical method based on kernel approximation using resonance parameter uncertainties from the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Analytical expressions derived for average cross sections in broader energy bins along with their sensitivities provide transparent tool for determining cross section uncertainties. The role of resonance-resonance and bin-bin correlations is specifically studied. As an example we apply this approach to estimate (n,{gamma}) and (n,el) covariances for the structural material {sup 55}Mn.

  11. Covariant Methods for Calculating Differential Cross Sections and Polarization Characteristics of Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikach, S.M.

    2005-06-01

    A covariant method for calculating reaction amplitudes in the diagonal spin basis is presented. In this basis, amplitudes represent the spin kinematics of the interacting particles in the simplest and most adequate manner. A matrix is obtained such that differential cross sections for polarized particles and amplitude combinations that are required to calculate various polarization characteristics of reactions can be expressed in an arbitrary basis in terms of the amplitudes calculated in one basis.

  12. Exploitation of Geometric Occlusion and Covariance Spectroscopy in a Gamma Sensor Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul; Trainham, Clifford

    2013-09-01

    The National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory has recently used an array of six small-footprint (1-inch diameter by 3-inch long) cylindrical crystals of thallium-doped sodium iodide scintillators to obtain angular information from discrete gamma ray–emitting point sources. Obtaining angular information in a near-field measurement for a field-deployed gamma sensor is a requirement for radiological emergency work. Three of the sensors sit at the vertices of a 2-inch isosceles triangle, while the other three sit on the circumference of a 3-inch-radius circle centered in this triangle. This configuration exploits occlusion of sensors, correlation from Compton scattering within a detector array, and covariance spectroscopy, a spectral coincidence technique. Careful placement and orientation of individual detectors with reference to other detectors in an array can provide improved angular resolution for determining the source position by occlusion mechanism. By evaluating the values of, and the uncertainties in, the photopeak areas, efficiencies, branching ratio, peak area correction factors, and the correlations between these quantities, one can determine the precise activity of a particular radioisotope from a mixture of radioisotopes that have overlapping photopeaks that are ordinarily hard to deconvolve. The spectral coincidence technique, often known as covariance spectroscopy, examines the correlations and fluctuations in data that contain valuable information about radiation sources, transport media, and detection systems. Covariance spectroscopy enhances radionuclide identification techniques, provides directional information, and makes weaker gamma-ray emission—normally undetectable by common spectroscopic analysis—detectable. A series of experimental results using the concept of covariance spectroscopy are presented.

  13. Resilience to decoherence of the macroscopic quantum superpositions generated by universally covariant optimal quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spagnolo, Nicolo; Sciarrino, Fabio; De Martini, Francesco

    2010-09-15

    We show that the quantum states generated by universal optimal quantum cloning of a single photon represent a universal set of quantum superpositions resilient to decoherence. We adopt the Bures distance as a tool to investigate the persistence of quantum coherence of these quantum states. According to this analysis, the process of universal cloning realizes a class of quantum superpositions that exhibits a covariance property in lossy configuration over the complete set of polarization states in the Bloch sphere.

  14. 0v{beta}{beta} decay: theoretical nuclear matrix elements and their covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisi, Eligio [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2009-11-09

    Within the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), the covariances associated to the nuclear matrix elements (NME) of neutrinoless double beta decay (0v{beta}{beta}) are estimated. It is shown that correlated NME uncertainties play an important role in the comparison of 0v{beta}{beta} decay rates for different nuclei, both in the standard case of light Majorana neutrino exchange, and in nonstandard physics cases.

  15. Pairwise covariance adds little to secondary structure prediction but improves the prediction of non-canonical local structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bystroff, Christopher; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2009-05-06

    Amino acid sequence probability distributions, or profiles, have been used successfully to predict secondary structure and local structure in proteins. Profile models assume the statistical independence of each position in the sequence, but the energetics of protein folding is better captured in a scoring function that is based on pairwise interactions, like a force field. I-sites motifs are short sequence/structure motifs that populate the protein structure database due to energy-driven convergent evolution. Here we show that a pairwise covariant sequence model does not predict alpha helix or beta strand significantly better overall than a profile-based model, but it does improve the prediction of certain loop motifs. The finding is best explained by considering secondary structure profiles as multivariant, all-or-none models, which subsume covariant models. Pairwise covariance is nonetheless present and energetically rational. Examples of negative design are present, where the covariances disfavor non-native structures. Measured pairwise covariances are shown to be statistically robust in cross-validation tests, as long as the amino acid alphabet is reduced to nine classes. We present an updated I-sites local structure motif library and web server that provide sequence covariance information for all types of local structure in globular proteins.

  16. Covariant spectator theory for the electromagnetic three-nucleon form factors: Complete impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergio Alexandre Pinto, Alfred Stadler, Franz Gross

    2009-05-01

    We present the first calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of 3He and 3H within the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). This first exploratory study concentrates on the sensitivity of the form factors to the strength of the scalar meson-nucleon off-shell coupling, known from previous studies to have a strong influence on the three-body binding energy. Results presented here were obtained using the complete impulse approximation (CIA), which includes contributions of relativistic origin that appear as two-body corrections in a non-relativistic framework, such as #28;Z-graphs#29;, but omits other two and three-body currents. We compare our results to non-relativistic calculations augmented by relativistic corrections of O(v/c)2.

  17. Chiral symmetry and π-π scattering in the Covariant Spectator Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Peña, M. T.; Ribeiro, J. E.; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2014-11-14

    The π-π scattering amplitude calculated with a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) is shown to satisfy the Adler zero constraint imposed by chiral symmetry. The CST formalism is established in Minkowski space and our calculations are performed in momentum space. We prove that the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied by our model. Then we show that, similarly to what happens within the Bethe-Salpeter formalism, application of the axial-vector Ward Takahashi identity to the CST π-π scattering amplitude allows us to sum the intermediate quark-quark interactions to all orders. Thus, the Adlermore » self-consistency zero for π-π scattering in the chiral limit emerges as the result for this sum.« less

  18. Covariant spectator theory for the electromagnetic three-nucleon form factors: Complete impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, Sérgio Alexandre; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2009-05-01

    We present the first calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of 3He and 3H within the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). This first exploratory study concentrates on the sensitivity of the form factors to the strength of the scalar meson-nucleon off-shell coupling, known from previous studies to have a strong influence on the three-body binding energy. Results presented here were obtained using the complete impulse approximation (CIA), which includes contributions of relativistic origin that appear as two-body corrections in a non-relativistic framework, such as "Z-graphs," but omits other two and three-body currents. Finally, we compare our results to non-relativistic calculations augmented by relativistic corrections of O(v/c)2.

  19. Covariant spectator theory for the electromagnetic three-nucleon form factors: Complete impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, Sergio Alexandre; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2009-05-15

    We present the first calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H within the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). This first exploratory study concentrates on the sensitivity of the form factors to the strength of the scalar meson-nucleon off-shell coupling, known from previous studies to have a strong influence on the three-body binding energy. Results presented here were obtained using the complete impulse approximation (CIA), which includes contributions of relativistic origin that appear as two-body corrections in a nonrelativistic framework, such as 'Z-graphs', but omits other two and three-body currents. We compare our results to nonrelativistic calculations augmented by relativistic corrections of O(v/c){sup 2}.

  20. Covariant spectator theory for the electromagnetic three-nucleon form factors: Complete impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre Pinto, SÂ ergio; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2009-01-01

    We present the first calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of 3He and 3H within the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). This first exploratory study concentrates on the sensitivity of the form factors to the strength of the scalar meson-nucleon off-shell coupling, known from previous studies to have a strong influence on the three-body binding energy. Results presented here were obtained using the complete impulse approximation (CIA), which includes contributions of relativistic origin that appear as two-body corrections in a non-relativistic framework, such as ?Z-graphs?, but omits other two and three-body currents. We compare our results to non-relativistic calculations augmented by relativistic corrections of O(v/c)2.

  1. Computation of Large Covariance Matrices by SAMMY on Graphical Processing Units and Multicore CPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbanas, Goran [ORNL; Dunn, Michael E [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Computational power of Graphical Processing Units and multicore CPUs was harnessed by the nuclear data evaluation code SAMMY to speed up computations of large Resonance Parameter Covariance Matrices (RPCMs). This was accomplished by linking SAMMY to vendor-optimized implementations of the matrix-matrix multiplication subroutine of the Basic Linear Algebra Library to compute the most time-consuming step. The U-235 RPCM computed previously using a triple-nested loop was re-computed using the NVIDIA implementation of the subroutine on a single Tesla Fermi Graphical Processing Unit, and also using the Intel's Math Kernel Library implementation on two different multicore CPU systems. A multiplication of two matrices of dimensions 16,000 x 20,000 that had previously taken days, took approximately one minute on the GPU. Similar performance was achieved on a dual six-core CPU system. The magnitude of the speed-up suggests that these, or similar, combinations of hardware and libraries may be useful for large matrix operations in SAMMY. Uniform interfaces of standard linear algebra libraries make them a promising candidate for a programming framework of a new generation of SAMMY for the emerging heterogeneous computing platforms.

  2. Topological charges in SL(2,R) covariant massive 11-dimensional and type IIB supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callister, Andrew K.; Smith, Douglas J.

    2009-12-15

    In this paper we construct closed expressions that correspond to the topological charges of the various 1/2-BPS states of the maximal 10- and 11-dimensional supergravity theories. These expressions are related to the structure of the supersymmetry algebras in curved spacetimes. We mainly focus on IIB supergravity and 11-dimensional supergravity in a double M9-brane background, with an emphasis on the SL(2,R) multiplet structure of the charges and how these map between theories. This includes the charges corresponding to the multiplets of 7- and 9-branes in IIB. We find that examining the possible multiplet structures of the charges provides another tool for exploring the spectrum of BPS states that appear in these theories. As a prerequisite to constructing the charges we determine the field equations and multiplet structure of the 11-dimensional gauge potentials, extending previous results on the subject. The massive gauge transformations of the fields are also discussed. We also demonstrate how these massive gauge transformations are compatible with the construction of an SL(2,R) covariant kinetic term in the 11-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole worldvolume action.

  3. Deriving Daytime Variables From the AmeriFlux Standard Eddy Covariance Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Ingen, Catharine; Agarwal, Deborah A.; Humphrey, Marty; Li, Jie

    2008-12-06

    A gap-filled, quality assessed eddy covariance dataset has recently become available for the AmeriFluxnetwork. This dataset uses standard processing and produces commonly used science variables. This shared dataset enables robust comparisons across different analyses. Of course, there are many remaining questions. One of those is how to define 'during the day' which is an important concept for many analyses. Some studies have used local time for example 9am to 5pm; others have used thresholds on photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). A related question is how to derive quantities such as the Bowen ratio. Most studies compute the ratio of the averages of the latent heat (LE) and sensible heat (H). In this study, we use different methods of defining 'during the day' for GPP, LE, and H. We evaluate the differences between methods in two ways. First, we look at a number of statistics of GPP. Second, we look at differences in the derived Bowen ratio. Our goal is not science per se, but rather informatics in support of the science.

  4. General variational principle for spherically symmetric perturbations in diffeomorphism covariant theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seifert, Michael D.; Wald, Robert M.

    2007-04-15

    We present a general method for the analysis of the stability of static, spherically symmetric solutions to spherically symmetric perturbations in an arbitrary diffeomorphism covariant Lagrangian field theory. Our method involves fixing the gauge and solving the linearized gravitational field equations to eliminate the metric perturbation variables in terms of the matter variables. In a wide class of cases--which include f(R) gravity, the Einstein-aether theory of Jacobson and Mattingly, and Bekenstein's TeVeS theory--the remaining perturbation equations for the matter fields are second order in time. We show how the symplectic current arising from the original Lagrangian gives rise to a symmetric bilinear form on the variables of the reduced theory. If this bilinear form is positive definite, it provides an inner product that puts the equations of motion of the reduced theory into a self-adjoint form. A variational principle can then be written down immediately, from which stability can be tested readily. We illustrate our method in the case of Einstein's equation with perfect fluid matter, thereby rederiving, in a systematic manner, Chandrasekhar's variational principle for radial oscillations of spherically symmetric stars. In a subsequent paper, we will apply our analysis to f(R) gravity, the Einstein-aether theory, and Bekenstein's TeVeS theory.

  5. A-Priori and A-Posteriori Covariance Data in Nuclear Cross Section Adjustments: Issues and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Salvatores, Massimo; Aliberti, G.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide useful feedback to evaluators a set of criteria are established for assessing the robustness and reliability of the cross section adjustments that make use of integral experiment information. Criteria are also provided for accepting the “a posteriori” cross sections, both as new “nominal” values and as “trends”. Some indications of the use of the “a posteriori” covariance matrix are indicated, even though more investigation is needed to settle this complex subject.

  6. A-priori and A-posteriori Covariance Data in Nuclear Cross Section Adjustments: Issues and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.

    2015-01-15

    In order to provide useful feedback to evaluators a set of criteria are established for assessing the robustness and reliability of the cross section adjustments that make use of integral experiment information. Criteria are also provided for accepting the “a posteriori” cross sections, both as new “nominal” values and as “trends”. Some indications of the use of the “a posteriori” covariance matrix are indicated, even though more investigation is needed to settle this complex subject.

  7. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  8. Use and Impact of Covariance Data in the Japanese Latest Adjusted Library ADJ2010 Based on JENDL-4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoyama, K. Ishikawa, M.

    2015-01-15

    The current status of covariance applications to fast reactor analysis and design in Japan is summarized. In Japan, the covariance data are mainly used for three purposes: (1) to quantify the uncertainty of nuclear core parameters, (2) to identify important nuclides, reactions and energy ranges which are dominant to the uncertainty of core parameters, and (3) to improve the accuracy of core design values by adopting the integral data such as the critical experiments and the power reactor operation data. For the last purpose, the cross section adjustment based on the Bayesian theorem is used. After the release of JENDL-4.0, a development project of the new adjusted group-constant set ADJ2010 was started in 2010 and completed in 2013. In the present paper, the final results of ADJ2010 are briefly summarized. In addition, the adjustment results of ADJ2010 are discussed from the viewpoint of use and impact of nuclear data covariances, focusing on {sup 239}Pu capture cross section alterations. For this purpose three kind of indices, called “degree of mobility,” “adjustment motive force,” and “adjustment potential,” are proposed.

  9. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  10. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ? Z ? 104 and 144 ? N ? 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, oddeven and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  11. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using themore » EDF modelling.« less

  12. Charge-conjugation symmetric complete impulse approximation for the pion electromagnetic form factor in the covariant spectator theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Gross, Franz; Peña, M. T.; Stadler, Alfred

    2015-10-26

    The pion form factor is calculated in the framework of the charge-conjugation invariant covariant spectator theory. This formalism is established in Minkowski space, and the calculation is set up in momentum space. In a previous calculation we included only the leading pole coming from the spectator quark (referred to as the relativistic impulse approximation). In this study we also include the contributions from the poles of the quark which interacts with the photon and average over all poles in both the upper and lower half-planes in order to preserve charge conjugation invariance (referred to as the C-symmetric complete impulse approximation).more » We find that for small pion mass these contributions are significant at all values of the four-momentum transfer Q2 but, surprisingly, do not alter the shape obtained from the spectator poles alone.« less

  13. Charge-conjugation symmetric complete impulse approximation for the pion electromagnetic form factor in the covariant spectator theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Gross, Franz; Peña, M. T.; Stadler, Alfred

    2015-10-26

    The pion form factor is calculated in the framework of the charge-conjugation invariant covariant spectator theory. This formalism is established in Minkowski space, and the calculation is set up in momentum space. In a previous calculation we included only the leading pole coming from the spectator quark (referred to as the relativistic impulse approximation). In this study we also include the contributions from the poles of the quark which interacts with the photon and average over all poles in both the upper and lower half-planes in order to preserve charge conjugation invariance (referred to as the C-symmetric complete impulse approximation). We find that for small pion mass these contributions are significant at all values of the four-momentum transfer Q2 but, surprisingly, do not alter the shape obtained from the spectator poles alone.

  14. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 418 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 185 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions at higher energies for isotopes of F, Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new Decay Data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide

  15. Black holes, compact objects and solar system tests in non-relativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwald, Jared; Satheeshkumar, V.H.; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: VHSatheeshkumar@baylor.edu

    2010-12-01

    We study spherically symmetric static spacetimes generally filled with an anisotropic fluid in the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity. In particular, we find that the vacuum solutions are not unique, and can be expressed in terms of the U(1) gauge field A. When solar system tests are considered, severe constraints on A are obtained, which seemingly pick up the Schwarzschild solution uniquely. In contrast to other versions of the Horava-Lifshitz theory, non-singular static stars made of a perfect fluid without heat flow can be constructed, due to the coupling of the fluid with the gauge field. These include the solutions with a constant pressure. We also study the general junction conditions across the surface of a star. In general, the conditions allow the existence of a thin matter shell on the surface. When applying these conditions to the perfect fluid solutions with the vacuum ones as describing their external spacetimes, we find explicitly the matching conditions in terms of the parameters appearing in the solutions. Such matching is possible even without the presence of a thin matter shell.

  16. Spherically symmetric solutions, Newton's Law, and the infrared limit {lambda}{yields}1 in covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre, Jean; Pasipoularides, Pavlos

    2011-10-15

    In this note we examine whether spherically symmetric solutions in covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity can reproduce Newton's Law in the IR limit {lambda}{yields}1. We adopt the position that the auxiliary field A is independent of the space-time metric [J. Alexandre and P. Pasipoularides, Phys. Rev. D 83, 084030 (2011).][J. Greenwald, V. H. Satheeshkumar, and A. Wang, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 12 (2010) 007.], and we assume, as in [A. M. da Silva, Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 055011 (2011).], that {lambda} is a running coupling constant. We show that under these assumptions, spherically symmetric solutions fail to restore the standard Newtonian physics in the IR limit {lambda}{yields}1, unless {lambda} does not run, and has the fixed value {lambda}=1. Finally, we comment on the Horava and Melby-Thompson approach [P. Horava and C. M. Melby-Thompson, Phys. Rev. D 82, 064027 (2010).] in which A is assumed as a part of the space-time metric in the IR.

  17. Observed and modeled patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the structure of the trade-wind layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nuijens, Louise; Medeiros, Brian; Sandu, Irina; Ahlgrimm, Maike

    2015-11-06

    We present patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the trade-wind boundary layer structure using long-term measurements at a site representative of dynamical regimes with moderate subsidence or weak ascent. We compare these with ECMWF’s Integrated Forecast System and 10 CMIP5 models. By using single-time step output at a single location, we find that models can produce a fairly realistic trade-wind layer structure in long-term means, but with unrealistic variability at shorter-time scales. The unrealistic variability in modeled cloudiness near the lifting condensation level (LCL) is due to stronger than observed relationships with mixed-layer relative humidity (RH) and temperature stratificationmore » at the mixed-layer top. Those relationships are weak in observations, or even of opposite sign, which can be explained by a negative feedback of convection on cloudiness. Cloudiness near cumulus tops at the tradewind inversion instead varies more pronouncedly in observations on monthly time scales, whereby larger cloudiness relates to larger surface winds and stronger trade-wind inversions. However, these parameters appear to be a prerequisite, rather than strong controlling factors on cloudiness, because they do not explain submonthly variations in cloudiness. Models underestimate the strength of these relationships and diverge in particular in their responses to large-scale vertical motion. No model stands out by reproducing the observed behavior in all respects. As a result, these findings suggest that climate models do not realistically represent the physical processes that underlie the coupling between trade-wind clouds and their environments in present-day climate, which is relevant for how we interpret modeled cloud feedbacks.« less

  18. Observed and modeled patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the structure of the trade-wind layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuijens, Louise; Medeiros, Brian; Sandu, Irina; Ahlgrimm, Maike

    2015-11-06

    We present patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the trade-wind boundary layer structure using long-term measurements at a site representative of dynamical regimes with moderate subsidence or weak ascent. We compare these with ECMWF’s Integrated Forecast System and 10 CMIP5 models. By using single-time step output at a single location, we find that models can produce a fairly realistic trade-wind layer structure in long-term means, but with unrealistic variability at shorter-time scales. The unrealistic variability in modeled cloudiness near the lifting condensation level (LCL) is due to stronger than observed relationships with mixed-layer relative humidity (RH) and temperature stratification at the mixed-layer top. Those relationships are weak in observations, or even of opposite sign, which can be explained by a negative feedback of convection on cloudiness. Cloudiness near cumulus tops at the tradewind inversion instead varies more pronouncedly in observations on monthly time scales, whereby larger cloudiness relates to larger surface winds and stronger trade-wind inversions. However, these parameters appear to be a prerequisite, rather than strong controlling factors on cloudiness, because they do not explain submonthly variations in cloudiness. Models underestimate the strength of these relationships and diverge in particular in their responses to large-scale vertical motion. No model stands out by reproducing the observed behavior in all respects. As a result, these findings suggest that climate models do not realistically represent the physical processes that underlie the coupling between trade-wind clouds and their environments in present-day climate, which is relevant for how we interpret modeled cloud feedbacks.

  19. Spatial and temporal variations in plant water-use efficiency inferred from tree-ring, eddy covariance and atmospheric observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dekker, Stefan C.; Groenendijk, Margriet; Booth, Ben B. B.; Huntingford, Chris; Cox, Peter M.

    2016-06-28

    Plant water-use efficiency (WUE), which is the ratio of the uptake of carbon dioxide through photosynthesis to the loss of water through transpiration, is a very useful metric of the functioning of the land biosphere. WUE is expected to increase with atmospheric CO2, but to decline with increasing atmospheric evaporative demand – which can arise from increases in near-surface temperature or decreases in relative humidity. We have used Δ13C measurements from tree rings, along with eddy covariance measurements from Fluxnet sites, to estimate the sensitivities of WUE to changes in CO2 and atmospheric humidity deficit. This enables us to reconstructmore » fractional changes in WUE, based on changes in atmospheric climate and CO2, for the entire period of the instrumental global climate record. We estimate that overall WUE increased from 1900 to 2010 by 48 ± 22 %, which is more than double that simulated by the latest Earth System Models. This long-term trend is largely driven by increases in CO2, but significant inter-annual variability and regional differences are evident due to variations in temperature and relative humidity. Here, there are several highly populated regions, such as western Europe and East Asia, where the rate of increase of WUE has declined sharply in the last 2 decades. Our data-based analysis indicates increases in WUE that typically exceed those simulated by Earth System Models – implying that these models are either underestimating increases in photosynthesis or underestimating reductions in transpiration.« less

  20. “Full Model” Nuclear Data and Covariance Evaluation Process Using TALYS, Total Monte Carlo and Backward-forward Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauge, E.

    2015-01-15

    The “Full model” evaluation process, that is used in CEA DAM DIF to evaluate nuclear data in the continuum region, makes extended use of nuclear models implemented in the TALYS code to account for experimental data (both differential and integral) by varying the parameters of these models until a satisfactory description of these experimental data is reached. For the evaluation of the covariance data associated with this evaluated data, the Backward-forward Monte Carlo (BFMC) method was devised in such a way that it mirrors the process of the “Full model” evaluation method. When coupled with the Total Monte Carlo method via the T6 system developed by NRG Petten, the BFMC method allows to make use of integral experiments to constrain the distribution of model parameters, and hence the distribution of derived observables and their covariance matrix. Together, TALYS, TMC, BFMC, and T6, constitute a powerful integrated tool for nuclear data evaluation, that allows for evaluation of nuclear data and the associated covariance matrix, all at once, making good use of all the available experimental information to drive the distribution of the model parameters and the derived observables.

  1. Chiral symmetry and π-π scattering in the Covariant Spectator Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Peña, M. T.; Ribeiro, J. E.; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2014-11-14

    The π-π scattering amplitude calculated with a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) is shown to satisfy the Adler zero constraint imposed by chiral symmetry. The CST formalism is established in Minkowski space and our calculations are performed in momentum space. We prove that the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied by our model. Then we show that, similarly to what happens within the Bethe-Salpeter formalism, application of the axial-vector Ward Takahashi identity to the CST π-π scattering amplitude allows us to sum the intermediate quark-quark interactions to all orders. Thus, the Adler self-consistency zero for π-π scattering in the chiral limit emerges as the result for this sum.

  2. Observation of multiple ionization pathways for OCS in an intense laser field resolved by three-dimensional covariance mapping and visualized by hierarchical ionization topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, W. A.; Newell, W. R.; Sanderson, J. H.; Langley, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    The two- and three-body Coulomb explosion of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) by 790 nm, 50 fs laser pulses focused to {approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2} has been investigated by the three-dimensional covariance mapping technique. In a triatomic molecule, a single charge state, in this case the trication, has been observed to dissociate into two distinct energy channels. With the aid of a three-dimensional visualization technique to reveal the ionization hierarchy, evidence is presented for the existence of two sets of ionization pathways resulting from these two initial states. While one group of ions can be modeled using a classical enhanced ionization model, the second group, consisting of mainly asymmetric channels, cannot. The results provide clear evidence that an enhanced ionization approach must also be accompanied by an appreciation of the effects of excited ionic states and multielectronic processes.

  3. Covariance mapping of two-photon double core hole states in C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 6 produced by an x-ray free electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mucke, M; Zhaunerchyk, V; Frasinski, L J; Squibb, R J; Siano, M; Eland, J H D; Linusson, P; Salén, P; Meulen, P v d; Thomas, R D; et al

    2015-07-01

    Few-photon ionization and relaxation processes in acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) were investigated at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at SLAC, Stanford using a highly efficient multi-particle correlation spectroscopy technique based on a magnetic bottle. The analysis method of covariance mapping has been applied and enhanced, allowing us to identify electron pairs associated with double core hole (DCH) production and competing multiple ionization processes including Auger decay sequences. The experimental technique and the analysis procedure are discussed in the light of earlier investigations of DCH studies carried out at the same FEL and at thirdmore » generation synchrotron radiation sources. In particular, we demonstrate the capability of the covariance mapping technique to disentangle the formation of molecular DCH states which is barely feasible with conventional electron spectroscopy methods.« less

  4. Covariance mapping of two-photon double core hole states in C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 6 produced by an x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mucke, M; Zhaunerchyk, V; Frasinski, L J; Squibb, R J; Siano, M; Eland, J H D; Linusson, P; Salén, P; Meulen, P v d; Thomas, R D; Larsson, M; Foucar, L; Ullrich, J; Motomura, K; Mondal, S; Ueda, K; Osipov, T; Fang, L; Murphy, B F; Berrah, N; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Schorb, S; Messerschmidt, M; Glownia, J M; Cryan, J P; Coffee, R N; Takahashi, O; Wada, S; Piancastelli, M N; Richter, R; Prince, K C; Feifel, R

    2015-07-01

    Few-photon ionization and relaxation processes in acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) were investigated at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at SLAC, Stanford using a highly efficient multi-particle correlation spectroscopy technique based on a magnetic bottle. The analysis method of covariance mapping has been applied and enhanced, allowing us to identify electron pairs associated with double core hole (DCH) production and competing multiple ionization processes including Auger decay sequences. The experimental technique and the analysis procedure are discussed in the light of earlier investigations of DCH studies carried out at the same FEL and at third generation synchrotron radiation sources. In particular, we demonstrate the capability of the covariance mapping technique to disentangle the formation of molecular DCH states which is barely feasible with conventional electron spectroscopy methods.

  5. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  6. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, andmore » provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  7. Six-week time series of eddy covariance CO2 flux at Mammoth Mountain, California: performance evaluation and role of meteorological forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, Jennifer; Lewicki, J.L.; Fischer, M.L.; Hilley, G.E.

    2007-10-15

    CO{sub 2} and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO{sub 2} emission rates. EC CO{sub 2} fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (mean = 1346 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}). Using footprint modeling, EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were compared to CO{sub 2} fluxes measured by the chamber method on a grid repeatedly over a 10-day period. Half-hour EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were moderately correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.42) with chamber fluxes, whereas average-daily EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were well correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.70) with chamber measurements. Average daily EC CO{sub 2} fluxes were correlated with both average daily wind speed and atmospheric pressure; relationships were similar to those observed between chamber CO{sub 2} fluxes and the atmospheric parameters over a comparable time period. Energy balance closure was assessed by statistical regression of EC energy fluxes (sensible and latent heat) against available energy (net radiation, less soil heat flux). While incomplete (R{sup 2} = 0.77 for 1:1 line), the degree of energy balance closure fell within the range observed in many investigations conducted in contrasting ecosystems and climates. Results indicate that despite complexities presented by the HLTK, EC can be reliably used to monitor background variations in volcanic CO{sub 2} fluxes associated with meteorological forcing, and presumably changes related to deeply derived processes such as volcanic activity.

  8. Evaluation of the ²³⁹Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³⁹Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted valuesmore » and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,γ) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.« less

  9. Evaluation of the ²³⁹Pu prompt fission neutron spectrum induced by neutrons of 500 keV and associated covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neudecker, D.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Smith, D. L.; Capote, R.; Rising, M. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2015-08-01

    We present evaluations of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) of ²³⁹Pu induced by 500 keV neutrons, and associated covariances. In a previous evaluation by Talou et al. 2010, surprisingly low evaluated uncertainties were obtained, partly due to simplifying assumptions in the quantification of uncertainties from experiment and model. Therefore, special emphasis is placed here on a thorough uncertainty quantification of experimental data and of the Los Alamos model predicted values entering the evaluation. In addition, the Los Alamos model was extended and an evaluation technique was employed that takes into account the qualitative differences between normalized model predicted values and experimental shape data. These improvements lead to changes in the evaluated PFNS and overall larger evaluated uncertainties than in the previous work. However, these evaluated uncertainties are still smaller than those obtained in a statistical analysis using experimental information only, due to strong model correlations. Hence, suggestions to estimate model defect uncertainties are presented, which lead to more reasonable evaluated uncertainties. The calculated keff of selected criticality benchmarks obtained with these new evaluations agree with each other within their uncertainties despite the different approaches to estimate model defect uncertainties. The keff one standard deviations overlap with some of those obtained using ENDF/B-VII.1, albeit their mean values are further away from unity. Spectral indexes for the Jezebel critical assembly calculated with the newly evaluated PFNS agree with the experimental data for selected (n,γ) and (n,f) reactions, and show improvements for high-energy threshold (n,2n) reactions compared to ENDF/B-VII.1.

  10. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-31

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation variesmore » with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5–16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4–14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3–21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4–19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor–capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was

  11. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  12. COVARIANT STATISTICAL TREATMENT OF ANTIPROTON ANNIHILATION (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1963-06-16 OSTI Identifier: 4627450 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nuovo Cimento (Italy) Divided into Nuovo Cimento A and Nuovo ...

  13. The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVII : Effects of Ocean Covariates and Release Timing on First Ocean-Year Survival of Fall Chinook Salmon from Oregon and Washington Coastal Hatcheries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

    2001-05-01

    Effects of oceanographic conditions, as well as effects of release-timing and release-size, on first ocean-year survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon were investigated by analyzing CWT release and recovery data from Oregon and Washington coastal hatcheries. Age-class strength was estimated using a multinomial probability likelihood which estimated first-year survival as a proportional hazards regression against ocean and release covariates. Weight-at-release and release-month were found to significantly effect first year survival (p < 0.05) and ocean effects were therefore estimated after adjusting for weight-at-release. Negative survival trend was modeled for sea surface temperature (SST) during 11 months of the year over the study period (1970-1992). Statistically significant negative survival trends (p < 0.05) were found for SST during April, June, November and December. Strong pairwise correlations (r > 0.6) between SST in April/June, April/November and April/December suggest the significant relationships were due to one underlying process. At higher latitudes (45{sup o} and 48{sup o}N), summer upwelling (June-August) showed positive survival trend with survival and fall (September-November) downwelling showed positive trend with survival, indicating early fall transition improved survival. At 45{sup o} and 48{sup o}, during spring, alternating survival trends with upwelling were observed between March and May, with negative trend occurring in March and May, and positive trend with survival occurring in April. In January, two distinct scenarios of improved survival were linked to upwelling conditions, indicated by (1) a significant linear model effect (p < 0.05) showing improved survival with increasing upwelling, and (2) significant bowl-shaped curvature (p < 0.05) of survival with upwelling. The interpretation of the effects is that there was (1) significantly improved survival when downwelling conditions shifted to upwelling conditions in January (i

  14. Magnetic and antimagnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, P. W.; Liang, H. Z.; Peng, J.; Ring, P.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.

    2012-10-20

    Progress on microscopic and self-consistent description of the magnetic rotation and antimagnetic rotation phenomena in tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field theory based on a point-coupling interaction are briefly reviewed. In particular, the microscopic pictures of the shears mechanism in {sup 60}Ni and the two shears-like mechanism in {sup 105}Cd are discussed.

  15. Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Deuteron quadrupole moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, Franz

    2015-01-26

    The deuteron quadrupole moment is calculated using two CST model wave functions obtained from the 2007 high precision fits to np scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar np interaction currents automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. The prediction for model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, is 2.5% smaller that the experiential result, in common with the inability of models prior to 2014 to predict this important quantity. However, model WJC-2, with very small P-state components, gives agreement to better than 1%, similar to the results obtained recently from XEFT predictions to order N3LO.

  16. Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Deuteron quadrupole moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gross, Franz

    2015-01-26

    The deuteron quadrupole moment is calculated using two CST model wave functions obtained from the 2007 high precision fits to np scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar np interaction currents automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. The prediction for model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, is 2.5% smaller that the experiential result, in common with the inability of models prior to 2014 to predict this important quantity. However, model WJC-2, with very small P-state components, gives agreement to better than 1%, similar to the results obtained recently frommore » XEFT predictions to order N3LO.« less

  17. Parameters Covariance in Neutron Time of Flight Analysis Explicit Formulae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odyniec, M.; Blair, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present here a method that estimates the parameters variance in a parametric model for neutron time of flight (NToF). The analytical formulae for parameter variances, obtained independently of calculation of parameter values from measured data, express the variances in terms of the choice, settings, and placement of the detector and the oscilloscope. Consequently, the method can serve as a tool in planning a measurement setup.

  18. Spectral characteristics of background error covariance and multiscale data assimilation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Zhijin; Cheng, Xiaoping; Gustafson, Jr., William I.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.

    2016-05-17

    The steady increase of the spatial resolutions of numerical atmospheric and oceanic circulation models has occurred over the past decades. Horizontal grid spacing down to the order of 1 km is now often used to resolve cloud systems in the atmosphere and sub-mesoscale circulation systems in the ocean. These fine resolution models encompass a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, across which dynamical and statistical properties vary. In particular, dynamic flow systems at small scales can be spatially localized and temporarily intermittent. Difficulties of current data assimilation algorithms for such fine resolution models are numerically and theoretically examined. Ourmore » analysis shows that the background error correlation length scale is larger than 75 km for streamfunctions and is larger than 25 km for water vapor mixing ratios, even for a 2-km resolution model. A theoretical analysis suggests that such correlation length scales prevent the currently used data assimilation schemes from constraining spatial scales smaller than 150 km for streamfunctions and 50 km for water vapor mixing ratios. Moreover, our results highlight the need to fundamentally modify currently used data assimilation algorithms for assimilating high-resolution observations into the aforementioned fine resolution models. Lastly, within the framework of four-dimensional variational data assimilation, a multiscale methodology based on scale decomposition is suggested and challenges are discussed.« less

  19. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Morrison, Adele K.; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2015-12-10

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, ‘Agulhas leakage’, forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870–2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. Lastly, this is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic.

  20. Spectral Characteristics of Background Error Covariance and Multiscale Data Assimilation: Background Error Covariance and Multiscale Data Assimilation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Zhijin; Cheng, Xiaoping; Gustafson, William I.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.

    2016-05-17

    The steady increase of the spatial resolutions of numerical atmospheric and oceanic circulation models has occurred over the past decades. Horizontal grid spacing down to the order of 1 km is now often used to resolve cloud systems in the atmosphere and sub-mesoscale circulation systems in the ocean. These fine resolution models encompass a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, across which dynamical and statistical properties vary. In particular, dynamic flow systems at small scales can be spatially localized and temporarily intermittent. Difficulties of current data assimilation algorithms for such fine resolution models are numerically and theoretically examined. Ourmore » analysis shows that the background error correlation length scale is larger than 75 km for streamfunctions and is larger than 25 km for water vapor mixing ratios, even for a 2-km resolution model. A theoretical analysis suggests that such correlation length scales prevent the currently used data assimilation schemes from constraining spatial scales smaller than 150 km for streamfunctions and 50 km for water vapor mixing ratios. Moreover, our results highlight the need to fundamentally modify currently used data assimilation algorithms for assimilating high-resolution observations into the aforementioned fine resolution models. Within the framework of four-dimensional variational data assimilation, a multiscale methodology based on scale decomposition is suggested and challenges are discussed.« less

  1. Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance CO2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    high, spatially heterogeneous CO2 emission rates. EC CO2 fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m- 2 d- 1 (mean 1346 g m- 2 d- 1). Using footprint modeling, EC CO2 fluxes were...

  2. Covariant density functional theory with two-phonon coupling in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, P.; Litvinova, E.; Tselyaev, V.

    2012-10-20

    A full description of excited states within the framework of density functional theory requires energy dependent self energies. We present a new class of many-body models. It allows a parameter free description of the fragmentation of nuclear states induced by mode coupling of two-quasiparticle and two-phonon configurations. The method is applied for an investigation of low-lying dipole excitations in Sn isotopes with large neutron excess.

  3. Constraints on Covariant Horava-Lifshitz Gravity from frame-dragging experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radicella, Ninfa; Lambiase, Gaetano; Parisi, Luca; Vilasi, Gaetano E-mail: lambiase@sa.infn.it E-mail: vilasi@sa.infn.it

    2014-12-01

    The effects of Horava-Lifshitz corrections to the gravito-magnetic field are analyzed. Solutions in the weak field, slow motion limit, referring to the motion of a satellite around the Earth are considered. The post-newtonian paradigm is used to evaluate constraints on the Horava-Lifshitz parameter space from current satellite and terrestrial experiments data. In particular, we focus on GRAVITY PROBE B, LAGEOS and the more recent LARES mission, as well as a forthcoming terrestrial project, GINGER.

  4. Covariant energymomentum and an uncertainty principle for general relativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooperstock, F.I.; Dupre, M.J.

    2013-12-15

    We introduce a naturally-defined totally invariant spacetime energy expression for general relativity incorporating the contribution from gravity. The extension links seamlessly to the action integral for the gravitational field. The demand that the general expression for arbitrary systems reduces to the Tolman integral in the case of stationary bounded distributions, leads to the matter-localized Ricci integral for energymomentum in support of the energy localization hypothesis. The role of the observer is addressed and as an extension of the special relativistic case, the field of observers comoving with the matter is seen to compute the intrinsic global energy of a system. The new localized energy supports the Bonnor claim that the Szekeres collapsing dust solutions are energy-conserving. It is suggested that in the extreme of strong gravity, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle be generalized in terms of spacetime energymomentum. -- Highlights: We present a totally invariant spacetime energy expression for general relativity incorporating the contribution from gravity. Demand for the general expression to reduce to the Tolman integral for stationary systems supports the Ricci integral as energymomentum. Localized energy via the Ricci integral is consistent with the energy localization hypothesis. New localized energy supports the Bonnor claim that the Szekeres collapsing dust solutions are energy-conserving. Suggest the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle be generalized in terms of spacetime energymomentum in strong gravity extreme.

  5. Eddy-Covariance and auxiliary measurements, NGEE-Barrow, 2012-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, Margaret; Billesbach, Dave; Raz-Yaseef, Naama

    2014-03-24

    The EC tower is operated as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment-Arctic (NGEE) at Barrow, Alaska. The tower is collecting flux data from the beginning of the thaw season, early June, and until conditions are completely frozen, early November. The tower is equipped with a Gill R3-50 Sonic Anemometer, LI-7700 (CH4) sensor, a LI-7500A (CO2/H2O) sensor, and radiation sensors (Kipp and Zonen CNR-4 (four component radiometer), two LiCor LI-190 quantum sensors (PAR upwelling and downwelling), and a down-looking Apogee SI-111 infrared radiometer (surface temperature)). The sensors are remotely controlled, and communication with the tower allows us to retrieve information in real time.

  6. Covariant Spectator Theory of np scattering: Deuteron magnetic moment and form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, Franz L.

    2014-06-01

    The deuteron magnetic moment is calculated using two model wave functions obtained from 2007 high precision fits to $np$ scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar $np$ interaction currents which are automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. After normalizing the wave functions, nearly identical predictions are obtained: model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, gives 0.863(2), while model WJC-2 with very small $P$-state components gives 0.864(2) These are about 1\\% larger than the measured value of the moment, 0.857 n.m., giving a new prediction for the size of the $\\rho\\pi\\gamma$ exchange, and other purely transverse interaction currents that are largely unconstrained by the nuclear dynamics. The physical significance of these results is discussed, and general formulae for the deuteron form factors, expressed in terms of deuteron wave functions and a new class of interaction current wave functions, are given.

  7. Evaluated Mean Values and Covariances for the Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum of 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neudecker, Denise

    2014-07-10

    This document provides the numerical values of the evaluated prompt fission neutron spectrum for 239Pu induced by neutrons of 500 keV as well as relative uncertainties and correlations. This document also contains a short description how these data were obtained and shows plots comparing the evaluated results to experimental information as well as the corresponding ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.

  8. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    536 Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Mini-Split Air Conditioners Omar Abdelaziz Som Shrestha Jeffrey Munk Randall Linkous William Goetzler Matthew Guernsey Theo Kassuga October 2015 Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via US Department of Energy (DOE) SciTech Connect. Website http://www.osti.gov/scitech/

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Spin Structure Functions in a Covariant Spectator Quark Model G. Ramalho, Franz Gross and M. T. Pea We apply the covariant spectator quark-diquark model, already probed in the ...

  10. Particle Energy Spectrum, Revisited from a Counting Statistics Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, D., Marks, D. G., Guss, P. P.

    2012-07-16

    This document is a slide show type presentation of a new covariance estimation for gamma spectra and neutron cross section.

  11. Study of B̄→Xulν̄ decays in BB̄ events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; et al

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10⁶ Υ(4S)→BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ΔB in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCDmore » predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ΔB=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10⁻³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp±0.15theo)×10⁻³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B⁻ decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ decays.« less

  12. Study of B̄→Xulν̄ decays in BB̄ events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Tackmann, K.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10⁶ Υ(4S)→BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ΔB in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCD predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ΔB=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10⁻³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp±0.15theo)×10⁻³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B⁻ decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ decays.

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... covariances (5) comparative evaluations (4) accuracy (3) computer codes (3) mathematical methods and computing (3) performance (3) risk assessment (3) accidents (2) benchmarks ...

  14. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MODELS; PARTICLE MODELS; POSTULATED PARTICLES",,"The effective field theory of massive gravity has long been formulated in a generally covariant way N. Arkani-Hamed, H. Georgi,...

  15. Unitarity check in gravitational Higgs mechanism Berezhiani,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MODELS; PARTICLE MODELS; POSTULATED PARTICLES The effective field theory of massive gravity has long been formulated in a generally covariant way N. Arkani-Hamed, H. Georgi,...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and the atmosphere is of scientific importance and also relevant to climate-policy making. Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of ecosystem-level...

  17. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... no evidence for new effects coming from quark and gluon degrees of freedom at short ... Using a covariant spectator constituent quark model we predict an electric quadrupole ...

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accurate estimation of landscape-averaged ecosystem-atmosphere exchange hence suggests the ... Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) and heat fluxes ...

  19. OpWise: Operons aid the identification of differentially expressedgene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; GENES; PATTERN RECOGNITION; BACTERIA; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; DATA COVARIANCES; O ...

  20. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sensitivities of the variational objective analysis to background data, error covariance matrix and constraint variables are described and used to quantify the uncertainties in the ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, ... error covariance matrix and constraint variables are described and used to quantify the ...

  2. Combination of Evidence in Dempster-Shafer Theory (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This is a potentially valuable tool for the evaluation of risk and reliability in ... DATA COVARIANCES; PROBABILITY; RISK ASSESSMENT; RELIABILITY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS Word ...

  3. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a northwesterly direction. ...

  4. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurements of leaf biochemistry and physiology, biomass inventory, tree allometry, ... cycle; eddy-covariance analysis; plant physiology; carbon sequestration; drought; water ...

  5. Slides presented by workshop participants at the International...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Workshop on Nuclear Data Covariances Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Slides presented by workshop participants at the International Workshop on Nuclear Data ...

  6. CC Kaon Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CC Kaon Data Release Page Measurement of Charged Current muon neutrino production of K+ Phys. Rev. D 94, 012002 and hep-ex/1604.03920 Data Ancillary data files for this result are available on arXiv at http://arxiv.org/src/1604.03920/anc Among the available data files are: Cross Sections with Uncertainties Flux Covariance Matrix Covariance Matrix of flux uncertainties Covariance Matrix of uncertainties OTHER than those coming from the flux Contact Information For information on use of this

  7. Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter; Kalhori, Aram

    2015-12-01

    In order to advance the understanding of the patterns and controls on the carbon budget in the Arctic region, San Diego State University has maintained eddy covariance flux towers at three sites in Arctic Alaska, starting in 1997.

  8. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MODELS PARTICLE MODELS POSTULATED PARTICLES The effective field theory of massive gravity has long been formulated in a generally covariant way N Arkani Hamed H Georgi and M D...

  9. The MicroBooNE Technical Design Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The TPB-PS coating with 50% TPB mass ... it has advantages in terms of cost, durability, and ease of production in the lab. ... Its estimation of track parameter covariance ...

  10. Electric quadrupole and magnetic octupole moments of the Delta

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramalho, G.; Pena, M. T.; Gross, Franz L.

    2009-07-01

    Using a covariant spectator constituent quark model we predict an electric quadrupole moment -0.042 efm2 and a magnetic octupole moment -0.0035 efm3 for the Delta+ excited state of the nucleon.

  11. Recent joint developments in cross-section uncertainty analysis at Los Alamos and EIR (Eidgenoessiches Institut fuer Reaktorforschung)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.W.; Dudziak, D.J.; Muir, D.W.; Stepanek, J.; Higgs, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses recent developments and future plans for the SENSIBL code (the successor to the SENSIT(6) and SENSIT-2D(7) codes), along with associated covariance data and cross section libraries. 34 refs. (DWL)

  12. Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing in the DES Science Verification Data (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Covariances from jackknife subsamples of the data are validated with a suite of 50 mock surveys. The results and systematics checks in this work provide a critical input for future ...

  13. Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-09-17

    System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

  14. Electric quadrupole and magnetic octupole moments of the Δ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramalho, G.; Peña, M. T.; Gross, Franz

    2009-07-01

    Using a covariant spectator constituent quark model we predict an electric quadrupole moment -0.042 efm2 and a magnetic octupole moment -0.0035 efm3 for the Delta+ excited state of the nucleon.

  15. Structure functions and intrinsic quark orbital motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavada, Petr

    2007-06-13

    Covariant version of the quark model is studied. It is shown how the polarized and unpolarized structure functions depend on the quark intrinsic motion. The important role of the quark orbital momentum, by which the intrinsic motion is generated, appears as a direct consequence of the covariant description. At the same time, the procedure for obtaining 3D quark momentum distribution from the structure functions is suggested.

  16. abst.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Covariant density functional theory: nuclei at the extremes of nuclear landscape Anatoli Afanasjev Mississippi State University Density functional theory is one of few theoretical approaches which allows to describe the nuclei across full nuclear landscape. I will base my talk on the results obtained in covariant density functional theory (CDFT) which is a modern theoretical tool for the description of low-energy nuclear phenomena. In its framework the nucleus is described as a system of

  17. Statistics for characterizing data on the periphery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Hush, Donald R

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a class of statistics for characterizing the periphery of a distribution, and show that these statistics are particularly valuable for problems in target detection. Because so many detection algorithms are rooted in Gaussian statistics, we concentrate on ellipsoidal models of high-dimensional data distributions (that is to say: covariance matrices), but we recommend several alternatives to the sample covariance matrix that more efficiently model the periphery of a distribution, and can more effectively detect anomalous data samples.

  18. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-27

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ was measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass $M_{\\mathrm{Z}}$ is determined to be $\\alpha_S(M_{\\mathrm{Z}}) = 0.1185 \\pm 0.0019\\,(\\mathrm{exp})\\,^{+0.0060}_{-0.0037}\\,(\\mathrm{theo})$, which is in agreement with the world average.

  19. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD atmorenext-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).less

  20. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-27

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ was measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2$~\\mathrm{TeV}$ in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantummorechromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass $M_{\\mathrm{Z}}$ is determined to be $\\alpha_S(M_{\\mathrm{Z}}) = 0.1185 \\pm 0.0019\\,(\\mathrm{exp})\\,^{+0.0060}_{-0.0037}\\,(\\mathrm{theo})$, which is in agreement with the world average.less

  1. Measurement of the B0(s) - anti-B0(s) Oscillation Frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-06-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s}. They use 1 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The sample contains signals of 3600 fully reconstructed hadronic B{sub s} decays and 37,000 partially reconstructed semileptonic B{sub s} decays. They measure the probability as a function of proper decay time that the B{sub s} decays with the same, or opposite, flavor as the flavor at production and they find a signal consistent with B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations. The probability that random fluctuations could produce a comparable signal is 0.2%. Under the hypothesis that the signal is due to B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, they measure {Delta}m{sub s} = 17.31{sub -0.18}{sup +0.33}(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.) ps{sup -1} and determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| = 0.208{sub -0.002}{sup +0.001}(exp.){sub -0.006}{sup +0.008}(theo.).

  2. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).

  3. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include ??, ZZ, WW, ??, bb, and ?? pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? at 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. From the high-resolution ?? and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02\\,+0.26-0.27(stat)+0.14-0.15(syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtained in the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 0.09 (stat), +0.08 -0.07 (theo) 0.07 (syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. No significant deviations are found.

  4. Observation of the diphoton decay of the Higgs boson and measurement of its properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, A. M.

    2014-10-15

    Observation of the diphoton decay mode of the recently discovered Higgs boson and measurement of some of its properties are reported. The analysis uses the entire dataset collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions during the 2011 and 2012 LHC running periods. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.1fb-1 at √s=7 TeV and 19.7fb-1 at 8TeV. A clear signal is observed in the diphoton channel at a mass close to 125GeV with a local significance of 5.7σ, where a significance of 5.2σ is expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The mass is measured to be 124.70 ± 0.34 GeV = 124.70 ± 0.31(stat) ± 0.15(syst) GeV, and the best-fit signal strength relative to the standard model prediction is 1.14+0.26–0.23 = 1.14 ± 0.21(stat) +0.09–0.05(syst) +0.13–0.09(theo). Thus, additional measurements include the signal strength modifiers associated with different production mechanisms, and hypothesis tests between spin-0 and spin-2 models.

  5. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7$$ $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamicsmore » at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.« less

  6. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.

  7. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, bb, and μμ pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1fb-1 at 7TeV and up to 19.7fb-1 at 8TeV. From the high-resolution γγ and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02+0.26–0.27 (stat) +0.14–0.15 (syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtained in themore » different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 ± 0.09(stat)+0.08–0.07 (theo) ± 0.07(syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. As a result, no significant deviations are found.« less

  8. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leadingmore » order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).« less

  9. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).

  10. Observation of the diphoton decay of the Higgs boson and measurement of its properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, A. M.

    2014-10-15

    Observation of the diphoton decay mode of the recently discovered Higgs boson and measurement of some of its properties are reported. The analysis uses the entire dataset collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton collisions during the 2011 and 2012 LHC running periods. The data samples correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.1fb-1 at √s=7 TeV and 19.7fb-1 at 8TeV. A clear signal is observed in the diphoton channel at a mass close to 125GeV with a local significance of 5.7σ, where a significance of 5.2σ is expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The mass is measured to be 124.70more » ± 0.34 GeV = 124.70 ± 0.31(stat) ± 0.15(syst) GeV, and the best-fit signal strength relative to the standard model prediction is 1.14+0.26–0.23 = 1.14 ± 0.21(stat) +0.09–0.05(syst) +0.13–0.09(theo). Thus, additional measurements include the signal strength modifiers associated with different production mechanisms, and hypothesis tests between spin-0 and spin-2 models.« less

  11. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include ??, ZZ, WW, ??, bb, and ?? pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? at 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. From the high-resolution ?? and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02\\,+0.26-0.27(stat)+0.14-0.15(syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtainedmorein the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 0.09 (stat), +0.08 -0.07 (theo) 0.07 (syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. No significant deviations are found.less

  12. An Evaluation of Parametric and Nonparametric Models of Fish Population Response.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Timothy C.; Peterson, James T.; Lee, Danny C.

    1999-11-01

    Predicting the distribution or status of animal populations at large scales often requires the use of broad-scale information describing landforms, climate, vegetation, etc. These data, however, often consist of mixtures of continuous and categorical covariates and nonmultiplicative interactions among covariates, complicating statistical analyses. Using data from the interior Columbia River Basin, USA, we compared four methods for predicting the distribution of seven salmonid taxa using landscape information. Subwatersheds (mean size, 7800 ha) were characterized using a set of 12 covariates describing physiography, vegetation, and current land-use. The techniques included generalized logit modeling, classification trees, a nearest neighbor technique, and a modular neural network. We evaluated model performance using out-of-sample prediction accuracy via leave-one-out cross-validation and introduce a computer-intensive Monte Carlo hypothesis testing approach for examining the statistical significance of landscape covariates with the non-parametric methods. We found the modular neural network and the nearest-neighbor techniques to be the most accurate, but were difficult to summarize in ways that provided ecological insight. The modular neural network also required the most extensive computer resources for model fitting and hypothesis testing. The generalized logit models were readily interpretable, but were the least accurate, possibly due to nonlinear relationships and nonmultiplicative interactions among covariates. Substantial overlap among the statistically significant (P<0.05) covariates for each method suggested that each is capable of detecting similar relationships between responses and covariates. Consequently, we believe that employing one or more methods may provide greater biological insight without sacrificing prediction accuracy.

  13. On the Bayesian Treed Multivariate Gaussian Process with Linear Model of Coregionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konomi, Bledar A.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Lin, Guang

    2015-02-01

    The Bayesian treed Gaussian process (BTGP) has gained popularity in recent years because it provides a straightforward mechanism for modeling non-stationary data and can alleviate computational demands by fitting models to less data. The extension of BTGP to the multivariate setting requires us to model the cross-covariance and to propose efficient algorithms that can deal with trans-dimensional MCMC moves. In this paper we extend the cross-covariance of the Bayesian treed multivariate Gaussian process (BTMGP) to that of linear model of Coregionalization (LMC) cross-covariances. Different strategies have been developed to improve the MCMC mixing and invert smaller matrices in the Bayesian inference. Moreover, we compare the proposed BTMGP with existing multiple BTGP and BTMGP in test cases and multiphase flow computer experiment in a full scale regenerator of a carbon capture unit. The use of the BTMGP with LMC cross-covariance helped to predict the computer experiments relatively better than existing competitors. The proposed model has a wide variety of applications, such as computer experiments and environmental data. In the case of computer experiments we also develop an adaptive sampling strategy for the BTMGP with LMC cross-covariance function.

  14. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ - 8 TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60-120 GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 +/- 8 (exp) +/- 25 (theo) +/- 30 (lumi) pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section $d\\sigma/dm$ in the dilepton mass range 15 to 2000moreGeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section $d^2 \\sigma / d(m) d(abs(y))$ is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500 GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. The measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.less

  15. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Mittag, G.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Strologas, J.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Branca, A.; Dall’Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. 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R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Smith, G.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, The CMS

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.

  16. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; et al

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the fullmore » phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.« less

  17. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and limits on anomalous gauge couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-14

    A measurement of the W boson pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √ s = 8 TeV is presented. The data we collected with the CMS detector at the LHC correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb-1 . The W+W- candidates are selected from events with two charged leptons, electrons or muons, and large missing transverse energy. The measured W+W- cross section is 60.1 ± 0.9 (stat) ± 3.2 (exp) ± 3.1 (theo) ± 1.6 (lumi) pb = 60.1 ± 4.8 pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. The W+W-cross sections are also measured in two different fiducial phase space regions. The normalized differential cross section is measured as a function of kinematic variables of the final-state charged leptons and compared with several perturbative QCD predictions. Limits on anomalous gauge couplings associated with dimension-six operators are also given in the framework of an effective field theory. Finally, the corresponding 95% confidence level intervals are -5.7 < cWWW2 < 5.9 TeV-2 , -11.4 < cW2 < 5.4 TeV-2 , -29.2 < cB2 < 23.9 TeV-2 , in the HISZ basis.

  18. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $$\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$= 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) =more » 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.« less

  19. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the |Vtb| CKM matrix element in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2014-06-01

    Measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb? recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop $ \\left(\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}\\right) $ , in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is ?t-ch. = 83.6 2.3 (stat.) 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and $ \\overline{\\mathrm{t}} $ cross sections are measured to be ?t-ch.(t) = 53.8 1.5 (stat.) 4.4 (syst.) pb and ?$_{t-ch.}$ $ \\left(\\overline{t}\\right) $ = 27.6 1.3 (stat.) 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is Rt-ch. = ?t-ch.(t)/?t-ch. $ \\left(\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}\\right) $ = 1.95 0.10 (stat.) 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. The modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vtb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at ?s = 7 TeV, a value |Vtb| = 0.998 0.038 (exp.) 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.

  20. ACORNS: Analysis of Correlations Used in Neutron Spectrometry

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1988-05-01

    The program ACORNS performs the complete analysis of the input covariance and/or relative covariance and/or correlation matrices, first of all used in the activation neutron spectrometry. These matrices have to be positive definite. To check the fulfillment of this requirement, the program calculates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of those. If all the eigenvalues are positive, the program optionally performs the factor analysis. The user's input can be either made manually, or the cross section librariesmore » generated by the code X333.« less

  1. Selecta from a Life-Long Obsession with Path Integrals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klauder, John R.

    2008-06-18

    The definition and interpretation of canonical, phase space path integrals has evolved over many years to achieve a form that now admits a correct and rigorous formulation, which is also covariant under canonical coordinate transformations. Such formulations involve coherent state representations, which, in their modern version, were originally introduced as an alternative tool to construct phase space path integrals. Moreover, coherent state representations lead to physical interpretations that are more natural than those afforded by more traditional representations. Suitable continuous time regularization procedures lead to a covariant phase space path integral formulation that greatly clarifies the vague phrase that canonical quantization requires Cartesian coordinates.

  2. The many meanings of gross photosynthesis and their implication for photosynthesis research from leaf to globe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Gu, Lianhong

    2015-06-25

    different meanings by different communities. We review the history of this term and associated concepts to clarify the terminology and make recommendations about a consistent use of terms in accordance with photosynthetic theory. We show that a widely used eddy covariance CO2 flux partitioning approach yields estimates which are quantitatively closer to the definition of true photosynthesis despite aiming at estimating apparent photosynthesis.

  3. A comparison of spatial averaging and Cadzow's method for array wavenumber estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.B.; Clark, G.A.

    1989-10-31

    We are concerned with resolving superimposed, correlated seismic waves with small-aperture arrays. The limited time-bandwidth product of transient seismic signals complicates the task. We examine the use of MUSIC and Cadzow's ML estimator with and without subarray averaging for resolution potential. A case study with real data favors the MUSIC algorithm and a multiple event covariance averaging scheme.

  4. Visions for Data Management and Remote Collaboration on ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I P 0.9 MA P IN 2.3 MW H98 1.3 M. Greenwald, et al., APS-DPP November 2007 C-Mod Data Helps Break Covariance Between EFF and nn G Makes Extrapolation To ITER More...

  5. Evaluated Nuclear (reaction) Data from the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The current version is ENDF/B VII.0, released in 2006. Users can search ENDF via specialized interfaces, browse sub-libraries or download them as zipped files. Data plots can be generated through the Sigma interface. The ENDF web page also provides access to covariance data processing and plots. (Specialized Interface)

  6. Bayesian Monte Carlo Method for Nuclear Data Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koning, A.J.

    2015-01-15

    A Bayesian Monte Carlo method is outlined which allows a systematic evaluation of nuclear reactions using TALYS. The result will be either an EXFOR-weighted covariance matrix or a collection of random files, each accompanied by an experiment based weight.

  7. Nucleon Spin Structure at Low Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krebs, H.; Bernard, V.; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2009-07-27

    We apply chiral effective field theory with explicit DELTA-1232) degrees of freedom to study double virtual Compton scattering at the photon point. Generalized spin polarizabilities are calculated up to order epsilon{sup 3} in the covariant small scale expansion. Systematic inclusion of DELTA degrees of freedom drastically improves the theoretical predictions.

  8. Improving Dryer and Press Efficiencies Through Combustion of Hydrocarbon Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujit Banerjee

    2005-10-31

    Emission control devices on dryers and presses have been legislated into the industry, and are now an integral part of the drying system. These devices consume large quantities of natural gas and electricity and down-sizing or eliminating them will provide major energy savings. The principal strategy taken here focuses on developing process changes that should minimize (and in some cases eliminate) the need for controls. A second approach is to develop lower-cost control options. It has been shown in laboratory and full-scale work that Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) emerge mainly at the end of the press cycle for particleboard, and, by extension, to other prod-ucts. Hence, only the air associated with this point of the cycle need be captured and treated. A model for estimating terpene emissions in the various zones of veneer dryers has been developed. This should allow the emissions to be concentrated in some zones and minimized in others, so that some of the air could be directly released without controls. Low-cost catalysts have been developed for controlling HAPs from dryers and presses. Catalysts conventionally used for regenerative catalytic oxidizers can be used at much lower temperatures for treating press emissions. Fluidized wood ash is an especially inexpensive mate-rial for efficiently reducing formaldehyde in dryer emissions. A heat transfer model for estimating pinene emissions from hot-pressing strand for the manufacture of flakeboard has been constructed from first principles and validated. The model shows that most of the emissions originate from the 1-mm layer of wood adjoining the platen surface. Hence, a simple control option is to surface a softwood mat with a layer of hardwood prior to pressing. Fines release a disproportionate large quantity of HAPs, and it has been shown both theo-retically and in full-scale work that particles smaller than 400 µm are principally responsible. Georgia-Pacific is considering green

  9. A strict test of stellar evolution models: The absolute dimensions of the massive benchmark eclipsing binary V578 Mon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, E. V.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pavlovski, K.; Hensberge, H.; Chew, Y. Gmez Maqueo; Claret, A.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the absolute dimensions of the eclipsing binary V578 Mon, a detached system of two early B-type stars (B0V + B1V, P = 2.40848 days) in the star-forming region NGC 2244 of the Rosette Nebula. From the light curve analysis of 40 yr of photometry and the analysis of HERMES spectra, we find radii of 5.41 0.04 R{sub ?} and 4.29 0.05 R{sub ?}, and temperatures of 30,000 500 K and 25,750 435 K, respectively. We find that our disentangled component spectra for V578 Mon agree well with previous spectral disentangling from the literature. We also reconfirm the previous spectroscopic orbit of V578 Mon finding that masses of 14.54 0.08 M{sub ?} and 10.29 0.06 M{sub ?} are fully compatible with the new analysis. We compare the absolute dimensions to the rotating models of the Geneva and Utrecht groups and the models of the Granada group. We find that all three sets of models marginally reproduce the absolute dimensions of both stars with a common age within the uncertainty for gravity-effective temperature isochrones. However, there are some apparent age discrepancies for the corresponding mass-radius isochrones. Models with larger convective overshoot, >0.35, worked best. Combined with our previously determined apsidal motion of 0.07089{sub ?0.00013}{sup +0.00021} deg cycle{sup 1}, we compute the internal structure constants (tidal Love number) for the Newtonian and general relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion as log k {sub 2} = 1.975 0.017 and log k {sub 2} = 3.412 0.018, respectively. We find the relativistic contribution to the apsidal motion to be small, <4%. We find that the prediction of log k {sub 2,theo} = 2.005 0.025 of the Granada models fully agrees with our observed log k {sub 2}.

  10. Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P.; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2013-03-15

    Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

  11. STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-07-19

    Version: 00 The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist ofmore » the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.« less

  12. Inferring spatial clouds statistics from limited field-of-view, zenith observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, C.H.; Thorne, L.R.

    1996-04-01

    Many of the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) measurements produce a time series of zenith observations, but spatial averages are often the desired data product. One possible approach to deriving spatial averages from temporal averages is to invoke Taylor`s hypothesis where and when it is valid. Taylor`s hypothesis states that when the turbulence is small compared with the mean flow, the covariance in time is related to the covariance in space by the speed of the mean flow. For clouds fields, Taylor`s hypothesis would apply when the {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} turbulence is small compared with advective flow (mean wind). The objective of this study is to determine under what conditions Taylor`s hypothesis holds or does not hold true for broken cloud fields.

  13. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  14. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance atmore » high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.« less

  15. User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-27

    The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  16. Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson-motivated Lagrangian formulation for the chiral two-form gauge field in D=6 and M5-branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasti, Paolo; Tonin, Mario; Samsonov, Igor; Sorokin, Dmitri

    2009-10-15

    We reveal nonmanifest gauge and SO(1,5) Lorentz symmetries in the Lagrangian description of a six-dimensional free chiral field derived from the Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson model in [P.-M. Ho and Y. Matsuo, J. High Energy Phys. 06 (2008) 105.] and make this formulation covariant with the use of a triplet of auxiliary scalar fields. We consider the coupling of this self-dual construction to gravity and its supersymmetrization. In the case of the nonlinear model of [P.-M. Ho, Y. Imamura, Y. Matsuo, and S. Shiba, J. High Energy Phys. 08 (2008) 014.] we solve the equations of motion of the gauge field, prove that its nonlinear field strength is self-dual and find a gauge-covariant form of the nonlinear action. Issues of the relation of this model to the known formulations of the M5-brane worldvolume theory are discussed.

  17. SENSIT: a cross-section and design sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code. [In FORTRAN for CDC-7600, IBM 360

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1980-01-01

    SENSIT computes the sensitivity and uncertainty of a calculated integral response (such as a dose rate) due to input cross sections and their uncertainties. Sensitivity profiles are computed for neutron and gamma-ray reaction cross sections of standard multigroup cross section sets and for secondary energy distributions (SEDs) of multigroup scattering matrices. In the design sensitivity mode, SENSIT computes changes in an integral response due to design changes and gives the appropriate sensitivity coefficients. Cross section uncertainty analyses are performed for three types of input data uncertainties: cross-section covariance matrices for pairs of multigroup reaction cross sections, spectral shape uncertainty parameters for secondary energy distributions (integral SED uncertainties), and covariance matrices for energy-dependent response functions. For all three types of data uncertainties SENSIT computes the resulting variance and estimated standard deviation in an integral response of interest, on the basis of generalized perturbation theory. SENSIT attempts to be more comprehensive than earlier sensitivity analysis codes, such as SWANLAKE.

  18. Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molnar, Denes

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes research activities at Purdue University done as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration. These mainly involve calculation of covariant radiative energy loss in the (Djordjevic-)Gyulassy-Levai-Vitev ((D)GLV) framework for relativistic A+A reactions at RHIC and LHC energies using realistic bulk medium evolution with both transverse and longitudinal expansion. The single PDF file provided also includes a report from the entire JET Collaboration.

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eddy Correlation Deployments Completed Bookmark and Share In mid-March, the last of a series of new eddy covariance or "eddy correlation" (ECOR) systems was installed at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) extended facility at Cyril, Oklahoma. This completes the replacement of the original ECOR systems initiated in 2002. In all, nine new ECOR systems have been deployed, including one on the 18-meter tower at the SGP forest locale at Okmulgee, Oklahoma. The

  20. Nuclear energy density functionals: What we can learn about/from their global performance?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Agbemava, S. E.; Ray, D.; Ring, P.

    2014-10-15

    A short review of recent results on the global performance of covariant energy density functionals is presented. It is focused on an analysis of the accuracy of the description of physical observables of ground and excited states as well as to related theoretical uncertainties. In addition, a global analysis of pairing properties is presented and the impact of pairing on the position of two-neutron drip line is discussed.

  1. Accounting for Incomplete Species Detection in Fish Community Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A; Orth, Dr. Donald J; Jager, Yetta

    2013-01-01

    Riverine fish assemblages are heterogeneous and very difficult to characterize with a one-size-fits-all approach to sampling. Furthermore, detecting changes in fish assemblages over time requires accounting for variation in sampling designs. We present a modeling approach that permits heterogeneous sampling by accounting for site and sampling covariates (including method) in a model-based framework for estimation (versus a sampling-based framework). We snorkeled during three surveys and electrofished during a single survey in suite of delineated habitats stratified by reach types. We developed single-species occupancy models to determine covariates influencing patch occupancy and species detection probabilities whereas community occupancy models estimated species richness in light of incomplete detections. For most species, information-theoretic criteria showed higher support for models that included patch size and reach as covariates of occupancy. In addition, models including patch size and sampling method as covariates of detection probabilities also had higher support. Detection probability estimates for snorkeling surveys were higher for larger non-benthic species whereas electrofishing was more effective at detecting smaller benthic species. The number of sites and sampling occasions required to accurately estimate occupancy varied among fish species. For rare benthic species, our results suggested that higher number of occasions, and especially the addition of electrofishing, may be required to improve detection probabilities and obtain accurate occupancy estimates. Community models suggested that richness was 41% higher than the number of species actually observed and the addition of an electrofishing survey increased estimated richness by 13%. These results can be useful to future fish assemblage monitoring efforts by informing sampling designs, such as site selection (e.g. stratifying based on patch size) and determining effort required (e.g. number of

  2. Correlation function analysis of the COBE differential microwave radiometer sky maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineweaver, C.H.

    1994-08-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite has detected anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. A two-point correlation function analysis which helped lead to this discovery is presented in detail. The results of a correlation function analysis of the two year DMR data set is presented. The first and second year data sets are compared and found to be reasonably consistent. The positive correlation for separation angles less than {approximately}20{degree} is robust to Galactic latitude cuts and is very stable from year to year. The Galactic latitude cut independence of the correlation function is strong evidence that the signal is not Galactic in origin. The statistical significance of the structure seen in the correlation function of the first, second and two year maps is respectively > 9{sigma}, > 10{sigma} and > 18{sigma} above the noise. The noise in the DMR sky maps is correlated at a low level. The structure of the pixel temperature covariance matrix is given. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60{degree} due to the 60{degree} separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance of 60{degree} is 0.45%{sub {minus}0.14}{sup +0.18} of the mean variance. The noise properties of the DMR maps are thus well approximated by the noise properties of maps made by a single-beam experiment. Previously published DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  3. A fast map-making preconditioner for regular scanning patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nss, Sigurd K.; Louis, Thibaut E-mail: thibaut.louis@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution Maximum Likelihood map-making of the Cosmic Microwave Background is usually performed using Conjugate Gradients with a preconditioner that ignores noise correlations. We here present a new preconditioner that approximates the map noise covariance as circulant, and show that this results in a speedup of up to 400% for a realistic scanning pattern from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The improvement is especially large for polarized maps.

  4. A generic formulation for emittance and lattice function evolution for non-Hamiltonian systems with stochastic effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    I describe a generic formulation for the evolution of emittances and lattice functions under arbitrary, possibly non-Hamiltonian, linear equations of motion. The average effect of stochastic processes, which would include ionization interactions and synchrotron radiation, is also included. I first compute the evolution of the covariance matrix, then the evolution of emittances and lattice functions from that. I examine the particular case of a cylindrically symmetric system, which is of particular interest for ionization cooling.

  5. Nuclear test ban treaty verification: Improving test ban monitoring with empirical and model-based signal processing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harris, David B.; Gibbons, Steven J.; Rodgers, Arthur J.; Pasyanls, Michael E.

    2012-05-01

    In this approach, small scale-length medium perturbations not modeled in the tomographic inversion might be described as random fields, characterized by particular distribution functions (e.g., normal with specified spatial covariance). Conceivably, random field parameters (scatterer density or scale length) might themselves be the targets of tomographic inversions of the scattered wave field. As a result, such augmented models may provide processing gain through the use of probabilistic signal sub spaces rather than deterministic waveforms.

  6. Unitarity check in gravitational Higgs mechanism (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Journal Article: Unitarity check in gravitational Higgs mechanism Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Unitarity check in gravitational Higgs mechanism The effective field theory of massive gravity has long been formulated in a generally covariant way [N. Arkani-Hamed, H. Georgi, and M. D. Schwartz, Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 305, 96 (2003).]. Using this formalism, it has been found recently that there exists a class of massive nonlinear theories that are free of the

  7. Chiral Effective Field Theory in the $\\Delta$-resonance region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2006-09-18

    I discuss the problem of constructing an effective low-energy theory in the vicinity of a resonance or a bound state. The focus is on the example of the $\\Delta(1232)$, the lightest resonance in the nucleon sector. Recent developments of the chiral effective-field theory in the $\\Delta$-resonance region are briefly reviewed. I conclude with a comment on the merits of the manifestly covariant formulation of chiral EFT in the baryon sector.

  8. AmeriFlux US-Wkg Walnut Gulch Kendall Grasslands

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Scott, Russell [United States Department of Agriculture

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wkg Walnut Gulch Kendall Grasslands. Site Description - This site is located in a small, intensively-studied, experimental watershed within USDA-ARS's Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed. Eddy covariance measurements of energy, water and CO2 fluxes began in the spring of 2004, though meteorological (including Bowen ratio) and hydrological measurements are available much further back.

  9. Flat space physics from holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2004-02-06

    We point out that aspects of quantum mechanics can be derived from the holographic principle, using only a perturbative limit of classical general relativity. In flat space, the covariant entropy bound reduces to the Bekenstein bound. The latter does not contain Newton's constant and cannot operate via gravitational backreaction. Instead, it is protected by--and in this sense, predicts--the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

  10. Scalar graviton as dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirogov, Yu. F.

    2015-06-15

    The basics of the theory of unimodular bimode gravity built on the principles of unimodular gauge invariance/relativity and general covariance are exposed. Besides the massless tensor graviton of General Relativity, the theory includes an (almost) massless scalar graviton treated as the gravitational dark matter. A spherically symmetric vacuum solution describing the coherent scalar-graviton field for the soft-core dark halos, with the asymptotically flat rotation curves, is demonstrated as an example.

  11. CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS FOR ENDF/B-VII.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERMAN, M.; ROCHMAN, D.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2006-06-05

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on neutron cross section evaluations for ENDF/B-VII (April 2005-May 2006). The purpose of the contract was to ensure seamless integration of the LANL neutron cross section evaluations in the new ENDF/B-VII library. The following work was performed: (1) LANL evaluated data files submitted for inclusion in ENDF/B-VII were checked and, when necessary, formal formatting errors were corrected. As a consequence, ENDF checking codes, run on all LANL files, do not report any errors that would rise concern. (2) LANL dosimetry evaluations for {sup 191}Ir and {sup 193}Ir were completed to match ENDF requirements for the general purpose library suitable for transport calculations. A set of covariances for both isotopes is included in the ENDF files. (3) Library of fission products was assembled and successfully tested with ENDF checking codes, processed with NJOY-99.125 and simple MCNP calculations. (4) KALMAN code has been integrated with the EMPIRE system to allow estimation of covariances based on the combination of measurements and model calculations. Covariances were produced for 155,157-Gd and also for 6 remaining isotopes of Gd.

  12. Application of asymptotic expansions for maximum likelihood estimators errors to gravitational waves from binary mergers: The single interferometer case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanolin, M.; Vitale, S.; Makris, N.

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we apply to gravitational waves (GW) from the inspiral phase of binary systems a recently derived frequentist methodology to calculate analytically the error for a maximum likelihood estimate of physical parameters. We use expansions of the covariance and the bias of a maximum likelihood estimate in terms of inverse powers of the signal-to-noise ration (SNR)s where the square root of the first order in the covariance expansion is the Cramer Rao lower bound (CRLB). We evaluate the expansions, for the first time, for GW signals in noises of GW interferometers. The examples are limited to a single, optimally oriented, interferometer. We also compare the error estimates using the first two orders of the expansions with existing numerical Monte Carlo simulations. The first two orders of the covariance allow us to get error predictions closer to what is observed in numerical simulations than the CRLB. The methodology also predicts a necessary SNR to approximate the error with the CRLB and provides new insight on the relationship between waveform properties, SNR, dimension of the parameter space and estimation errors. For example the timing match filtering can achieve the CRLB only if the SNR is larger than the Kurtosis of the gravitational wave spectrum and the necessary SNR is much larger if other physical parameters are also unknown.

  13. Image Appraisal for 2D and 3D Electromagnetic Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    1999-01-28

    Linearized methods are presented for appraising image resolution and parameter accuracy in images generated with two and three dimensional non-linear electromagnetic inversion schemes. When direct matrix inversion is employed, the model resolution and posterior model covariance matrices can be directly calculated. A method to examine how the horizontal and vertical resolution varies spatially within the electromagnetic property image is developed by examining the columns of the model resolution matrix. Plotting the square root of the diagonal of the model covariance matrix yields an estimate of how errors in the inversion process such as data noise and incorrect a priori assumptions about the imaged model map into parameter error. This type of image is shown to be useful in analyzing spatial variations in the image sensitivity to the data. A method is analyzed for statistically estimating the model covariance matrix when the conjugate gradient method is employed rather than a direct inversion technique (for example in 3D inversion). A method for calculating individual columns of the model resolution matrix using the conjugate gradient method is also developed. Examples of the image analysis techniques are provided on 2D and 3D synthetic cross well EM data sets, as well as a field data set collected at the Lost Hills Oil Field in Central California.

  14. Einstein-aether theory with a Maxwell field: General formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakin, Alexander B.; Lemos, José P.S.

    2014-11-15

    We extend the Einstein-aether theory to include the Maxwell field in a nontrivial manner by taking into account its interaction with the time-like unit vector field characterizing the aether. We also include a generic matter term. We present a model with a Lagrangian that includes cross-terms linear and quadratic in the Maxwell tensor, linear and quadratic in the covariant derivative of the aether velocity four-vector, linear in its second covariant derivative and in the Riemann tensor. We decompose these terms with respect to the irreducible parts of the covariant derivative of the aether velocity, namely, the acceleration four-vector, the shear and vorticity tensors, and the expansion scalar. Furthermore, we discuss the influence of an aether non-uniform motion on the polarization and magnetization of the matter in such an aether environment, as well as on its dielectric and magnetic properties. The total self-consistent system of equations for the electromagnetic and the gravitational fields, and the dynamic equations for the unit vector aether field are obtained. Possible applications of this system are discussed. Based on the principles of effective field theories, we display in an appendix all the terms up to fourth order in derivative operators that can be considered in a Lagrangian that includes the metric, the electromagnetic and the aether fields.

  15. STAYSL PNNL Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-12

    The STAYSL PNNL Suite of software provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of themore » reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations. The software suite consists of the STAYSL PNNL, SHIELD, BCF, and NJpp Fortran codes and the SigPhi Calculator spreadsheet tool. In addition, the development of this software suite and associated data libraries used the third-party NJOY99 Fortran code (http://t2.lanl.gov/nis/codes/njoy99/). The NJOY99 and NJpp codes are used to assemble cross section and covariance input data libraries (for both SHIELD and STAYSL PNNL) from the International Reactor Dosimetry File of 2002 (IRDF-2002; http://www-nds.iaea.org/irdf2002/) developed by the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Vienna, Austria). The BCF, SigPhi Calculator, and SHIELD software tools are used to calculate corrected activation rates and neutron self-shielding correction factors, which are inputs to the STAYSL PNNL code.« less

  16. Prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants and body composition at age 7–9 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delvaux, Immle; Van Cauwenberghe, Jolijn; Den Hond, Elly; Schoeters, Greet; Govarts, Eva; Nelen, Vera; Baeyens, Willy; Van Larebeke, Nicolas; Sioen, Isabelle

    2014-07-15

    The study aim was to investigate the association between prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and the body composition of 7 to 9 year old Flemish children. The subjects were 114 Flemish children (50% boys) that took part in the first Flemish Environment and Health Study (2002–2006). Cadmium, PCBs, dioxins, p,p′-DDE and HCB were analysed in cord blood/plasma. When the child reached 7–9 years, height, weight, waist circumference and skinfolds were measured. Significant associations between prenatal exposure to EDCs and indicators of body composition were only found in girls. After adjustment for confounders and covariates, a significant negative association was found in girls between prenatal cadmium exposure and weight, BMI and waist circumference (indicator of abdominal fat) and the sum of four skinfolds (indicator of subcutaneous fat). In contrast, a significant positive association (after adjustment for confounders/covariates) was found between prenatal p,p′-DDE exposure and waist circumference as well as waist/height ratio in girls (indicators of abdominal fat). No significant associations were found for prenatal PCBs, dioxins and HCB exposure after adjustment for confounders/covariates. This study suggests a positive association between prenatal p,p′-DDE exposure and indicators of abdominal fat and a negative association between prenatal cadmium exposure and indicators of both abdominal as well as subcutaneous fat in girls between 7 and 9 years old. - Highlights: • Associations between prenatal contaminant exposure and anthropometrics in children. • Significant association only found in girls. • No significant associations found for prenatal PCBs, dioxins and HCB exposure. • Girls: negative association between cadmium and abdominal and subcutaneous fat. • Girls: positive association between p,p′-DDE and indicators of abdominal fat.

  17. Relationship between blood manganese and blood pressure in the Korean general population according to KNHANES 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Byung-Kook; Kim, Yangho

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: We present data on the association of manganese (Mn) level with hypertension in a representative sample of the adult Korean population who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2008. Methods: This study was based on the data obtained by KNHANES 2008, which was conducted for three years (2007-2009) using a rolling sampling design involving a complex, stratified, multistage, probability-cluster survey of a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population of South Korea. Results: Multiple regression analysis after controlling for covariates, including gender, age, regional area, education level, smoking, drinking status, hemoglobin, and serum creatinine, showed that the beta coefficients of log blood Mn were 3.514, 1.878, and 2.517 for diastolic blood pressure, and 3.593, 2.449, and 2.440 for systolic blood pressure in female, male, and all participants, respectively. Multiple regression analysis including three other blood metals, lead, mercury, and cadmium, revealed no significant effects of the three metals on blood pressure and showed no effect on the association between blood Mn and blood pressure. In addition, doubling the blood Mn increased the risk of hypertension 1.828, 1.573, and 1.567 fold in women, men, and all participants, respectively, after adjustment for covariates. The addition of blood lead, mercury, and cadmium as covariates did not affect the association between blood Mn and the prevalence of hypertension. Conclusion: Blood Mn level was associated with an increased risk of hypertension in a representative sample of the Korean adult population. - Highlights: {yields} We showed the association of manganese with hypertension in Korean population. {yields} This study was based on the data obtained by KNHANES 2008. {yields} Blood manganese level was associated with an increased risk of hypertension.

  18. Ordovician carbonate formation waters in the Illinois Basin: Chemical and isotopic evolution beneath a regional aquitard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stueber, A.M. ); Walter, L.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the upper Ordovician Galena Group of the Illinois Basin have been analyzed geochemically to study origin of salinity, chemical and isotopic evolution, and relation to paleohydrologic flow systems. These carbonate reservoirs underlie the Maquoketa Shale Group of Cincinnatian age, which forms a regional aquitard. Cl-Br relations and Na/Br-Cl/Br systematics indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater to a point not significantly beyond halite saturation. Subsequent dilution in the subsurface by meteoric waters is supported by delta D-delta O-18 covariance. Systematic relations between Sr-87/Sr-86 and 1/Sr suggest two distinct mixing events: introduction of a Sr-87 enriched fluid from a siliciclastic source, and a later event which only affected reservoir waters from the western shelf of the basin. The second mixing event is supported by covariance between Sr-87/Sr-86 and concentrations of cations and anions; covariance between Sr and O-D isotopes suggests that the event is related to meteoric water influx. Systematic geochemical relations in ordovician Galena Group formation waters have been preserved by the overlying Maquoketa shale aquitard. Comparison with results from previous studies indicates that waters from Silurian-Devonian carbonate strata evolved in a manner similar to yet distinct from that of the Ordovician carbonate waters, whereas waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian strata that overlie the New Albany Shale Group regional aquitard are marked by fundamentally different Cl-Br-Na and Sr isotope systematics. Evolution of these geochemical formation-water regimes apparently has been influenced significantly by paleohydrologic flow systems.

  19. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positive semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.

  20. Sample variance in weak lensing: How many simulations are required?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltan

    2016-03-24

    Constraining cosmology using weak gravitational lensing consists of comparing a measured feature vector of dimension Nb with its simulated counterpart. An accurate estimate of the Nb × Nb feature covariance matrix C is essential to obtain accurate parameter confidence intervals. When C is measured from a set of simulations, an important question is how large this set should be. To answer this question, we construct different ensembles of Nr realizations of the shear field, using a common randomization procedure that recycles the outputs from a smaller number Ns ≤ Nr of independent ray-tracing N-body simulations. We study parameter confidence intervalsmore » as a function of (Ns, Nr) in the range 1 ≤ Ns ≤ 200 and 1 ≤ Nr ≲ 105. Previous work [S. Dodelson and M. D. Schneider, Phys. Rev. D 88, 063537 (2013)] has shown that Gaussian noise in the feature vectors (from which the covariance is estimated) lead, at quadratic order, to an O(1/Nr) degradation of the parameter confidence intervals. Using a variety of lensing features measured in our simulations, including shear-shear power spectra and peak counts, we show that cubic and quartic covariance fluctuations lead to additional O(1/N2r) error degradation that is not negligible when Nr is only a factor of few larger than Nb. We study the large Nr limit, and find that a single, 240 Mpc/h sized 5123-particle N-body simulation (Ns = 1) can be repeatedly recycled to produce as many as Nr = few × 104 shear maps whose power spectra and high-significance peak counts can be treated as statistically independent. Lastly, a small number of simulations (Ns = 1 or 2) is sufficient to forecast parameter confidence intervals at percent accuracy.« less

  1. Transit light curves with finite integration time: Fisher information analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Ellen M.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2014-10-10

    Kepler has revolutionized the study of transiting planets with its unprecedented photometric precision on more than 150,000 target stars. Most of the transiting planet candidates detected by Kepler have been observed as long-cadence targets with 30 minute integration times, and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will record full frame images with a similar integration time. Integrations of 30 minutes affect the transit shape, particularly for small planets and in cases of low signal to noise. Using the Fisher information matrix technique, we derive analytic approximations for the variances and covariances on the transit parameters obtained from fitting light curve photometry collected with a finite integration time. We find that binning the light curve can significantly increase the uncertainties and covariances on the inferred parameters when comparing scenarios with constant total signal to noise (constant total integration time in the absence of read noise). Uncertainties on the transit ingress/egress time increase by a factor of 34 for Earth-size planets and 3.4 for Jupiter-size planets around Sun-like stars for integration times of 30 minutes compared to instantaneously sampled light curves. Similarly, uncertainties on the mid-transit time for Earth and Jupiter-size planets increase by factors of 3.9 and 1.4. Uncertainties on the transit depth are largely unaffected by finite integration times. While correlations among the transit depth, ingress duration, and transit duration all increase in magnitude with longer integration times, the mid-transit time remains uncorrelated with the other parameters. We provide code in Python and Mathematica for predicting the variances and covariances at www.its.caltech.edu/∼eprice.

  2. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positivemore » semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.« less

  3. Estimation of the mixing layer height over a high altitude site in Central Himalayan region by using Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Newsom, Rob K.; Kumar, Niranjan; Ratnam, Venkat; Naja, M.; Singh, Narendra

    2014-03-01

    A Doppler lidar was installed at Manora Peak, Nainital (29.4 N; 79.2 E, 1958 amsl) to estimate mixing layer height for the first time by using vertical velocity variance as basic measurement parameter for the period September-November 2011. Mixing layer height is found to be located ~0.57 +/- 0.1and 0.45 +/- 0.05km AGL during day and nighttime, respectively. The estimation of mixing layer height shows good correlation (R>0.8) between different instruments and with different methods. Our results show that wavelet co-variance transform is a robust method for mixing layer height estimation.

  4. Quantum field theory of classically unstable Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, Y.; Horwitz, L. P.; Levitan, J.; Yahalom, A.

    2015-07-15

    We study a class of dynamical systems for which the motions can be described in terms of geodesics on a manifold (ordinary potential models can be cast into this form by means of a conformal map). It is rigorously proven that the geodesic deviation equation of Jacobi, constructed with a second covariant derivative, is unitarily equivalent to that of a parametric harmonic oscillator, and we study the second quantization of this oscillator. The excitations of the Fock space modes correspond to the emission and absorption of quanta into the dynamical medium, thus associating unstable behavior of the dynamical system with calculable fluctuations in an ensemble with possible thermodynamic consequences.

  5. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  6. Existence and Properties of an Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnock, Robert L.

    2001-02-15

    The equilibrium phase distribution of stored colliding electron beams is studied from the viewpoint of Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) theory. Numerical integration of the VFP system in one degree of freedom revealed a nearly Gaussian equilibrium with non-diagonal covariance matrix. This result is reproduced approximately in an analytic theory based on linearization of the beam-beam force. Analysis of an integral equation for the equilibrium distribution, without linearization, establishes the existence of a unique equilibrium at sufficiently small current. The role of damping and quantum noise is clarified through a new representation of the propagator of the linear Fokker-Planck equation with harmonic force.

  7. Final Technical Report Interannual Variations in the Rate of Carbon Storage by a Mid-Latitude Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wofsy, Steven; Munger, J W

    2012-07-31

    The time series of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of carbon by an entire forest ecosystem on time scales from hourly to decadal was measured by eddy-covariance supplemented with plot-level measurements of biomass and tree demography. The results demonstrate the response of forest carbon fluxes and long-term budgets to climatic factors and to successional change. The data from this project have been extensively used worldwide by the carbon cycle science community in support of model development and validation of remote sensing observations.

  8. Delta and Omega electromagnetic form factors in a Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diana Nicmorus, Gernot Eichmann, Reinhard Alkofer

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the electromagnetic form factors of the Delta and the Omega baryons within the Poincare-covariant framework of Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. The three-quark core contributions of the form factors are evaluated by employing a quark-diquark approximation. We use a consistent setup for the quark-gluon dressing, the quark-quark bound-state kernel and the quark-photon interaction. Our predictions for the multipole form factors are compatible with available experimental data and quark-model estimates. The current-quark mass evolution of the static electromagnetic properties agrees with results provided by lattice calculations.

  9. Disentangling formation of multiple-core holes in aminophenol molecules exposed to bright X-FEL radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhaunerchyk, V.; Kaminska, M.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Eland, J. H. D.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Frasinski, L. J.; Grilj, J.; Koch, M.; McFarland, B. K.; et al

    2015-10-28

    Competing multi-photon ionization processes, some leading to the formation of double core hole states, have been examined in 4-aminophenol. The experiments used the linac coherent light source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser, in combination with a time-of-flight magnetic bottle electron spectrometer and the correlation analysis method of covariance mapping. Furthermore, the results imply that 4-aminophenol molecules exposed to the focused x-ray pulses of the LCLS sequentially absorb more than two x-ray photons, resulting in the formation of multiple core holes as well as in the sequential removal of photoelectrons and Auger electrons (so-called PAPA sequences).

  10. Benchmark Testing of a New 56Fe Evaluation for Criticality Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, Luiz C; Ivanov, E.

    2015-01-01

    The SAMMY code was used to evaluate resonance parameters of the 56Fe cross section in the resolved resonance energy range of 0–2 MeV using transmission data, capture, elastic, inelastic, and double differential elastic cross sections. The resonance analysis was performed with the code SAMMY that fits R-matrix resonance parameters using the generalized least-squares technique (Bayes’ theory). The evaluation yielded a set of resonance parameters that reproduced the experimental data very well, along with a resonance parameter covariance matrix for data uncertainty calculations. Benchmark tests were conducted to assess the evaluation performance in benchmark calculations.

  11. Relations between health indicators and residential proximity to coal mining in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Ahern, M.M.

    2008-04-15

    We used data from a survey of 16493 West Virginians merged with county-level coal production and other covariates to investigate the relations between health indicators and residential proximity to coal mining. Results of hierarchical analyses indicated that high levels of coal production were associated with worse adjusted health status and with higher rates of cardiopulmonary disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, lung disease, and kidney disease. Research is recommended to ascertain the mechanisms, magnitude, and consequences of a community coal-mining exposure effect.

  12. Upgrades to the R-Matrix Code SAMMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.

    2005-05-24

    The analysis code SAMMY is widely used for parameterization and understanding of neutron- and charged-particle-induced cross-section data. This report describes advances made in the development of the code: An overview of the main features of SAMMY is presented, with emphasis on options recently added to the code. Among the new options are an energy-dependent direct-capture component for capture cross sections, a crystal-lattice model for Doppler broadening, improvements in the fitting procedure to incorporate more of the experimental uncertainties and covariances, streamlined input, and enhanced ENDF-related capabilities.

  13. NuMI Low Energy Flux Prediction Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NuMI Low Energy Flux Prediction Release Neutrino Flux Predictions for the NuMI Beam hep-ex/1607.00704 Data Ancillary data files for this result are available on arXiv at http://arxiv.org/src/1607.00704/anc.< /li> Among the available data files are: pdf file describing format of all the available files root file of all the available fluxes python code to read and process MINERvA's flux predictions Text Files of the flux, uncertainties, and covariance matrix, with units of neutrinos/m^2/POT,

  14. Quantum field theory in the presence of a medium: Green's function expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheirandish, Fardin; Salimi, Shahriar

    2011-12-15

    Starting from a Lagrangian and using functional-integration techniques, series expansions of Green's function of a real scalar field and electromagnetic field, in the presence of a medium, are obtained. The parameter of expansion in these series is the susceptibility function of the medium. Relativistic and nonrelativistic Langevin-type equations are derived. Series expansions for Lifshitz energy in finite temperature and for an arbitrary matter distribution are derived. Covariant formulations for both scalar and electromagnetic fields are introduced. Two illustrative examples are given.

  15. Electron Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page Measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielastic-like scattering on hydrocarbon at ⟨Eν⟩ = 3.6 GeV Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 081802 (2016) and hep-ex/1509.05729 Data Ancillary files for this result are available at http://arxiv.org/src/1509.05729v6/anc The available data files are: Cross Section as a function of Electron Angle Cross Section as a function of Electron Energy Cross Section as a function of Q2 Covariance Matrix as a function of

  16. Mode Coupling and the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in a Relativistic Two-Phonon Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinova, Elena; Ring, Peter; Tselyaev, Victor

    2010-07-09

    A new class of many-body models, based on covariant density functional theory for excited states, is presented. It allows a parameter free description of the fragmentation of nuclear states induced by mode coupling of two-quasiparticle and two-phonon configurations. As compared to earlier methods it provides a consistent and parameter free theory of the fine structure of nuclear resonances. The method is applied very successfully to investigate the newly discovered low-lying dipole excitations in Sn and Ni isotopes with large neutron excess.

  17. Entanglement verification for quantum-key-distribution systems with an underlying bipartite qubit-mode structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigas, Johannes; Luetkenhaus, Norbert

    2006-01-15

    We consider entanglement detection for quantum-key-distribution systems that use two signal states and continuous-variable measurements. This problem can be formulated as a separability problem in a qubit-mode system. To verify entanglement, we introduce an object that combines the covariance matrix of the mode with the density matrix of the qubit. We derive necessary separability criteria for this scenario. These criteria can be readily evaluated using semidefinite programming and we apply them to the specific quantum key distribution protocol.

  18. AmeriFlux US-LPH Little Prospect Hill

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hadley, Julian [Ecovative Design, LLC

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-LPH Little Prospect Hill. Site Description - The site was cleared for pasture, but not deeply plowed or planted, in the 18th and 19th centuries. Agriculture on the site was abandoned near the end of the 19th century. The forest within 200 to 300 m of the eddy covariance tower to the NW, W, SW, and S burned in an intense fire in 1957, which left few or no surviving trees.

  19. Information content of nonautonomous free fields in curved space-time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parreira, J. E.; Nemes, M. C.; Fonseca-Romero, K. M.

    2011-03-15

    We show that it is possible to quantify the information content of a nonautonomous free field state in curved space-time. A covariance matrix is defined and it is shown that, for symmetric Gaussian field states, the matrix is connected to the entropy of the state. This connection is maintained throughout a quadratic nonautonomous (including possible phase transitions) evolution. Although particle-antiparticle correlations are dynamically generated, the evolution is isoentropic. If the current standard cosmological model for the inflationary period is correct, in absence of decoherence such correlations will be preserved, and could potentially lead to observable effects, allowing for a test of the model.

  20. Path integral quantization of generalized quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bufalo, R.; Pimentel, B. M.; Zambrano, G. E. R.

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, a complete covariant quantization of generalized electrodynamics is shown through the path integral approach. To this goal, we first studied the Hamiltonian structure of the system following Dirac's methodology and, then, we followed the Faddeev-Senjanovic procedure to obtain the transition amplitude. The complete propagators (Schwinger-Dyson-Fradkin equations) of the correct gauge fixation and the generalized Ward-Fradkin-Takahashi identities are also obtained. Afterwards, an explicit calculation of one-loop approximations of all Green's functions and a discussion about the obtained results are presented.

  1. Non-gaussian inflationary shapes in G{sup 3} theories beyond Horndeski

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasiello, Matteo; Renaux-Petel, Sébastien E-mail: srenaux@lpthe.jussieu.fr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the possible signatures of a recently introduced class of healthy theories beyond Horndeski models on higher-order correlators of the inflationary curvature fluctuation. Despite the apparent large number and complexity of the cubic interactions, we show that the leading-order bispectrum generated by the Generalized Horndeski (also called G{sup 3}) interactions can be reduced to a linear combination of two well known k-inflationary shapes. We conjecture that said behavior is not an accident of the cubic order but a consequence dictated by the requirements on the absence of Ostrogradski instability, the general covariance and the linear dispersion relation in these theories.

  2. Estimation of the Dynamic States of Synchronous Machines Using an Extended Particle Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Meng, Da; Lu, Shuai

    2013-11-11

    In this paper, an extended particle filter (PF) is proposed to estimate the dynamic states of a synchronous machine using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. A PF propagates the mean and covariance of states via Monte Carlo simulation, is easy to implement, and can be directly applied to a non-linear system with non-Gaussian noise. The extended PF modifies a basic PF to improve robustness. Using Monte Carlo simulations with practical noise and model uncertainty considerations, the extended PFs performance is evaluated and compared with the basic PF and an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The extended PF results showed high accuracy and robustness against measurement and model noise.

  3. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain themore » $$\\pi BB'$$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.« less

  4. Metric redefinitions in Einstein-Aether theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Brendan Z.

    2005-08-15

    'Einstein-Aether' theory, in which gravity couples to a dynamical, timelike, unit-norm vector field, provides a means for studying Lorentz violation in a generally covariant setting. Demonstrated here is the effect of a redefinition of the metric and 'aether' fields in terms of the original fields and two free parameters. The net effect is a change of the coupling constants appearing in the action. Using such a redefinition, one of the coupling constants can be set to zero, simplifying studies of solutions of the theory.

  5. Constraining Lorentz Violation with Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuntz, J. A.; Ferreira, P. G.; Zlosnik, T. G

    2008-12-31

    The Einstein-aether theory provides a simple, dynamical mechanism for breaking Lorentz invariance. It does so within a generally covariant context and may emerge from quantum effects in more fundamental theories. The theory leads to a preferred frame and can have distinct experimental signatures. In this Letter, we perform a comprehensive study of the cosmological effects of the Einstein-aether theory and use observational data to constrain it. Allied to previously determined consistency and experimental constraints, we find that an Einstein-aether universe can fit experimental data over a wide range of its parameter space, but requires a specific rescaling of the other cosmological densities.

  6. Post-Newtonian parameters and constraints on Einstein-aether theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Brendan Z.; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-03-15

    We analyze the observational and theoretical constraints on ''Einstein-aether theory,'' a generally covariant theory of gravity coupled to a dynamical, unit, timelike vector field that breaks local Lorentz symmetry. The results of a computation of the remaining post-Newtonian parameters are reported. These are combined with other results to determine the joint post-Newtonian, vacuum-Cerenkov, nucleosynthesis, stability, and positive-energy constraints. All of these constraints are satisfied by parameters in a large two-dimensional region in the four-dimensional parameter space defining the theory.

  7. CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR CALCULATING GENERALIZED RESPONSE SENSITIVITIES USING TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces a new approach for calculating sensitivity coefficients for generalized neutronic responses to nuclear data uncertainties using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. The approach presented in this paper, known as the GEAR-MC method, allows for the calculation of generalized sensitivity coefficients for multiple responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with no nuclear data perturbations or knowledge of nuclear covariance data. The theory behind the GEAR-MC method is presented here, and proof of principle is demonstrated by using the GEAR-MC method to calculate sensitivity coefficients for responses in several 3D, continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications.

  8. Noncommutative magnetic moment of charged particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2011-10-15

    It has been argued that in noncommutative field theories, the sizes of physical objects cannot be taken smaller than an ''elementary length'' related to noncommutativity parameters. By gauge covariantly extending field equations of noncommutative U(1){sub *} theory to cover the presence of external sources, we find electric and magnetic fields produced by an extended static charge. We find that such a charge, apart from being an ordinary electric monopole, is also a magnetic dipole. By writing off the existing experimental clearance in the value of the lepton magnetic moments for the present effect, we get the bound on noncommutativity at the level of 10{sup 4} TeV.

  9. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  10. Sigma: Web Retrieval Interface for Nuclear Reaction Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko,B.; Sonzogni, A.A.

    2008-06-24

    The authors present Sigma, a Web-rich application which provides user-friendly access in processing and plotting of the evaluated and experimental nuclear reaction data stored in the ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. The main interface includes browsing using a periodic table and a directory tree, basic and advanced search capabilities, interactive plots of cross sections, angular distributions and spectra, comparisons between evaluated and experimental data, computations between different cross section sets. Interactive energy-angle, neutron cross section uncertainties plots and visualization of covariance matrices are under development. Sigma is publicly available at the National Nuclear Data Center website at www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma.

  11. The Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum: From Experiment to the Evaluated Data and its Impact on Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-06-10

    After a brief introduction concerning nuclear data, prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) evaluations and the limited PFNS covariance data in the ENDF/B-VII library, and the important fact that cross section uncertainties ~ PFNS uncertainties, the author presents background information on the PFNS (experimental data, theoretical models, data evaluation, uncertainty quantification) and discusses the impact on certain well-known critical assemblies with regard to integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation. He sketches recent and ongoing research and concludes with some final thoughts.

  12. Electroweak Radiative Corrections to the Parity-violating Asymmetry for SLAC Experiment E158

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zykunov, Vladimir A.; /Gomel State Tech. U.

    2012-04-04

    Electroweak radiative corrections to observable quantities of Moeller scattering of polarized particles are calculated. We emphasize the contribution induced by infrared divergent parts of cross section. The covariant method is used to remove infrared divergences, so that our results do not involve any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of SLAC E158 experiment, these corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by about -6.5% at E = 48 GeV and y = 0.5, and kinematically weighted 'hard' bremsstrahlung effect for SLAC E158 is {approx} 1%.

  13. Nuclear Material Variance Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculations) is a custom spreadsheet that significantly reduces the effort required to make the variance and covariance calculations needed to determine the detection sensitivity of a materials accounting system and loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The user is required to enter information into one of four data tables depending on the type of term in the materials balance (MB) equation. The four data tables correspond to input transfers, output transfers,more » and two types of inventory terms, one for nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and one for measurements made by chemical analysis. Each data entry must contain an identification number and a short description, as well as values for the SNM concentration, the bulk mass (or solution volume), the measurement error standard deviations, and the number of measurements during an accounting period. The user must also specify the type of error model (additive or multiplicative) associated with each measurement, and possible correlations between transfer terms. Predefined spreadsheet macros are used to perform the variance and covariance calculations for each term based on the corresponding set of entries. MAVARIC has been used for sensitivity studies of chemical separation facilities, fuel processing and fabrication facilities, and gas centrifuge and laser isotope enrichment facilities.« less

  14. The effective field theory of dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Vernizzi, Filippo; Piazza, Federico E-mail: fpiazza@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-02-01

    We propose a universal description of dark energy and modified gravity that includes all single-field models. By extending a formalism previously applied to inflation, we consider the metric universally coupled to matter fields and we write in terms of it the most general unitary gauge action consistent with the residual unbroken symmetries of spatial diffeomorphisms. Our action is particularly suited for cosmological perturbation theory: the background evolution depends on only three operators. All other operators start at least at quadratic order in the perturbations and their effects can be studied independently and systematically. In particular, we focus on the properties of a few operators which appear in non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor gravity and galileon theories. In this context, we study the mixing between gravity and the scalar degree of freedom. We assess the quantum and classical stability, derive the speed of sound of fluctuations and the renormalization of the Newton constant. The scalar can always be de-mixed from gravity at quadratic order in the perturbations, but not necessarily through a conformal rescaling of the metric. We show how to express covariant field-operators in our formalism and give several explicit examples of dark energy and modified gravity models in our language. Finally, we discuss the relation with the covariant EFT methods recently appeared in the literature.

  15. Hamiltonian dynamics of an exotic action for gravity in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escalante, Alberto Manuel-Cabrera, J.

    2014-04-15

    The Hamiltonian dynamics and the canonical covariant formalism for an exotic action in three dimensions are performed. By working with the complete phase space, we report a complete Hamiltonian description of the theory such as the extended action, the extended Hamiltonian, the algebra among the constraints, the Diracs brackets and the correct gauge transformations. In addition, we show that in spite of exotic action and tetrad gravity with a cosmological constant give rise to the same equations of motion, they are not equivalent, in fact, we show that their corresponding Diracs brackets are quite different. Finally, we construct a gauge invariant symplectic form which in turn represents a complete Hamiltonian description of the covariant phase space. -- Highlights: We report a detailed Hamiltonian analysis for an exotic action of gravity. We show that Palatini and exotic actions are not equivalent. The exotic action is a non-commutative theory. The fundamental gauge transformations of the theory are ?-deformed Poincar transformations. A Lorentz and gauge invariant symplectic two-form is constructed.

  16. Mortality in Appalachian coal mining regions: the value of statistical life lost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Ahern, M.M.

    2009-07-15

    We examined elevated mortality rates in Appalachian coal mining areas for 1979-2005, and estimated the corresponding value of statistical life (VSL) lost relative to the economic benefits of the coal mining industry. We compared age-adjusted mortality rates and socioeconomic conditions across four county groups: Appalachia with high levels of coal mining, Appalachia with lower mining levels, Appalachia without coal mining, and other counties in the nation. We converted mortality estimates to VSL estimates and compared the results with the economic contribution of coal mining. We also conducted a discount analysis to estimate current benefits relative to future mortality costs. The heaviest coal mining areas of Appalachia had the poorest socioeconomic conditions. Before adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas ranged from 3,975 to 10,923, depending on years studied and comparison group. Corresponding VSL estimates ranged from $18.563 billion to $84.544 billion, with a point estimate of $50.010 billion, greater than the $8.088 billion economic contribution of coal mining. After adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual deaths in mining areas ranged from 1,736 to 2,889, and VSL costs continued to exceed the benefits of mining. Discounting VSL costs into the future resulted in excess costs relative to benefits in seven of eight conditions, with a point estimate of $41.846 billion.

  17. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  18. Codes for Handling ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI Data.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-08-31

    Version 7.02 of the ENDF Utility Codes corrects all bugs reported to NNDC as of April 1, 2005 and supercedes all previous releases. Three codes CHECKR, STANEF, and INTER were actually ported from the 7.01 release without any change (therefore they will identify themselves as 7.01 in the output). A detailed log of changes can be found at the beginning of the respective FORTRAN sources. The programs can process ENDF-6 formatted files including all formatsmore » approved up to and including the November 2004 CSEWG meeting except for the Generalized R-Matrix resonance region format and the generalized format for covariances (file 30) and the new “trial” formats for resonance parameters and their covariances. The programs will also process ENDF-5 formatted files. (Note: Four programs that were present in the 6.13 release: GETMAT, LISTEF, PLOTEF and SETMDC are no longer maintained.) Additional information is on the developer’s web site: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/.« less

  19. Many-Group Cross-Section Adjustment Techniques for Boiling Water Reactor Adaptive Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multigroup neutron cross sections, including self-shielding correction factors, to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) core modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainties through various BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k{sub eff}, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multigroup cross sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR core modeling predictions and observed (i.e., measured) plant data. For this paper, observed plant data are virtually simulated in the form of perturbed three-dimensional nodal power distributions with the perturbations sized to represent actual discrepancies between predictions and real plant data. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics and core simulator calculations. The data adjustment equations are developed using a subspace approach that exploits the ill-conditioning of the multigroup cross-section covariance matrix to minimize computation and storage burden. Tikhonov regularization is also employed to improve the conditioning of the data adjustment equations. Expressions are also provided for posterior covariance matrices of both the multigroup cross-section and core attributes uncertainties.

  20. Detecting a Lorentz-violating field in cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Baojiu; Barrow, John D.; Mota, David F.

    2008-01-15

    We consider cosmology in the Einstein-Aether theory (the generally covariant theory of gravitation coupled to a dynamical timelike Lorentz-violating vector field) with a linear Ae-Lagrangian. The 3+1 spacetime splitting approach is used to derive covariant and gauge invariant perturbation equations which are valid for a general class of Lagrangians. Restricting attention to the parameter space of these theories which is consistent with local gravity experiments, we show that there are tracking behaviors for the Ae field, both in the background cosmology and at the linear perturbation level. The primordial power spectrum of scalar perturbations in this model is shown to be the same as that predicted by standard general relativity. However, the power spectrum of tensor perturbation is different from that in general relativity, but has a smaller amplitude and so cannot be detected at present. We also study the implications for late-time cosmology and find that the evolution of photon and neutrino anisotropic stresses can source the Ae field perturbation during the radiation and matter dominated epochs, and as a result the CMB and matter power spectra are modified. However, these effects are degenerate with respect to other cosmological parameters, such as neutrino masses and the bias parameter in the observed galaxy spectrum.

  1. The principal component analysis method used with polynomial Chaos expansion to propagate uncertainties through critical transport problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rising, M. E.; Prinja, A. K.

    2012-07-01

    A critical neutron transport problem with random material properties is introduced. The total cross section and the average neutron multiplicity are assumed to be uncertain, characterized by the mean and variance with a log-normal distribution. The average neutron multiplicity and the total cross section are assumed to be uncorrected and the material properties for differing materials are also assumed to be uncorrected. The principal component analysis method is used to decompose the covariance matrix into eigenvalues and eigenvectors and then 'realizations' of the material properties can be computed. A simple Monte Carlo brute force sampling of the decomposed covariance matrix is employed to obtain a benchmark result for each test problem. In order to save computational time and to characterize the moments and probability density function of the multiplication factor the polynomial chaos expansion method is employed along with the stochastic collocation method. A Gauss-Hermite quadrature set is convolved into a multidimensional tensor product quadrature set and is successfully used to compute the polynomial chaos expansion coefficients of the multiplication factor. Finally, for a particular critical fuel pin assembly the appropriate number of random variables and polynomial expansion order are investigated. (authors)

  2. Cosmic shear measurements with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Becker, M. R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulationsmore » to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper (DES et al. 2015).« less

  3. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  4. Cosmic Shear Measurements with DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, M. R.

    2015-07-20

    We present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulations to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper (DES et al. 2015).

  5. Decreases in Human Semen Quality with Age Among Healthy Men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eskenazi, B.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Kidd, S.A.; Moore, L.; Young, S.S.; Moore, D.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this report is to characterize the associations between age and semen quality among healthy active men after controlling for identified covariates. Ninety-seven healthy, nonsmoking men between 22 and 80 years without known fertility problems who worked for or retired from a large research laboratory. There was a gradual decrease in all semen parameters from 22-80 years of age. After adjusting for covariates, volume decreased 0.03 ml per year (p = 0.001); sperm concentration decreased 2.5% per year (p = 0.005); total count decreased 3.6% per year of age (p < 0.001); motility decreased 0.7% per year (P < 0.001); progressive motility decreased 3.1% per year (p < 0.001); and total progressively motile sperm decreased 4.8% per year (p < 0.001). In a group of healthy active men, semen volume, sperm concentration, total sperm count, and sperm motility decrease continuously between 22-80 years of age, with no evidence of a threshold.

  6. TCP Final Report: Measuring the Effects of Stand Age and Soil Drainage on Boreal Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Goulden

    2007-05-02

    This was a 6-year research project in the Canadian boreal forest that focused on using field observations to understand how boreal forest carbon balance changes during recovery from catastrophic forest fire. The project began with two overarching goals: (1) to develop techniques that would all the year round operation of 7 eddy covariance sites in a harsh environment at a much lower cost than had previously been possible, and (2) to use these measurements to determine how carbon balance changes during secondary succession. The project ended in 2006, having accomplished its primary objectives. Key contributions to DOE during the study were: (1) Design, test, and demonstrate a lightweight, fully portable eddy flux system that exploits several economies of scale to allow AmeriFlux-quality measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange at many sites for a large reduction in cost (Goulden et al. 2006). (2) Added seven year-round sites to AmeriFlux, at a relatively low per site cost using the Eddy Covariance Mesonet approach (Goulden et al. 2006). These data are freely available on the AmeriFlux web site. (3) Tested and rejected the conventional wisdom that forests lose large amounts of carbon during the first decade after disturbance, then accumulate large amounts of carbon for {approx}several decades, and then return to steady state in old age. Rather, we found that boreal forests recovers quickly from fire and begins to accumulate carbon within {approx}5 years after disturbance. Additionally, we found no evidence that carbon accumulation declines in old stands (Goulden et al. 2006, Goulden et al. in prep). (4) Tested and rejected claims based on remote sensing observations (for example, Myneni et al 1996 using AVHRR) that regions of boreal forest have changed markedly in the last 20 years. Rather, we assembled a much richer data set than had been used in the past (eddy covariance observations, tree rings, biomass, NPP, AVHRR, and LandSat), which we used to establish that the

  7. A Continuous Measure of Gross Primary Production for the Conterminous U.S. Derived from MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Law, Beverly E.; Chen, Jiquan; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Cook, David R.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Wharton, Sonia; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Verma, Shashi B.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Scott, Russell L.; Monson, Russell K.; Litvak, Marcy; Hollinger, David Y.; Sun, Ge; Davis, Kenneth J.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Starr, Gregory; Torn, Margaret S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2009-01-28

    The quantification of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is of scientific importance and also relevant to climate-policy making. Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of ecosystem-level exchange of carbon dioxide spanning diurnal, synoptic, seasonal, and interannual time scales. However, these measurements only represent the fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to upscale gross primary productivity (GPP) data from eddy covariance flux towers to the continental scale. We first combined GPP and MODIS data for 42 AmeriFlux towers encompassing a wide range of ecosystem and climate types to develop a predictive GPP model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained using observed GPP over the period 2000-2004, and was validated using observed GPP over the period 2005-2006 and leave-one-out cross-validation. Our model predicted GPP fairly well at the site level. We then used the model to estimate GPP for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the U.S. for each 8-day interval over the period from February 2000 to December 2006 using MODIS data. Our GPP estimates provide a spatially and temporally continuous measure of gross primary production for the U.S. that is a highly constrained by eddy covariance flux data. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for upscaling eddy flux GPP data to the continental scale and producing continuous GPP estimates across multiple biomes. With these estimates, we then examined the patterns, magnitude, and interannual variability of GPP. We estimated a gross carbon uptake between 6.91 and 7.33 Pg C yr{sup -1} for the conterminous U.S. Drought, fires, and hurricanes reduced annual GPP at regional scales and could have a significant impact on the U.S. net ecosystem carbon exchange. The sources of the interannual variability of U.S. GPP were dominated

  8. The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-09-15

    Storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep geological formations for greenhouse gas mitigation is gaining momentum and moving from its conceptual and testing stages towards widespread application. In this work we explore various optimization strategies for characterizing surface leakage (seepage) using near-surface measurement approaches such as accumulation chambers and eddy covariance towers. Seepage characterization objectives and limitations need to be defined carefully from the outset especially in light of large natural background variations that can mask seepage. The cost and sensitivity of seepage detection are related to four critical length scales pertaining to the size of the: (1) region that needs to be monitored; (2) footprint of the measurement approach, and (3) main seepage zone; and (4) region in which concentrations or fluxes are influenced by seepage. Seepage characterization objectives may include one or all of the tasks of detecting, locating, and quantifying seepage. Each of these tasks has its own optimal strategy. Detecting and locating seepage in a region in which there is no expected or preferred location for seepage nor existing evidence for seepage requires monitoring on a fixed grid, e.g., using eddy covariance towers. The fixed-grid approaches needed to detect seepage are expected to require large numbers of eddy covariance towers for large-scale geologic CO{sub 2} storage. Once seepage has been detected and roughly located, seepage zones and features can be optimally pinpointed through a dynamic search strategy, e.g., employing accumulation chambers and/or soil-gas sampling. Quantification of seepage rates can be done through measurements on a localized fixed grid once the seepage is pinpointed. Background measurements are essential for seepage detection in natural ecosystems. Artificial neural networks are considered as regression models useful for distinguishing natural system behavior from anomalous behavior

  9. Importance of Lorentz structure in the parton model: Target mass corrections, transverse momentum dependence, positivity bounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Alesio, U.; Leader, E.; Murgia, F.

    2010-02-01

    We show that respecting the underlying Lorentz structure in the parton model has very strong consequences. Failure to insist on the correct Lorentz covariance is responsible for the existence of contradictory results in the literature for the polarized structure function g{sub 2}(x), whereas with the correct imposition we are able to derive the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for g{sub 2}(x) and the target-mass corrections for polarized deep inelastic scattering without recourse to the operator product expansion. We comment briefly on the problem of threshold behavior in the presence of target-mass corrections. Careful attention to the Lorentz structure has also profound implications for the structure of the transverse momentum dependent parton densities often used in parton model treatments of hadron production, allowing the k{sub T} dependence to be derived explicitly. It also leads to stronger positivity and Soffer-type bounds than usually utilized for the collinear densities.

  10. Induced representations of tensors and spinors of any rank in the Stueckelberg-Horwitz-Piron theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horwitz, Lawrence P.; Zeilig-Hess, Meir

    2015-09-15

    We show that a modification of Wigner’s induced representation for the description of a relativistic particle with spin can be used to construct spinors and tensors of arbitrary rank, with invariant decomposition over angular momentum. In particular, scalar and vector fields, as well as the representations of their transformations, are constructed. The method that is developed here admits the construction of wave packets and states of a many body relativistic system with definite total angular momentum. Furthermore, a Pauli-Lubanski operator is constructed on the orbit of the induced representation which provides a Casimir operator for the Poincaré group and which contains the physical intrinsic angular momentum of the particle covariantly.

  11. Recovering complete and draft population genomes from metagenome datasets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sangwan, Naseer; Xia, Fangfang; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2016-03-08

    Assembly of metagenomic sequence data into microbial genomes is of fundamental value to improving our understanding of microbial ecology and metabolism by elucidating the functional potential of hard-to-culture microorganisms. Here, we provide a synthesis of available methods to bin metagenomic contigs into species-level groups and highlight how genetic diversity, sequencing depth, and coverage influence binning success. Despite the computational cost on application to deeply sequenced complex metagenomes (e.g., soil), covarying patterns of contig coverage across multiple datasets significantly improves the binning process. We also discuss and compare current genome validation methods and reveal how these methods tackle the problem ofmore » chimeric genome bins i.e., sequences from multiple species. Finally, we explore how population genome assembly can be used to uncover biogeographic trends and to characterize the effect of in situ functional constraints on the genome-wide evolution.« less

  12. The use of microdosimetric techniques in radiation protection measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.; Hsu, H.H.; Casson, W.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    A major objective of radiation protection is to determine the dose equivalent for routine radiation protection applications. As microdosimetry has developed over approximately three decades, its most important application has been in measuring radiation quality, especially in radiation fields of unknown or inadequately known energy spectra. In these radiation fields, determination of dose equivalent is not straightforward; however, the use of microdosimetric principles and techniques could solve this problem. In this paper, the authors discuss the measurement of lineal energy, a microscopic analog to linear energy transfer, and demonstrate the development and implementation of the variance-covariance method, a novel method in experimental microdosimetry. This method permits the determination of dose mean lineal energy, an essential parameter of radiation quality, in a radiation field of unknown spectrum, time-varying dose rate, and high dose rate. Real-time monitoring of changes in radiation quality can also be achieved by using microdosimetric techniques.

  13. Fault Tree Cut Set System Performance.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-02-21

    Version 00 SIGPI computes the probabilistic performance of complex systems by combining cut set or other binary product data with probability information on each basic event. SIGPI is designed to work with either coherent systems, where the system fails when certain combinations of components fail, or noncoherent systems, where at least one cut set occurs only if at least one component of the system is operating properly. The program can handle conditionally independent components, dependentmore » components, or a combination of component types and has been used to evaluate responses to environmental threats and seismic events. The three data types that can be input are cut set data in disjoint normal form, basic component probabilities for independent basic components, and mean and covariance data for statistically dependent basic components.« less

  14. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilitiesInternational Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden)Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis VlachoudisWorkshop Assistant: Graldine Jean

  15. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Central Cavity Free-Field Environment with the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-FF-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Lippert, Lance L.; Vehar, David W.; Griffin, Patrick J.

    2015-08-01

    This document presents the facilit y - recommended characteri zation o f the neutron, prompt gamma - ray, and delayed gamma - ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor ( ACRR ) for the cen tral cavity free - field environment with the 32 - inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environmen t is ACRR - FF - CC - 32 - cl. The neutron, prompt gamma - ray , and delayed gamma - ray energy spectra , uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma - ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the cavity . Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples . Acknowledgements The authors wish to th ank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work . Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  16. Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2011-05-23

    In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10{sup 16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

  17. Uncertainty of silicon 1-MeV damage function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danjaji, M.B.; Griffin, P.J.

    1997-02-01

    The electronics radiation hardness-testing community uses the ASTM E722-93 Standard Practice to define the energy dependence of the nonionizing neutron damage to silicon semiconductors. This neutron displacement damage response function is defined to be equal to the silicon displacement kerma as calculated from the ORNL Si cross-section evaluation. Experimental work has shown that observed damage ratios at various test facilities agree with the defined response function to within 5%. Here, a covariance matrix for the silicon 1-MeV neutron displacement damage function is developed. This uncertainty data will support the electronic radiation hardness-testing community and will permit silicon displacement damage sensors to be used in least squares spectrum adjustment codes.

  18. Quantifying sources and sinks of reactive gases in the lower atmosphere using airborne flux observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, Glenn; Hanisco, T. F.; Atkinson, H. L.; Bui, Thaopaul; Crounse, J. D.; Dean-Day, J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Jacob, D.; Karl, T.; Kim, P. S.; Liu, X.; Marvin, M. R.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Misztal, Pawel K.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Peischl, Jeff; Pollack, Ilana; Ryerson, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Travis, Katherine; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-10-16

    Atmospheric composition is governed by the interplay of emissions, chemistry, deposition, and transport. Substantial questions surround each of these processes, especially in forested environments with strong biogenic emissions. Utilizing aircraft observations acquired over a forest in the southeast U.S., we calculate eddy covariance fluxes for a suite of reactive gases and apply the synergistic information derived from this analysis to quantify emission and deposition fluxes, oxidant concentrations, aerosol uptake coefficients, and other key parameters. Evaluation of results against state-of-the-science models and parameterizations provides insight into our current understanding of this system and frames future observational priorities. As a near-direct measurement of fundamental process rates, airborne fluxes offer a new tool to improve biogenic and anthropogenic emissions inventories, photochemical mechanisms, and deposition parameterizations.

  19. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichtl, Adam

    2007-09-06

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  20. Unsaturated fractured rock characterization methods and data sets at the Apache Leap Tuff Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.; Sheets, P.J.; Blanford, J.H. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

    1990-08-01

    Performance assessment of high-level nuclear waste containment feasibility requires representative values of parameters as input, including parameter moments, distributional characteristics, and covariance structures between parameters. To meet this need, characterization methods and data sets for interstitial, hydraulic, pneumatic and thermal parameters for a slightly welded fractured tuff at the Apache Leap Tuff Site situated in central Arizona are reported in this document. The data sets include the influence of matric suction on measured parameters. Spatial variability is investigated by sampling along nine boreholes at regular distances. Laboratory parameter estimates for 105 core segments are provided, as well as field estimates centered on the intervals where the core segments were collected. Measurement uncertainty is estimated by repetitively testing control samples. 31 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2012-12-15

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  2. Galileon gravity and its relevance to late time cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gannouji, Radouane; Sami, M.

    2010-07-15

    We consider the covariant Galileon gravity taking into account the third order and fourth order scalar field Lagrangians L{sub 3}({pi}) and L{sub 4}({pi}), consisting of three and four {pi}'s with four and five derivatives acting on them, respectively. The background dynamical equations are set up for the system under consideration and the stability of the self-accelerating solution is demonstrated in a general setting. We extended this study to the general case of the fifth order theory. For the spherically symmetric static background, we spell out conditions for the suppression of fifth force effects mediated by the Galileon field {pi}. We study field perturbations in the fixed background and investigate the conditions for their causal propagation. We also briefly discuss metric fluctuations and derive an evolution equation for matter perturbations in Galileon gravity.

  3. Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racker, Juan [CONICET, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Avenida Bustillo 9500 (8400), San Carlos De Bariloche (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina); Sisterna, Pablo [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350 (7600), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Vucetich, Hector [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-10-15

    The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light (c), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of c is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

  4. Introduction to the theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-02-01

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: First, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics. Second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular techniques used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher energy regions.

  5. Introduction to the Theory and Analysis of Resolved (and Unresolved) Neutron Resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.

    2000-03-13

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two purposes: First, they provide insight into the nature of matter, increasing our understanding of fundamental physics. Second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, or for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this report, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular techniques used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  6. Introduction to theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-07-01

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: first, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics; second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular technique used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  7. Chiral anomalies and zeta-function regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1985-03-15

    The zeta-function method for regularizing determinants is used to calculate the chiral anomalies of several field-theory models. In SU(N) gauge theories without ..gamma../sub 5/ couplings, the results of perturbation theory are obtained in an unambiguous manner for the full gauge theory as well as for the corresponding external-field problem. If axial-vector couplings are present, different anomalies occur for the two cases. The result for the full gauge theory is again uniquely determined; for its nongauge analog, however, ambiguities can arise. The connection between the basic path integral and the operator used to construct the heat kernel is investigated and the significance of its Hermiticity and gauge covariance are analyzed. The implications of the Wess-Zumino conditions are considered.

  8. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  9. Relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation. II. Pygmy dipole resonance in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinova, E.; Ring, P.; Tselyaev, V.; Langanke, K.

    2009-05-15

    Theoretical studies of low-lying dipole strength in even-even spherical nuclei within the relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation (RQTBA) are presented. The RQTBA developed recently as an extension of the self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation (RQRPA) enables one to investigate the effects of the coupling of two-quasiparticle excitations to collective vibrations within a fully consistent calculation scheme based on covariant energy density functional theory. Dipole spectra of even-even {sup 130}Sn-{sup 140}Sn and {sup 68}Ni-{sup 78}Ni isotopes calculated within both RQRPA and RQTBA show two well-separated collective structures: the higher lying giant dipole resonance and the lower lying pygmy dipole resonance, which can be identified by the different behavior of the transition densities of states in these regions.

  10. A Carbon Flux Super Site. New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2014-11-17

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.