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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Energy Systems

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

3

Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

4

Model year 2010 (Gen 3) Toyota Prius level 1 testing report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Toyota Prius (Generation 3) was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of 'Level 1' testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network connection, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D{sup 3}). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from the exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and minimal CAN bus data such as engine speed and pedal position. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Prius over standard regulatory cycles.

Rask, E.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Bocci, D.; Energy Systems

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Working natural gas inventories below last year's level at ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Despite inventory levels at the end of March above the 5-year average, cumulative net injections this year are over 20% lower than in 2010.

6

Model Year 2014 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 SmartWay Vehicles Updated November 6, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 12 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales...

7

Model Year 2013 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Updated August 14, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 13 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales...

8

Model Year 1999 Fuel Economy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL FUEL ECONOMY GUIDE MODEL YEAR 1999 DOE/EE-0178 Fuel Economy Estimates October 1998 1 CONTENTS PAGE Purpose of the Guide ..................................................... 1 Interior Volume ................................................................ 1 How the Fuel Economy Estimates are Obtained ........... 1 Factors Affecting MPG .................................................... 2 Fuel Economy and Climate Change ............................... 2 Gas Guzzler Tax ............................................................. 2 Vehicle Classes Used in This Guide. .............................. 2 Annuel Fuel Costs .......................................................... 3 How to Use the Guide .................................................... 4 Where to Re-order Guides

9

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Model Year 2012-2013 SmartWay Vans Year Model Displ Cyl Trans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-2013 SmartWay Vans Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score...

11

Model Year 2013 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Updated August 14, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 13 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2 small car 7 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 8 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.0CB2 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.4DB3 small car 6 22 31 26 7 yes AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5

12

Model Year 2014 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Updated December 20, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 14 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 EHNXV01.58D2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV EHNXV01.58D2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV EHNXV02.0EB3 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes ACURA RLX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-7 4WD Gasoline FA B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 EHNXV03.52G2 midsize car 7 28 32 30 8 yes ACURA RLX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-7 4WD Gasoline CA L3SULEV30 California LEV-III SULEV30 EHNXV03.52G2 midsize car 8 28 32 30 8 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5

13

Model Year 2003 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 2 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay...

14

Model Year 2010 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 20 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score...

15

Model Year 2009 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 16 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas...

16

Model Year 2001 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 1 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG GHG Score SmartWay HONDA Accord...

17

Model Year 2012 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 14 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas...

18

Model Year 2007 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 18 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay...

19

Model Year 2000 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 1 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG GHG Score...

20

Model Year 2011 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 10 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Model Year 2008 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 20 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay...

22

Model Year 2004 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 5 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 4HNXV02.0RKC small car 6 21 28 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 24 30 26 8 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA LEV 4HNXV02.0RKC small car 6 21 28 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA LEV 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CA LEV 4HNXV02.0XKC small car 6 24 30 26 8 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 4HNXV03.2CKR midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 4HNXV03.2CKR midsize car 7 18 28 21 6 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-S5

23

Model Year 2005 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 9 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 5HNXV02.0HKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA L2 5HNXV02.0HKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 5HNXV02.4KBP small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 5HNXV03.24B4 midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 5HNXV03.24B4 midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD

24

Model Year 2002 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 1 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG GHG Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0EKC small car 6 21 28 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0VBP small car 6 21 30 24 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0VBP small car 6 23 30 26 8 yes HONDA Accord 2.3 (4 cyl) Auto-L4 2WD Gasoline CA SLEV 2HNXV02.3FK6 midsize car 9 20 28 23 7 yes HONDA CR-V 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-L4 2WD Gasoline NF LEV 2HNXT02.4YBP SUV 6 20 26 23 7 yes HONDA Civic 1.7 (4 cyl) Auto-AV 2WD CNG CA SLEV 2HNXV01.74WN small car 9.5 26 31 28 9 yes HONDA Civic 1.7 (4 cyl) Auto-AV 2WD CNG NL+CF ULEV 2HNXV01.74WN small car 9 26 31 28 9 yes HONDA Civic 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CL LEV 2HNXV02.0VBP small car 6 23 28 25 7 yes HONDA Insight 1 (3 cyl)

25

Model Year 2006 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 11 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA L2 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 20 28 23 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 22 31 25 7 yes ACURA RSX 2 (4 cyl) Man-5 2WD Gasoline CA L2 6HNXV02.0DKC small car 6 24 31 26 8 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 6HNXV03.2NKR midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TL 3.2 (6 cyl) Man-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 6HNXV03.2NKR midsize car 7 18 26 21 6 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 (4 cyl) Auto-S5 2WD

26

Model Year 2011 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 10 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXV02.4DB9 small car 6 22 31 26 6 yes ACURA TSX Wagon 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXV02.4DB9 station wagon 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 6 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 5 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A4 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BADXJ02.03UB small car 6 21 31 25 6 yes AUDI A4 2 4 CVT 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BADXJ02.03UB small car 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A5 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV

27

Model Year 2012 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Page 1 of 14 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXV02.4DB9 small car 6 22 31 26 6 yes ACURA TSX Wagon 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXV02.4DB9 station wagon 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 5 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A3 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Diesel CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 6 30 42 34 7 yes AUDI A4 2 4 CVT 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CADXJ02.03UB small car 6 22 30 25 6 yes AUDI A4 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CADXJ02.03UB small car 6 21 31 25 6 yes AUDI A5 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV

28

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

29

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay MidsizeCars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MidsizeCars MidsizeCars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI A6 2 4 SCV-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB midsize car 6 25 33 28 7 yes 2013 BMW 528i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 midsize car 6 22 33 26 7 yes 2013 BMW 528i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 midsize car 6 24 34 28 7 yes 2013 BMW ActiveHybrid 5 3 6 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXV03.0AH5 midsize car 6 23 30 26 7 yes 2013 BUICK Lacrosse 2.4 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DGMXV02.4060 midsize car 5 25 36 29 8 yes 2013 BUICK Lacrosse 2.4 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline CA L2 California LEV-II LEV DGMXV02.4060 midsize car 5 25 36 29 8 yes 2013 BUICK Regal

30

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Large Cars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Cars Large Cars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 BMW X1 sDrive28i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 large car 6 24 34 28 7 yes 2013 BMW X1 xDrive28i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 large car 6 22 33 26 7 yes 2013 FORD C-MAX Hybrid 2 4 CVT 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DFMXV02.0VZL large car 7 45 40 43 10 yes 2013 FORD Taurus 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DFMXV02.0VE6 large car 6 22 32 26 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata 2 4 Auto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHYXV02.01FE large car 6 22 34 26 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata 2.4 4 Auto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHYXV02.41GE large car 6 24 35 28 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata

31

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Station Wagons Year Model Displ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Wagons Station Wagons Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 5 30 42 34 8 yes 2013 AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 6 30 42 34 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit N/A N/A Auto-1 2WD Electricity FA B1 Federal Tier 2 Bin 1 DHNXV00.05ET station wagon 10 132 105 118 10 yes 2013 HONDA Fit N/A N/A Auto-1 2WD Electricity CA ZEV California ZEV DHNXV00.05ET station wagon 10 132 105 118 10 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Auto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DHNXV01.5JB2 station wagon 5 28 35 31 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Auto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV01.5JB2 station wagon 6 28 35 31 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Man-5 2WD

32

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Small Cars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Cars Small Cars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2 small car 7 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 8 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.0CB2 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes 2013 ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.4DB3 small car 6 22 31 26 7 yes 2013 AUDI A4 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB small car 6 22 32 26 7 yes 2013 AUDI A4 2 4 SCV-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB

33

CSP transactors for asynchronous transaction level modeling and IP reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In synchronous circuit design, new levels of abstraction above RTL allow the designer to model, simulate, debug and explore various architectures more efficiently than before. These are known as transaction level modeling. The translation between signals ...

Lilian Janin; Doug Edwards

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Policies of System Level Pipeline Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipelining is a well understood and often used implementation technique for increasing the performance of a hardware system. We develop several SystemC/C++ modeling techniques that allow us to quickly model, simulate, and evaluate pipelines. We employ a small domain specific language (DSL) based on resource usage patterns that automates the drudgery of boilerplate code needed to configure connectivity in simulation models. The DSL is embedded directly in the host modeling language SystemC/C++. Additionally we develop several techniques for parameterizing a pipeline's behavior based on policies of function, communication, and timing (performance modeling).

Harcourt, Ed

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Age-aware solder performance models : level 2 milestone completion.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Legislated requirements and industry standards are replacing eutectic lead-tin (Pb-Sn) solders with lead-free (Pb-free) solders in future component designs and in replacements and retrofits. Since Pb-free solders have not yet seen service for long periods, their long-term behavior is poorly characterized. Because understanding the reliability of Pb-free solders is critical to supporting the next generation of circuit board designs, it is imperative that we develop, validate and exercise a solder lifetime model that can capture the thermomechanical response of Pb-free solder joints in stockpile components. To this end, an ASC Level 2 milestone was identified for fiscal year 2010: Milestone 3605: Utilize experimentally validated constitutive model for lead-free solder to simulate aging and reliability of solder joints in stockpile components. This report documents the completion of this milestone, including evidence that the milestone completion criteria were met and a summary of the milestone Program Review.

Neilsen, Michael K.; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Neidigk, Matthew Aaron; Holm, Elizabeth Ann

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Property:Buildings/ModelYear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings/ModelYear Buildings/ModelYear Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelYear" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load Baseline + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load Baseline + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + 2009 + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load Baseline + 2009 +

37

ENSO Prediction with Markov Models: The Impact of Sea Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of seasonally varying linear Markov models are constructed in a reduced multivariate empirical orthogonal function (MEOF) space of observed sea surface temperature, surface wind stress, and sea level analysis. The Markov models are ...

Yan Xue; Ants Leetmaa; Ming Ji

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Two-Level Wind and Buoyancy Driven Thermocline Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple two-level model is designed to simulate the “thermocline equations,” applicable for large-scale steady oceanic flow. The model serves two functions. First, it replaces problems with the interpretation of slablike dynamics (e.g., Luyten ...

Peter D. Killworth

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Model documentation: electricity market module. [15 year forecasts  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the electricity market model. This model is a component of the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS), the energy market model used to provide projections of energy markets up to 15 years into the future. The electricity market model was developed by the Supply Analysis and Integration Branch as part of building the larger system. This report is written for an audience consisting of mathematical economists, statisticians, operations research analysts, and utility planners. This report contains an overview and a mathematical specification of the electricity market module. It includes a description of the model logic and the individual subroutines in the computer code. A companion document Intermediate Future Forecasting System: Executive Summary (DOE/EIA-430) provides an overview of the components in IFFS and their linkages. 22 figures, 2 tables.

Sanders, R.C.; Murphy, F.H.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Evaluation of System Level Modeling for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for Hanford More Documents & Publications Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Three level constraints on conformal field theories and string models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple tree level constraints for conformal field theories which follow from the requirement of crossing symmetry of four-point amplitudes are presented, and their utility for probing general properties of string models is briefly illustrated and discussed. 9 refs.

Lewellen, D.C.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Simple Model for Coastal Sea Level Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable forecasting of wind-forced coastal sea level on the synoptic scale is available for most of the coastal areas of the United States through the National Weather Service Extratropical Storm Surge Model (ESSM). However, in many coastal ...

Charles E. Tilburg; Richard W. Garvine

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A model for a national low level waste program  

SciTech Connect

A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site services over forty generators and has historically managed over 12,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The results of the waste minimization program at the site resulted in over 900 initiatives, avoiding over 220,000 cubic meters of waste for a life cycle cost savings of $275 million. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the low level waste program services over 20 major generators and several hundred smaller generators that produce over 4,000 cubic meters of low level waste annually. The Los Alamos National Laboratory low level waste program utilizes both on-site and off-site disposal capabilities. Off-site disposal requires the implementation of certification requirements to utilize both federal and commercial options. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the US Department of Energy's first deep geological repository for the permanent disposal of Transuanic waste. Transuranic waste was generated and retrievably stored at 39 sites across the US. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with a radionuclide concentration equal to or greater than 100 nCi/g consisting of radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years and with an atomic mass greater than uranium. Combining the lessons learned from the national transuranic waste program, the successful low level waste program at Savannah River Site and the experience of off-site disposal options at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides the framework and basis for developing a viable national strategy for managing low level waste.

Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Challenging beliefs through multi-level participatory modelling in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical challenge for science in times of increasingly depleted natural resources is how policy and management can be improved to attain a pathway to sustainability. This paper argues that facilitating a learning experience for decision makers by ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Indonesia, Multi-level governance, Participatory modelling

Alexander Smajgl

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

PERFORMANCE OF A BURIED RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS AFTER 24 YEARS  

SciTech Connect

A radioactive high level waste glass was made in 1980 with Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 15 waste. This glass was buried in the SRS burial ground for 24 years but lysimeter data was only available for the first 8 years. The glass was exhumed and analyzed in 2004. The glass was predicted to be very durable and laboratory tests confirmed the durability response. The laboratory results indicated that the glass was very durable as did analysis of the lysimeter data. Scanning electron microscopy of the glass burial surface showed no significant glass alteration consistent with the results of the laboratory and field tests. No detectable Pu, Am, Cm, Np, or Ru leached from the glass into the surrounding sediment. Leaching of {beta}/{delta} from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in the glass was diffusion controlled. Less than 0.5% of the Cs and Sr in the glass leached into the surrounding sediment, with >99% of the leached radionuclides remaining within 8 centimeters of the glass pellet.

Jantzen, C; Daniel Kaplan, D; Ned Bibler, N; David Peeler, D; John Plodinec, J

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

46

SP-100 operational life model. Fiscal Year 1990 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the initial year`s effort in the development of an Operational Life Model (OLM) for the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System. The initial step undertaken in developing the OLM was to review all available documentation from GE on their plans for the OLM and on the degradation and failure mechanisms envisioned for the SP-100. In addition, the DEGRA code developed at JPL, which modelled the degradation of the General Purpose Heat Source based Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG), was reviewed. Based on the review of the degradation and failure mechanisms, a list of the most pertinent degradation effects along with their key degradation mechanisms was compiled. This was done as a way of separating the mechanisms from the effects and allowing all of the effects to be incorporated into the OLM. The emphasis was on parameters which will tend to change performance as a function of time and not on those that are simply failures without any prior degradation.

Ewell, R.; Awaya, H.

1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Interoperation of DEVS models and differential equation models using HLA/RTI: hybrid simulation of engineering and engagement level models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid model is a combination of models developed in various simulation development environments. A war game model is a kind of hybrid model and consists of multiple level models. Engineering level models are interested in the change of values via ... Keywords: DEVS, HLA/RTI, MATLAB/Simulink, combat system effectiveness, hybrid simulation

Chang Ho Sung; Jeong Hee Hong; Tag Gon Kim

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Dispersion modeling of ground-level area sources of particulate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of dispersion modeling by State Air Pollution hics. Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAS) is increasing. Dispersion modeling provides a quick and efficient means of determining the downwind impact of pollutant release from a source. The SAPRAS are charged with the task of insuring that public exposure levels of these pollutants are less than the standards set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Estimating the concentration of pollutant at some distance downwind, in most cases the property line, allows that SAPRAS to determine whether or not a source needs to install additional means of control in order to decrease the rate of pollutant release. One set of models approved for regulatory use by the US EPA is Industrial Source Complex (ISC). ISC includes SCREEN: which is a simple screening model with imbedded meteorological data, and ST3 which is a more refined model requiring meteorological data to be provided. ISC models are based on the concept of Gaussian dispersion. The concentration determined using the ISC models are a result of determining concentrations based on a single wind speed and direction for a one hour time period. The first step in the formulation of a new model was to incorporate smaller time periods into the concentration predictions, in order to account for variation or wind speed and direction within an hour period. For ground-level sources, the vertical distribution involves mathematically dispersing the pollutant underground, then reflecting it back up. The next step taken in the new model development was the incorporation of a triangular distribution in the Medical plane. The triangular distribution is entirely above ground. Once the new model was formulated, a sample modeling procedure was performed in order to compare the behavior of the new model as compared to ISC ST3. Examination of the characteristics of the two models, the meteorological data, and the output from the modeling procedures allows the comparison and contrast of the behavioral characteristics of the two models.

Fritz, Bradley Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Parity Dependent Shell Model Level Densities for Nuclear Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, we developed a methodology [1-4] of calculating the spin and parity dependent shell model nuclear level density, which is a very useful ingredient in the Huaser-Feshbach theory for calculating reaction rates for nuclear astrophysics[5]. We developed new techniques based on nuclear statistical spectroscopy [6] to calculate the spin and parity projected moments of the nuclear shell model Hamiltonian, that can be further used to obtain an accurate description of the nuclear level density up to about 15 MeV excitation energy. These techniques were fully tested for the sd-shell nuclei and some light f p-shell nuclei, by comparing with the level density obtained from exact shell model diagonalization. Here we present for the first time comparisons with the exact shell model diagonalization for nuclei heavier than 56 Ni, in a model space spanned by the f 5/2, p 3/2, p 1/2 and g 9/2 orbits. The ratio of nuclear level densities of opposite parities is also discussed. This analysis was possible due to a new and very efficient nuclear shell model code [7] that can provide a large number of states of given spin and parity. PoS(NIC X)132

Mike Scott; Mihai Horoi; Mike Scott

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

51

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

52

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

53

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

54

Generic Disposal System Modeling--Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12/2011 12/2011 Rev. 2 FCRD- T10-201 0-00005 FCRD Technical Integration Office (TIO) DOCUMENT NUMBER REQUEST TRANSMITTAL SHEET 1. Document Information Document Title/Description: Generic Disposal System Modeling--Fiscal Year 2011 Revision: 0 Progress Re~ort Assigned Document Number: FCRD-USED-2011-000184 Effective Start Date: 08/1112011 Document Author/Creator: D. Clayton, G. Freeze, T. Hadgu, E. Hardin, J. Lee, OR .~: J. Prouty, R. Rogers, W.M. Nutt, J. Berkholzer, H.H. Liu, L. Zheng, S. Chu Document Owner: Palmer Vaughn Date Range: Originating Organization: Sandia National Laboratories From: To: Milestone OM1 ~M2 OM3 ~M4 o Not a Milestone Milestone Number:: M21UF034101 and M41UF035102 Work Package WBS Number: FTSN11 UF0341 and FTSN11 UF0351; 1.02.08.03 Controlled Unclassified Infonnation (CUI) Type ~ None OOUO OAT o Other FCRD SYSTEM: Year: o FUEL Fuels 2011 OINTL International

55

Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology in and Technology in the National Interest 60 Years of Excellence Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2012 Annual Report About the Cover: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers Chris Spadaccini (left) and Eric Duoss are shown experimenting with direct ink-writing to create micro- to macroscale structures with extreme precision. The Laboratory is advancing this process and other additive manufacturing technologies to develop new materials with extraordinary properties for use in a wide range of national-security and other applications. About the Laboratory: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in 1952 to enhance the security of the United States by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. With a talented and dedicated workforce and

56

Multi-level agent-based modeling - Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This very short article aims to bring together the available bibliography on multi-level (or multi-layer, multi-perspective, multi-view, multi-scale, multi-resolution) agent-based modeling so that it is accessible to interested researchers.

Morvan, Gildas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Advanced Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

Programme Csad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip Computer Science 120 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) Credit

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 180 credits with not more than 30 credits at level 3 (FHEQ level 6) and the rest at level M (FHEQ level 7) 4. Other entry N/A Credit Level awards (if applicable): 5. Exit Awards: PGDip in Advanced Computer Science with

Programme Csci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: September 16, 4: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #234: September 16, 2002 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles on

62

WHEN MODEL MEETS REALITY – A REVIEW OF SPAR LEVEL 2 MODEL AGAINST FUKUSHIMA ACCIDENT  

SciTech Connect

The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models are a set of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate the risk of operations at U.S. nuclear power plants and provide inputs to risk informed regulatory process. A small number of SPAR Level 2 models have been developed mostly for feasibility study purpose. They extend the Level 1 models to include containment systems, group plant damage states, and model containment phenomenology and accident progression in containment event trees. A severe earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan in March 2011 and caused significant damages on the reactors in Fukushima Daiichi site. Station blackout (SBO), core damage, containment damage, hydrogen explosion, and intensive radioactivity release, which have been previous analyzed and assumed as postulated accident progression in PRA models, now occurred with various degrees in the multi-units Fukushima Daiichi site. This paper reviews and compares a typical BWR SPAR Level 2 model with the “real” accident progressions and sequences occurred in Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3. It shows that the SPAR Level 2 model is a robust PRA model that could very reasonably describe the accident progression for a real and complicated nuclear accident in the world. On the other hand, the comparison shows that the SPAR model could be enhanced by incorporating some accident characteristics for better representation of severe accident progression.

Zhegang Ma

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Evaluation of Steam Generator Level Measurement Model for OPR1000 Using RETRAN-3D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator level measurement is important factor for plant transient analyses using best estimate thermal hydraulic computer codes since the value of steam generator level is used for steam generator level control system and plant protection system. Because steam generator is in the saturation condition which includes steam and liquid together and is the place that heat exchange occurs from primary side to secondary side, computer codes are hard to calculate steam generator level realistically without appropriate level measurement model. In this paper, we prepare the steam generator models using RETRAN-3D that include geometry models, full range feedwater control system and five types of steam generator level measurement model. Five types of steam generator level measurement model consist of level measurement model using elevation difference in downcomer, 1D level measurement model using fluid mass, 1D level measurement model using fluid volume, 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass, and 2D level measurement model using power and fluid volume. And we perform the evaluation of the capability of each steam generator level measurement model by simulating the real plant transient condition, the title is 'Reactor Trip by The Failure of The Deaerator Level Control Card of Ulchin Unit 3'. The comparison results between real plant data and RETRAN-3D analyses for each steam generator level measurement model show that 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass or fluid volume has more realistic prediction capability compared with other level measurement models. (authors)

Doo Yong Lee; Soon Joon Hong; Byung Chul Lee [FNC Technology Co., SNU Research Park Innovation Center 516, San4-2, Bongchun-7 dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Heok Soon Lim [KHNP Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Munji-dong 103-16, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

National Low-Level Waste Management Program final summary report of key activities and accomplishments for fiscal year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 to assist states and compacts in their siting and licensing efforts for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) is the element of the DOE that performs the key support activities under the Act. The NLLWMP`s activities are driven by the needs of the states and compacts as they prepare to manage their low-level waste under the Act. Other work is added during the fiscal year as necessary to accommodate new requests brought on by status changes in states` and compacts` siting and licensing efforts. This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the NLLWMP during FY 1997.

Rittenberg, R.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 06: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Fuel Type EPAct Compliant? Model Vehicle Type Emission Class Powertrain Fuel Capacity Range American Honda Motor Corporation 888-CCHONDA www.honda.com CNG Dedicated EPAct Yes Civic GX Compact Sedan SULEV Tier 2 Bin II 1.7L, 4-cylinder 8 GGE 200 mi HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Accord Hybrid Sedan ULEV 3.0L V6 144 volt NiMH + 17.1 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Civic Hybrid Sedan CA ULEV 1.3L, 4-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 13.2 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Insight Two-seater SULEV (CVT model) ULEV (MT model) 1.0L, 3-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 10.6 Gal Gasoline 636 mi DaimlerChrysler 800-999-FLEET www.fleet.chrysler.com E85 FFV EPAct Yes Dodge Ram Pickup 1500 Series 1 Pickup Tier 2 Bin 10A 4.7L V8 26 Gal 416 mi E85 FFV

67

Search for Model Year 2014 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Type Model Year: 2014 Select Class... Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles...

68

Model Year 2013: Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Advanced Technology Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 13: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles 1 (Updated 3/6/13) 1 Source: http:/afdc.energy.gov/vehicles/search/light/ Fuel/Powertrain Type Make Model Vehicle Type Engine Size/Cylinders Transmission Emissions Class 2 Fuel Economy Gasoline 3,4 City/Hwy Fuel Economy Alt Fuel 3,4 City/Hwy HEV Acura ILX Sedan 1.5L I4 ECVT Tier 2 Bin 3 LEVII PZEV 39 / 38 N/A FFV E85 Audi A4 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi A5 Cabriolet Sedan 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 29 14 / 20 FFV E85 Audi Allroad Quatro Wagon 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 27 14 / 18 FFV E85 Audi Q5 SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 20 / 28 14 / 19 HEV Audi Q5 Hybrid SUV 2.0 I4 Auto Tier 2 Bin 5 LEVII ULEV 24 / 30 N/A FFV E85 Bentley

69

An independent verification and validation of the Future Theater Level Model conceptual model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and results of independent verification and validation performed on a combat model in its design stage. The combat model is the Future Theater Level Model (FTLM), under development by The Joint Staff/J-8. J-8 has undertaken its development to provide an analysis tool that addresses the uncertainties of combat more directly than previous models and yields more rapid study results. The methodology adopted for this verification and validation consisted of document analyses. Included were detailed examination of the FTLM design documents (at all stages of development), the FTLM Mission Needs Statement, and selected documentation for other theater level combat models. These documents were compared to assess the FTLM as to its design stage, its purpose as an analytical combat model, and its capabilities as specified in the Mission Needs Statement. The conceptual design passed those tests. The recommendations included specific modifications as well as a recommendation for continued development. The methodology is significant because independent verification and validation have not been previously reported as being performed on a combat model in its design stage. The results are significant because The Joint Staff/J-8 will be using the recommendations from this study in determining whether to proceed with develop of the model.

Hartley, D.S. III; Kruse, K.L.; Martellaro, A.J.; Packard, S.L.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Turley, V.K.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Baroclinic Adjustment in a Two-Level Model with Barotropic Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic instability in two-level models is characterized by a critical vertical shear, for values above which the flow is unstable. Existing studies of nonlinear baroclinic equilibration in two-level models suggest that, while equilibration ...

Gerard H. Roe; Richard S. Lindzen

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Equatorial Superrotation and Maintenance of the General Circulation in Two-Level Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suarez and Duffy have noted an interesting bifurcation in a two-level gridpoint general circulation model when strong tropical heating is imposed. This bifurcation results in a model climatology with strong upper-level westerlies in the tropics. ...

R. Saravanan

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

CCSI Technology Readiness Levels Likelihood Model (TRL-LM) User’s Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the manual for the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) Technology Readiness Level Likelihood model based on PNNL velo.

Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

74

Approximate posterior distributions for convolutional two-level hidden Markov models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A convolutional two-level hidden Markov model is defined and evaluated. The bottom level contains an unobserved categorical Markov chain, and given the variables in this level the middle level contains unobserved conditionally independent Gaussian variables. ... Keywords: Approximation, Convolution, Forward-backward algorithm, Hidden Markov model, Seismic inversion

Kjartan Rimstad; Henning Omre

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Multi-level agent-based modeling with the Influence Reaction principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the specification and the implementation of multi-level agent-based models, using a formal model, IRM4MLS (an Influence Reaction Model for Multi-Level Simulation), based on the Influence Reaction principle. Proposed examples illustrate forms of top-down control in (multi-level) multi-agent based-simulations.

Morvan, Gildas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1991  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth report submitted to Congress under section 5(d)(2)(E)(ii)(II) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1985 (the Act). This section of the Act directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the limitations specified in the Act. In addition to placing limitations on the use of these funds, the Act also requires the nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within 6 months after receiving the individual reports, the Act requires the Secretary to furnish Congress with a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the specified usage limitations. This report fulfills that requirement. DOE disbursed funds totaling $15,037,778.91 to the States and compact regions following the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones specified in the Act. Of this amount, $3,517,020.56 was expended during calendar year 1991 and $6,602,546.24 was expended during the prior 5 years. At the end of December 1991, $4,918,212.11 was unexpended. DOE has reviewed each of the reported expenditures and concluded that all reported expenditures comply with the spending limitations stated in section 5(d)(2)(E)(i) of the Act.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1990  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth report submitted to Congress under Title 1, section 5(d)(2)(E) of Public Law 99--240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985'' (the Act). This section of the Act requests the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the specified limitations. The Act places limitations on the use of these funds and requires the nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within 6 months after receiving the individual reports, DOE is to furnish Congress a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the limitations on the use of these funds specified in the Act. This report fulfills that requirements. DOE disbursed funds totaling $15,006,587.76 to the States and compact regions following the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones. Of this amount, $4,328,340.44 was expended during calendar year 1990 and $2,239,205.80 was expended during the prior 4 years. At the end of December 1990, $8,439,041.52 was unexpended. 5 tabs.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Application of a computer model for predicting remote noise levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prediction of noise levels at selected remote locations is an integral part of estimating the environmental impact of new stationary sources or of noise reduction for existing facilities. A three?dimensional computermodel

S. H. Judd; S. L. Dryden

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Tissue-Level Electromechanical Model of the Left Ventricle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EA are stochastic search methods inspired from the natural selection process. ..... Ten Tusscher KH, Noble D, Noble PJ, Panfilov AV (2004) A model for human ...

80

Paleoclimate data–model comparison and the role of climate forcings over the past 1500 years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provides a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving our understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Search for Model Year 2005 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2005 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

82

Search for Model Year 2009 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2009 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

83

Search for Model Year 2010 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year: 2010 Select Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

84

Stability and Variability in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Climate Model: Results of 100-year Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two 100-year seasonal simulators, one performed with a low resolution atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to a mixed-layer ocean formulation and the other made with the GCM forced by prescribed ocean conditions, are compared to ...

David D. Houghton; Robert G. Gallimore; Linda M. Keller

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Paleoclimate Data–Model Comparison and the Role of Climate Forcings over the Past 1500 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The past 1500 years provide a valuable opportunity to study the response of the climate system to external forcings. However, the integration of paleoclimate proxies with climate modeling is critical to improving the understanding of climate ...

Steven J. Phipps; Helen V. McGregor; Joëlle Gergis; Ailie J. E. Gallant; Raphael Neukom; Samantha Stevenson; Duncan Ackerley; Josephine R. Brown; Matt J. Fischer; Tas D. van Ommen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh report submitted to Congress in accordance with section 5(d)(2)(E)(ii)(II) of Title I--Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (the Act). This section of the Act directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the limitations specified in the Act. In addition to placing limitations on the use of these funds, the Act also requires the nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within 6 months after receiving the individual reports, the Act requires the Secretary to furnish Congress with a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the specified usage limitations. This report fulfills that requirement. DOE disbursed funds totaling $15,037,778.91 to the States and compact regions following the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones specified in the Act. Of this amount, $1,445,701.61 was expended during calendar year 1992 and $10,026,763.87 was expended during the prior 6 years. At the end of December 1992, $3,565,313.43 was unexpended. DOE has reviewed each of the reported expenditures and concluded that all reported expenditures comply with the spending limitations stated in section 5(d)(2)(E)(i) of the Act.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1988  

SciTech Connect

This is the third report submitted to Congress under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985'' (the Act). This section of the Act requires the Department of Energy to summarize the annual expenditures made by states and compacts of funds disbursed from the Department's Surcharge Escrow Account, and to assess the compliance of these expenditures with the specified limitations. This report covers expenditures made during calendar year 1988 from funds disbursed to states and compacts following the July 1, 1986, and January 1, 1988, milestones. The next milestone in the Act is January 1, 1990, following which the accumulated surcharge deposits in the Department's Surcharge Escrow Account will again be disbursed. The Act authorizes states with operating low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (sited states) to collect surcharges on disposal of waste from generators located in compact regions currently without disposal sites (non-sited compacts) and in states that do not have sites and that are not members of compacts (nonmember states). The Act requires the sited states to make a monthly deposit to the Department of Energy's Surcharge Escrow Account of 25 percent of the surcharges they collect. Following each milestone date, the Department is required to disburse these funds, with accrued interest, back to those non-sited compacts and nonmember states found in compliance with the milestone requirements for new disposal site development. 4 tabs.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Production Cost Modeling for High Levels of Photovoltaics Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this report is to evaluate the likely avoided generation, fuels, and emissions resulting from photovoltaics (PV) deployment in several U.S. locations and identify new tools, methods, and analysis to improve understanding of PV impacts at the grid level.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Milford, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Extractive SPL adoption using multi-level variability modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software Product Line engineering aims at reusing and automating software development to reduce costs, have shorter development cycles, and maintain quality. However, for organizations with settled development processes and a large code base, adopting ... Keywords: model-driven engineering, software product lines

Carlos Parra; Leonardo Giral; Alvaro Infante; Camilo Cortés

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

SystemC-AMS high-level modeling of linear analog blocks with power consumption information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SystemC-AMS allows the modeling of complex heterogeneous systems at different levels of abstraction using different modeling styles, called Models of Computation (MoC). This work presents an approach for including energy consumption information in high-level ... Keywords: passive fourth-order low pass filter, systemC-AMS high-level modeling, linear analog blocks, power consumption information, energy consumption information, linear electrical circuits, systemC-AMS linear signal flow MoC, SPICE netlist, state space representation extraction, LSF description level

L. Bousquet; F. Cenni; E. Simeu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Agent-based modeling of climate policy: An introduction to the ENGAGE multi-level model framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model-based support of climate policy is scientifically challenging because climate change involves linked physical and social systems that operate on multiple levels: local, national, and international. As a result, models must employ some strongly ... Keywords: Climate policy, Complex systems, Energy-economic modeling, Evolutionary economics, Integrated assessment model, System-of-systems

M. D. Gerst, P. Wang, A. Roventini, G. Fagiolo, G. Dosi, R. B. Howarth, M. E. Borsuk

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Empirical Probability Models to Predict Precipitation Levels over Puerto Rico Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new algorithm is proposed to predict the level of rainfall (above normal, normal, and below normal) in Puerto Rico that relies on probability and empirical models. The algorithm includes a theoretical probability model in which parameters are ...

Nazario D. Ramirez-Beltran; William K. M. Lau; Amos Winter; Joan M. Castro; Nazario Ramirez Escalante

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A One-Level, Mesoscale Model for Diagnosing Surface Winds in Mountainous and Coastal Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a one-level, sigma-coordinate, mesoscale model suitable for diagnosing surface winds in mountainous and coastal regions. The model requires only modest computer resources and needs little data for initialization. Energy and ...

Clifford F. Mass; David P. Dempsey

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Weather Regimes and Preferred Transition Paths in a Three-Level Quasigeostrophic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple flow regimes are reexamined in a global, three-level, quasigeostrophic (QG3) model with realistic topography in spherical geometry. This QG3 model, using a T21 triangular truncation in the horizontal, has a fairly realistic climatology ...

D. Kondrashov; K. Ide; M. Ghil

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The impact of over 100 years of wildfires on mercury levels and accumulation rates in two lakes in southern California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 years of wild?res on mercury levels and accumulationbe an important source of mercury (Hg) to local watersheds.transport of gaseous mercury from a large scale Canadian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workflo Workflo The ob Proces Savann Dispos assess evaluat design evaluat predict to guid * Th so in w es sy * Th is m * Th fle m de fu The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S Report Date: J ited States valuation i Why DOE ow Diagram bjective of the rev ss Simulation To nah River Site (S sition System Pla s whether the too te methods used , construction, p te methods to im ions; and (4) det e actual executio What th he current Syst oftware tools to formation, and aste. These to stimates, but th ystem planning he capability of limited. This h mid to long-term here is a need exibility, and tu model prediction ecouple safety unctions. To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa ical risk associated w ct decisions. Technic Savannah Rive SRS System M June 2009 Departmen n of Sys n Suppo E-EM Did This view was to eva

97

Fission Cross Section Calculation Using TALYS Based on Two Different Level Density Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission cross sections in statistical model of fission are calculated using one of important parameter such as transmission coefficients. This parameter calculated using optical model parameter and level density. There are several models of level density that can be used to predict fission cross section. They are Constant Temperature Model, Fermi Gas Model, Back-Shifted Fermi Gas Model, and Generalized Superfluid Model. In this work, fission cross section would be calculated using two different model of level density, such as Constant Temperature Model Plus Fermi Gas and Generalized Superfluid Model on Th-232 (n,f) fission reaction. Calculation result from two different model then would be compared with experimental data from ENDF B/VI. Analysis of result would lead to the conclusion of spesific characteristic for each model in every fission cases. This work has became a preliminary study to calculate fission cross section using different set of level density models. Further work will be implemented to calculate similar fission cross section using level density parameter that approximated by Thermal wavelength [see 21].

Kurniadi, R.; Basar, K.; Waris, A. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Perkasa, Yudha S. [Department of Physics, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Variations of Cn2 Between 4 and 18 km above Sea Level as Measured over 5 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We computed the monthly average backscattered power over a five-year period for the Fleming 50 MHz wind profiler, which is proportional to CN2. We found that in addition to seasonal cycle in CN2 below the tropopause, there was a year-to-year ...

A. S. Frisch; B. L. Weber; D. B. Wuertz; R. G. Strauch; D. A. Merritt

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Probabilistic versus possibilistic risk assessment models for optimal service level agreements in grid computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a probabilistic and a possibilistic model for assessing the risk of a service level agreement for a computing task in a cluster/grid environment. These models can also be applied to cloud computing. Using the predictive probabilistic approach ... Keywords: Grid and cloud computing, Predictive possibilities, Predictive probabilities, Service level agreement (SLA)

Christer Carlsson; Robert Fullér

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Firm Level Investment in France and the United States: An Exploration of What We Have Learned in Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and that their capital intensity has increased between thethis aggregate level. The capital intensity for firms in the

Hall, Bronwyn H.; Mairesse, Jacques; Mulkay, Benoit

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Impacts of the Lowest Model Level Height on the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lowest model level height z1 is important in atmospheric numerical models, since surface layer similarity is applied to the height in most of the models. This indicates an implicit assumption that z1 is within the surface layer. In this study, ...

Hyeyum Hailey Shin; Song-You Hong; Jimy Dudhia

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Modeling of Future-Year Emissions Control Scenarios for the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts of Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MC2–CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of two fuel substitution scenarios on ozone levels for a future year in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The relative impacts of selected natural gas ...

M. Hedley; W. Jiang; R. McLaren; D. L. Singleton

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fitting Dynamic Models to the Geosat Sea Level Observations in the Tropical Pacific Ocean. Part I: A Free Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free, equatorially trapped sinusoidal wave solutions to a linear model on an equatorial beta plane are used to fit the Geosat altimetric sea level observations in the Tropical Pacific Ocean. The Kalman filter technique is used to estimate the ...

Lee-Lueng Fu; Jorge Vazquez; Claire Perigaud

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

105

The January and July Performance of the OSU Two-Level Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified version of the two-level atmospheric general circulation model has been developed and used in the simulation of January and July global climates. The overall physical and numerical formulation of this Oregon State University (OSU) ...

Michael E. Schlesinger; W. Lawrence Gates

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Three-Dimensional Linear Instability Modeling of the Cloud Level Venus Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the success of several 2-D (latitude, longitude) linear barotropic instability models at matching some of the observed characteristics of the cloud level, polar region of the Venus atmosphere, a more realistic, linear, 3-D (height, ...

Lee S. Elson

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Climatic Effects on Lake Basins. Part I: Modeling Tropical Lake Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of satellite estimates of rainfall and lake levels offers exciting new opportunities to estimate the hydrologic properties of lake systems. Combined with simple basin models, connections to climatic variations can then be explored ...

Martina Ricko; James A. Carton; Charon Birkett

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Spurious Stability and instability in N-Level Quasi-geostrophic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eady's and Green's baroclinic instability problems are examined in N-level models with 2 N 180. As N is increased, both the maximum growth rate and the wavelength at which it occurs converge monotonically, without the irregular oscillatory ...

M. J. Bell; A. A. White

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A January Angular Momentum Balance in the OSU Two-Level Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric angular momentum balance is studied by analyzing the data during a simulated January of the Oregon State University two-level atmospheric general circulation model. Monthly zonal means of the Coriolis torques, the vertical ...

J-W. Kim; W. Grady

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Eddy Transport of Thickness and Momentum in Layer and Level Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relation between thickness diffusion in layer and level models is set out. Parameterizations of thickness diffusion are related to a parameterization of eddy effects on momentum. The author anticipates where these parameterizations for ...

Greg Holloway

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Coordinated inventory models with compensation policy in a three level supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop inventory models for the three level supply chain (one supplier, one warehouse, and one retailer) and consider the problem of determining the optimal integer multiple n of time interval, time interval between successive ...

Jeong Hun Lee; Il Kyeong Moon

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Model Year 2010 Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Vehicle Guide Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXT03.7W19 SUV 7 16 21 18 4 no ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 AHNXT03.7W19 SUV 6 16 21 18 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 7 19 24 21 5 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 7 17 22 19 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 19 24 21 5 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 AHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 17 22 19 4 no ACURA RL 3.7 6 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV AHNXV03.7PB9 midsize car

113

Model Year 2011 Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Vehicle Guide Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA MDX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXT03.7M19 SUV 6 16 21 18 3 no ACURA MDX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BHNXT03.7M19 SUV 5 16 21 18 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 6 19 24 21 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 6 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 5 19 24 21 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 BHNXT02.3X19 SUV 5 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RL 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV BHNXV03.7PB9 midsize car

114

Model Year 2012 Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Vehicle Guide Green Vehicle Guide Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXT03.7R19 SUV 5 16 21 18 3 no ACURA MDX 3.7 6 SemiAuto-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXT03.7R19 SUV 6 16 21 18 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 5 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 17 22 19 3 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 5 19 24 21 4 no ACURA RDX 2.3 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV CHNXT02.3Y19 SUV 6 19 24 21 4 no ACURA TL 3.5 6 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 CHNXV03.5EB3 midsize car 5

115

A high level power model for Network-on-Chip (NoC) router  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a high level power estimation methodology for a Network-on-Chip (NoC) router, that is capable of providing cycle accurate power profile to enable power exploration at system level. Our power macro model is based on the number of flits ... Keywords: Interconnection network, Multi-processor System-on-Chip (MPSoC), Network-on-Chip (NoC), Power model

Seung Eun Lee; Nader Bagherzadeh

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Discriminating between Models: An Application to Relative Sea Level at Brest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple, informal method is presented for discriminating between competing models of trend in a climate record. The method is applied to a tide gauge record of relative see level at Brest for the period 1807–1970. Although relative sea level at ...

Andrew R. Solow

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

An Evaluation of Sea Level Cyclone Forecasts Produced by NMC's Nested-Grid Model and Global Spectral Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea level cyclone errors are computed for the National Meteorological Center's Nested-Grid Model (NGM) and the Aviation Run of the Global Spectral Model (AVN). The study is performed for the 1987/88 and 1989/90 cool seasons. All available 24- and ...

Bruce B. Smith; Steven L. Mullen

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year FacilitiesPlan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort to the optimization of key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfill our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

de Supinski, B R; Alam, S R; Bailey, D H; Carrington, L; Daley, C

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort optimizing key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfill our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

de Supinski, Bronis R.; Alam, Sadaf; Bailey, David H.; Carrington, Laura; Daley, Chris; Dubey, Anshu; Gamblin, Todd; Gunter, Dan; Hovland, Paul D.; Jagode, Heike; Karavanic, Karen; Marin, Gabriel; Mellor-Crummey, John; Moore, Shirley; Norris, Boyana; Oliker, Leonid; Olschanowsky, Catherine; Roth, Philip C.; Schulz, Martin; Shende, Sameer; Snavely, Allan; Spear, Wyatt; Tikir, Mustafa; Vetter, Jeff; Worley, Pat; Wright, Nicholas

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

120

Model tracking system for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: License application interrogatories and responses  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a model tracking system for a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility license application. In particular, the model tracks interrogatories (questions, requests for information, comments) and responses. A set of requirements and desired features for the model tracking system was developed, including required structure and computer screens. Nine tracking systems were then reviewed against the model system requirements and only two were found to meet all requirements. Using Kepner-Tregoe decision analysis, a model tracking system was selected.

Benbennick, M.E.; Broton, M.S.; Fuoto, J.S.; Novgrod, R.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Direct pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a dynamic particle-based model for direct pore-level modeling of incompressible viscous fluid flow in disordered porous media. The model is capable of simulating flow directly in three-dimensional high-resolution micro-CT images of rock samples. ... Keywords: Incompressible fluid flow, Micro-CT X-ray imaging, Moving particle semi-implicit, Particle-based methods, Porous media

Saeed Ovaysi; Mohammad Piri

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A New Approach to Quantify Level 2 SPAR Models in SAPHIRE 8  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (USNRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Level 2 models for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants has historically used a partitioning approach for plant damage state (PDS) binning and model quantification since late 1990s [1]. While this approach has the advantage to be able to identify the details of the severe accident sequences with one or more individual PDS vector characters, the Level 2 model quantification process is tedious and error-prone with multiple steps involved. A new approach to quantify Level 2 SPAR models was recently developed and implemented in the latest SAPHIRE Version 8 [2]. The new approach removes the partition rules and greatly simplifies the quantification process.

Zhegang Ma; John Schroeder; Curtis Smith; Ted Wood; Martin Sattison

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Battery-level material cost model facilitates high-power li-ion battery cost reductions.  

SciTech Connect

Under the FreedomCAR Partnership, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously enhancing the calendar life and inherent safety of high-power Li-Ion batteries. Material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in batteries designed to meet the requirements of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). In order to quantify the material costs, relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared to the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. The most recent freedomCAR cost goals for 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries are $500 and $800, respectively, which is $20/kW in both cases. In 2001, ANL developed a high-power cell chemistry that was incorporated into high-power 18650 cells for use in extensive accelerated aging and thermal abuse characterization studies. This cell chemistry serves as a baseline for this material cost study. It incorporates a LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathode, a synthetic graphite anode, and a LiPF6 in EC:EMC electrolyte. Based on volume production cost estimates for these materials-as well as those for binders/solvents, cathode conductive additives, separator, and current collectors--the total cell winding material cost for a 25-kW power-assist HEV battery is estimated to be $399 (based on a 48- cell battery design, each cell having a capacity of 15.4 Ah). This corresponds to {approx}$16/kW. Our goal is to reduce the cell winding material cost to <$10/kW, in order to allow >$10/kW for the cell and battery manufacturing costs, as well as profit for the industrial manufacturer. The material cost information is obtained directly from the industrial material suppliers, based on supplying the material quantities necessary to support an introductory market of 100,000 HEV batteries/year. Using its battery design model, ANL provides the material suppliers with estimates of the material quantities needed to meet this market, for both 25-kW and 40-kW power-assist HEV batteries. Also, ANL has funded a few volume-production material cost analyses, with industrial material suppliers, to obtain needed cost information. In a related project, ANL evaluates and develops low-cost advanced materials for use in high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries. [This work is the subject of one or more separate papers at this conference.] Cell chemistries are developed from the most promising low-cost materials. The performance characteristics of test cells that employ these cell chemistries are used as input to the cost model. Batteries, employing these cell chemistries, are designed to meet the FreedomCAR power, energy, weight, and volume requirements. The cost model then provides a battery-level material cost and material cost breakdown for each battery design. Two of these advanced cell chemistries show promise for significantly reducing the battery-level material costs (see Table 1), as well as enhancing calendar life and inherent safety. It is projected that these two advanced cell chemistries (A and B) could reduce the battery-level material costs by an estimated 24% and 43%, respectively. An additional cost advantage is realized with advanced chemistry B, due to the high rate capability of the 3-dimensional LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode. This means that a greater percentage of the total Ah capacity of the cell is usable and cells with reduced Ah capacity can be used. This allows for a reduction in the quantity of the anode, electrolyte, separator, and current collector materials needed f

Henriksen, G.; Chemical Engineering

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An Accurate Instruction-Level Energy Consumption Model for Embedded RISC Processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption of software is becoming an increasingly important issue in designing mobile embedded systems where batteries are used as the main power source. As a consequence, recently, a number of promising techniques have been proposed to optimize software for reduced energy consumption. Such low-power software techniques require an energy consumption model that can be used to estimate or predict the energy consumed by software. We propose a technique to derive an accurate energy consumption model at the instruction level, combining an empirical method and a statistical analysis technique. The result of the proposed approach is given by a model equation that characterizes energy behavior of software based on the properties of the instructions. Experimental results show that the model equation can accurately estimate the energy consumption of random instruction sequences, with an average error of 2.5 %. Keywords Low-power systems, instruction-level energy model, regression analysis 1.

Sheayun Lee; Andreas Ermedahl; Sang Lyul Min

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Yearly distributed insolation model and optimum design of a two dimensional compound parabolic concentrator  

SciTech Connect

Optimum acceptance angle of a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) is studied by the use of an insolation model proposed in this paper. The insolation consists of two components: diffuse and direct. The direct radiation is supposed to be distributed in the field within {+-}23.5{degree} of declination on the celestial hemisphere and the diffuse radiation is assumed to have uniform irradiance. This yearly insolation model suggests that the optimum half-acceptance angle at the two-dimensional CPC becomes 26{degree} irrespective of the change of the diffuse radiation fraction. This result leads us to the conclusion that, almost all over the world, a common CPC could be used as an optimum concentration for many solar radiation collecting systems. 11 refs., 8 figs.

Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Shigeo [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology (Japan)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of Standardized Probabilistic Risk Assessment Models for Shutdown Operations Integrated in SPAR Level 1 Model  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear plant operating experience and several studies show that the risk from shutdown operation during Modes 4, 5, and 6 at pressurized water reactors and Modes 4 and 5 at boiling water reactors can be significant. This paper describes using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s full-power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development of risk evaluation models for commercial nuclear power plants. The shutdown models are integrated with their respective internal event at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the SPAR full-power model with shutdown event tree logic. Preliminary human reliability analysis results indicate that risk is dominated by the operator’s ability to correctly diagnose events and initiate systems.

S. T. Khericha; J. Mitman

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of Low-Level Waste Disposal Receipt Data for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational or institutional waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research. Environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on-site and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The accuracy of the performance assessment and composite analysis depends upon the validity of the data used and assumptions made in conducting the analyses. If changes in these data and assumptions are significant, they may invalidate or call into question certain aspects of the analyses. For example, if the volumes and activities of waste disposed of during the remainder of the disposal facility's lifetime differ significantly from those projected, the doses projected by the analyses may no longer apply. DOE field sites are required to implement a performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. The purpose of this program is to ensure the continued applicability of the analyses through incremental improvement of the level of understanding of the disposal site and facility. Site personnel are required to conduct field and experimental work to reduce the uncertainty in the data and models used in the assessments. Furthermore, they are required to conduct periodic reviews of waste receipts, comparing them to projected waste disposal rates. The radiological inventory for Area G was updated in conjunction with Revision 4 of the performance assessment and composite analysis (Shuman, 2008). That effort used disposal records and other sources of information to estimate the quantities of radioactive waste that have been disposed of at Area G from 1959, the year the facility started receiving waste on a routine basis, through 2007. It also estimated the quantities of LLW that will require disposal from 2008 through 2044, the year in which it is assumed that disposal operations at Area G will cease. This report documents the fourth review of Area G disposal receipts since the inventory was updated and examines information for waste placed in the ground during fiscal years (FY) 2008 through 2011. The primary objective of the disposal receipt review is to ensure that the future waste inventory projections developed for the performance assessment and composite analysis are consistent with the actual types and quantities of waste being disposed of at Area G. Toward this end, the disposal data that are the subject of this review are used to update the future waste inventory projections for the disposal facility. These projections are compared to the future inventory projections that were develope

French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Robert [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

130

Predicting Land-Ice Retreat and Sea-Level Rise with the Community Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect

Coastal stakeholders need defensible predictions of 21st century sea-level rise (SLR). IPCC assessments suggest 21st century SLR of {approx}0.5 m under aggressive emission scenarios. Semi-empirical models project SLR of {approx}1 m or more by 2100. Although some sea-level contributions are fairly well constrained by models, others are highly uncertain. Recent studies suggest a potential large contribution ({approx}0.5 m/century) from the marine-based West Antarctic Ice Sheet, linked to changes in Southern Ocean wind stress. To assess the likelihood of fast retreat of marine ice sheets, we need coupled ice-sheet/ocean models that do not yet exist (but are well under way). CESM is uniquely positioned to provide integrated, physics based sea-level predictions.

Lipscomb, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

Natural circulation steam generator model for optimal steam generator water level control  

SciTech Connect

Several authors have cited the control of steam generator water level as an important problem in the operation of pressurized water reactor plants. In this paper problems associated with steam generator water level control are identified, and advantages of modern estimation and control theory in dealing with these problems are discussed. A new state variable steam generator model and preliminary verification results using data from the loss of fluid test (LOFT) plant are also presented.

Feeley, J.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Balance of Kinetic and Total Energy Simulated by the OSU Two-Level Atmospheric General Circulation Model for January and July  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizontal structure of the balances of kinetic energy and total energy simulated by the Oregon State University (OSU) two-level atmospheric general circulation model are studied for January and July on the basis of a three-year simulation ...

Jough-Tai Wang; Jeong-Woo Kim; W. Lawrence Gates

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fundamentals of PV Efficiency Interpreted by a Two-Level Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elementary physics of photovoltaic energy conversion in a two-level atomic PV is considered. We explain the conditions for which the Carnot efficiency is reached and how it can be exceeded! The loss mechanisms - thermalization, angle entropy, and below-bandgap transmission - explain the gap between Carnot efficiency and the Shockley-Queisser limit. Wide varieties of techniques developed to reduce these losses (e.g., solar concentrators, solar-thermal, tandem cells, etc.) are reinterpreted by using a two level model. Remarkably, the simple model appears to capture the essence of PV operation and reproduce the key results and important insights that are known to the experts through complex derivations.

Alam, Muhammad A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fundamentals of PV Efficiency Interpreted by a Two-Level Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elementary physics of photovoltaic energy conversion in a two-level atomic PV is considered. We explain the conditions for which the Carnot efficiency is reached and how it can be exceeded! The loss mechanisms - thermalization, angle entropy, and below-bandgap transmission - explain the gap between Carnot efficiency and the Shockley-Queisser limit. Wide varieties of techniques developed to reduce these losses (e.g., solar concentrators, solar-thermal, tandem cells, etc.) are reinterpreted by using a two level model. Remarkably, the simple model appears to capture the essence of PV operation and reproduce the key results and important insights that are known to the experts through complex derivations.

Muhammad A. Alam; M. Ryyan Khan

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Using Van Manen's model to assess levels of reflectivity among preservice physical education teachers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intent of this study was two-fold. The first purpose was to apply Van Manen's model to specific strategies (i.e., written assignments) and supervisory practices (i.e., interviews) to examine levels of reflectivity demonstrated and if there were any changes in the reflectivity of student teachers throughout a student teaching period. The second purpose was to assess the applicability of Van Manen's model to a preservice physical education setting. Five physical education majors enrolled in a student teaching experience volunteered to participate. Five weekly web-based written assignments were selected and analyzed using Van Manen's model of reflection. In addition, two interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and subjected to thematic analysis techniques. Using Naturalistic Inquiry as a method of analysis suggests that utilizing supervisory approaches, written assignments, and reflective teaching can foster important changes in reflectivity levels which encourage reflective thinking in physical education student teachers. Increased levels of sophistication among the participants as the semester progressed were noted and may be attributed to a developmental effect similar to Fuller's Concerns Theory. The results also support Pultorak's (1993) assertion that students can increase reflective thinking when fostered and encouraged in preservice programs. This study combines available resources (i.e., technology, supervisors) with Van Manen's model to assess reflectivity levels in a physical education setting. Findings indicate that Van Manen's model can be used objectively in a physical education setting and can be utilized in applying a quantitative measure to qualitative responses.

Ballard, Kristy Kay

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Results from five years of treatability studies using hydraulic binders to stabilize low-level mixed waste at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes work involving bench-scale solidification of nonincinerable, land disposal restricted low-level mixed waste. Waste forms included liquids, sludges, and solids; treatment techniques included hydraulic systems (Portland cement with and without additives), proprietary commercial formulations, and sulphur polymer cement. Solidification was performed to immobilize hazardous heavy metals (including mercury, lead, chromium, and cadmium), and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Pretreatment options for mixed wastes are discussed, using a decision tree based on the form of mixed waste and the type of hazardous constituents. Hundreds of small concrete monoliths were formed for a variety of waste types. The experimental parameters used for the hydraulic concrete systems include the ratio of waste to dry binder (Portland cement, proprietary materials, etc.), the total percentage of water in concrete, and the amount of concrete additives. The only parameter that was used for the sulfur polymer-based monoliths is ratio of waste to binder. Optimum concrete formulations or {open_quotes}recipes{close_quotes} for a given type of waste were derived through this study, as based on results from the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure analyses and a free liquids test. Overall results indicate that high waste loadings in the concrete can be achieved while the monolithic mass maintains excellent resistance to leaching of heavy metals. In our study the waste loadings in the concrete generally fell within the range of 0.5 to 2.0 kg mixed waste per kg dry binder. Likewise, the most favorable amount of water in concrete, which is highly dependent upon the concrete constituents, was determined to be generally within the range of 300 to 330 g/kg (30-33% by weight). The results of this bench-scale study will find applicability at facilities where mixed or hazardous waste solidification is a planned or ongoing activity. 19 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Gering, K.L.; Schwendiman, G.L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO{sub 2} emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3})--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO{sub 2} disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO{sub 2} under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH){sub 2}. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach will provide a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. Ab initio techniques will also significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by e

A.V.G. Chizmeshya

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coalfired power assumes that the resulting CO{sub 2} emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3})--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO{sub 2} disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO{sub 2} under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (i) is environmentally benign, (ii) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (iii) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH){sub 2}. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach will provide a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. Ab initio techniques will also significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by

A.V.G. Chizmeshya

2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO2 emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO2 levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO2 emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO2 as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO2 mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO2 emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO3 and CaCO3)--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO2 disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO2 under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO2 mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH)2. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO2 mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach has provided a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. We used ab initio techniques to significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by elucidating the origin of vibrational, electronic, x-ray and electron energy loss sp

A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; G.H. Wolf; R.W. Carpenter; D.A. Gormley; J.R. Diefenbacher; R. Marzke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A System-Level Model for Runtime Power Estimation on Mobile Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing popularity of mobile internet services, characterized by heavy network transmission, intensive computation and an always-on display, poses a great challenge to the battery lifetime of mobile devices. To manage the power consumption in an ... Keywords: regression, power model, system-level, mobile device

Yu Xiao; Rijubrata Bhaumik; Zhirong Yang; Matti Siekkinen; Petri Savolainen; Antti Yla-Jaaski

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evaluation of Hydration Free Energy by Level-Set Variational Implicit-Solvent Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Hydration Free Energy by Level-Set Variational Implicit-Solvent Model with Coulomb free energy but also the polar and nonpolar contributions individually. The correlation between VISM-CFA and experiments is R2 = 0.763 for total hydration free energy, with a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 1

Li, Bo

143

Internal Tide Generation over Topography: Experiments with a Free-Surface z-Level Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, z-level, primitive-equation ocean circulation model (DieCAST) is modified to include a free-surface and partial cells. The updating of free-surface elevation is implicit in time so that the extra computational cost is minimal ...

Youyu Lu; Daniel G. Wright; David Brickman

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

An application-level parallel I/O library for Earth system models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and implementation of an application-level parallel I/O (PIO) library for the reading and writing of distributed arrays to several common scientific data formats. PIO provides the flexibility to control the number of I/O tasks ... Keywords: Earth System Modeling, Parallel I/O, memory efficient, netCDF, parallel computing

John M. Dennis; Jim Edwards; Ray Loy; Robert Jacob; Arthur A. Mirin; Anthony P. Craig; Mariana Vertenstein

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Forced Planetary Waves in a Two-Level Model and Evaluation of the Upper Boundary Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stationary planetary waves forced by orography and diabatic beating are studied using a quasi-geostrophic two-level model on a beta-plane. This study extends a previous one by Trenberth to include the effects of a baroclinic atmosphere with zonal ...

Shyh-Chin Chen; Kevin E. Trenberth

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Large-Scale Urban Modeling by Combining Ground Level Panoramic and Aerial Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the United States Ge- ographic Survey. One aerial image is shown in Fig. 1(a). Another inherentLarge-Scale Urban Modeling by Combining Ground Level Panoramic and Aerial Imagery Lu Wang, Suya You a high resolution orthorecti- fied aerial image to provide the building footprints. Users draw

Shahabi, Cyrus

147

Two-Time-Level Semi-Lagrangian Modeling of Precipitating Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses two-time-level semi-Lagrangian approximations for the bulk warm-rain microphysics embedded in the framework of an anelastic cloud model. The central theoretical issue is a semi-Lagrangian integration of the rain-evolution ...

Wojciech W. Grabowski; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Numerical Model of the Formation and Evolution of a Low-Level Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-layer. one-dimensional numerical model is described which simulates the life cycle of the extratropical low-level jet (LLJ). The LLJ starts as an isallobaric wind near the point of maximum pressure tall. Subsequently, the LLJ expands over a ...

Dušan Djuri?

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Models for estimation of service life of concrete barriers in low-level radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

Concrete barriers will be used as intimate parts of systems for isolation of low level radioactive wastes subsequent to disposal. This work reviews mathematical models for estimating the degradation rate of concrete in typical service environments. The models considered cover sulfate attack, reinforcement corrosion, calcium hydroxide leaching, carbonation, freeze/thaw, and cracking. Additionally, fluid flow, mass transport, and geochemical properties of concrete are briefly reviewed. Example calculations included illustrate the types of predictions expected of the models. 79 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

Walton, J.C.; Plansky, L.E.; Smith, R.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Diagnostic Study of Recurrent Meteorological Anomalies Appearing in a 15-Year Simulation with a GFDL General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial structure and temporal characteristics of prominent anomalies occurring in a 15-year simulation with a GFDL spectral general circulation model are examined using empirical orthogonal functions, teleconnection patterns, composite ...

Ngar-Cheung Lau

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1993: Report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

This is the eighth report submitted to Congress in accordance with section 5(d)(2)(E)(ii)(II) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (the Act). This section of the Act directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the following limitations specified in the Act: establish low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities; mitigate the impact of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities on the host State; regulate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities; or ensure the decommissioning, closure, and care during the period of institutional control of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. In addition to placing these limitations on the use of these funds, the Act also requires all nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within six months after receiving the individual reports, the Act requires the Secretary of Energy to furnish Congress with a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the specified usage limitations. This report fulfills that requirement.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Abstract--We present new approaches for building yearly and seasonal models for 5-minute ahead electricity load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity load forecasting. They are evaluated using two full years of Australian electricity load data. We first analyze the cyclic nature of the electricity load and show that the autocorrelation function to building a single yearly model. I. INTRODUCTION PREDICTING the future electricity demand, also called

Koprinska, Irena

155

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields M. Ferer, (mferer@wvu.edu) Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315, Grant S. Bromhal, (bromhal@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; and Duane H. Smith, (dsmith@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 & Department of Physics, West Virginia University. Underground injection of gas is a common practice in the oil and gas industry. Injection into deep, brine-saturated formations is a commercially proven method of sequestering CO 2 . However, it has long been known that displacement of a connate fluid by a less viscous fluid produces unstable displacement fronts with significant fingering. This fingering allows only a

156

Phase field and level set methods for modeling solute precipitation and/or dissolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of solid-liquid interfaces controlled by solute precipitation and/or dissolution due to the chemical reaction at the interface were computed in two dimensions using a phase field models. Sharp-interface asymptotic analysis demonstrated that the phase field solutions should converge to the proper sharp-interface precipitation/dissolution limit. For the purpose of comparison, the numerical solution of the sharp-interface model for solute precipitation/dissolution was directly solved using a level set method. In general, the phase field results are found in good agreement with the level set results for all reaction rates and geometry configurations. Present study supports the applications of both methods to more complicated and realistic reactive systems.

Xu, Zhijie; Huang, Hai; Li, Xiaoyi; Meakin, Paul

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Phase field and level set methods for modeling solute precipitation and/or dissolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of solid-liquid interfaces controlled by solute precipitation and/or dissolution due to the chemical reaction at the interface were computed in two dimensions using a phase field models. Sharp-interface asymptotic analysis demonstrated that the phase field solutions should converge to the proper sharp-interface precipitation/dissolution limit. For the purpose of comparison, the numerical solution of the sharp-interface model for solute precipitation/dissolution was directly solved using a level set method. In general, the phase field results are found in good agreement with the level set results for all reaction rates and geometry configurations investigated. Present study supports the applications of both methods to more complicated and realistic reactive systems, including the nuclear waste release and mineral precipitation and dissolution

Zhijie Xu; Hai Huang; Paul Meakin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Decadal Sea Level Variability in the South Pacific in a Global Eddy-Resolving Ocean Model Hindcast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea level variability and related oceanic changes in the South Pacific from 1970 to 2003 are investigated using a hindcast simulation of an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model (OGCM) for the Earth Simulator (OFES), along with sea level ...

Yoshi N. Sasaki; Shoshiro Minobe; Niklas Schneider; Takashi Kagimoto; Masami Nonaka; Hideharu Sasaki

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Multi-level assembly model for top-down design of mechanical products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To enable next generation CAD tools to effectively support top-down design of products, a top-down assembly design process is refined from the traditional product design process to better exhibit the recursive-execution and structure-evolvement characteristics ... Keywords: Inheritance mechanism, Layout skeleton, Multi-level assembly model, Shape skeleton, Skeleton feature, Skeleton interface, Top-down assembly design, Top-down component design

Xiang Chen; Shuming Gao; Youdong Yang; Shuting Zhang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Low level waste management: a compilation of models and monitoring techniques. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In support of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Science Applications, Inc., conducted a survey of models and monitoring techniques associated with the transport of radionuclides and other chemical species from LLW burial sites. As a result of this survey, approximately 350 models were identified. For each model the purpose and a brief description are presented. To the extent possible, a point of contact and reference material are identified. The models are organized into six technical categories: atmospheric transport, dosimetry, food chain, groundwater transport, soil transport, and surface water transport. About 4% of the models identified covered other aspects of LLW management and are placed in a miscellaneous category. A preliminary assessment of all these models was performed to determine their ability to analyze the transport of other chemical species. The models that appeared to be applicable are identified. A brief survey of the state-of-the-art techniques employed to monitor LLW burial sites is also presented, along with a very brief discussion of up-to-date burial techniques.

Mosier, J.E.; Fowler, J.R.; Barton, C.J. (comps.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Comparison of GCM and Energy Balance Model Simulations of Seasonal Temperature Changes over the Past 18 000 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sensitivity of a linear two dimensional Energy Balance Model (EBM) to altered surface albedo and insolation over the last 18 000 years is compared to simulators made with the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The two-dimensional EBM is a ...

William T. Hyde; Thomas J. Crowley; Kwang-Yul Kim; Gerald R. North

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Status of Safeguards and Separations Model Development at Plant and Molecular Levels  

SciTech Connect

A primary goal of the Safeguards and Separations IPSC effort is the development of process modeling tools that allow dynamic simulations of separations plant operations under various configurations and conditions, and integration of relevant safeguards analyses. A requirement of the effort is to develop codes on modern, expandable architectures, with flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options. During FY09, efforts at ORNL have been focused on two priority tasks toward achieving the IPSC goal: (1) a top-down exploration of architecture - Subtask 1: Explore framework for code development and integration for plant-level simulation; and (2) a bottom-up fundamental modeling effort - Subtask 2: Development of molecular-level agent design code. Subtask 1 is important because definition and development of architecture is a key issue for the overall effort, as selection of an overall approach and code/data requirements is a necessary first step in the organization, design and development of separations and safeguards codes that will be incorporated. The agent design effort of Subtask 2 is a molecular-level modeling effort that has a direct impact on a near-term issue of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. A current focus of experimental efforts is the development of robust agents and processes for separation of Am/Cm. Development of enhanced agent-design codes will greatly accelerate discovery and experimental testing.

de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Modeling Plot-Level Biomass and Volume Using Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Forest Service (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program provides a diverse selection of data used to assess the status of the nation’s forested areas using sample locations dispersed throughout the country. Airborne, and more recently, terrestrial lidar (light detection and ranging) systems are capable of producing accurate measurements of individual tree dimensions and also possess the ability to characterize three-dimensional vertical forest structure. This study investigates the potential of airborne and terrestrial scanning lidar systems for modeling forest volume and aboveground biomass on FIA subplots in the Malheur National Forest, eastern Oregon. A methodology for the creation of five airborne lidar metric sets (four point cloud-based and one individual tree based) and four terrestrial lidar metric sets (three height-based and one distance-based) is presented. Metrics were compared to estimates of subplot aboveground biomass and gross volume derived from FIA data using national and regional allometric equations respectively. Simple linear regression models from the airborne lidar data accounted for 15 percent of the variability in subplot biomass and 14 percent of the variability in subplot volume, while multiple linear regression models increased these amounts to 29 percent and 25 percent, respectively. When subplot estimates of biophysical parameters were scaled to the plot-level and compared with plot-level lidar metrics, simple linear regression models were able to account for 60 percent of the variability in biomass and 71 percent of the variation in volume. Terrestrial lidar metrics produced moderate results with simple linear regression models accounting for 41 percent of the variability in biomass and 46 percent of the variability in volume, with multiple linear regression models accounting for 71 percent and 84 percent, respectively. Results show that: (1) larger plot sizes help to mitigate errors and produce better models; and (2) a combination of height-based and distance-based terrestrial lidar metrics has the potential to estimate biomass and volume on FIA subplots.

Sheridan, Ryan D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Level 1 transient model for a molybdenum-99 producing aqueous homogeneous reactor and its applicability to the tracy reactor  

SciTech Connect

Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group (B and W) has identified aqueous homogeneous reactors (AHRs) as a technology well suited to produce the medical isotope molybdenum 99 (Mo-99). AHRs have never been specifically designed or built for this specialized purpose. However, AHRs have a proven history of being safe research reactors. In fact, in 1958, AHRs had 'a longer history of operation than any other type of research reactor using enriched fuel' and had 'experimentally demonstrated to be among the safest of all various type of research reactor now in use [1].' A 'Level 1' model representing B and W's proposed Medical Isotope Production System (MIPS) reactor has been developed. The Level 1 model couples a series of differential equations representing neutronics, temperature, and voiding. Neutronics are represented by point reactor kinetics while temperature and voiding terms are axially varying (one-dimensional). While this model was developed specifically for the MIPS reactor, its applicability to the Japanese TRACY reactor was assessed. The results from the Level 1 model were in good agreement with TRACY experimental data and found to be conservative over most of the time domains considered. The Level 1 model was used to study the MIPS reactor. An analysis showed the Level 1 model agreed well with a more complex computational model of the MIPS reactor (a FETCH model). Finally, a significant reactivity insertion was simulated with the Level 1 model to study the MIPS reactor's time-dependent response. (authors)

Nygaard, E. T. [Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group, 800 Main Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504 (United States); Williams, M. M. R. [Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Angelo, P. L. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Search for Model Year 2001 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

168

Search for Model Year 2004 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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169

Search for Model Year 2008 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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170

Search for Model Year 2003 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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171

Search for Model Year 2002 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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172

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173

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS MODELING FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS OF SHALLOW LAND BURIAL OF LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 9243  

SciTech Connect

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was created to develop predictive capabilities for the aging of cementitious barriers over long timeframes. The CBP is a multi-agency, multi-national consortium working under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-21) funded Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as the lead laboratory. Members of the CBP are SRNL, Vanderbilt University, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (Canada), and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). A first step in developing advanced tools is to determine the current state-of-the-art. A review has been undertaken to assess the treatment of cementitious barriers in Performance Assessments (PA). Representatives of US DOE sites which have PAs for their low level waste disposal facilities were contacted. These sites are the Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada Test Site, and Hanford. Several of the more arid sites did not employ cementitious barriers. Of those sites which do employ cementitious barriers, a wide range of treatment of the barriers in a PA was present. Some sites used conservative, simplistic models that even though conservative still showed compliance with disposal limits. Other sites used much more detailed models to demonstrate compliance. These more detailed models tend to be correlation-based rather than mechanistically-based. With the US DOE's Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group (LFRG) moving towards embracing a risk-based, best estimate with an uncertainties type of analysis, the conservative treatment of the cementitious barriers seems to be obviated. The CBP is creating a tool that adheres to the LFRG chairman's paradigm of continuous improvement.

Taylor, G

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

174

Unified Modeling and Prediction of Weather and Climate: A 25-Year Journey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years there has been a growing appreciation of the potential advantages of using a seamless approach to weather and climate prediction. However, what exactly should this mean in practice? To help address this question, we document some of the ...

Andrew Brown; Sean Milton; Mike Cullen; Brian Golding; John Mitchell; Ann Shelly

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inside this issue: 350: An Interna- tional Day of Cli- mate Change 1-3 Fall 2009 Energy Campaign 4 visit: www.350.org #12;Fall 2009 Energy Campaign Page 4 Sustainability Bulletin This year's Energy. Then you can turn them all off with one switch and eliminate vampire power*. 4. Learn how to put your

Marin, Gabriel

176

Modeling the Office of Science ten year facilities plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inside this issue: 350: An Interna- tional Day of Cli- mate Change 1-3 Fall 2009 Energy Campaign 4 visit: www.350.org #12;Fall 2009 Energy Campaign Page 4 Sustainability Bulletin This year's Energy. Then you can turn them all off with one switch and eliminate vampire power*. 4. Learn how to put your

Snavely, Allan

177

Re-calibration of the apparent 25,000 to 35,000 ybp sea level high stand: Just a moment in time some 55,000 to 70,000 years ago  

SciTech Connect

Occurrences of shallow marine and strand line sediments at or near the elevation of modern mean sea level with radiocarbon dates in the range of 25,000--35,000 ybp have been reported from the Delmarva Peninsula to the Florida Peninsula. Such dates are in conflict with established sea level curves and have consequently been written off as much older samples contaminated with small amounts of young carbon. An alternate hypothesis is that the assumed near constancy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux and consequently the C-14 production rate is not totally correct. Be-10 concentrations from ice cores suggests that possibly twice in the last 100,000 years the earth has been briefly subjected to greatly enhanced GCR fluxes. Modeling effects of the increased but brief GCR flux on the total C-14 concentrations in the ocean and biosphere suggests that apparent C-14 dates of 25K to 35K ybp on certain marine deposits may actually reflect deposition during a very brief period of time somewhere between 55K to 70K ybp. Deposits possibly effected include but are not restricted to: an unnamed beach/shore face deposit at Mockhorn Is. Virginia, Diamond City Clay at Cape Lookout NC, Cape Fear Coquina in southeastern NC, Silver Bluff at Sapelo Is. GA, and an unnamed coarse sand at St. George Is., FL. Such deposits are depositionally associated with strand line processes, either near shore, beach, or estuarine. Characteristics of the C-14 dates from such deposits include great variability in age ranges for spatially close samples including association with non-finite samples and apparent violation of the principle of superposition where older material overlies apparently younger. Interpretation of such deposits suggest deposition at or near sea level during a period of falling sea level. Correlation of such deposits north to south along the Atlantic coast suggest continued influence of the glacial forebulge and deposition topographically 5 to 10 meters below modern mean sea level.

Dockal, J.A. (Univ. of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Search for Model Year 2013 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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179

Search for Model Year 2012 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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180

Search for Model Year 2011 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Model Output Statistics Forecasts: Three Years of Operational Experience in the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Netherlands, one to five day Model Output Statistics (MOS) forecasts have been used operationally since November 1983. The weather elements predicted are the probability of precipitation, the conditional probability of frozen precipitation,...

C. Lemcke; S. Kruizinga

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

18-Year Land-Surface Hydrology Model Simulations for a Midlatitude Grassland Catchment in Valdai, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Off-line simulations of improved bucket hydrology and Simplified Simple Biosphere (SSiB) models are performed for a grassland vegetation catchment region, located at the Valdai water-balance research station in Russia, forced by observed ...

C. Adam Schlosser; Alan Robock; Konstantin Ya Vinnikov; Nina A. Speranskaya; Yongkang Xue

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Two-Year Simulation of the Great Lakes Region with a Coupled Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on an experiment aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the application of our coupled regional climate modeling system to long-term climate simulations over the Great Lakes region. The simulation analyzed covers a ...

Gary T. Bates; Steven W. Hostetler; Filippo Giorgi

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Modeling the corrosion of high-level waste containers: CAM-CRM interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C-22 and A516 are favored. This publication addresses the development of models to account for corrosion of Alloy C-22 surfaces exposed directly to the Near Field Environment (NFE), as well as to the exacerbated conditions in the CAM-CRM crevice.

Farmer, J. C., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Model training curriculum for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is to assist in the development of the training programs required to be in place for the operating license for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It consists of an introductory document and four additional appendixes of individual training program curricula. This information will provide the starting point for the more detailed facility-specific training programs that will be developed as the facility hires and trains new personnel and begins operation. This document is comprehensive and is intended as a guide for the development of a company- or facility-specific program. The individual licensee does not need to use this model training curriculum as written. Instead, this document can be used as a menu for the development, modification, or verification of customized training programs.

Tyner, C.J.; Birk, S.M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 5 (Appendix V)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 5 contains model validation simulations and comparison with data.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston`s 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA`s Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

190

Modeling Wet Snow Accretion on Power Lines: Improvements to Previous Methods Using 50 Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to model wet snow accretion on structures are developed and improved, based on unique records of wet snow icing events as well as large datasets of observed and simulated weather. Hundreds of observed wet snow icing events are logged in ...

Bjørn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Hálfdán Ágústsson; Katalin Somfalvi-Tóth

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Automated system for near-real time modelling and prediction of altimeter-derived sea level anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper serves as a presentation of a novel geoinformation system and a dedicated service, jointly named as Prognocean and based at the University of Wroclaw (Poland), that aim to predict Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) maps and publish them online. The system ... Keywords: Geoinformation, Modelling, Prediction, Satellite altimetry, Sea level anomaly, System

Tomasz Niedzielski, Bart?Omiej Mizi?Ski

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The k?3 and k?5/3 Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Turbulence: Quasigeostrophic Two-Level Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nastrom–Gage energy spectrum of atmospheric turbulence as a function of wavelength is simulated here with a two-level quasigeostrophic (QG) model. This simple model has no topography, no direct wave forcing, and no small-scale forcing, nor ...

Ka Kit Tung; Wendell Welch Orlando

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Mechanistic Model Simulations of the East African Climate Using NCAR Regional Climate Model: Influence of Large-Scale Orography on the Turkana Low-Level Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research regional climate model (RegCM) is employed to study the dynamics of the Turkana low-level jet that lies between the Ethiopian and the East African highlands, and also investigate the mechanisms ...

Matayo Indeje; Fredrick H. M. Semazzi; Lian Xie; Laban J. Ogallo

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of an Atlantic Canadian Coastal Water Level Neural Network Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal water-level information is essential for coastal zone management, navigation, and oceanographic research. However, long-term water-level observations are usually only available at a limited number of locations. This study discusses a ...

Guoqi Han; Yu Shi

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technology and Cost of the Model Year (MY) 2007 Toyota Camry HEV Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides research and development (R&D) support to the Department of Energy on issues related to the cost and performance of hybrid vehicles. ORNL frequently benchmarks its own research against commercially available hybrid components currently used in the market. In 2005 we completed a detailed review of the cost of the second generation Prius hybrid. This study examines the new 2007 Camry hybrid model for changes in technology and cost relative to the Prius. The work effort involved a detailed review of the Camry hybrid and the system control strategy to identify the hybrid components used in the drive train. Section 2 provides this review while Section 3 presents our detailed evaluation of the specific drive train components and their cost estimates. Section 3 also provides a summary of the total electrical drive train cost for the Camry hybrid vehicle and contrasts these estimates to the costs for the second generation Prius that we estimated in 2005. Most of the information on cost and performance were derived from meetings with the technical staff of Toyota, Nissan, and some key Tier I suppliers like Hitachi and Panasonic Electric Vehicle Energy (PEVE) and we thank these companies for their kind cooperation.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

David W. Nigg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fitting Dynamic Models to the Geosat Sea Level Observations in the Tropical Pacific Ocean. Part II: A Linear, Wind-driven Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geosat altimeter sea level observations in the tropical Pacific Ocean are used to evaluate the Performance of a linear wind-driven equatorial wave model. The question posed is the extent to which such a model can describe the observed sea ...

Lee-Lueng Fu; Ichiro Fukumori; Robert N. Miller

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modeling the Effect of Chlorine Emissions on Ozone Levels over the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents model estimates of the effect of chlorine emissions on atmospheric ozone concentrations in the eastern United States. The model included anthropogenic molecular chlorine emissions, anthropogenic hypochlorous acid emissions ...

Golam Sarwar; Prakash V. Bhave

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Modeling and Analysis of the Wind-Waves Field Variability in the Indian Ocean During 1998-2009 Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To calculate the wind-waves in the Indian Ocean (IO), the wind field for the period from 1998 to 2009 was used, obtained from the NCEP/NOAA archive, and numerical model WAM (Cycle-4) was applied, modified by the new source function proposed in Polnikov (2005). Based on buoy data for the Indian Ocean, the fitting of the modified model WAM was done, which provides the win in accuracy of calculations on 35%, in comparison with the original model. All the further calculations of the wave fields in IO were made for these model settings. At the first stage, the analysis of the simulation results involves a) mapping the fields of the significant wave height and the wave energy , calculated with different scales of averaging in time T and space R; b) estimating the fields of seasonal, annual and long-term variability; and c) determining the 12-year trend of the annually averaged fields. The analysis was carried out taking into account the previously introduced zoning the ocean area, provided by the spatial inhomogen...

Polnikov, V G; Sannasiraj, S A; Sundar, V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Model of Sea Level Rise Caused by Ocean Thermal Expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming of the atmosphere as a result of an increased concentration of greenhouse gases is expected to lead to a significant rise is global sea level. We present estimates of the component of this sea level rise caused by thermal expansion of the ...

John A. Church; J. Stuart Godfrey; David R. Jackett; Trevor J. McDougall

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Observed and Modeled Wind and Water-Level Response from Tropical Storm Marco (1990)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hurricane Research Division (HRD) analyzes surface wind fields in tropical storms and hurricanes using surface wind observations and aircraft flight-level wind measurements in the vicinity of the storms. The analyzed surface wind fields for ...

Sam H. Houston; Mark D. Powell

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Numerical Solution of the Mellor-Yamada Level 2.5 Turbulent Kinetic Energy Equation in the Eta Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is presented for obtaining the numerical solution of the production-dissipation component of the turbulent kinetic energy equation that arises in the Mellor-Yamada level 2.5 turbulent closure model. The development of this new method ...

Joseph P. Gerrity Jr.; Thomas L. Black; Russell E. Treadon

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Design of a Nonsingular Level 2.5 Second-Order Closure Model for the Prediction of Atmospheric Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of the Mellor and Yamada Level 2.5 second-order turbulence closure model is analyzed over its entire domain of definition on the Ri × q2/qe2 plane, where Ri is the Richardson number of the mean flow and where q2/qe2 is the ratio of ...

H. M. Helfand; J. C. Labraga

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Wind Effects on the Buoyancy-Driven General Circulation in a Closed Basin Using a Two-Level Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind effects on buoyancy-driven circulation in a two-level rectangular basin are studied. The ocean is driven by positive and negative buoyancy fluxes in the northern and southern portions as well as wind stress of constant curl. In a model with ...

M. Ikeda

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Comparison of Model Forecast Skill of Sea-Level Pressure Along the East and West Coasts of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Comparison of Model Forecast Skill of Sea-Level Pressure Along the East and West Coasts, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Submitted to: Weather and Forecasting May 2008 Revised recent advances in numerical weather prediction, major errors in short-range forecasts still occur

Mass, Clifford F.

206

A Simulator for high level Petri Nets: Model based design and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 ­ Present: Graduate Program Director, Old Dominion University, Modeling, Simulation-time. #12;Dr. McKenzie 3 SUMMARY STATEMENT Dr. McKenzie is the Graduate Program Director in the new Modeling: Initial Phase, PI Jiang Li, Co-PI Rick McKenzie Fall 2008 to Summer 2009. $41,397. · Health iManage (Hi

207

Prediction of ozone levels in London using the MM5-CMAQ modelling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution in urban areas has important implications for health and environmental management. Consequently, various methodologies have been developed for its assessment. Traditionally, simple approaches such as the box model or the Gaussian plume ... Keywords: Atmospheric modelling, CMAQ, MM5, Ozone, Urban air quality

R. S. Sokhi; R. San José; N. Kitwiroon; E. Fragkou; J. L. Pérez; D. R. Middleton

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for absence of solar radiation. Using AERMOD predictions of pollutant concentrations off property for regulatory purposes will likely affect a source?s ability to comply with limits set forth by State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) and could lead to inappropriate regulation of the source.

Botlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Theory of agent-based market models with controlled levels of greed and anxiety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use generating functional analysis to study minority-game type market models with generalized strategy valuation updates that control the psychology of agents' actions. The agents' choice between trend following and contrarian trading, and their vigor in each, depends on the overall state of the market. Even in `fake history' models, the theory now involves an effective overall bid process (coupled to the effective agent process) which can exhibit profound remanence effects and new phase transitions. For some models the bid process can be solved directly, others require Maxwell-construction type approximations.

Papadopoulos, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

One-Level Diagnostic Modeling of Mesoscale Surface Winds in Complex Terrain. Part I: Comparison with Three-Dimensional Modeling in Israel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-level sigma-coordinate model originally developed by Danard and modified by Mass and Dempsey and Alpert et al., is applied to the study of surface flow over an averaged summer diurnal cycle in Israel. The detailed flow features are compared ...

P. Alpert; B. Getenio

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Radiation-induced Soft Errors: A Chip-level Modeling Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chip-level soft-error rate (SER) estimation can come from two sources: direct experimental measurement and simulation. Because SER mitigation decisions need to be made very early in the product design cycle, long before product Si is available, a simulation-based ...

Norbert Seifert

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Comparison of ELCAP data with lighting and equipment load levels and profiles assumed in regional models  

SciTech Connect

The analysis in this report was driven by two primary objectives: to determine whether and to what extent the lighting and miscellaneous equipment electricity consumption measured by metering in real buildings differs from the levels assumed in the various prototypes used in power forecasting; and to determine the reasons for those differences if, in fact, differences were found. 13 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

SciTech Connect

An automated fault detection and diagnosis tool for HVAC systems is being developed, based on an integrated, life-cycle, approach to commissioning and performance monitoring. The tool uses component-level HVAC equipment models implemented in the SPARK equation-based simulation environment. The models are configured using design information and component manufacturers' data and then fine-tuned to match the actual performance of the equipment by using data measured during functional tests of the sort using in commissioning. This paper presents the results of field tests of mixing box and VAV fan system models in an experimental facility and a commercial office building. The models were found to be capable of representing the performance of correctly operating mixing box and VAV fan systems and detecting several types of incorrect operation.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modeling the Effect of Chlorine Emissions on Ozone Levels over the Eastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents model estimates of the effect of chlorine emissions on atmospheric ozone concentrations in the eastern United States. The model included anthropogenic molecular chlorine emissions, anthropogenic hypochlorous acid emissions from cooling towers and swimming pools, and chlorine released from sea-salt aerosols. The release of chlorine emissions from sea-salt aerosols was modeled using heterogeneous reactions involving chloride ions in aerosols and three gas-phase species. The gas-phase chlorine chemistry was combined with the Carbon Bond Mechanism and incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system. Air quality model simulations were performed for July 2001 and the results obtained with and without chlorine emissions were analyzed. When chlorine emissions were included in the model, ozone concentrations increased in the Houston, Texas, and New York–New Jersey areas. The daily maximum 1-h ozone concentrations increased by up to 12 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) in the Houston area and 6 ppbv in the New York–New Jersey area. The daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations increased by up to 8 ppbv in the Houston area and 4 ppbv in the New York–New Jersey area. The monthly average daily maximum 1-h ozone concentration increased by up to 3 ppbv in the Houston area, but the increases in the monthly average daily maximum 1-h ozone concentration in the New York–New Jersey area were small. Chlorine emissions and chemistry enhanced the volatile organic compound oxidation rates and, thereby, increased the ozone production rate. 1.

Golam Sarwar; Prakash; V. Bhave

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Modeling and simulation in analyzing geological repositories for high level nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is very often used to generate electricity. But first the energy must be released from atoms which can be done in two ways: nuclear fusion and nuclear fission. Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission to produce electrical energy. Electrical ... Keywords: modeling, nuclear energy, nuclear waste, nuclear waste storage, simulation

Dietmar P. F. Möller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Diurnal Oscillations of Low-Level Jets, Vertical Motion, and Precipitation: A Model Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy convection that occurred over Tulsa, Oklahoma, during the evening and night of 26/27 May 1984 is studied through a series of numerical experiments with a regional forecast model. The emphasis is on diurnal oscillations of the boundary-layer ...

Matilde Nicolini; Kim M. Waldron; Jan Paegle

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Model Checking Approach to Evaluating System Level Dynamic Power Management Policies for Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and state transitions, with a cumulative power dissipation model. However, as stated in [3], assessing state, is a sleep state, which the system transitions to, if it does not want to dissipate any power power dissipation rate, and different latency and energy consumptionto go back to the busy state

Gupta, Rajesh

218

Georeferencing Flickr photos using language models at different levels of granularity: An evidence based approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The topic of automatically assigning geographic coordinates to Web 2.0 resources based on their tags has recently gained considerable attention. However, the coordinates that are produced by automated techniques are necessarily variable, since not all ... Keywords: Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, Geographic information retrieval, Georeferencing, Language models, Web 2.0

Olivier Van Laere; Steven Schockaert; Bart Dhoedt

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modelling and measuring single cell RNA expression levels find considerable transcriptional differences among phenotypically identical cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unit bins); y-axis: proportion of genes in each bin. 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 Log (base 2) expression ratios Fr eq ue nc yPage 9 of 12 (page number not for citation purposes) should generally apply to expression experiments per... following linear T7-based amplifi- cation [16,25], multiplexed FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) [26] and quantitative PCR [27]. Transcrip- tional bursting has been observed in Escherichia coli, in which protein levels have very little correlation...

Subkhankulova, Tatiana; Gilchrist, Michael J; Livesey, Frederick J

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

220

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Infiltrating the Ocean Floor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Grant S. Bromhal, Duane H. Smith, US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered to be a potentially important method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions (US DOE, 1999). Oceans are currently the largest atmospheric carbon dioxide sink; and certainly, enough storage capacity exists in the oceans to hold all of the CO 2 that we can emit for many years. Additionally, technologies exist that allow us to pump liquid CO 2 into the oceans at depths between one and two kilometers for extended periods of time and five times that deep for shorter durations. The biggest unknown in the ocean sequestration process, however, is the fate and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modelling of light driven CO2 concentration gradient and photosynthetic carbon assimilation flux distribution at the chloroplast level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steady state of the two-substance model of light driven carbon turnover for the photosynthetic CO2 assimilation rate is presented. The model is based on the nonlinear diffusion equation for a single chloroplast in the elliptical geometry by assuming light driven Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration and CO2 assimilation reaction of carboxilation coupled with the photosynthetic sink strength. The detailed analysis of 3 -dimensional CO2 concentration and flux on the chloroplast level is made. It is shown that under intense light irradiation there exists a boundary layer of chloroplasts with a high value of CO2 assimilation flux. The presented simplified model can be used for the calculations and experimental estimations of the CO2 assimilation rate for environmental applications.

Jouravlev, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

223

The Meteorological Model BOLAM at the National Observatory of Athens: Assessment of Two-Year Operational Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since November 1999, the hydrostatic meteorological Bologna Limited-Area Model (BOLAM) has been running operationally at the National Observatory of Athens. The assessment of the model forecast skill during the 2-yr period included (a) ...

K. Lagouvardos; V. Kotroni; A. Koussis; H. Feidas; A. Buzzi; P. Malguzzi

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in FIGURE 5. NG: natural gas price increase 50% per 5 years,cost, as opposed to constant natural gas price in Base case.no effect of natural gas price increase on electricity cost

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in FIGURE 5. NG: natural gas price increase 50% per 5 years,cost, as opposed to constant natural gas price in Base case.no effect of natural gas price increase on electricity cost

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition (HIT) Model and Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure." Annual Review of EnergyZoia (2005). "Hydrogen infrastructure strategic planning06—05 The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) &

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) & Its Application in Optimizing a 50-year Hydrogen Infrastructure for Urban Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure." Annual Review of EnergyZoia (2005). "Hydrogen infrastructure strategic planning06—05 The Hydrogen Infrastructure Transition Model (HIT) &

Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, J; Fan, Yueyue; Sperling, Dan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Mr. Glyn Trenchard, Team Lead for Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of River Protection, Mr. Paul Rutland, RPP System Planning Manager for Washington River Protection Solutions, and Mr. Ernie Lee,

229

Chemical Speciation of Strontium, Americium, and Curium in High Level Waste: Predictive Modeling of Phase Partitioning During Tank Processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to measure the effects of organic chelate complexation on the speciation and solubility of Sr and trivalent actinides under strongly basic, high carbonate conditions, similar to those present in high- level waste tanks at U.S. Department of Energy storage sites. We proposed, (1) extension to important chelates not previously studied; (2) studies of completing metal ions; and (3) specific studies using Am(III)/Cm(III). The chelate complexation studies would extend our previous research on EDTA, HEDTA, NTA, and IDA to citrate and oxalate. In addition, we propose to address the possible formation of mixed ligand- ligand complexes for Eu(III) in EDTA-HEDTA, EDTA-NTA, HEDTA-NTA, and ligand-carbonate solutions. The fundamental data on chemical speciation and solubility will be used to develop accurate thermodynamic models which are valid to high ionic strength.

CHOPPIN, GREGORY R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Sahid C. Smith Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process June 2009 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Review Team thanks Ms. Sonitza Blanco, Team Lead Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office and Mr. Pete Hill, Liquid Waste Planning Manager for Washington Savannah River Company, for their

231

Numerical modeling of gas migration at a proposed repository for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes at Oberbauenstock, Switzerland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic impacts of corrosive gas release from a hypothetical L/ILW nuclear waste repository at Oberbauenstock are explored by means of numerical simulation. A schematic two dimensional vertical section through the mountain is modeled with the simulator TOUGH, which describes two-phase flow of water and gas in porous and fractured media. Two reference cases are considered which represent the formations as a porous and as a fractured-porous (dual permeability) medium, respectively. Both cases predict similar and rather modest pressure increases, from ambient 10 bars to near 25 bars at the repository level. These results are to be considered preliminary because important parameters affecting two-phase flow, such as relative permeabilities of a fractured medium, are not well known at present. 24 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Pruess, K.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Diagnosis of the Low-Level Jet using a sounding analysis scheme and the ETA model, a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LLJ transports moisture northward from the Gulf of Mexico into the Great Plains. Proper detection of the LLJ is important in aviation and forecasting. Standard atmospheric charts are usually insufficient in properly depicting the structure and intensity of the LLJ. This limitation arises because the LLJ climbs in altitude as it flows northward. A sounding analysis scheme is presented as an alternative to currently existing LLJ detection methods. The intensity and aerial coverage of the LLJ were studied using this analysis scheme during a case study from May 1995. The data set used consisted of 80-km Eta model output. When compared to other methods, the developed analysis scheme showed more LLJ detail and structure. The LLJ appeared with multiple cores as opposed to one long and continuous core, as typically depicted at the 850-mb level. This fits in with current research that shows the existence of multiple LLJ cores caused by different factors, such as synoptic influences, orography, and a strong low-level pressure gradient. The method developed in this research is proposed as an alternate method for LLJ detection.

Wigginton, Scott Barrett

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Sensitivity of Low-Level Winds Simulated by the WRF Model in California’s Central Valley to Uncertainties in the Large-Scale Forcing and Soil Initialization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model-simulated low-level winds in the Central Valley (CV) of California to uncertainties in the atmospheric forcing and soil initialization is investigated using scatter diagrams for ...

Sara A. Michelson; Jian-Wen Bao

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1991. Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth report submitted to Congress under section 5(d)(2)(E)(ii)(II) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1985 (the Act). This section of the Act directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the limitations specified in the Act. In addition to placing limitations on the use of these funds, the Act also requires the nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within 6 months after receiving the individual reports, the Act requires the Secretary to furnish Congress with a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the specified usage limitations. This report fulfills that requirement. DOE disbursed funds totaling $15,037,778.91 to the States and compact regions following the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones specified in the Act. Of this amount, $3,517,020.56 was expended during calendar year 1991 and $6,602,546.24 was expended during the prior 5 years. At the end of December 1991, $4,918,212.11 was unexpended. DOE has reviewed each of the reported expenditures and concluded that all reported expenditures comply with the spending limitations stated in section 5(d)(2)(E)(i) of the Act.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Response of the HadGEM2 Earth System Model to Future Greenhouse Gas Emissions Pathways to the Year 2300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble of simulations from the Earth System configuration of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 2 (HadGEM2-ES), is used to evaluate the response to historical and projected future greenhouse gas forcings that follow ...

John Caesar; Erika Palin; Spencer Liddicoat; Jason Lowe; Eleanor Burke; Anne Pardaens; Michael Sanderson; Ron Kahana

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Description of a 1260-Year Control Integration with the Coupled ECHAM1/LSG General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1260-yr integration generated by the ECHAM1/LSG (Large Scale Geostrophic) coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model is analyzed in this paper. The analysis focuses on the climate drift and on the variations of the coupled atmosphere–...

Jin-Song von Storch; Viatcheslav V. Kharin; Ulrich Cubasch; Gabriele C. Hegerl; Dierk Schriever; Hans von Storch; Eduardo Zorita

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The HAMMONIA Chemistry Climate Model: Sensitivity of the Mesopause Region to the 11-Year Solar Cycle and CO2 Doubling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces the three-dimensional Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA), which treats atmospheric dynamics, radiation, and chemistry interactively for the height range from the earth’s surface to the ...

H. Schmidt; G. P. Brasseur; M. Charron; E. Manzini; M. A. Giorgetta; T. Diehl; V. I. Fomichev; D. Kinnison; D. Marsh; S. Walters

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A model for cGMP signal transduction in Dictyostelium in perspective of 25 years of cGMP research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemoattactant mediated cGMP response of Dictyostelium cells was discovered about twenty-five years ago. Shortly thereafter, guanylyl cyclases, cGMP-phosphodiesterases and cGMP-binding proteins were detected already in lysates, but the encoding genes were discovered only very recently. The deduced proteins appear to be very different from proteins with the same function in metazoa. In this review we discuss these new findings in perspective of the previously obtained biochemical and functional data on cGMP in Dictyostelium.

Leonard Bosgraaf; Peter J. M. Van Haastert

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radioactive waste from transmutation of technetium: a model for anticipating characteristics of high level waste from transmutation  

SciTech Connect

At this early stage in the conceptualization of fuel treatment and radioisotope transmutation for the disposition of nuclear wastes, it is possible to anticipate some characteristics of the waste stream resulting from the deployment of advanced technologies. Fission products and actinides cannot be completely destroyed by transmutation even with continuous purification and recycle. This is demonstrated for technetium in this analysis, but is true for all radioisotopes. Also, some of the reaction products are themselves long-lived radioactive isotopes. The purification and recycle steps produce nuclear wastes that must be planned for geologic disposal. Five radioisotopes have been identified to be produced in abundance by transmutation of technetium using fast neutrons. Four of these isotopes may be more benign than the original technetium-99 because of their longer half lives. However, one isotope, molybdenum-93 with a half life of four thousand years, may be troublesome. All of the isotopes arising from the transmutation process that end up in high level waste must be examined in terms of their behavior in geologic disposal. In selecting goals for chemical separations, the technologists must consider the entire cycle of separation and transmutation before applying the performance expected in a single separation to implications concerning a repository. A separation efficiency of 0.95 can translate into the disposal of as much as 30 to 60 percent of the technetium in the repository if down stream losses are not controlled. In this case, the treatment may have little impact on anticipated off site radiation from technetium. The destruction of technetium through continuous recycle requires the cost of increased neutron dose and increased space in reactors that must be considered in design of fuel treatment systems. (authors)

Seitz, M.G. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1989: Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

SciTech Connect

This response is submitted in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (the Act), Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes expenditures made during the calendar year 1989 of surcharge rebates from the July 1, 1986, milestones. Title I of the Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to administer a Surcharge Escrow Account. This account consists of a portion of the surcharge fees paid by generators of low-level radioactive waste in nonsited compacts (regional compacts currently without operating disposal sites) and nonmember States (States without disposal sites that are not members of compacts) to the three States with operating disposal facilities (Nevada, South Carolina, and Washington) (sited States) for using their disposal facilities. In administering the Surcharge Escrow Account, the Act requires DOE to: invest the funds in interest-bearing United States Government securities; determine eligibility of rebates of the funds by evaluating State and compact progress toward developing new disposal sites against milestones set forth in the Act; disburse the collected rebates and interest; assess compliance of rebate expenditures with the limitations prescribed in the Act; and submit a report annually to Congress summarizing rebate expenditures by States and regions. 5 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A systematic review to identify areas of enhancements of pandemic simulation models for operational use at provincial and local levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the UW-LANL [34] agent-based model. The source code forcomparing agent-based and differential equation models.In contrast, agent- based (AB) models track each individual

Prieto, Diana M; Das, Tapas K; Savachkin, Alex A; Uribe, Andres; Izurieta, Ricardo; Malavade, Sharad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based methods of fault detection and diagnosis (FDD).Component-level FDD, which is the subject of the work

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Most assessments of model performance occur at individual temporal scales, but ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the identification of the dominant time scales contributing to model performance in the frequency domain. In this study we used wavelet analyses to synthesize the performance of twenty-one ecosystem models at nine eddy-covariance towers as part of the North American Carbon Program's site-level inter-comparison. This study expands upon previous single-site and single-model analyses to determine what patterns of model failure are consistent across a diverse range of models and sites.

Dietze, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Richardson, Andrew D.; Stoy, Paul C.; Barr, Alan; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Flanagan, Lawrence; Gough, Christopher; Grant, R. F.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Munger, J. W.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Schaefer, Kevin; Suyker, Andrew E.; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.; Wang, Weifeng; Weng, Ensheng

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

High-level open evolvable systems design by process-oriented modeling: application to DNA replication mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Open Evolvable Systems' design requires a methodological [1] and conceptual paradigm different from the conventional software design. Evolvable Systems' research [2, 6, 16, and 17] has established itself as a new research field, but the content is more ... Keywords: abstractions, design, design patterns, evolvable systems, framework, method, methodologies, modeling, process-oriented modeling, requirements analysis, requirements and architecture modeling, software engineering, specification

Behzad Bastani; Hoda Bastani

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Prescriber-consumer social network analysis for risk level re-estimation based on an asymmetrical rating exchange model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a novel approach to re-estimate the risk level of prescribers and consumers (doctors and patients) that were previously evaluated by various independent Risk Analysis Systems (RAS). This is achieved by taking into consideration ... Keywords: fraud detection, risk level estimation, social network analysis

Yingsong Hu, D. Wayne Murray, Yin Shan, Alison Sutinen, B. Sumudu U. Mendis, MingJian Tang

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development and Testing of a Life Cycle Model and a Parameterization of Thin Mid-level Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

We used a cloud-resolving model (a detailed computer model of cloud systems) to evaluate and improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models used for numerical weather prediction and climate modeling. We also used observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, made at DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Climate Research Facility located in the Southern Great Plains (Kansas and Oklahoma) during Intensive Observation Periods to evaluate our detailed computer model as well as a single-column version of a global atmospheric model used for numerical weather prediction (the Global Forecast System of the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction). This so-called Single-Column Modeling approach has proved to be a very effective method for testing the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models. The method relies on detailed observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, in an atmospheric column comparable in size to a grid column used in a global atmospheric model. The required observations are made by a combination of in situ and remote sensing instruments. One of the greatest problems facing mankind at the present is climate change. Part of the problem is our limited ability to predict the regional patterns of climate change. In order to increase this ability, uncertainties in climate models must be reduced. One of the greatest of these uncertainties is the representation of clouds and cloud processes. This project, and ARM taken as a whole, has helped to improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models.

Krueger, Steven K.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Impact of Manually Derived Southern Hemisphere Sea Level Pressure Data upon Forecasts from a Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted within the framework of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's global data assimilation and prediction system to assess the forecast impact of Southern Hemisphere sea level pressure estimates [paid observations (...

R. Seaman; P. Steinle; W. Bourke; T. Hart

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An Analysis of Sea-Level Cyclone Errors in NMC's Nested Grid Model (NGM) During the 1987-88 Winter Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of sea-level cyclone errors which occurred in 24- and 48-h forecasts of the National Meteorological Center's nested grid model (NGM) is performed for the 1987–88 winter season (1 December 1987–31 March 1988). All available 0000 UTC and ...

Steven L. Mullen; Bruce B. Smith

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparison of Model Forecast Skill of Sea Level Pressure along the East and West Coasts of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite recent advances in numerical weather prediction, major errors in short-range forecasts still occur. To gain insight into the origin and nature of model forecast errors, error frequencies and magnitudes need to be documented for different ...

Garrett B. Wedam; Lynn A. McMurdie; Clifford F. Mass

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

System level design of telecom systems using formal model refinement: Applying the B method/language in practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing complexity of modern telecommunication systems is one of the main issues encountered in most telecom products. Despite the plethora of methods and tools for efficient system design, verification and validation phases are still consuming ... Keywords: Correct by construction systems, Formal methods, Formal verification, System level design

Konstantinos Antonis; Nikolaos S. Voros

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of a High Resolution, Real Time, Distribution-Level Metering System and Associated Visualization, Modeling, and Data Analysis Functions  

SciTech Connect

NREL is developing measurement devices and a supporting data collection network specifically targeted at electrical distribution systems to support research in this area. This paper describes the measurement network which is designed to apply real-time and high speed (sub-second) measurement principles to distribution systems that are already common for the transmission level in the form of phasor measurement units and related technologies.

Bank, J.; Hambrick, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A two-level computable equilibrium model to assess the strategic allocation of emission allowances within the European union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the modeling of the strategic allocation of greenhouse gases emission allowances in the EU-wide trading market that results from Kyoto agreement implementation. An M-matrix game is formulated where the players are countries or groups ...

Laurent Viguier; Marc Vielle; Alain Haurie; Alain Bernard

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration in Oil Fields: A Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces Grant S. Bromhal, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880, gbromhal@netl.doe.gov, M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, and Duane H. Smith, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Underground injection of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is a common practice in the oil and gas industry and has often been cited as a proven method of sequestering CO 2 (US DOE, 1999). Of all sequestration methods, this is probably the best understood, as carbon dioxide has been used in the oil industry for many years. Additionally, most oil fields have been relatively well characterized geologically, and

256

Vacillations in a Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a 35-year integration of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Both ocean and atmosphere are two-level, nonlinear primitive equations models. The global atmospheric model is forced by a steady, zonally symmetric Newtonian ...

Paul S. Schopf; Max J. Suarez

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Dietary composition modulates brain mass and amyloid beta levels in a mouse model of aggressive Alzheimer's amyloid pathology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Western Diet (TWD). Neurobiol Dis 2007, 28:16-29. 9. Cao D, Lu H, Lewis TL, Li L: Intake of sucrose-sweetened water induces insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits and amyloidosis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease. J Biol Chem... Diets, Inc, so as to avoid diets associated with predictable organ toxicity. Mice were supplied with food and water ad libi- tum and were weighed weekly. At the age of 18 weeks, mice were sacrificed via isoflurane inhalation, and the brains were removed...

Pedrini, Steve; Thomas, Carlos; Brautigam, Hannah; Schmeidler, James; Ho, Lap; Fraser, Paul; Westaway, David; St George Hyslop, Peter; Martins, Ralph N; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Dickstein, Dara L; Hof, Patrick R; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Gandy, Sam

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Author manuscript, published in "Practical Applications of Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, Spain (2013)" GAMA: a spatially explicit, multi-level, agent-based modeling and simulation platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Agent-based modeling is now widely used to investigate complex systems but still lacks integrated and generic tools to support the representation of features usually associated with real complex systems, namely rich, dynamic and realistic environments or multiple levels of agency. The GAMA platform has been developed to address such issues and allow modelers, thanks to the use of a high-level modeling language, to build, couple and reuse complex models combining various agent architectures, environment representations and levels of abstraction.

Alexis Drogoul; Edouard Amouroux; Benoit Gaudou; Arnaud Grignard; Nicolas Marilleau; Patrick Taill; Maroussia Vavasseur; Duc-an Vo; Jean-daniel Zucker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Level-dynamic approach to the excited spectra of the Jahn-Teller model - kink-train lattice and 'glassy' quantum phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of excited phonon spectra of the Exe Jahn-Teller (hereafter, JT) model mapped onto the generalized Calogero-Moser (gCM) gas of pseudoparticles implies a complex interplay between nonlinearity and fluctuations of quasiparticle trajectories. A broad crossover appears in a pseudotime (interaction strength) between the initial oscillator region and the nonlinear region of the kink-train lattice as a superlattice of the kink-antikink gCM trajectories. The local nonlinear fluctuations, nuclei (droplets) of the growing kink phase arise at the crossover, forming a new intermediate droplet "glassy" phase as a precursor of the kink phase. The "glassy" phase is related to a broad maximum in the entropy of the probability distributions of pseudoparticle accelerations, or level curvatures. The kink-train lattice phase with multiple kink-antikink collisions is stabilised by long-range correlations when approaching a semiclassical limit. A series of bifurcations of nearest-level spacings were recognised as signatures of pre-chaotic behaviour at the quantum level in the kink phase. Statistical characteristics can be seen to confirm the coexistence within all of the spectra of both regularity and chaoticity to a varying extent (nonuniversality). Regions are observed within which one of the phases is dominant.

E. Majernikova; S. Shpyrko

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for a comprehensive, system biology level analysis of a metal-reducing microbial community.

Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources are then addressed. Differences in required analyses and data are captured as outstanding data needs.

A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

TransCom3 Level 2 Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Level 2 Data Set Released Level 2 Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of "TransCom 3: Seasonal CO2 Flux Estimates from Atmospheric Inversions (Level 2)", prepared by K.R. Gurney and A.S. Denning. This data set provides model outputs and seasonal mean CO2 fluxes from the Atmospheric Carbon Cycle Inversion Intercomparison (TransCom 3), Level 2 inversion experiment. This Level 2 experiment inverted for the spatial and temporal pattern of the residual CO2 sources and sinks. The seasonal inversion consists of a 3-year forward simulation (365 days per year) containing 4 presubtracted tracers, 11 SF6 tracers, and 22 CO2 tracers (11 terrestrial, 11 oceanic) (Gurney et al., 2000). Carbon fluxes were estimated for each month of an average year determined as the mean of the

264

Development of a high-resolution emission inventory for Spain using the SMOKE modelling system: A case study for the years 2000 and 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission preparation is a critical stage in air quality modelling. The generation of input information from regulatory emission inventories compatible with the requirements of eulerian chemical-transport models needs a computationally efficient, reliable, ... Keywords: Air quality, Atmospheric emissions, Emission preparation for modelling, SMOKE, Spain

Rafael Borge; Julio Lumbreras; Encarnacion Rodríguez

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Analysis of Surface Leaching Processes in Vitrified High-Level Nuclear Wastes Using In-Situ Raman Imaging and Atomistic Modeling - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The in situ analysis of surface conditions of vitrified nuclear wastes can provide an important check of the burial status of radioactive objects without risk of radiation exposure. Raman spectroscopy was initially chosen as the most promising method for testing the surface conditions of glasses undergoing chemical corrosion, and was used extensively during the first year. However, it was determined that infrared reflection spectroscopy was better suited to this particular need and was used for the remaining two years to investigate the surface corrosion behavior of model silicate glasses for extension to nuclear waste glasses. The developed methodology is consistent with the known theory of optical propagation of dielectric media and uses the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The results show that it is possible to study the corrosion of glass by analyzing the glass surface using reflection fast Fourier infrared measurements and the newly developed ''dispersion analysis method.'' The data show how this analysis can be used to monitor the corrosion behavior of vitrified waste glasses over extended periods of storage.

Simmons, Joseph H.

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the DOE low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1987: Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

SciTech Connect

This report is submitted to Congress. It summarizes the expenditures made by States and compact regions of funds rebated by DOE from the Surcharge Escrow Account created by the Act, and to assess the compliance of each State and compact region with the limitations on such expenditure. States with operating disposal sites (''sited States'') may collect a surcharge on disposal of low-level (compact regions currently without disposal sites) and nonmember States to transfer on a monthly basis 25 percent of the surcharges collected for deposit into a Surcharge Escrow Account administered by DOE. DOE, in turn, is required to transfer these funds, and interest which has accrued, back to the non-sited compacts and nonmember States which have compiled with milestones set forth in the Act for development of new disposal sites.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Four Years of TRMM/VIRS On-Orbit Calibrations and Characterization Using Lunar Models and Data from Terra/MODIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four years of on-orbit solar calibration data have been used to quantify the temporal degradation of the two reflected solar bands of the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Solar ...

Cheng-Hsuan Lyu; William L. Barnes

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A Two Time-Level, Three-Dimensional, Semi-Lagrangian, Semi-implicit, Limited-Area Gridpoint Model of the Primitive Equations. Part II: Extension to Hybrid Vertical Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two time-level, three-dimensional, semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit primitive equation gridpoint model that incorporates a sophisticated physics package and uses hybrid coordinates in the vertical is derived. A simple filter, which is needed to ...

A. McDonald; Jan Erik Haugen

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Through the years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through the years Through the years Early 1960s Researchers at PNL (now called PNNL) developed the standards and devices for setting and measuring radiation doses received by nuclear industry work- ers. Tens of thousands of people, including children, have been mea- sured by whole-body counters since the 1960s to relate their physical content of radioactive materials to sources such as food and water. 1960s PNL formulated the first use of a digital computer for complete process control of a mass spectrometer. Mid-1960s PNL devised a computer code, called COBRA for COolant Boiling in Rod Arrays, which allowed for three-dimensional, multiphase hydrothermal modeling of reactor and other complex systems. 1967 PNL researchers continued the fundamental scientific and

271

Year 2 Report: Protein Function Prediction Platform  

SciTech Connect

Upon completion of our second year of development in a 3-year development cycle, we have completed a prototype protein structure-function annotation and function prediction system: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) platform (v.0.5). We have met our milestones for Years 1 and 2 and are positioned to continue development in completion of our original statement of work, or a reasonable modification thereof, in service to DTRA Programs involved in diagnostics and medical countermeasures research and development. The PFP platform is a multi-scale computational modeling system for protein structure-function annotation and function prediction. As of this writing, PFP is the only existing fully automated, high-throughput, multi-scale modeling, whole-proteome annotation platform, and represents a significant advance in the field of genome annotation (Fig. 1). PFP modules perform protein functional annotations at the sequence, systems biology, protein structure, and atomistic levels of biological complexity (Fig. 2). Because these approaches provide orthogonal means of characterizing proteins and suggesting protein function, PFP processing maximizes the protein functional information that can currently be gained by computational means. Comprehensive annotation of pathogen genomes is essential for bio-defense applications in pathogen characterization, threat assessment, and medical countermeasure design and development in that it can short-cut the time and effort required to select and characterize protein biomarkers.

Zhou, C E

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Convection Produced by Interacting Thunderstorm Outflows. Part I: Control Simulation and Low-Level Moisture Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Klemp–Wilhelmson three-dimensional numerical cloud model is used to investigate cloud development along intersecting thunderstorm outflow boundaries. The model initial environment is characterized by a temperature and moisture profile ...

Kelvin K. Droegemeier; Robert B. Wilhelmson

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effects of Sea Level Data Assimilation by Ensemble Optimal Interpolation and 3D Variational Data Assimilation on the Simulation of Variability in a Tropical Pacific Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea level anomalies (SLA) from the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon are assimilated with three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) and ensemble optimal interpolation (EnOI) for the period of 1997–2001. When sea level data ...

Weiwei Fu; Jiang Zhu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Projects of the year  

SciTech Connect

The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

Hansen, T.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

From here to human-level AI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human-level AI will be achieved, but new ideas are almost certainly needed, so a date cannot be reliably predicted-maybe five years, maybe five hundred years. I'd be inclined to bet on this 21st century. It is not surprising that human-level AI has proved ... Keywords: Elaboration tolerance, Human-level AI

John McCarthy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

sea level | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sea level sea level Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), shows sea level rise for the period as early as 1834 through 2008 for the following UK sites: Aberdeen, Liverpool, Newlyn, North Shields, and Sheerness. Data is from the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory. Earliest year of available data varies by site, beginning between 1834 and 1916. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change sea level UK Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Sea level rise (UK) (xls, 280.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment (Does not have "National Statistics" status)

277

Using a Business Process Model as a Central Organizing Construct for an Undergraduate Weather Forecasting Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last five years, the author has employed a business process model as a central organizing construct for the senior-level Forecasting Techniques course at Embry- Riddle Aeronautical University's Daytona Beach, Florida, campus. The process model ...

John M. Lanicci

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Statistical Models of Holland Pressure Profile Parameter and Radius to Maximum Winds of Hurricanes from Flight-Level Pressure and H*Wind Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many hurricane risk models the inclusion of the Holland B parameter plays an important role in the risk prediction methodology. This paper presents an analysis of the relationship between B and a nondimensional intensity parameter. The ...

Peter J. Vickery; Dhiraj Wadhera

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Variational Assimilation of Radiometric Surface Temperature and Reference-Level Micrometeorology into a Model of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Land Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data assimilation provides a useful framework that allows us to combine measurements and models, by appropriately weighting the sources of error in both, to produce a statistically optimal and dynamically consistent estimate of the evolving state ...

Steven A. Margulis; Dara Entekhabi

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Modeling Study of Atmospheric Transport and Photochemistry in the Mixed Layer during Anticyclonic Episodes in Europe. Part II. Calculations of Photo-Oxidant Levels along Air Trajectories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer model for photochemical oxidant formation in the atmospheric boundary layer has been used to calculate trends in ozone formation in air masses traveling across Europe. Ozone calculations were made for some actual summertime ...

K. Selby

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

WMAP First Year Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) science team has released results from the first year of operation at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point. The maps are consistent with previous observations but have much better sensitivity and angular resolution than the COBE DMR maps, and much better calibration accuracy and sky coverage than ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. The angular power spectra from these ground-based and balloon-borne experiments are consistent within their systematic and statistical uncertainties with the WMAP results. WMAP detected the large angular-scale correlation between the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB caused by electron scattering since the Universe became reionized after the "Dark Ages", giving a value for the electron scattering optical depth of 0.17+/-0.04. The simplest Lambda-CDM model with n=1 and Omega_tot=1 provides an adequate fit to the WMAP data and gives parameters which are consistent with determinations of the Hubble constant and observations of the accelerating Universe using supernovae. The time-ordered data, maps, and power spectra from WMAP can be found at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov along with 13 papers by the WMAP science team describing the results in detail.

E. L. Wright

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

2009 Reporting Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

FRS Accumu- Book Value Year End Year's Foot Line # Gross Lated DD&A Net Additions DD&A of Disposals Other Balance Additions Other note Petroleum: A BCD E F G H IJ

283

The Simulation of the Southern Great Plains Nocturnal Boundary Layer and the Low-Level Jet with a High-Resolution Mesoscale Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement–Cloud and Radiation Test Bed (ARM–CART) site during a period of several nights in September 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data were collected from ...

David Werth; Robert Kurzeja; Nelson Luís Dias; Gengsheng Zhang; Henrique Duarte; Marc Fischer; Matthew Parker; Monique Leclerc

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fuel Economy Guide - Model Year 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31 2.04DOHC TP TALON (4WD) . . . .L4 19 25 2.04DOHC TP M5 21 28 2.04DOHC TP FERRARI 456 . . . . . . . . . . . .L4 9 15 5.512 GP M6 10 16 5.512 GP FORD ASPIRE . . . . . . . ....

285

Activities and Accomplishments in Model Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

Document summarizes the compliance activity of EPAct-covered state and alternative fuel provider fleets.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Model Year 2013 Green Vehicle Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay Comb CO2 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2...

287

Field, laboratory, and modeling studies of water infiltration and runoff in subfreezing snow on regional scales to estimate future greenhouse-induced changes in sea-level. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The current DOE-supported research program (Reduce Uncertainty in Future Sea-Level Change Due to Ice Wastage) addressed the question of how the refreezing of meltwater in cold snow affects sea-level changes in a future changing climate. The continuation of that research, proposed here, takes an additional new approach by focusing on processes which can be defined and characterized by measurements on regional scales. This new emphasis is intended to be directly applicable to a large-scale analysis from which runoff forecasts (and consequent sea level change) from the entire arctic region can be made. The research proposed here addresses the problem of forecasting future sea-level change due to greenhouse-induced changes in runoff from polar glaciers and ice caps. The objectives of this work are (1) to observe in the field the processes of infiltration and refreezing which lead to the formation of impermeable firn layers; (2) to reproduce these observed processes in the laboratory to confirm and further quantify their understanding; (3) to develop and calibrate a regional scale numerical model which can simulate these processes, based on measured parameters and driven by boundary conditions determined by climate; and (4) to apply this model to predict the development of impermeable firn (and consequent runoff and discharge to the ocean) in response to predicted future climate change.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Allocation Year Rollover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover: 2013 to 2014 Note: Allocation Year 2013 (AY13) ends at 23:59:59 on Monday, January 13, 2014. AY14 runs from Tuesday, January 14, 2014 through Monday, January 12, 2015. Below are major changes that will go into effect with the beginning of AY14 on Tuesday, January 14, 2014. All times listed are PST. Scheduled System Downtimes There will be no service disruption during the allocation year rollover this year. Interactive and batch use will continue uninterrupted (except for "premium" jobs on Hopper; see below). Charging Across AY Boundary All batch jobs will continue running during the rollover. Time accrued before midnight will be charged to AY13 repos; time accrued after midnight will be charged to AY14 repos. Running batch jobs that are associated with

289

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

• A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f (·) is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. • Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ˆ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t • What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End...

292

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End...

293

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End...

294

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End...

295

Transportation Sector Module 1997, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the past year, several modifications have been made to the NEMS Transportation Model,incorporating greater levels of detail and analysis in modules previously represented in the aggregate or under a profusion of simplifying assumptions. This document is intended to amend those sections of the Model Documentation Report (MDR) which describe these superseded modules.

John Maples

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Previous Year Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards Awards Previous Year Awards 2013 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2013 allocation year (Jan 8, 2013 through Jan 13, 2014). Read More » NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2013 Awards NISE is a mechanism used for allocating the NERSC reserve (10% of the total allocation). In 2013 we made the second year of the two-year awards made in 2012, supplemented by projects selected by the NERSC director. Read More » Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2012/2013 Awards NERSC's new data-intensive science pilot program is aimed at helping scientists capture, analyze and store the increasing stream of scientific data coming out of experiments, simulations and instruments. Read More » 2012 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2012 allocation

297

Welcome Year in Review  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 NMMSS Users Annual Training Meeting Orlando, Florida-May 23-25, 2006 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy & the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Welcome & Year In Review...

298

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

299

Agency Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year 2007 More Documents & Publications U.S> Department of Energy, Fiscal Year 2007 Buy American Act Report. Audit Report:...

300

USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Southern California Edison High Penetration Photovoltaic Project - Year 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses research efforts from the first year of a project analyzing the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) resources interconnected onto Southern California Edison's (SCE's) distribution system. SCE will be interconnecting a total of 500 MW of commercial scale PV within their service territory by 2015. This Year 1 report describes the need for investigating high-penetration PV scenarios on the SCE distribution system; discusses the necessary PV system modeling and distribution system simulation advances; describes the available distribution circuit data for the two distribution circuits identified in the study; and discusses the additional inverter functionality that could be implemented in order to specifically mitigate some of the undesirable distribution system impacts caused by high-penetration PV installations.

Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Southern California Edison High Penetration Photovoltaic Project - Year 1  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses research efforts from the first year of a project analyzing the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) resources interconnected onto Southern California Edison's (SCE's) distribution system. SCE will be interconnecting a total of 500 MW of commercial scale PV within their service territory by 2015. This Year 1 report describes the need for investigating high-penetration PV scenarios on the SCE distribution system; discusses the necessary PV system modeling and distribution system simulation advances; describes the available distribution circuit data for the two distribution circuits identified in the study; and discusses the additional inverter functionality that could be implemented in order to specifically mitigate some of the undesirable distribution system impacts caused by high-penetration PV installations.

Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Neal, R.; Katiraei, F.; Yazdani, A.; Aguero, J. R.; Hoff, T. E.; Norris, B. L.; Parkins, A.; Seguin, R.; Schauder, C.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

12 'Demonstrated peak working gas capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period ...

304

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Year 2000: energy enough  

SciTech Connect

The growing needs for energy in the U.S. are reviewed, and it is predicted that energy supplies will need be more than doubled by the year 2000. The solution lies in three areas: goal targeting, resource management, and timing. A no-growth economy and an economy continuing growth at an appropriate rate are two scenarios discussed. The second major area of choice in fixing energy capabilities for the year 2000 involves management of fuel resources. Shortages of oil and gas dictate that the increase in energy consumption be changed to coal and uranium, both of which are available domestically; utilization of these energy sources will mean increased electrification. It is concluded, then, that the best avenues toward ensuring a national energy supply are utilization of coal and uranium and the practice of energy conservation through greater efficiency. Timing is the third critical area of decision making that affects future energy supply. The long lead time required to bring about a change in the national energy mix is cited. Current estimates indicate that now is the time to push toward a national electricity target of at least 7500 billion kWh for the year 2000. Meeting the target means almost four times the present electricity supply, at a growth rate of about 5.7 percent per year. This target assumes a reasonable measure of energy conservation. (MCW)

Starr, C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fiscal Year Justification of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, epidemiology, laboratory services strengthen support for state, tribal, local, and territorial public healthDEPARTMENT of HEALTH and HUMAN SERVICES Fiscal Year 2012 Justification of Estimates Justification is one of several documents that fulfill the Department of Health and Human Services` (HHS

308

Statistical Alignment Models for . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-increasing amount of parallel data opens a rich resource to multilingual natural language processing, enabling models to work on various translational aspects like detailed human annotations, syntax and semantics. With efficient statistical models, many cross-language applications have seen significant progresses in recent years, such as statistical machine trans-lation, speech-to-speech translation, cross-lingual information retrieval and bilingual lexicog-raphy. However, the current state-of-the-art statistical translation models rely heavily on the word-level mixture models — a bottleneck, which fails to represent the rich varieties and depen-dencies in translations. In contrast to word-based translations, phrase-based models are more robust in capturing various translation phenomena than the word-level (e.g., local word reordering), and less susceptive to the errors from preprocessing such as word segmentations and tok-enizations. Leveraging phrase level knowledge in translation models is challenging yet reward-ing: it also brings significant improvements on translation qualities. Above the phrase-level are

Bing Zhao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay SUVs Year Model Displ Cyl Trans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI Q5 Hybrid 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV...

310

LEVEL OF DETAIL MODELS FOR DISMOUNTED INFANTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monterey, California #12;Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average. 0704-0188 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE in NPSNET-IV.8.1. Additionally, view volume culling techniques were employed to reduce polygon flow through

Zyda, Michael

311

A switch level fault simulation environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fault simulation environment which accepts pure switch level or mixed switch/RT level descriptions of the design under test. Switch level fault injection strategies for the stuck-at, transition and logic bridge models are presented. ...

V. Krishnaswamy; J. Casas; T. Tetzlaff

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

model for delivery system component costs and performance: Components Model Delivery scenario model for Urban and Rural Interstate markets and demand levels (Mkt....

313

Calendar Year 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 Independence Avenue, SW 
 Washington, DC 20585 202-586-4128 en Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-fs-14-03 Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03

314

2013 Director's New Year Address  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director's New Year Address 2013 Director's New Year Address Print Looking Forward and Celebrating 20 Years in 2013 falocne We recently sat down with ALS Director Roger Falcone to...

315

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

316

Spherical Harmonic Analysis of a Model-Generated Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean fields of 850 mb temperature (T850), 500 mb geopetential height (G500) and sea level pressure (SLP) were generated in the course of a 5-year climate simulation run with a global general circulation model. Both the model-generated ...

Zaphiris D. Christidis; Jerome Spar

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Company Level Imports Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Company Level Imports Company Level Imports Archives 2013 Imports by Month January XLS February XLS March XLS April XLS May XLS June XLS July XLS August XLS September XLS...

318

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, A.P.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Stretches of Upper Mississippi River near record-low levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As a result of last year's drought, stretches of the Upper Mississippi River have approached record lows. These low water levels have jeopardized commercial barge ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Alternative methods of modeling wind generation using production costing models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the methods of incorporating wind generation in two production costing models: one is a load duration curve (LDC) based model and the other is a chronological-based model. These two models were used to evaluate the impacts of wind generation on two utility systems using actual collected wind data at two locations with high potential for wind generation. The results are sensitive to the selected wind data and the level of benefits of wind generation is sensitive to the load forecast. The total production cost over a year obtained by the chronological approach does not differ significantly from that of the LDC approach, though the chronological commitment of units is more realistic and more accurate. Chronological models provide the capability of answering important questions about wind resources which are difficult or impossible to address with LDC models.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pang, C.K. [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Level: National Data;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy...

324

Liquid level detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses a method. It is for detecting presence of a liquid level at a first predetermined point along the depth of a borehole.

Fryer, C.D.; Stie, K.E.; Wedel, M.W.; Stamper, K.R.

1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

" Level: National Data;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" "...

326

" Level: National Data;" " ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" "...

327

Balanced and Unbalanced Upper-Level Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of frontogenesis at upper levels are investigated using a hierarchy of three numerical models. They are, in order of decreasing sophistication, the anelastic (AN), the geostrophic momentum (GM), and the quasi-geostrophic (QG) ...

Michael J. Reeder; Daniel Keyser

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Carbon - 14 In Low-Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes EPRI's collective efforts to understand and model the behavior of long-lived radionuclide Carbon-14 ((14)C) in low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

329

2002 EIA Models Directory - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Levelized Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Model (LNFCC-PC) Propane Market Model (PPMM) Short-Term Hydroelectric Generation Model (STHGM)

330

Introduction: Twenty Years of ACCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vision of future priorities in transportation research ands 20th Transportation Center. A year ago, UCTC’s future, and

Cervero, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ACTIVITIES REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Phase Transition in Cooperative Agent-based Digital Ant ... a method of structurally constructing models of an ... This figure shows a temporal model of a ...

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

332

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

SciTech Connect

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Property:DIA/Level | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:DIA/Level Jump to: navigation, search Property Name DIA/Level Property Type String Description Development Impacts Assessment Toolkit property to help filter pages Used in Form/Template Tool Allows Values Global;National;Sectoral;Regional;Local;Project;Policy Pages using the property "DIA/Level" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool + Project + Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + National +, Regional +, Local +, ... Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) + Regional + Assessing Green Jobs Potential in Developing Countries: A Practitioner's Guide + National +

334

Waste management fiscal year 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Program is pleased to issue the Fiscal Year 1998 Progress Report presenting program highlights and major accomplishments of the last year. This year-end update describes the current initiatives in waste management and the progress DOE has made toward their goals and objectives, including the results of the waste management annual performance commitments. One of the most important program efforts continues to be opening the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for the deep geologic disposal of transuranic waste. A major success was achieved this year by the West Valley Demonstration Project in New York, which in June completed the project`s production phase of high-level waste processing ahead of schedule and under budget. Another significant accomplishment this year was the award of two privatization contracts for major waste management operations, one at Oak ridge for transuranic waste treatment, and one at Hanford for the Tank Waste Remediation System privatization project. DOE is proud of the progress that has been made, and will continue to pursue program activities that allow it to safely and expeditiously dispose of radioactive and hazardous wastes across the complex, while reducing worker, public, and environmental risks.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Yearly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, a new activity was launched under the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement (IEA Wind) for the small wind sector. The main focus of this activity, called Task 27, is to develop recommended practices for consumer labeling of existing commercial small wind turbines. Participants will also exchange information about the status of the small wind industry in the member countries. This report outlines the status of the small wind sector in 2009 in the countries participating in Task 27. (For more information about IEA Wind and the consumer label developed under Task 27, see www.ieawind.org.)

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 15 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 49 White Female (W, F) 12 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Los Alamos Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.0% 9.4% 28.1%...

337

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 28 White Female 6 Workforce Diversity Kansas City Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

338

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

29 Hispanic Male 220 Hispanic Female 202 White Male 1340 White Female 519 Workforce Diversity National Nuclear Security Administration As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

339

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 5 Hispanic Female (H, F) 4 White Male (W, M) 25 White Female (W, F) 17 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Livermore Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.2% 4.7% 3.5%...

340

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

7 Asian Female 6 Hispanic Male 8 Hispanic Female 7 White Male 128 White Female 83 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Immedidate Office of the Deputy Administrator (NA-20) As of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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341

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 12 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 34 White Female (W, F) 16 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Sandia Field Office As of March 23, 2013 2.5% 8.8% 13.8% 1.3%...

342

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 23 Hispanic Female 24 White Male 36 White Female 35 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management...

343

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 29 26 -10.34% White Female (W,F) 19 16 -15.79% Change DIVERSITY Change Livermore Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

344

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 4 Hispanic Male 21 Hispanic Female 47 White Male 61 White Female 92 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Management & Budget, NA-MB As of Sep...

345

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 8 White Female 3 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE 9 64.3% 5 35.7%...

346

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 4 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 4 White Male 30 White Female 19 Workforce Diversity Livermore Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER DIVERSITY...

347

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female (W, F) 474 Total includes 2561 permanent and 21 temporary employees. PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER National Nuclear Security Administration As of March 23, 2013...

348

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 74 Hispanic Female (H, F) 22 White Male (W, M) 393 White Female (W, F) 19 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation...

349

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 1 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 1 White Male 46 White Female 22 Workforce Diversity Y-12 Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE DIVERSITY GENDER 51...

350

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 9 White Female 1 Workforce Diversity Office of the Administrator (NA-1) As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE...

351

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

32 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 1.5% 0.7% 21.9% 21.9% 1.5% 16.8% 32.8% 2.9% Pay Plan Males 65.7% Females 34.3%...

352

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 18 White Male 40 White Female 28 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security, NA-70 As...

353

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

-8.33% White Male (W,M) 34 34 0.00% White Female (W,F) 17 16 -5.88% Change DIVERSITY Change Sandia Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

354

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 15 13 -13.33% White Female (W,F) 8 6 -25.00% Change DIVERSITY Change Savannah River Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

355

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 6 Hispanic Female (H, F) 6 White Male (W, M) 51 White Female (W, F) 14 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Nevada Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.1% 3.4% 1.1% 31.8%...

356

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 14 White Female 8 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Savannah River Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN...

357

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 29 White Female 5 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Safety & Health, NA-SH As of Sep 24,...

358

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 3 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 76 White Female 22 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors (NA-30) As of March 24,...

359

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 3 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 50 White Female 11 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations (NA-40)...

360

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City Field Office As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 2.6% 2.6% 28.9% 21.1% 39.5% 5.3% Pay Plan Males 71.1% Females 28.9% Gender AIAN, M...

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361

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 44 White Female 13 Workforce Diversity Pantex Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE DIVERSITY GENDER 57...

362

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 85 71 -16.47% White Female (W,F) 33 30 -9.09% Change DIVERSITY Change NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

363

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 20 Hispanic Female 11 White Male 53 White Female 17 Workforce Diversity Los Alamos Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

364

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9 Asian Female 5 Hispanic Male 18 Hispanic Female 12 White Male 101 White Female 49 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Immediate Office of the Deputy Administrator (DP) (NA-10) As of...

365

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Administration As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER PAY PLAN Change DIVERSITY Change 4.2% 0.1% 0.0% 3.5% 1.6% 6.8% 0.7% 17.6% 49.5% 2.6% 13.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.1%...

366

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 4 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 53 White Female 19 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Nevada Site Office As of September 25, 2010 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

367

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 3 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 52 White Female 20 Workforce Diversity Nevada Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER DIVERSITY 64...

368

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

F) 7 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Savannah River Field Office As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 6.5% 12.9% 38.7% 38.7% 3.2% Pay Plan Males 64.5% Females 35.5% Gender AIAN, M AIAN,...

369

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 18 White Male 40 White Female 25 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE Associate...

370

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 389 400 2.83% White Female (W,F) 21 19 -9.52% Change DIVERSITY Change Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (NA-15) As of...

371

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 13 Hispanic Female 17 White Male 37 White Female 17 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Sandia Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

372

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reactors (120) and Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (586) DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity National Nuclear Security Administration As of Apr 10, 2011 PAY...

373

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 6.1% 21.6% 26.7% 34.5% 10.6% 0.6% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 3.5% 30.8% 34.2% 31.5% Education J.D....

374

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 7.5% 22.5% 30.0% 32.5% 7.5% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.0% 32.5% 27.5% 40.0% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

375

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 35.3% 29.4% 17.6% 5.9% 11.8% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.0% 23.5% 58.8% 17.6% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

376

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 24.8% 15.0% 21.7% 31.8% 5.6% 1.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.3% 31.5% 37.4% 30.8% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

377

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 2.3% 2.3% 20.5% 50.0% 22.7% 2.3% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 6.8% 38.6% 45.5% 9.1% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

378

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 6.6% 41.7% 32.7% 16.0% 3.0% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.4% 7.6% 16.0% 76.0% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

379

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 11.6% 27.9% 18.6% 18.6% 23.3% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 41.9% 16.3% 25.6% 16.3% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters...

380

Evaluating service level agreements using observational probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on our use of quantitative modelling in predicting the success of systems and services in achieving Service Level Agreements (SLAs). We construct models of the systems in the stochastic process algebra PEPA[1], and queries in the language of ...

Allan Clark; Stephen Gilmore

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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381

Liquid level controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for maintaining two distinct sodium levels within the shell of a heat exchanger having a plurality of J-shaped modular tube bundles each enclosed in a separate shell which extends from a common base portion. A lower liquid level is maintained in the base portion and an upper liquid level is maintained in the shell enwrapping the long stem of the J-shaped tube bundles by utilizing standpipes with a notch at the lower end which decreases in open area the distance from the end of the stand pipe increases and a supply of inert gas fed at a constant rate to produce liquid levels, which will remain generally constant as the flow of liquid through the vessel varies. (auth)

Mangus, J.D.; Redding, A.H.

1975-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Interannual Variability in the Northern Hemisphere Winter Middle Atmosphere in Control and Perturbed Experiments with the GFDL SKYHI General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on interannual variability of the Northern Hemisphere winter stratospheric circulation as simulated by the 40-level GFDL “SKYHI” general circulation model. A 31-year control simulation was performed using a climatological ...

Kevin Hamilton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the  

SciTech Connect

Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Software Architecture for High Level Applications  

SciTech Connect

A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

Shen,G.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

385

CALENDAR YEAR 2011 ANNUAL SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALENDAR YEAR 2011 ANNUAL SECURITY FIRE SAFETY REPORT& #12;University of North Dakota Annual Security & Fire Safety Report: Calendar Year 2011 n Page 1 Dear Community Member: I am pleased to introduce the 2011 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for the University of North Dakota. This report

Delene, David J.

386

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

SciTech Connect

I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

387

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the big questions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

Hitoshi Murayama

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

388

Level-of-Detail Shaders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current graphics hardware can render objects using simple procedural shaders in real-time. However, detailed, highquality shaders will continue to stress the resources of hardware for some time to come. Shaders written for film production and software renderers may stretch to thousands of lines. The difficulty of rendering efficiently is compounded when there is not just one, but a scene full of shaded objects, surpassing the capability of any hardware to render. This problem has many similarities to the rendering of large models, a problem that has inspired extensive research in geometric level-of-detail and geometric simplification. We introduce an analogous process for shading, shader simplification. Starting from an initial detailed shader, shader simplification produces a new shader with extra level-of-detail parameters that control the shader execution. The resulting level-of-detail shader, can automatically adjust its rendered appearance based on measures of distance, size, or importance as well as physical limits such as rendering time budget or texture usage.

Marc Olano; Bob Kuehne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Solid Waste Program Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS 1.2.1, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan for the Solid Waste Program at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The Solid Waste Program treats, stores, and disposes of a wide variety of solid wastes consisting of radioactive, nonradioactive and hazardous material types. Solid waste types are typically classified as transuranic waste, low-level radioactive waste, low-level mixed waste, and non-radioactive hazardous waste. This report describes the mission, goals and program strategies for the Solid Waste Program for fiscal year 1996 and beyond.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Shipping source level estimation for ambient noise forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to accurately estimate shipping source levels from ambient noise data is an essential step towards creating a forecast model of the ocean soundscape. Source level estimates can be obtained by solving the system of linear equations

Jeffrey S. Rogers; Steven L. Means; Stephen C. Wales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Low-Level Waste Branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosed please find five copies of an application for ground water Alternate Concentration Limits (ACLs) for the Shirley Basin mill and tailings site. Pathfinder requests that the NRC amend the above referenced license to incorporate the proposed ACLs. Pathfinder has been endeavoring for over fifteen years to accomplish a ground water restoration at the site with overall favorable results. Of the thirteen constituents assigned ground water protection standards in the license, only two continue to exceed the site standard limits: uranium and thorium-230. While both of these parameters have been dramatically reduced in the ground water over the years, they remain at levels which have become very difficult to further reduce. Additionally, it is noteworthy that over the period of record these two constituents have routinely exceeded the site standards in the designated site background well. This would suggest that the site standards for uranium and thorium-230 originally were set unrealistically low. We have concluded that we have essentially reached the point of ALARA relative to ground water restoration at the Shirley Basin site, prompting this application for ACLs. The enclosed application discusses the attainment of ALARA, presents sound technical justification for the proposed ACLs, and ably demonstrates the minimal public health risk associated with the proposed ACLs.

Mr. Thomas; H. Essig

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

Hartman, M.J. [and others

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Summary of photovoltaic system performance models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed overview of photovoltaics (PV) performance modeling capabilities that have been developed during recent years for analyzing PV system and component design and policy issues. A set of 10 performance models have been selected which span a representative range of capabilities from generalized first-order calculations to highly specialized electrical network simulations. A set of performance modeling topics and characteristics is defined and used to examine some of the major issues associated with photovoltaic performance modeling. Next, each of the models is described in the context of these topics and characteristics to assess its purpose, approach, and level of detail. Then each of the issues is discussed in terms of the range of model capabilities available and summarized in tabular form for quick reference. Finally, the models are grouped into categories to illustrate their purposes and perspectives.

Smith, J. H.; Reiter, L. J.

1984-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

70 Images for 70 Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 Images for 70 Years 70 Images for 70 Years 70 Images for 70 Years Los Alamos has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people of the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best scientific and engineering solutions to many of the nation's most crucial security challenges. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. 1938 Hahn and Meitner Fission 1938 Hahn and Meitner Fission 1939 Einstein-Szilard 1939 Einstein-Szilard 1940s Main Guard Gate (671938) 1940s Main Guard Gate (671938) 1940s Security check 1940s Security check 1940 Boys Ranch School hockey on Ashley Pond 1940 Boys Ranch School hockey on Ashley Pond 1942 Fuller Lodge 1942 Fuller Lodge

395

Microsoft Word - The Oppenheimer Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Years 1943-1945 At 5:29:45 am MWT on July 16, 1945, the world's first atomic bomb exploded 100 feet over a portion of the southern New Mexico desert known as the Jornada...

396

Accountability report - fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

FEMP Year in Review 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identifying and implementing energy saving projects, the 2003 award winners have created energy cost savings of more than 62 million and 3.4 trillion Btu in one year. Our winners...

398

World Year of Physics 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMAGE: World Year of Physics 2005 nameplate Berkeley Lab logo Berkeley Lab Celebrates World Year of Physics 2005 Berkeley Lab Web Search Berkeley Lab Phone Book Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Berkeley Lab Privacy and Security Notice IMAGE: World Year of Physics 2005 nameplate Berkeley Lab logo Berkeley Lab Celebrates World Year of Physics 2005 Berkeley Lab Web Search Berkeley Lab Phone Book Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Berkeley Lab Privacy and Security Notice IMAGE: World of Physics graphic Symposia page link Special Events page link Lectures page link Education page link The World Year of Physics is a worldwide celebration of physics and its importance in our everyday lives. Physics not only plays an important role in the development of science and technology but also has a tremendous impact on our society. WYP aims to raise the worldwide awareness of physics and physical science. The United Nations has declared 2005 to be the International Year of Physics. This declaration coincides with the 100th anniversary of physicist

399

WIPP_Marks_12_Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

improvements to highways and high-level training provided to first U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation Pilot Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New...

400

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

On Thermal Expansion over the Last Hundred Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of sea level rise during the period 1856–1991 due to thermal expansion are presented. The estimates are based on an ocean model that consists of three zonally averaged ocean basins representing the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. ...

J. R. de Wolde; R. Bintanja; J. Oerlemans

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Difficult Concepts in Systems Biology II: Levels and Reductions Motivation. System Biology is very much in the vogue. This is partly because full modelling of biological systems is now a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a series of objects (for instance atoms or molecules that can be view as a unit with properties that can", "Level", "Analyzability", "Explanation", "Understanding", "Cause" and "Disease or irreducibility. We will define a series of projects with the primary aim of clarifying these concepts

Goldschmidt, Christina

403

Photovoltaics Overview: Fiscal Year 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 2001, for the third year in a row, the solar electric market grew at more than 30%. Fueling this growth is the U.S. photovoltaic industry - the companies that design, manufacture, install, operate, and maintain all components of solar generating systems. The messages of the U.S. PV industry roadmap are taken very seriously by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Solar Energy Technologies. Achieving industry's goals will demand aggressive work in fundamental and exploratory research, manufacturing, and system applications to reduce the cost of solar electric systems. This is an annual report of the DOE PV Program, FY2001.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Today in Energy - Year-to-date natural gas use for electric power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas used to generate electricity so far this year is below the high level during the comparable 2012 period, when low natural gas prices led to significant ...

405

Year-to-date natural gas use for electric power generation is down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas used to generate electricity so far this year is below the high level during the comparable 2012 period, when low natural gas prices led to significant ...

406

Limits on Three-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR First Year Anisotropy Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the three-point temperature correlation function of the {\\it COBE} Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps to search for non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. The level of fluctuations seen in the computed correlation function are too large to be attributable solely to instrument noise. However the fluctuations are consistent with the level expected to result from a superposition of instrument noise and sky signal arising from a Gaussian power law model of initial fluctuations, with a quadrupole normalized amplitude of 17 $\\mu$K and a power law spectral index $n = 1$. We place limits on the amplitude of intrinsic three-point correlations with a variety of predicted functional forms.

G. Hinshaw; A. Kogut; K. M. Gorski; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; C. Lineweaver; P. Lubin; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

407

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs 1 February 2013 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) End-Use Models FAQs What is an end-use model? An end-use model is a set of equations designed to disaggregate a RECS sample household's total annual fuel consumption into end uses such as space heating, air conditioning, water heating, refrigeration, and so on. These disaggregated values are then weighted up to produce population estimates of total and average energy end uses at various levels of geography, by housing unit type, or other tabulations of interest. Why are end-use models needed? Information regarding how total energy is distributed across various end uses is critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. Using submeters

408

Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Coke Calcination Level and Anode Baking Level – Application and Reproducibility of Lc Based Methods. Author(s), Stein ...

409

Climate uncertainty and implications for U.S. state-level risk assessment through 2050.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decisions for climate policy will need to take place in advance of climate science resolving all relevant uncertainties. Further, if the concern of policy is to reduce risk, then the best-estimate of climate change impacts may not be so important as the currently understood uncertainty associated with realizable conditions having high consequence. This study focuses on one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change - precipitation - to understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and the near-term justification for interventions to mitigate the course of climate change. We show that the mean risk of damage to the economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of one trillion dollars over the next 40 years, with employment impacts of nearly 7 million labor-years. At a 1% exceedance-probability, the impact is over twice the mean-risk value. Impacts at the level of individual U.S. states are then typically in the multiple tens of billions dollar range with employment losses exceeding hundreds of thousands of labor-years. We used results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) climate-model ensemble as the referent for climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, mapped the simulated weather hydrologically to the county level for determining the physical consequence to economic activity at the state level, and then performed a detailed, seventy-industry, analysis of economic impact among the interacting lower-48 states. We determined industry GDP and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effect on personal income, and the consequences for the U.S. trade balance.

Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ARM - Field Campaign - Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsYear of Tropical Convection (YOTC) govCampaignsYear of Tropical Convection (YOTC) Campaign Links Year of Tropical Convection Website Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) 2008.05.01 - 2010.04.30 Lead Scientist : Sally McFarlane Description Example of a sonde profile available from the ARM Archive The realistic representation of tropical convection in global atmospheric models is a long-standing challenge for weather and global climate models. The lack of fundamental knowledge in this area causes difficulties in modeling and predicting prominent phenomena of the tropical atmosphere such as the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), El-Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), monsoons, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), tropical cyclones,

411

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Prenatal dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) exposure and child growth during the first year of life  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Due to its long-term persistence in the environment and its ability to cross the placental barrier, prenatal p,p Prime -dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE) exposure continues to be a public health concern. This study aimed to evaluate the association between prenatal DDE exposure and child growth, at birth and during the first year of life. Methods: 253 pregnant women were recruited between January 2001 and June 2005 in a prospective cohort in Morelos, Mexico. Serum levels of DDE were measured during each trimester of pregnancy by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector. Using the generalized mixed-effects models, the association between DDE and child growth parameters (weight-for-age, length-for-age, weight-for-length, BMI-for-age and head circumference-for-age Z-scores) from birth to 1 year of age was assessed. Maternal dietary intake was considered as covariable among others. Results: DDE levels were 6.3{+-}2.8 ng/mL (first trimester), 6.6{+-}2.9 ng/mL (second trimester), and 7.6{+-}2.9 ng/mL (third trimester). After adjusting for potential confounder variables, no significant associations were observed with prenatal DDE exposure and each of the selected parameters. Conclusions: Our results show no evidence of an association between prenatal DDE exposure and child growth during the first year of life.

Garced, Sheyla, E-mail: sgarced@gmail.com [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Torres-Sanchez, Luisa, E-mail: ltorress@insp.mx [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)] [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E., E-mail: mcebrian@cinvestav.mx [Department of Toxicology, CINVESTAV, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360 Mexico, D.F., Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Claudio, Luz, E-mail: luz.claudio@mssm.edu [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, International Training and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health Program, 17 E 102nd Street, CAM Building, 3 West, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Lopez-Carrillo, Lizbeth, E-mail: lizbeth@insp.mx [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)] [National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta Maria Ahuacatitlan, C.P. 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Non-OPEC oil supply outages remain above year-ago level ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most Popular Tags. electricity; oil/petroleum; liquid ... South Sudan has signed an agreement with Sudan on oil export fees and security ...

415

Ten years of varying lake level and selection on size-at-maturity in sockeye salmon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science 296:707–711. Guillen, G. 2003. Klamath River ?shtshawytscha; e.g. , Guillen 2003). Short-term climate

Carlson, Stephanie M; Quinn, Thomas P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Non-OPEC oil supply outages remain above year-ago level - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

417

FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outlook) for the City of San Diego which presented a comprehensive examination of the City’s long range fiscal condition. The Financial Outlook has proven to be an important planning tool for the City of San Diego. The Outlook guided the City in establishing the fiscal year 2008 annual budget and has served throughout the year as the basis for longer term fiscal decisionmaking. The Outlook has communicated the City’s fiscal priorities along with the City’s strengths and the challenges that remain in achieving a balanced General Fund budget and fiscal health. The updated Five-Year Financial Outlook (2009-2013 Outlook) includes revised revenue and expenditure projections for fiscal years 2009 through 2013 as well as additional fiscal commitments that have emerged since the 2008-2012 Outlook was issued. Similar to the 2008-2012 Outlook, the revised revenue and expenditure estimates in the 2009-2013 Outlook are based on a variety of assumptions in the context of current and projected economic conditions. The updated Outlook not only identifies revenue and expenditure trends but also discusses risks and opportunities that affect fiscal decisions and the City’s ability to accomplish its strategic goals over the next five-year period. Those goals include: • Preservation of City services to the fullest extent possible. Fund the operations of new public facilities. • Meet contractual obligations and fund mandated programs. • Contribute the full payment of the Annual Required Contribution (ARC) for the City’s pension system. • Establish and maintain adequate General Fund reserves according to City Charter Section 91 and the City Reserve Policy recently approved by the City Council. • Address other significant financial obligations with a longer-term strategy.

Jerry Sanders; Jay M. Goldstone

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Company Level Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports All Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Company Level Imports With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 | XLS Previous Issues Month: September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 prior issues Go September 2013 Import Highlights Monthly data on the origins of crude oil imports in September 2013 has been released and it shows that two countries exported more than 1 million barrels per day to the United States (see table below). The top five exporting countries accounted for 75 percent of United States crude oil imports in September while the top ten sources accounted for approximately 92 percent of all U.S. crude oil imports. The top five sources of US crude

419

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

420

Evaluation of CLM4 Solar Radiation Partitioning Scheme Using Remote Sensing and Site Level FPAR Datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper examines a land surface solar radiation partitioning scheme, i.e., that of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles. Taking advantage of a unique 30-year fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) dataset, derived from the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data set, multiple other remote sensing datasets, and site level observations, we evaluated the CLM4 FPAR’s seasonal cycle, diurnal cycle, long-term trends, and spatial patterns. Our findings show that the model generally agrees with observations in the seasonal cycle, long-term trends, and spatial patterns, but does not reproduce the diurnal cycle. Discrepancies also exist in seasonality magnitudes, peak value months, and spatial heterogeneity. We identify the discrepancy in the diurnal cycle as, due to, the absence of dependence on sun angle in the model. Implementation of sun angle dependence in a one-dimensional (1-D) model is proposed. The need for better relating of vegetation to climate in the model, indicated by long-term trends, is also noted. Evaluation of the CLM4 land surface solar radiation partitioning scheme using remote sensing and site level FPAR datasets provides targets for

Kai Wang; Jiafu Mao; Robert E. Dickinson; Xiaoying Shi; Wilfred M. Post; Zaichun Zhu; Ranga B. Myneni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mixed-Technology System-Level Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient method to simulate mixed-domain systems under the requirements of a system-level framework. The approach is the combined use of Modified Nodal Analysis (MNA) for the representation of a mixed-technology ... Keywords: MEM simulation, microsystem modeling and simulation, modified nodal analysis (MNA), optical MEM CAD tool, optoelectronic simulation, piecewise linear simulation (PWL)

J. A. Martinez; T. P. Kurzweg; S. P. Levitan; P. J. Marchand; D. M. Chiarulli

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/ak213e/ak213e00.pdf‎ Cost: Free Related Tools CDM Sustainable Development Tool Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS The Socio-economic and Gender Analysis (SEAGA) handbook of concepts, tools and guidelines for mainstreaming gender into development planning and policy implementation. Approach SEAGA, for Socio-economic and Gender Analysis, is an approach to

424

Features, Events, and Processes: system Level  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

D. McGregor

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Search for Model Year 2002 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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426

Search for Model Year 2000 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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427

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428

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429

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430

Model Year 2012: Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Advanced Technology...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Focus Electric sedan ZEV, Tier 2 Bin 1 Auto 105 kW e-motor est. 100 micharge 23 kWh Battery Electric (Li-ion) Ford Transit Connect (Azure Dynamics) Van ZEV, Tier 2 Bin 1 Auto...

431

Long-range dependence - Ten years of Internet traffic modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

correlation structure (ACF) is preserved irrespective ofself-similar time series’ ACF is the same for either coarses autocorrelation function (ACF), which is ? (k). The ACF

Karagiannis, T; Molle, M; Faloutsos, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

MODEL YEAR 2000 FUEL ECONOMY LEADERS IN POPULAR VEHICLE CLASSES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS VEHICLES ... 5 LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS (PROPANE) VEHICLES ...... 5 DIESEL VEHICLES ......

433

Search for Model Year 1995 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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434

Search for Model Year 1998 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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435

Search for Model Year 1996 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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436

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437

Search for Model Year 1990 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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438

Search for Model Year 2003 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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439

Search for Model Year 2006 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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440

Search for Model Year 2014 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Search for Model Year 1997 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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442

Search for Model Year 2007 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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443

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444

Search for Model Year 1984 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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445

Search for Model Year 1994 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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446

Search for Model Year 2004 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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447

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448

Search for Model Year 2001 Vehicles by EPA Size Class  

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449

Steric Sea Level Trends in the Northeast Pacific Ocean: Possible Evidence of Global Sea Level Rise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-year time series of hydrographic observations from Ocean Station PAPA and Line ‘P’ are used to estimate secular trends in monthly mean steric sea level heights relative to depths of 100 and 1000 decibars in the northeast Pacific Ocean. ...

Richard E. Thomson; Susumu Tabata

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Cosmological Parameter Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year WMAP data, in conjunction with additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter LCDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l CMB anisotropy, the BAO scale, and the Hubble constant, the densities, Omegabh2, Omegach2, and Omega_L, are each determined to a precision of ~1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5sigma level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional LCDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their LCDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are p...

Hinshaw, G; Komatsu, E; Spergel, D N; Bennett, C L; Dunkley, J; Nolta, M R; Halpern, M; Hill, R S; Odegard, N; Page, L; Smith, K M; Weiland, J L; Gold, B; Jarosik, N; Kogut, A; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

Jenifer Nordstrom

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Title Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Brown, Nancy J.,...

453

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontario’s electricity system faces significant challenges over the next 10 years. The uncertainty surrounding the return to service of Pickering A nuclear units, the lack of new generation investment and the commitment to shut down 7,500 MW of coal fired generation by December 31, 2007, all contribute to a potentially severe shortfall. New transmission, supply and demand side initiatives are urgently needed to address this gap and secure Ontario’s energy future. The need is most pressing in the Toronto area, to deal with the immediate impact of the April 30, 2005 shutdown of the Lakeview Thermal Generating Station. Plans are being implemented to address this in the short term. In the longer term, additional generation is also required in the Toronto area to replace the Lakeview generating capacity and to meet load growth in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Each year the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO) publishes an integrated assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario electricity system over the next 10 years. This report presents the IMO assessment for the 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It is based on the IMO’s forecast of electricity demand, information provided by Ontario generators on the supply that will be available and the latest information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Electricity Supply Outlook Additional Ontario electricity supply and demand-side measures are required to maintain supply adequacy into the future and to reduce Ontario’s dependency on supply from other jurisdictions.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Year STB EIA STB EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: November 16, 2012 Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample

455

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The provincial government?s plan to phase out coal?fired generation in favour of cleaner forms of generation represents one of the most significant undertakings in the 100?year history of Ontario?s electricity sector. Aging generation facilities and the continued increase in demand for electricity add to the urgency of proceeding with new generating and transmission facilities over the next 10 years. Over the last 12 months 650 MW of new gas?fired generation has been put in place and 515 MW of nuclear generation and 370 MW of renewable generation is expected to be in service within the next 18 months. There are also a number of projects totalling more than 9,000 MW of additional capacity that are in various stages of discussion, development or negotiation. Timely progress to achieve this additional capacity must continue if Ontario is to ensure a reliable supply of electricity over the next decade and beyond. This 10?year Outlook from the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) provides an assessment of the demand?supply picture for the province over the next decade and provides a plan identifying the timing and requirements of system changes needed to meet the government’s coal shutdown timeframe. Under the provisions of Bill 100, the Ontario Power

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

TRANSIENT CONTROL LEVEL PHILOSOPHY AND ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. TRANSIENT CONTROL LEVEL PHILOSOPHY AND IMPLEMENTATION II. Techniques and Equipment for Making TCL Tests ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

457

Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of data relating to the Tank Waste Remediation System Multi-Year Program. Topics discussed include: management systems; waste volume, transfer and evaporation management; transition of 200 East and West areas; ferricyanide, volatile organic vapor, and flammable gas management; waste characterization; retrieval from SSTs and DSTs; heat management; interim storage; low-level and high-level radioactive waste management; and tank farm closure.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Climate Fluctuations and Record-High Levels of Lake Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake Michigan reached record-high levels during 1985 and 1986 just 10 years after attaining its previous record highs of this century. The climate of the basin has become cloudier and cooler over the past 40 years, loading to decreased ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

Michael Lewis

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past year, several modifications have been made to the NEMS Transportation Model, incorporating greater levels of detail and analysis in modules previously represented in the aggregate or under a profusion of simplifying assumptions. This document is intended to amend those sections of the Model Documentation Report (MDR) which describe these superseded modules. Significant changes have been implemented in the LDV Fuel Economy Model, the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the LDV Fleet Module, and the Highway Freight Model. The relevant sections of the MDR have been extracted from the original document, amended, and are presented in the following pages. A brief summary of the modifications follows: In the Fuel Economy Model, modifications have been made which permit the user to employ more optimistic assumptions about the commercial viability and impact of selected technological improvements. This model also explicitly calculates the fuel economy of an array of alternative fuel vehicles (AFV`s) which are subsequently used in the estimation of vehicle sales. In the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the results of the Fuel Economy Model have been incorporated, and the program flows have been modified to reflect that fact. In the Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Module, the sales of vehicles to fleets of various size are endogenously calculated in order to provide a more detailed estimate of the impacts of EPACT legislation on the sales of AFV`s to fleets. In the Highway Freight Model, the previous aggregate estimation has been replaced by a detailed Freight Truck Stock Model, where travel patterns, efficiencies, and energy intensities are estimated by industrial grouping. Several appendices are provided at the end of this document, containing data tables and supplementary descriptions of the model development process which are not integral to an understanding of the overall model structure.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

DOE/EEI Model Agreement Explanation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EEI Model Agreement Explanation DOE/EEI Model Agreement Explanation Introduction The attached document serves as a model for the development of formal agreements between a Federal civilian Agency and its serving Utility for the procurement of energy services on a "designated" or "sole" source basis. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 ("EPAct") establishes as a federal government goal, identifying and implementing all energy and water conservation projects with a payback of ten years or less. Executive Order 13123, signed on June 3, 1999, requires all federal agencies to achieve a 30% reduction in facilities energy use and a 20% improvement in industrial energy efficiency by the year 2005, relative to 1990 levels. The Order requires a 35% reduction in energy use at facilities and a 25% improvement in industrial energy

463

DOE/EEI Model Agreement Explanation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EEI Model Agreement Explanation EEI Model Agreement Explanation Introduction The attached document serves as a model for the development of formal agreements between a Federal civilian Agency and its serving Utility for the procurement of energy services on a "designated" or "sole" source basis. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 ("EPAct") establishes as a federal government goal, identifying and implementing all energy and water conservation projects with a payback of ten years or less. Executive Order 13123, signed on June 3, 1999, requires all federal agencies to achieve a 30% reduction in facilities energy use and a 20% improvement in industrial energy efficiency by the year 2005, relative to 1990 levels. The Order requires a 35% reduction in energy use at facilities and a 25% improvement in industrial energy

464

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario Electricity System for the 10-year period from 2003 to 2012. This assessment is based on forecasts of electricity demand and available supply combined with current information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Based on existing and proposed facilities, Ontario is expected to have a reliable supply of electricity during the forecast period under a wide-variety of conditions. Opportunities also exist for additional enhancements to improve the efficiency of the Ontario electricity market. The assessments in this report were made based on a number of key planning assumptions. Assuming a median growth scenario, the energy demand is forecast to grow over the study period from 151 terawatt-hours (TWh) in 2003 to 164 TWh in 2012, at an average annual growth rate of 0.9%. Peak demands are forecast to increase from about 24,000 MW in 2003 to 26,000 MW in 2012 at an average annual growth rate of 0.9%. Under normal weather conditions, Ontario is expected to be summer peaking by 2008. However, given the high variability of summer peak demands, there is a possibility that actual summer peaks may be higher than the winter peaks in some or all of the years before 2008, as has been the case in the recent past. In addition to the

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Report on Competitive Sourcing Results Fiscal Year 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 April 2006 Executive Office of the President Office of Management and Budget Table of Contents Executive Summary ...................................................................................................1 Introduction ................................................................................................................3 Part I. FY 2005 activities and three-year trends .......................................................3 A. Use of competition............................................................................................3 1. Level of competition ......................................................................................3 2. Activities competed........................................................................................9

466

Specification of history based constraints for access control in conceptual level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An access control model for Semantic Web should take the semantic relationships among the entities, defined in the abstract conceptual level (i.e., ontology level), into account. Authorization and policy specification based on a logical model let us ...

Fathiyeh Faghih; Morteza Amini; Rasool Jalili

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Kirkpatrick's Learning Evaluation Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the core principles of training evaluation is the model based on four sequential levels that was developed by Donald Kirkpatrick. The levels, 1) Reaction, 2) Learning, 3) Behavior, and 4)...

468

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh from NREL Bangladesh from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not

469

Data Center Celebrates 20 Years of Delivering Savings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Celebrates 20 Years of Delivering Savings Center Celebrates 20 Years of Delivering Savings Data Center Celebrates 20 Years of Delivering Savings September 23, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis Find Stations Plan a Route Location: Go Start: End: Go Fuel: All Fuels Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) more search options close × More Search Options Include private stations Include planned stations Owner All Private Federal State Local Utility Payment All American Express Discover MasterCard VISA Cash Checks CFN Clean Energy Fuel Man Gas Card PHH Services Voyager WEX Electric charger types Include level 1 Include level 2 Include DC fast Include legacy chargers Limit results to within 5 miles Limit results to within 5 miles

470

The More Important Price Indicator This Year is Low Stocks  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 of 6 6 of 6 Notes: Crude prices this year at the beginning of the second quarter are likely to be higher -- not lower -- as a result of the current shortfall in crude oil production relative to demand on top of low stocks. OECD stocks of crude oil and products plunged steeply in 1999. By year end, they were below the low levels at end December 1996 -- OPEC's stated target. This does not take into consideration the growth in demand that these stocks must help supply. EIA expects OECD stocks to stay very low throughout the year 2000. The projection shows end March levels remain well below those seen at the end of the first quarter 1996. The build during the summer will not be adequate to make up for the draws, resulting in a net draw of over 300 thousand barrels in an already tight market.

471

Advanced material appearance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many years, appearance models in computer graphics focused on general models for reflectance functions coupled with texture maps. Recently, it has been recognized that even very common materials such as hair, skin, fabric, and rusting metal require ...

Julie Dorsey; Holly Rushmeier

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Umbra's High Level Architecture (HLA) Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Umbra's High Level Architecture HLA library. This library serves as an interface to the Defense Simulation and Modeling Office's (DMSO) Run Time Infrastructure Next Generation Version 1.3 (RTI NG1.3) software library and enables Umbra-based models to be federated into HLA environments. The Umbra library was built to enable the modeling of robots for military and security system concept evaluation. A first application provides component technologies that ideally fit the US Army JPSD's Joint Virtual Battlespace (JVB) simulation framework for Objective Force concept analysis. In addition to describing the Umbra HLA library, the report describes general issues of integrating Umbra with RTI code and outlines ways of building models to support particular HLA simulation frameworks like the JVB.

GOTTLIEB, ERIC JOSEPH; MCDONALD, MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III, FRED J.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia from NREL Ethiopia from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions

474

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil from NREL Brazil from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

475

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from NREL Nepal from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

476

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from NREL Kenya from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

477

A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

478

Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ten Year Site Plans Ten Year Site Plans A Ten Year Site Plan (TYSP) is the essential planning document linking a site's real property requirements to its mission in support of the...

479

Federal Energy Management Year 2001 In Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT YEAR IN REVIEW 2001 United States Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program YEAR IN REVIEW...

480

Calendar Year 2003 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year 2003 Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan December 22, 2003...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "levels model years" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

National high-level waste systems analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the assessment of budgetary impacts, constraints, and repository availability on the storage and treatment of high-level waste and on both existing and pending negotiated milestones. The impacts of the availabilities of various treatment systems on schedule and throughput at four Department of Energy sites are compared to repository readiness in order to determine the prudent application of resources. The information modeled for each of these sites is integrated with a single national model. The report suggests a high-level-waste model that offers a national perspective on all high-level waste treatment and storage systems managed by the Department of Energy.

Kristofferson, K.; Oholleran, T.P.; Powell, R.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

end-of-year reserves | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281512 Varnish cache server end-of-year reserves Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA end-of-year reserves gas oil Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions- Reference Case (xls, 58.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

483

Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California: Year 2 Project Update; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Southern California Edison (SCE) is well into a five-year project to install a total of 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy within its utility service territory. Typical installations to date are 1-3 MW peak rooftop PV systems that interconnect to medium-voltage urban distribution circuits or larger (5 MW peak) ground-mounted systems that connect to medium-voltage rural distribution circuits. Some of the PV system interconnections have resulted in distribution circuits that have a significant amount of PV generation compared to customer load, resulting in high-penetration PV integration scenarios. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE have assembled a team of distribution modeling, resource assessment, and PV inverter technology experts in order to investigate a few of the high-penetration PV distribution circuits. Currently, the distribution circuits being studied include an urban circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 46% and a rural circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 60%. In both cases, power flow on the circuit reverses direction, compared to traditional circuit operation, during periods of high PV power production and low circuit loading. Research efforts during year two of the five-year project were focused on modeling the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, the development and installation of distribution circuit data acquisition equipment appropriate for quantifying the impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, and investigating high-penetration PV impact mitigation strategies. This paper outlines these research efforts and discusses the following activities in more detail: the development of a quasi-static time-series test feeder for evaluating high-penetration PV integration modeling tools; the advanced inverter functions being investigated for deployment in the project's field demonstration and a power hardware-in-loop test of a 500-kW PV inverter implementing a limited set of advanced inverter functions.

Mather, B.; Neal, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Fiscal year 1987 program plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, operation, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate