National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for levels eco-ssls eco-ssl

  1. Service Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Service Levels Service Levels NERSC Supported Services Model NERSC supports various services at various levels of support. This document outlines the different levels of support that can be expected for a given service. Production Services All production services at NERSC have the following characteristics: Monitored by NERSC Operations with automated tools (Nagios). Outages are announced on the MOTD and must follow the rules defined in System Outages document. User facing documentation

  2. Company Level Imports Archives

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Company Level Imports Company Level Imports Archives 2015 Imports by Month January XLS February XLS March XLS April XLS May XLS June XLS July XLS August XLS September XLS October...

  3. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  4. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  5. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, Albert P.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  6. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  7. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: ...

  8. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy ...

  9. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy ...

  10. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: ...

  11. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: ...

  12. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy ...

  13. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " ...

  14. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: ...

  15. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " ...

  16. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " ...

  17. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  18. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  19. Tables of Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tables of Energy Levels The Image Map below will direct you to the table of energy levels [PDF format only] for that particular nuclide from the most recent publication found within the TUNL and FAS publications of "Energy Levels of Light Nuclei" for A = 4 - 20. If your browser does not support image maps or you would like the choice of PostScript and PDF formats for the tables, please view the list below. Click on the button corresponding to the nucleus for which you would like to

  20. Liquid level controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mangus, J.D.; Redding, A.H.

    1975-07-15

    A system for maintaining two distinct sodium levels within the shell of a heat exchanger having a plurality of J-shaped modular tube bundles each enclosed in a separate shell which extends from a common base portion. A lower liquid level is maintained in the base portion and an upper liquid level is maintained in the shell enwrapping the long stem of the J-shaped tube bundles by utilizing standpipes with a notch at the lower end which decreases in open area the distance from the end of the stand pipe increases and a supply of inert gas fed at a constant rate to produce liquid levels, which will remain generally constant as the flow of liquid through the vessel varies. (auth)

  1. Liquid-level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Aliquid level sensor is described which has a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

  2. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  3. Current level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, Cordon R.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for detecting the current level of a DC signal. It includes an even harmonic modulator to which a reference AC signal is applied. The unknown DC signal acts on the reference AC signal so that the output of the modulator includes an even harmonic whose amplitude is proportional to the unknown DC current.

  4. Level: National Data;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,433 Natural Gas 5,911 Net Electricity 2,851 Purchases 2,894 Transfers In 20 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 4 Sales and Transfers Offsite 67 Coke and Breeze 272

  5. Switch wear leveling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  6. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M.

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  7. High-Level Waste Inventory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis of Alternatives for Disposition of the Idaho Calcined High-Level Waste Inventory ... of the Idaho Calcined High-Level Waste Inventory Volume 1- Summary Report April ...

  8. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the ...

  9. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  10. High Level Waste Management Division High. Level Waste System Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HLW -OVP-98-0037 High Level Waste Management Division High. Level Waste System Plan Revision 9 (U) April 1998 Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U. S. Department of Energy under contract no. DE-AC09-96SR18500 HLW -OVP-98-0037 High Level Waste Management Division High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9 (U) Contributors: A. S. Choi P. Paul F. E. Wise Prepared by: ?1M.J II£) ~ N. R. Davis Approved by: HLW System Integration Manager ll\1-'-ft

  11. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That! Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the cell phone application EcoData: Radiation are expanding their global network of radiation monitoring stations to include up-to-date readings from the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) based out of southern Nevada. The CEMP was established in 1981 to monitor manmade and natural radiation levels surrounding

  12. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" ...

  13. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment ...

  14. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " ...

  15. " Level: National Data and Regional...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment ...

  16. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  17. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  18. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  19. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E.; Long, Frederick G.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  20. Energy Level Diagrams A=16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Available in the following years: (1993), (1986), (1982), (1977), (1971), (1959) A=16 Energy Level Diagrams from (1993TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 16C (223 KB) 16N (274 KB) 16O (176 KB) 16F (106 KB) Isobar diagram (190 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 16C (154 KB) 16N (71 KB) 16O (178 KB) 16F (108 KB) Isobar diagram (266 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 16C (542 KB) 16N (430 KB) 16O (178 KB) 16F (357 KB) Isobar diagram (190 KB) A=16 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ04) GIF

  1. Energy Level Diagrams A=17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Available in the following years: (1993), (1986), (1982), (1977), (1971), (1959) A=17 Energy Level Diagrams from (1993TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 17N (104 KB) 17O (148 KB) 17F (155 KB) Isobar diagram (82 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 17N (107 KB) 17O (141 KB) 17F (147 KB) Isobar diagram (90 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 17N (107 KB) 17O (141 KB) 17F (147 KB) Isobar diagram (90 KB) A=17 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ04) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 17N (76 KB)

  2. Energy Level Diagrams A=18

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Available in the following years: (1995), (1987), (1983), (1978), (1972), (1959) A=18 Energy Level Diagrams from (1995TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 18N (34 KB) 18O (97 KB) 18F (89 KB) 18Ne (56 KB) Isobar diagram (87 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 18N (13 KB) 18O (56 KB) 18F (54 KB) 18Ne (36 KB) Isobar diagram (50 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 18N (13 KB) 18O (1.98 MB) 18F (1.40 MB) 18Ne (1.64 MB) Isobar diagram (1.79 MB) A=18 Energy Level Diagrams from (1987AJ02) GIF

  3. Energy Level Diagrams A=19

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Available in the following years: (1995), (1987), (1983), (1978), (1972), (1959) A=19 Energy Level Diagrams from (1995TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 19O (50 KB) 19F (99 KB) 19Ne (53 KB) Isobar diagram (65 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 19O (34 KB) 19F (63 KB) 19Ne (35 KB) Isobar diagram (43 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 19O (1.60 MB) 19F (1.82 MB) 19Ne (1.26 MB) Isobar diagram (1.55 MB) A=19 Energy Level Diagrams from (1987AJ02) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 19O (204 KB)

  4. Energy Level Diagrams A=20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 Available in the following years: (1998), (1987), (1983), (1978), (1972), (1959) A=20 Energy Level Diagrams from (1998TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 20O (47 KB) 20F (61 KB) 20Ne (75 KB) 20Na (61 KB) Isobar diagram (73 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 20O (31 KB) 20F (40 KB) 20Ne (51 KB) 20Na (41 KB) Isobar diagram (47 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 20O (1.44 MB) 20F (1.45 MB) 20Ne (1.38 MB) 20Na (1.75 MB) Isobar diagram (1.73 MB) A=20 Energy Level Diagrams from (1987AJ02) GIF

  5. Energy Level Diagrams A=5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Available in the following years: (2002), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=5 Energy Level Diagrams from (2002TI10) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 5He (28 KB) 5Li (28 KB) Isobar diagram (20 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 5He (40 KB) 5Li (40 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 5He (1.7 MB) 5Li (1.7 MB) Isobar diagram (1.6 MB) A=5 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 5He (67 KB) 5Li (70 KB) Isobar diagram (55 KB) PDF

  6. Energy Level Diagrams A=6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Available in the following years: (2002), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=6 Energy Level Diagrams from (2002TI10) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 6He (98 KB) 6Li (98 KB) 6Be (98 KB) Isobar Diagram (130 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 6He (65 KB) 6Li (65 KB) 6Be (33 KB) Isobar Diagram (65 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 6He (1.5 MB) 6Li (1.5 MB) 6Be (1.3 MB) Isobar Diagram (1.7 MB) A=6 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 6He (50 KB)

  7. Energy Level Diagrams A=7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Available in the following years: (2002), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=7 Energy Level Diagrams from (2002TI10) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 7He (65 KB) 7Li (130 KB) 7Be (65 KB) Isobar Diagram (65 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 7He (35 KB) 7Li (65 KB) 7Be (65 KB) Isobar Diagram (65 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 7He (1.7 MB) 7Li (1.8 MB) 7Be (1.6 MB) Isobar Diagram (1.6 MB) A=7 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 7Li (80 KB)

  8. Energy Level Diagrams A=8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=8 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 8He (20 KB) 8Li (194 KB) 8Be (44 KB) 8B (24 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 8He (28 KB) 8Li (703 KB) 8Be (60 KB) 8B (32 KB) Isobar diagram (48 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 8He (1.7 MB) 8Li (1.1 MB) 8Be (1.5 MB) 8B (1.4 MB) Isobar diagram (1.5 MB) A=8 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF

  9. Energy Level Diagrams A=12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Available in the following years: (1990), (1985), (1980), (1975), (1968), (1959) A=12 Energy Level Diagrams from (1990AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 12Be (48 KB) 12B (93 KB) 12C (129 KB) 12N (63 KB) Isobar diagram (91 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 12Be (30 KB) 12B (52 KB) 12C (72 KB) 12N (40 KB) Isobar diagram (57 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 12Be (1.39 MB) 12B (1.80 MB) 12C (1.89 MB) 12N (1.66 MB) Isobar diagram (1.75 MB) A=12 Energy Level Diagrams from (1985AJ01) GIF

  10. Energy Level Diagrams A=13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Available in the following years: (1991), (1986), (1981), (1976), (1970), (1959) A=13 Energy Level Diagrams from (1991AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 13B (53 KB) 13C (115 KB) 13N (107 KB) Isobar diagram (94 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 13B (35 KB) 13C (63 KB) 13N (56 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 13B (1.5 MB) 13C (1.7 MB) 13N (1.4 MB) Isobar diagram (1.5 MB) A=13 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 13B (72 KB) 13C

  11. Energy Level Diagrams A=14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Available in the following years: (1991), (1986), (1981), (1976), (1970), (1959) A=14 Energy Level Diagrams from (1991AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 14B (48 KB) 14C (92 KB) 14N (132 KB) 14O (60 KB) Isobar diagram (93 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 14B (33 KB) 14C (50 KB) 14N (69 KB) 14O (40 KB) Isobar diagram (51 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 14B (1.57 MB) 14C (1.72 MB) 14N (1.76 MB) 14O (1.75 MB) Isobar diagram (1.83 MB) A=14 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ01) GIF

  12. Energy Level Diagrams A=15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Available in the following years: (1991), (1986), (1981), (1976), (1970), (1959) A=15 Energy Level Diagrams from (1991AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 15C (67 KB) 15N (114 KB) 15O (106 KB) Isobar diagram (100 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 15C (43 KB) 15N (69 KB) 15O (59 KB) Isobar diagram (58 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 15C (1.82 MB) 15N (1.98 MB) 15O (1.67 MB) Isobar diagram (1.83 MB) A=15 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 15C (52 KB)

  13. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  14. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  15. Program Secretarial Office Name Certification Level

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... M Level I 6132011 NE ARENAZ,MARK R Level IV 9282010 NE BASS,WILLIAM G ... HERRERA,JOHN M Level I 10312011 NNSA HOLTZAPPLE,CLAIRE S Level II 5222008 NNSA ...

  16. Program Secretarial Office Name Certification Level Certified...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... EM PYLES,GARY L Level I 7312009 EM QUINTERO,ROGER A Level I 11182009 EM RAGOS,ENRIQUE DYREYES Level I 9192008 EM RAMPERTAAP,AUTAR NMN Level I 11182009 EM RAMSEY,RONALD ...

  17. Energy Level Diagrams A=9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 9Li (24 KB) 9Be (44 KB) 9B (36 KB) 9C (20 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 9Li (36 KB) 9Be (60 KB) 9B (48 KB) 9C (28 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 9Li (1.7 MB) 9Be (1.7 MB) 9B (1.6 MB) 9C (1.7 MB) Isobar diagram (1.8 MB) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic

  18. Levelized Power Generation Cost Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-30

    LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generationmore » cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor.« less

  19. Energy Level Diagrams A=4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Available in the following year: (1992) A=4 Energy Level Diagrams from (1992TI02) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 4H (38 KB) 4He (90 KB) 4Li (36 KB) Isobar diagram (60 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 4H (26 KB) 4He (47 KB) 4Li (24 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 4H (1.32 MB) 4He (1.79 MB) 4Li (1.13 MB) Isobar diagram (1.54 MB

  20. Load Leveling Battery System Costs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-10-12

    SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer's monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer's peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer's side of themore » meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer's load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.« less

  1. Energy Level Diagrams A=10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=10 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 10He (16 KB) 10Li (20 KB) 10Be (36 KB) 10B (44 KB) γ transitions for 10B (32 KB) 10C (20 KB) Isobar diagram (40 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 10He (16 KB) 10Li (24 KB) 10Be (48 KB) 10B (56 KB) γ transitions for 10B (44 KB) 10C (28 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 10He (1.6 MB) 10Li (1.6 MB) 10Be

  2. Energy Level Diagrams A=11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Available in the following years: (2012), (1990), (1985), (1980), (1975), (1968), (1959) A=11 Energy Level Diagrams from (2012KE01) PNG (Graphic Interchange Format): 11Li (26 KB) 11Be (66 KB) 11Li decay scheme (95 KB) 11B (147 KB) 11C (109 KB) 11N (25 KB) Isobar diagram (74 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 11Li (28 KB) 11Be (126 KB) 11Li decay scheme (185 KB) 11B (287 KB) 11C (185 KB) 11N (28 KB) Isobar diagram (245 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 11Li (1807 KB) 11Be (2213 KB) 11Li decay

  3. Liquid-level sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldfuss, G.T.

    1975-09-16

    This invention relates to a device for sensing the level of a liquid while preventing the deposition and accumulation of materials on the exterior surfaces thereof. Two dissimilar metal wires are enclosed within an electrical insulating material, the wires being joined together at one end to form a thermocouple junction outside the insulating material. Heating means is disposed within the electrical insulating material and maintains the device at a temperature substantially greater than that of the environment surrounding the device, the heating means being electrically insulated from the two dissimilar thermocouple wires. In addition, a metal sheath surrounds and contacts both the electrical insulating material and the thermocouple junction. Electrical connections are provided for connecting the heating means with a power source and for connecting the thermocouple wires with a device for sensing the electrical potential across the thermocouple junction. (auth)

  4. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  5. High level white noise generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  6. AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy testing done on the Voltec Level 1 and Level 2 charging systems for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon Voltec AC Level 1 - November 2012 PDF icon Voltec AC Level 2 - October 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results

  7. A=4-20 Level Diagrams (EPS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 4 - 20 Level Diagrams - EPS format The Image Map below will direct you to the most recent, updated Energy Level Diagram for that particular nuclide. To view previous Energy...

  8. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  9. Level III Mentoring Requirement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level III Mentoring Requirement Level III Mentoring Requirement Level III applicants must be mentored (minimum of six months) by a Level III or IV FPD or demonstrate equivalency (see below Competency 3.12.2 in the PMCDP's CEG). A formal mentoring agreement must be signed by both parties detailing the goals and activities of the mentoring arrangement, and a signed copy of the agreement must be submitted with the certification application when it is presented to the PMCDP. Applications will be

  10. Energy Level Diagrams A=4-20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Level Diagrams A = 4 - 20 Nuclei If your web browser supports imagemaps, try our "Chart of the Nuclides"-style interface for one of the following format options [available only for energy level diagrams from the most recent evaluation and/or preliminary evaluation]. Graphic Interchange Format (GIF) Portable Document Format (PDF) Encapsulated Postscript (EPS) To view all of the Energy Level Diagrams available for each mass chain, including the most recent versions as well as

  11. Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels | Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science | NREL Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels Materials discovery is important across technology readiness levels: basic science, applied research, and device development. Over the past several years, NREL has worked at each of these levels, demonstrating our competence in a broad range of materials discovery problems. Basic Science An image of a triangular diagram with tantalum-cobalt-tin at the top vertex, tantalum at the lower left vertex, and cobalt at the

  12. High Level Waste ManagemenfDivision ..

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Level Waste ManagemenfDivision .. . . HLWSystem Plan Revision 2(U) Westinghouse Savannah River Company . Aiken; South Carolina Jam,lary 14,1994 HIGH LEVEL WASTE SYSTEM PLAN REVISION 2 _--JANUARY 14, 1994 APPROVAL SHEET Deputy General Manager High Level Waste Management Westinghouse Savannah River Company fO ..... R. E. Erickson Director,- Vitrification Projects Division U. S. Department of Energy, Headquarters Date I Date Date " " HLW System Plan - Revision 2 (U) Table of Contents

  13. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Level and Climate Change Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Sea Level and Climate Change Atmospheric and oceanic processes have a powerful effect on changes in sea level. These changes are associated with variations in space and time of temperature, salinity, ocean currents and

  14. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface and Sea Level Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Sea Surface and Sea Level It is important not to confuse the shape of the sea surface with the level of the sea surface. Ocean bathymetry (and its effects on the geoid) changes significantly only on time scales of 1 to 10

  15. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-10-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite.

  16. Operating Experience Level 3: Radiologically Contaminated Respirators...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience Level 3 provides information on a safety concern related to radiological contamination of launderedreconditioned respirators and parts that have been certified as...

  17. Improvements to mixture level tracking model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, W.L.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the testing of the recent improvements made to the two-phase level tracking model in RELAP5/MOD3.2. The level model was originally developed during the development of the TRAC-BWR computer code and was subsequently modified by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The modifications developed at PSU concern the way in which the two-phase level is moved from volume to volume as the thermal-hydraulic conditions in the system being simulated change during the course of a transients. The other components in the level tracking model remain as described in the original implementation of the model.

  18. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The four-week average of commercial crude oil imports for PADD 3 dropped to 3.18 MMbbld for the week ending May 16, its lowest level since 1992. With the recent narrowing of the ...

  19. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... C-max Hybrid Ford C-max Energi Mitsubishi I-MiEV Nissan Leaf Ford Fusion Energi Ford Focus Electric Smart Fortwo ED Dodge Ram Idle Stop Honda Accord PHEV AVTA Test Cars Level 1 ...

  20. Operating Experience Level 3, Electrical Safety: Shocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3: 2015-03 This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to electrical shocks workers have received while performing work at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  1. Operating Experience Level 3, Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 OE-3 2015-02: Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter (xQ) for Calculation of Co-located Worker Dose This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document informs the complex of the...

  2. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Try to explain the information given in the following table, which lists the sea level for the last 250,000 years, as recorded by thoriumuranium dating of coral reefs off Papua ...

  3. Tank farms compacted low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetzer, D.C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the process of Low-Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  4. Tank farms compacted low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the process of Low Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  5. Natural gas inventories at record levels

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    record levels U.S. natural gas inventories at the end of October tied the all-time record high and inventories could climb to 4 trillion cubic feet in November for the first time. ...

  6. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  7. Low-level-waste-form criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, R.E.; Davis, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Efforts in five areas are reported: technical considerations for a high-integrity container for resin wastes; permissible radionuclide loadings for organic ion exchange resin wastes; technical factors affecting low-level waste form acceptance requirements of the proposed 10 CFR 61 and draft BTP; modeling of groundwater transport; and analysis of soils from low-level waste disposal sites (Barnwell, Hanford, and Sheffield). (DLC)

  8. College-Level Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    College-Level Materials College-Level Materials Professor reviewing student's papers. The following material is provided to help college professors and students looking for technical information on the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. Course Manual on Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines and Related Technologies - Hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle manual developed by SunLine and College of the Desert (among others) with funding from DOE. It covers hydrogen properties, use, and safety as well as fuel

  9. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2014-10-15

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  10. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  11. A=4-20 Level Diagrams (GIF)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIF format The Image Map below will direct you to the most recent, updated Energy Level Diagram for that particular nuclide. To view previous Energy Level Diagrams from past reviews, please refer to the list at the bottom of the page. Click on the button corresponding to the nucleus (or mass chain) for which you would like to see a level diagram. 20Mg 18Na 19Na 20Na 16Ne 17Ne 18Ne 19Ne 20Ne 14F 15F 16F 17F 18F 19F 20F 12O 13O 14O 15O 16O 17O 18O 19O 20O 10N 11N 12N 13N 14N 15N 16N 17N 18N 19N

  12. A=4-20 Level Diagrams (PDF)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF format The Image Map below will direct you to the most recent, updated Energy Level Diagram for that particular nuclide. To view previous Energy Level Diagrams from past reviews, please refer to the list at the bottom of the page. Click on the button corresponding to the nucleus (or mass chain) for which you would like to see a level diagram. 20Mg 18Na 19Na 20Na 16Ne 17Ne 18Ne 19Ne 20Ne 14F 15F 16F 17F 18F 19F 20F 12O 13O 14O 15O 16O 17O 18O 19O 20O 10N 11N 12N 13N 14N 15N 16N 17N 18N 19N

  13. Technical safety requirements control level verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEWART, J.L.

    1999-05-21

    A Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) control level verification process was developed for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) TSRs at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA, at the direction of the US. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The objective of the effort was to develop a process to ensure that the TWRS TSR controls are designated and managed at the appropriate levels as Safety Limits (SLs), Limiting Control Settings (LCSs), Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs), Administrative Controls (ACs), or Design Features. The TSR control level verification process was developed and implemented by a team of contractor personnel with the participation of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH), the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) integrating contractor, and RL representatives. The team was composed of individuals with the following experience base: nuclear safety analysis; licensing; nuclear industry and DOE-complex TSR preparation/review experience; tank farm operations; FDH policy and compliance; and RL-TWRS oversight. Each TSR control level designation was completed utilizing TSR control logic diagrams and TSR criteria checklists based on DOE Orders, Standards, Contractor TSR policy, and other guidance. The control logic diagrams and criteria checklists were reviewed and modified by team members during team meetings. The TSR control level verification process was used to systematically evaluate 12 LCOs, 22 AC programs, and approximately 100 program key elements identified in the TWRS TSR document. The verification of each TSR control required a team consensus. Based on the results of the process, refinements were identified and the TWRS TSRs were modified as appropriate. A final report documenting key assumptions and the control level designation for each TSR control was prepared and is maintained on file for future reference. The results of the process were used as a reference in the RL review of the final TWRS TSRs and control suite. RL concluded that the TSR control level verification process is clear and logically based upon DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements, and other TSR control selection guidelines. The process provides a documented, traceable basis for TSR level decisions and is a valid reference for preparation of new TSRs.

  14. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1998-01-01

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  15. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  16. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1998-03-03

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units. 12 figs.

  17. Fault-tolerant three-level inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, John; Xu, Longya; Bhargava, Brij B.

    2006-12-05

    A method for driving a neutral point clamped three-level inverter is provided. In one exemplary embodiment, DC current is received at a neutral point-clamped three-level inverter. The inverter has a plurality of nodes including first, second and third output nodes. The inverter also has a plurality of switches. Faults are checked for in the inverter and predetermined switches are automatically activated responsive to a detected fault such that three-phase electrical power is provided at the output nodes.

  18. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $34.46/b on February 4 $2.76 per barrel (b) below its January 4 level (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price settled at $31.72, a decrease of $5.04/b over the same period. On January 20, both Brent and WTI were at their lowest levels since 2003. During the first three weeks of January, Brent and WTI front month futures prices declined 25% and 28%,

  19. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combinatorial nuclear level-density model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combinatorial nuclear level-density model A microscopic nuclear level-density model is ...

  20. Operating Experience Level 3, Explosives Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the dangers inherent in material handling and the role hazard analysis, work planning, and walkdowns can play in preventing injuries during heavy equipment moves. More than 200 material handling events reported to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) from January 1, 2010, through August 31, 2014.

  1. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  2. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  3. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  4. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Percent of Establishments by Levels of Price Difference that Would Cause Fuel Switching from Coal to a Less Expensive Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference; Unit: Establishment Counts. Would Switch Would Not Estimate to More NAICS Establishments Switch Due 1 to 10 11 to 25 26 to 50 Over 50 Cannot Expensive Code(a) Subsector and Industry Able to Switch(b) to Price Percent Percent Percent Percent Be Provided Substitute Total United States

  5. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez Jr, Joseph M; Bickford, Dennis F; Day, Delbert E; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L; Marra, Sharon L; Peeler, David K; Strachan, Denis M; Triplett, Mark B; Vienna, John D; Wittman, Richard S

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  6. Low-level waste feed staging plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Certa, P.J.; Grams, W.H.; McConville, C.M.; L. W. Shelton, L.W.; Slaathaug, E.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The `Preliminary Low-Level Waste Feed Staging Plan` was updated to reflect the latest requirement in the Tank Waste Remediation Privatization Request for Proposals (RFP) and amendments. The updated plan develops the sequence and transfer schedule for retrieval of DST supernate by the management and integration contractor and delivery of the staged supernate to the private low-activity waste contractors for treatment. Two DSTs are allocated as intermediate staging tanks. A transfer system conflict analysis provides part of the basis for determining transfer system upgrade requirements to support both low-activity and high-level waste feed delivery. The intermediate staging tank architecture and retrieval system equipment are provided as a planning basis until design requirements documents are prepared. The actions needed to successfully implement the plan are identified. These include resolution of safety issues and changes to the feed envelope limits, minimum order quantities, and desired batch sizes.

  7. Background compensation for a radiation level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

  8. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  9. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  10. Risk Group and Biosafety Level Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group and Biosafety Level Definitions European Economic Community (DIRECTIVE 93/88/EEC, Oct. 1993) (1) Group 1 biological agent means one that is unlikely to cause human disease; (2) Group 2 biological agent means one that can cause human disease and might be a hazard to workers; it is unlikely to spread to the community; there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment available; (3) Group 3 biological agent means one that can cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to

  11. Mesoscopic Superposition States in Relativistic Landau Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-21

    We show that a linear superposition of mesoscopic states in relativistic Landau levels can be built when an external magnetic field couples to a relativistic spin 1/2 charged particle. Under suitable initial conditions, the associated Dirac equation produces unitarily superpositions of coherent states involving the particle orbital quanta in a well-defined mesoscopic regime. We demonstrate that these mesoscopic superpositions have a purely relativistic origin and disappear in the nonrelativistic limit.

  12. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W. T.

    2012-02-17

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  13. Circuit level modeling of inductive elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muyshondt, G.P.; Portnoy, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Design and analysis of spacecraft power systems have been difficult to perform because of the lack of circuit level models for nonlinear inductive elements. This paper reviews some of the models which have been proposed, their limitations, and applications. An improved saturation dependent model will be described. The model has been implemented in SPICE and with a commercial circuit program and demonstrated to be satisfactory in both implementations. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 10.17 Percent of Establishments by Levels of Price Difference that Would Cause Fuel Switching from LPG to a Less Expensive Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference; Unit: Establishment Counts. Would Switch Would Not Estimate to More NAICS Establishments Switch Due 1 to 10 11 to 25 26 to 50 Over 50 Cannot Expensive Code(a) Subsector and Industry Able to Switch(b) to Price Percent Percent Percent Percent

  15. High Level Waste Management Division High-Level Waste System Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 (U) December 20, 1995 Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 HLW-OVP-95-0102 Westinghouse Savannah River Company 2 0 GtC 1995 Mr. A. L. Watkins, Assistant Manager High Level Waste U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office P. O. Box A Aiken, SC 29802 Dear Mr. Watkins: A. B. Scott, Jr. Vice President and General Manager High Level Waste Management Division P. O. Box 616 Aiken, SC 29802 HLW-OVP-95-0102 HIGH LEVEL WASTE SYSTEM PLAN. REVISION 6 (U)

  16. River Protection Project (RPP) Level 0 Logic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEEMAN, S.E.

    2000-01-20

    The following modifications were made to the River Protection Project Level-0 logic in going from Rev. I to Rev. 2. The first change was the change to the heading at the top of the drawing: ''TWRS Program Logic'' to ''River Protection Project Mission Logic''. Note that purely format changes (e.g., fonts, location of boxes, date format, addition of numbers to ''ghost'' boxes) are not discussed. However, the major format change was to show DOE-BNFL Inc. Interface Control Documents (ICDs) on the logic.

  17. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, R.H.; Keener, W.E.

    1995-02-28

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame. 6 figs.

  18. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, Richard H.; Keener, Wendell E.

    1995-01-01

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame.

  19. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices continued upward and reached the highest levels of the year. The North Sea Brent front-month futures price rose $6.34 per barrel (b) from April 1 to settle at $45.01/b on May 5 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front-month futures price rose $7.53/b and settled at $44.32/b over the same period. Early data on petroleum product consumption in 2016 suggest that last year's strong growth may continue this year. U.S.

  20. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices, which reached their highest point of the year in June, fell to their lowest levels of the year in early August. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $105.44/barrel on August 7, a decrease of $6.85/barrel from July 1 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract also fell, settling at $97.34/barrel on August 7, $8.00/barrel lower than on July 1. A further easing of

  1. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices in November declined to the lowest levels since August. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $43.84 per barrel (b) on December 3, a decrease of $4.95/b since November 2 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price settled at $41.08/b on December 3, declining $5.06/b over the same period. The prospect of an oversupplied crude oil market continuing in the near term weighed on

  2. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil futures prices reached the lowest level in 12 years in December and early January. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $33.75 per barrel (b) on January 7, $10.69/b lower than the close on December 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price settled at $33.27, a decrease of $8.58/b over the same period. Global crude oil prices declined after the December 4 Organization of Petroleum

  3. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: After an upward move in mid-June, crude oil prices retreated close to previous levels. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $111/barrel on July 3, an increase of $2.17/barrel from June 2 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract also rose, settling at $104.06/barrel on July 3, $1.59/barrel higher than on June 2. Tensions in Iraq were the primary driver of the crude oil price increase in mid-June.

  4. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil futures prices rebounded in April and approached the top of their recent trading range. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $107.76 per barrel (bbl) on May 1, an increase of $2.14/bbl from April 1 (Figure 1). West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices at the start of May were near the same levels as the beginning of April. The front month WTI contract settled at $99.42/bbl on May 1, a slight decrease

  5. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices continued to rise in April and reached their highest levels of the year. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $65.54 per barrel (b) on May 7, an increase of $8.44/b since the close on April 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price rose by $8.85/b over the same period to settle at $58.94/b on May 7. Although current oil market conditions still show production outpacing

  6. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices fell in August and remain near their lowest levels of 2014. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $101.83/barrel on September 4, a decrease of $3.01/barrel from August 1 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract price fell by $3.43/barrel over the same period, settling at $94.45/barrel on September 4. Although the U.S. economy showed robust growth in the second

  7. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices continued upward and reached the highest levels of the year. The North Sea Brent front-month futures price rose $6.34 per barrel (b) from April 1 to settle at $45.01/b on May 5 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front-month futures price rose $7.53/b and settled at $44.32/b over the same period. Early data on petroleum product consumption in 2016 suggest that last year's strong growth may continue this year. U.S.

  8. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  9. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: 1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, 2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, 3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or "ghost" reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%.

  10. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: (1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, (2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, (3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or ``ghost`` reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%. 4 figs.

  11. PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.W.; LeBaron, G.J.

    1995-01-16

    The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated.

  12. PROVISIONAL ADVISORY LEVELS (PALs) FOR PHOSGENE (CG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass-Mattie, Dana F; McClanahan, Mark; Koller, Loren; Adeshina, Femi; Ross, Robert Hord

    2009-01-01

    The PAL protocol was applied to estimate inhalation exposure limits for phosgene (CG). Data on humans are limited to occupational exposures or accounts from the use of phosgene as a chemical warfare agent in WWI. Animal studies with phosgene show a steep dose-response curve for pulmonary edema and mortality with little species variability in effects. Although immediately upon exposure lacrimation and upper respiratory irritation can occur, the main effect in the target organ, a progressive pulmonary edema, occurs after a latency period of 1-24 hours. PAL estimates were approved by the Expert Consultation Panel for Provisional Advisory Levels in May 2007. Exposure limits for oral exposure to CG are not developed due to insufficient data. PAL estimates for inhalation exposure to CG are presented: The 24-hour PAL values for severity levels 1, 2, and 3 are 0.0017, 0.0033 and 0.022 ppm, respectively. The 30-day PAL values are 0.0006 and 0.0012 ppm for the PAL 1 and 2 values, respectively. These 30-day inhalation values were also accepted as the 90-day and 2-year PAL 1 and 2 values. Data were not available for deriving 30-day, 90-day and 2-year PAL 3 values.

  13. Universal single point liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid level detector comprises a thermistor and circuitry for determining electrically if the thermistor is wet or dry and additionally, and continuously, if the thermistor is open or shorted. The voltage across the thermistor is filtered to remove low frequency electrical noise, then compared with a reference low voltage to determine if shorted and to a transition voltage chosen to be between the thermistor's normal wet and dry voltages to determine if the thermistor is wet or dry. The voltage is also compared to the supply voltage using a CMOS gate circuit element to determine if the thermistor is open. The gate passes both faults on to an LED to signal that a fault condition exists or indicates by another LED the wet or dry condition of the thermistor. A pump may be activated through a relay if the thermistor tests wet or dry, as desired.

  14. Universal single point liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-27

    A liquid level detector comprises a thermistor and circuitry for determining electrically if the thermistor is wet or dry and additionally, and continuously, if the thermistor is open or shorted. The voltage across the thermistor is filtered to remove low frequency electrical noise, then compared with a reference low voltage to determine if shorted and to a transition voltage chosen to be between the thermistor's normal wet and dry voltages to determine if the thermistor is wet or dry. The voltage is also compared to the supply voltage using a CMOS gate circuit element to determine if the thermistor is open. The gate passes both faults on to an LED to signal that a fault condition exists or indicates by another LED the wet or dry condition of the thermistor. A pump may be activated through a relay if the thermistor tests wet or dry, as desired. 1 figure.

  15. Four-level entangled quantum heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Ting; Liu, W.-T.; Chen, P.-X.; Li, C.-Z.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a two-qubit one-dimensional isotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg spin chain in a constant external magnetic field, we construct a four-level entangled quantum heat engine (QHE) and investigate the influence of entanglement between two qubits on basic thermodynamic quantities, i.e., the heat transferred and the work done in a cycle, and the efficiency of the QHE. The validity of the second law of thermodynamics is confirmed in the entangled system. We also find several interesting features of the variation of the efficiency with the entanglement of two different thermal equilibrium states in a work cycle in zero and finite magnetic field. An abrupt transition of efficiency is found in zero field.

  16. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  17. Draft low level waste technical summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information.

  18. Acceptor levels in ZnMgO:N probed by deep level optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, A.; Hierro, A. Muoz, E.

    2014-02-24

    A combination of deep level optical spectroscopy and lighted capacitance voltage profiling has been used to analyze the effect of N into the energy levels close to the valence band of Zn{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}O. Three energy levels at E{sub V}?+?0.47?eV, E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV, and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV are observed in all films with concentrations in the range of 10{sup 15}10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. The two shallowest traps at E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV have very large concentrations that scale with the N exposure and are thus potential acceptor levels. In order to correctly quantify the deep level concentrations, a metal-insulator-semiconductor model has been invoked, explaining well the resulting capacitance-voltage curves.

  19. Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, ...

  20. Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid The National Renewable Energy ...

  1. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors An important niche ...

  2. Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions Quantifying the Level of Cross-State Renewable Energy Transactions This analysis provides first-ever assessment ...

  3. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

  4. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane levels larger over Four Corners region Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected over Four Corners region Study is first to show space-based...

  5. NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation, October 29, 2010 NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation, October 29, 2010 North ...

  6. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combinatorial nuclear level-density model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combinatorial nuclear level-density model You are accessing a document from the Department ...

  7. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm ... Title: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space ...

  8. Operating Experience Level 3, Update to Requalification Test...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operating Experience Level 3, Update to Requalification Test Failure of Certain High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Operating Experience Level 3, Update to...

  9. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels You are...

  10. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Authors:...

  11. Disposal of low-level and low-level mixed waste: audit report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-03

    The Department of Energy (Department) is faced with the legacy of thousands of contaminated areas and buildings and large volumes of `backlog` waste requiring disposal. Waste management and environmental restoration activities have become central to the Department`s mission. One of the Department`s priorities is to clean up former nuclear weapons sites and find more effective and timely methods for disposing of nuclear waste. This audit focused on determining if the Department was disposing of low-level and low-level mixed waste in the most cost-effective manner.

  12. Chemically Induced Surface Evolutions with Level Sets

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-11-17

    ChISELS is used for the theoretical modeling of detailed surface chemistry and consomitant surface evolutions occurring during microsystem fabrication processes conducted at low pressures. Examples include physical vapor deposition (PVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and plasma etching. Evolving interfaces are represented using the level-set method and the evolution equations time integrated using a Semi-Lagrangian approach. A Ballistic transport model is employed to solve for the fluxes incident on each of the surface elements.more » Surface chemistry leading to etching or deposition is computed by either coupling to Surface Chemkin (a commercially available code) or by providing user defined subroutines. The computational meshes used are quad-trees (2-D) and oct-trees (3-D), constructed such that grid refinement is localized to regions near the surface interfaces. As the interface evolves, the mesh is dynamically reconstructed as needed for the grid to remain fine only around the interface. For parallel computation, a domain decomposition scheme with dynamic load balancing is used to distribute the computational work across processors.« less

  13. Photovoltaic (PV) Module Level Remote Safety Disconnect - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Photovoltaic (PV) Module Level Remote Safety Disconnect National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Figure 1: System configuration of emergency module-level disconnect using module-level &lsquo;Isolation Detection Units&rsquo; (IDU).<br /> Figure 1: System configuration of emergency module-level disconnect using module-level 'Isolation Detection Units' (IDU). Technology Marketing Summary The ability to

  14. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  15. Levelized Cost of Electricity and Levelized Avoided Cost of Electricity Methodology Supplement

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    32,080 134,757 130,374 133,976 134,320 127,472 1980

    0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Thousand Short Tons. NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(c) Switchable Switchable Receipts(d) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 6,603 1,013 5,373 27 981 303 93

  16. State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge...

  17. Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season U.S. natural gas inventories are expected to be at record levels to start the winter heating ...

  18. High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities Breakout Session 1B-Integration of Supply Chains I: ...

  19. Levelized Cost of Energy in US | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Levelized Cost of Energy in US Home I'd like to pull a cost comparison for the levelized cost of energy in the US. How do I do this on this site? Does the LCOE interactive table...

  20. levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of...

  1. CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) April 2015...

  2. Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: ...

  3. Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will present a process for developing community-based sea level rise projections and facilitating their use.

  4. Memorandum, NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes, January

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2006 | Department of Energy NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes, January 2006 Memorandum, NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes, January 2006 January 23, 2006 Memorandum from Thomas P. D'Agostino, Assistant Deputy Administrator for Program Integration: Action: Revitalizing Integrated Safety Management; Site Office Action Plans for Improving Activity Level Work Planning and Control Processes. PDF icon Memorandum, NNSA Activity Level Work Planning

  5. Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives PDF icon Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives More Documents & Publications Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Focus

  6. Track 1: Safety Culture- Taking ISMS to the Next Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 1: Safety Culture - Taking ISMS to the Next Level

  7. Operating Experience Level 3, OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Publications Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Management of Mercury...

  8. Transient response of level instruments in a research reactor (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Transient response of level instruments in a research reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transient response of level instruments in a research reactor A numerical model has been developed to simulate the dynamics of water level instruments in a research nuclear reactor. A bubble device, with helium gas as the working fluid, is used to monitor liquid level by sensing the static head pressure due to the height of liquid in the reactor vessel. A

  9. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data.

  10. Level repulsion, nuclear chaos, and conserved quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same spin and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. Though the resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with Z = 62 - 75 and A = 155 - 185 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels, significant deviations are observed for small level spacings. Many, but not all, of the very closely-spaced levels have K-values differing by several units. The analysis of level spacings in {sup 157}Ho indicate that considerable caution should be excerised when drawing conclusions from such an analysis for a single deformed nucleus, since the sizable number of spacings that can be obtained from a few rotational bands are not all independent.

  11. EERE Corporate-Level Documents for Plans, Implementation, and Results |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EERE Corporate-Level Documents for Plans, Implementation, and Results EERE Corporate-Level Documents for Plans, Implementation, and Results The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) carries out technology research, development, and deployment through an ongoing process of planning and analysis, implementation, and review. This page includes documents that support EERE's overall, corporate-level program management process, and the results and public

  12. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Work Planning & Control | Department of Energy Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control May 16, 2013 Presenter: Donna J. Governor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Topics Covered: Work Control Review Board (WCRB) Functional Area Manager identified at the Institution level reporting directly to the Deputy Laboratory Director

  13. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Mid-Level Ethanol Blends 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ft_05_knoll.pdf More Documents & Publications Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program Biofuels Quality Surveys Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009

  14. Designating Efficiency Levels for Product Categories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Products & Technologies » Energy-Efficient Products » Designating Efficiency Levels for Product Categories Designating Efficiency Levels for Product Categories The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is authorized by Congress to designate product categories that have the potential to generate significant energy savings. Products in these categories must meet efficiency levels set by FEMP or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR program. These steps describe FEMP's

  15. Policy Memorandum #9 - Establishing and Maintaining Competitive Level Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 9 - Establishing and Maintaining Competitive Level Codes Policy Memorandum #9 - Establishing and Maintaining Competitive Level Codes PDF icon Policy Memorandum #9 - Establishing and Maintaining Competitive Level Codes.pdf More Documents & Publications POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #32A Schedule A Appointments of Persons with Disabilities and Appointments for Disabled Veterans POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #28 Requirements for Non-Competitive Reassignments into

  16. External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process | Department of Energy for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download PDF icon External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in

  17. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  18. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss031_rask_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth)

  19. Prioritizing Acquisition Pathways in the State Level Concept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Developing a State-specific, State-level approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan ... PHYSICAL PROTECTION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CONCRETES; EVALUATION; IAEA; ...

  20. Resources at the State and Regional Level for Manufacturers ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources at the State and Regional Level for Manufacturers Manufacturers can use resources delivered by industrial energy efficiency programs in their area. AMO's cost-shared ...

  1. Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Meeting arravt081vssnewhouse2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8...

  2. LANL Biosafety Level 3 Facility Environmental Impact Statement...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Biosafety Level 3 Facility Environmental Impact Statement | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  3. Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy Next-Generation ...

  4. Reliable Energy Level Alignment at Physisorbed Molecule-Metal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at Physisorbed Molecule-Metal Interfaces from Density Functional Theory Title: Reliable Energy Level Alignment at Physisorbed Molecule-Metal Interfaces from Density Functional ...

  5. Katharine Page-Atomic-level insights for better materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    manipulating and manufacturing particles at a level that is one-billionth of a meter small. For example, her examination of the fluid-mineral interface in carbonate...

  6. Operating Experience Level 3, Lack of Familiarity with Infrequently...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OE-3 2013-01: Lack of Familiarity with Infrequently Operated Vehicles Puts Drivers in Danger This Operating Experience Level 3 provides information on a significant recurring...

  7. Developing County-level Water Footprints of Biofuel Produced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water Footprints of Biofuel Produced from Switchgrass and Miscanthus x Giganteus in the United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Developing County-level Water ...

  8. Characterization of High Level Waste from a Hybrid LIFE Engine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Characterization of High Level Waste from a Hybrid LIFE Engine for Enhanced Repository Performance Authors: Beckett, E ; Fratoni, M Publication Date: 2010-08-25 OSTI ...

  9. Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013 Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013 January 29, 2015 OE-3 2015-01: DOE Occupational Radiation...

  10. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rates leveling off in 2014 after five years of increase Decline seen in undergraduate ... declined somewhat after five straight years of continual increases, according to a ...

  11. Application Assessment of Bi-Level LED Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Megan; Cook, Tyson; Shackelford, Jordan; Pang, Terrance

    2009-02-01

    This report summarizes an assessment project conducted to evaluate light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires with bi-level operation in an outdoor parking lot application.

  12. Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Process Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Savannah River Site Liquid Waste ...

  13. Operating Experience Level 2, Evaluation of Nitrate Bearing Transurani...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    015 OE-2 2015-01: Evaluation of Nitrate Bearing Transuranic Waste Streams This Operating Experience Level 2 (OE-2) document provides actions to perform an evaluation of...

  14. Energy level structure and transition probabilities in the spectra...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    H.M. 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DYSPROSIUM IONS; ENERGY LEVELS; ERBIUM IONS; EUROPIUM IONS; GADOLINIUM IONS; HOLMIUM IONS; LANTHANUM...

  15. West Valley Demonstration Project Low-Level Waste Shipment |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Low-Level Waste Shipment More Documents & Publications Indiana Department of Homeland Security - NNPP Exercise Transportation Security EIS-0337-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

  16. LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - About Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. James J. Spivey Director, Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design Office: 326, Cain Department of Chemical Engineering 110 Chemical Engineering South Stadium Road Baton...

  17. Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Management and Analysis Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy Next-Generation Data Management and ...

  18. Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Taming the Grid: Dynamic Load Composition Quantification at the Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holby, Edward F. Los Alamos...

  19. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage ...

  20. LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP EXECUTION...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP ... 13 9.0 LFRG Management Processes ... Specific Proficiency Checklist in Attachment 3 within one ...

  1. Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets October 2014 ... such as supply disruptions, policy changes, and technological breakthroughs. ...

  2. Operating Experience Level 3, NRC Notice: Antifreeze Agents in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    October 2015 OE-3 2015-04: NRC Notice: Antifreeze Agents in Fire Water Sprinkler Systems This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about safety...

  3. How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and Planning in the Water Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Integrate Climate...

  4. Subject: Executive and Senior Level Pay and Performance Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Element II. Critical Element II is based on the 5 Executive Core Qualifications (ECQs). ... Ensure Objectives are: o Written at an executive level with a strategic focus, yet ...

  5. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 washington.jpg Because seawater absorbs heat more slowly than the atmosphere above it, our oceans won't feel the full impact of the greenhouse gases already in the air for hundreds of years. Warm water expands, raising sea levels. (Courtesy W.

  6. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Advanced Technology ...

  7. Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office Merit Review 2015: Fuel Displacement Potential of Advanced Technologies under Different Thermal Conditions Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth)

  8. Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean,...

  9. Operating Experience Level 3, Losing Control: Material Handling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Losing Control: Material Handling Dangers Operating Experience Level 3, Losing Control: Material Handling Dangers October 23, 2014 OE-3 2014-05: Losing Control: Material Handling...

  10. Control Heterogeneous Catalysis at Atomic and Electronic-level...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Heterogeneous Catalysis at Atomic and Electronic-level Using Intermetallic Compounds Precious metals and metal alloys are important heterogeneous catalysts for renewable...

  11. LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space control Our Mission Statement space control "Building Effective Catalysts from First Principles: Computational Catalysis and Atomic-Level Synthesis" The mission of LSU's ...

  12. Training Manual for Senior and Middle Level Managers in Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agency for International Developments (USAID) Energy Small Grants Program developed a training manual in order to build the knowledge base of senior and middle level managers...

  13. North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting ...

  14. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the lived values of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  15. Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    must prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Copies of the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement are available at the...

  16. Understanding Lithium-Sulfur Batteries at the Molecular Level...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 17, 2015, Accomplishments Understanding Lithium-Sulfur Batteries at the Molecular Level Conceived some 40 years ago, the lithium-sulfur battery can store, in theory, ...

  17. High Level Waste Corporate Board Newsletter - 06/03/08

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2008 UPCOMING EVENTS: Next High-Level Waste Corporate Board meeting will be held at ... Needs Collection Prioritization * Waste Acceptance Product Specification This ...

  18. Report on Separate Disposal of Defense High- Level Radioactive...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radioactive Waste March 2015 This page left blank. i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose This report considers whether a separate repository for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) ...

  19. Developing County-level Water Footprints of Biofuel Produced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biofuel Produced from Switchgrass and Miscanthus x Giganteus in the United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Developing County-level Water Footprints of Biofuel ...

  20. Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Practices for Working with...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 makes the Department of Energy (DOE) nanotechnology community aware of a new publication as it relates to DOE's nanoscale safety...

  1. Gender differences in cadmium and cotinine levels in prepubertal children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fucic, A.; Plavec, D; Casteleyn, L.; Aerts, D.; Biot, P.; Katsonouri, A.; Cerna, M.; Knudsen, L.E.; Castano, A.; Rudnai, P.; Gutleb, A.; Ligocka, D.; Lupsa, I-R.; Berglund, M.; Horvat, M.; Halzlova, K.; Schoeters, G.; Koppen, G.; Hadjipanayis, A.; Krskova, A.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Susceptibility to environmental stressors has been described for fetal and early childhood development. However, the possible susceptibility of the prepubertal period, characterized by the orchestration of the organism towards sexual maturation and adulthood has been poorly investigated and exposure data are scarce. In the current study levels of cadmium (Cd), cotinine and creatinine in urine were analyzed in a subsample 216 children from 12 European countries within the DEMOCOPHES project. The children were divided into six age–sex groups: boys (6–8 years, 9–10 years and 11 years old), and girls (6–7 years, 8–9 years, 10–11 years). The number of subjects per group was between 23 and 53. The cut off values were set at 0.1 µg/L for Cd, and 0.8 µg/L for cotinine defined according to the highest limit of quantification. The levels of Cd and cotinine were adjusted for creatinine level. In the total subsample group, the median level of Cd was 0.180 µg/L (range 0.10–0.69 µg/L), and for cotinine the median wet weight value was 1.50 µg/L (range 0.80–39.91 µg/L). There was no significant difference in creatinine and cotinine levels between genders and age groups. There was a significant correlation between levels of cadmium and creatinine in all children of both genders. This shows that even at such low levels the possible effect of cadmium on kidney function was present and measurable. An increase in Cd levels was evident with age. Cadmium levels were significantly different between 6–7 year old girls, 11 year old boys and 10–11 year old girls. As there was a balanced distribution in the number of subjects from countries included in the study, bias due to data clustering was not probable. The impact of low Cd levels on kidney function and gender differences in Cd levels needs further investigation. - Highlights: • In 216 children from 6 to 11 years old the median level of Cd was 0.18 µg/L. • The median level of cotinine was 1.50 µg/L. • Correlation between levels of Cd and creatinine in all children was detected. • Cd levels were different between 6–7 year old, 10–11 year old girls vs. 11 year old boys.

  2. Evaluate the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The earth's radiation budget is sensitive to changes in the microphysical properties of low-level stratiform clouds. Their extensive coverage can significantly reduce the solar energy

  3. Process for solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Wayne A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition of a small amount of reducing agent to a mixture of a high-level radioactive waste calcine and glass frit before the mixture is melted will produce a more homogeneous glass which is leach-resistant and suitable for long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste products.

  4. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  5. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses a model to predict and analyze the system-level performance of a thermoelectric generator in terms of the power output and the power density … at the element, module and system-level and for a wide range of operating conditions.

  6. Electric Drive Vehicle Level Control Development Under Various Thermal

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Conditions | Department of Energy vss070_kim_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Vehicle Level Model and Control Development and Validation Under Various Thermal Conditions Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fuel Displacement Potential of Advanced Technologies under Different Thermal Conditions Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth)

  7. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shockley, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  8. Flammable gas tank waste level reconciliation for 241-SX-105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddie, L.A.

    1997-06-23

    Fluor Daniel Northwest was authorized to address flammable gas issues by reconciling the unexplained surface level increases in Tank 241-SX-105 (SX-105, typical). The trapped gas evaluation document states that Tank SX-105 exceeds the 25% of the lower flammable limit criterion, based on a surface level rise evaluation. The Waste Storage Tank Status and Leak Detection Criteria document, commonly referred to as the Welty Report is the basis for this letter report. The Welty Report is also a part of the trapped gas evaluation document criteria. The Welty Report contains various tank information, including: physical information, status, levels, and dry wells. The unexplained waste level rises were attributed to the production and retention of gas in the column of waste corresponding to the unaccounted for surface level rise. From 1973 through 1980, the Welty Report tracked Tank SX-105 transfers and reported a net cumulative change of 20.75 in. This surface level increase is from an unknown source or is unaccounted for. Duke Engineering and Services Hanford and Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation are interested in determining the validity of unexplained surface level changes reported in the Welty Report based upon other corroborative sources of data. The purpose of this letter report is to assemble detailed surface level and waste addition data from daily tank records, logbooks, and other corroborative data that indicate surface levels, and to reconcile the cumulative unaccounted for surface level changes as shown in the Welty Report from 1973 through 1980. Tank SX-105 initially received waste from REDOX starting the second quarter of 1955. After June 1975, the tank primarily received processed waste (slurry) from the 242-S Evaporator/Crystallizer and transferred supernate waste to Tanks S-102 and SX-102. The Welty Report shows a cumulative change of 20.75 in. from June 1973 through December 1980.

  9. Flammable gas tank waste level reconcilliation for 241-SX-102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddie, L.A.

    1997-06-23

    Fluoro Dynel Northwest (FDNW) was authorized to address flammable gas issues by reconciling the unexplained surface level increases in Tank 24 1-S-1 1 1 (S-I 1 1, typical). The trapped gas evaluation document (ref 1) states that Tank SX-102 exceeds the 25% of the lower flammable limit (FL) criterion (ref 2), based on a surface level rise evaluation. The Waste Storage Tank Status and Leak Detection Criteria document, commonly referred to as the ``Wallet Report`` is the basis for this letter report (ref 3). The Wallet Report is also a part of the trapped gas evaluation document criteria. The Wallet Report contains various tank information, including: physical information, status, levels, and dry wells, see Appendix A. The unexplained waste level rises were attributed to the production and retention of gas in the column of waste corresponding to the unacquainted for surface level rise. From 1973 through 1980, the Wallet Report tracked Tank S- 102 transfers and reported a net cumulative change of 19.95 in. This surface level increase is from an unknown source or is unacquainted for. Duke Engineering and Services Hanford (DASH) and Leached Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) are interested in determining the validity of the unexplained surface level changes reported in the 0611e Wallet Report based upon other corroborative sources of data. The purpose of this letter report is to assemble detailed surface level and waste addition data from daily tank records, logbooks, and other corroborative data that indicate surface levels, and to reconcile the cumulative unacquainted for surface level changes as shown in the Wallet Report from 1973 through 1980.

  10. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Reference commercial high-level waste glass and canister definition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, S.C.; Ross, W.A.; Partain, W.L.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents technical data and performance characteristics of a high-level waste glass and canister intended for use in the design of a complete waste encapsulation package suitable for disposal in a geologic repository. The borosilicate glass contained in the stainless steel canister represents the probable type of high-level waste product that will be produced in a commercial nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. Development history is summarized for high-level liquid waste compositions, waste glass composition and characteristics, and canister design. The decay histories of the fission products and actinides (plus daughters) calculated by the ORIGEN-II code are presented.

  12. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-11-16

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

  13. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  14. High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities Kevin Comer, Associate Principal, Antares Group Inc.

  15. Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft Accident on the Grand Coulee-Bell No.6, 500 kV Line Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft ...

  16. West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of low-level salt solution into 19,877 drums of cemented LLW that were placed in storage in the Drum Cell 2006 - 07 LLW drums safely removed and successfully shipped to...

  17. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uses a model to predict and analyze the system-level performance of a thermoelectric generator in terms of the power output and the power density at the element, module and ...

  18. Operating Experience Level 3, Winter Preparedness: Slips on Ice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3 2015-06: This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the hazards of slips, trips, and falls on ice across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex.

  19. Forecasting Crude Oil Spot Price Using OECD Petroleum Inventory Levels

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a short-term monthly forecasting model of West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) petroleum inventory levels.

  20. A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A TWP-ICE High-Level Cloud Case Study Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Field Campaigns The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP ICE) was conducted near...

  1. Operating Experience Level 1, Evaluation of Existing Facilities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OE-1 2015-01: Evaluation of Existing Facilities to DOE-STD-3009-2014 This Operating Experience Level 1 (OE-1) document provides requirements related to an evaluation of existing...

  2. Revised Propane Stock Levels for 6/7/13

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised Propane Stock Levels for 6713 Release Date: June 19, 2013 Following the release of the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) for the week ended June 7, 2013, EIA...

  3. Operating Experience Level 3, Dangers of Respirable Silica

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information on a safety concern related to recurring worker exposure to dust containing crystalline silica at Department of Energy (DOE) sites.

  4. Neptunium estimation in dissolver and high-level-waste solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pathak, P.N.; Prabhu, D.R.; Kanekar, A.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    This papers deals with the optimization of the experimental conditions for the estimation of {sup 237}Np in spent-fuel dissolver/high-level waste solutions using thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the extractant. (authors)

  5. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. E. Schwinkendorf

    1999-04-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options.

  6. LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Contact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us >> space control Center for Atomic-Level Catalyst Design (CALCD) 110 Chemical ... Telephone: 225.578.1426 Fax: 225.578.1476 E-mail: jjspivey@lsu.edu space control Webmaster ...

  7. EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid...

  8. Low-level waste vitrification plant environmental permitting plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gretsinger, W.T.; Colby, J.M.

    1994-10-03

    This document presents projected environmental permitting and approval requirements for the treatment and disposal of low-level Hanford tank waste by vitrification. Applicability, current status, and strategy are discussed for each potential environmental permit or approval.

  9. High Level Waste Corporate Board Newsletter - 09/11/08

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Federal Review Group (LFRG) in Washington, DC on 16-18 September 2008. Contact Maureen O'Dell for details (MAUREEN.O'DELL@hq.doe.gov) Next High-Level Waste Corporate ...

  10. Bibliographic Data on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Documents

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-11-10

    The purpose of the system is to allow users (researchers, policy makers, etc) to identify existing documents on a range of subjects related to low-level radioactive waste management. The software is menu driven.

  11. Appendix D.1 Hanford Sitewide SSHAC Level 3 PSHA Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D.1 Hanford Sitewide SSHAC Level 3 PSHA Project March 18, 2014 Hazard Input Document (HID) Final SSC Model 1 Contents Appendix D.1 ...................................................................................................................................... 1 Appendix D.1 ...................................................................................................................................... 2 Description of Seismic Sources

  12. Avoided level crossings in very highly charged ions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Avoided level crossings in very highly charged ions Authors: Beiersdorfer, P. ; Scofield, J. H. ; Brown, G. V. ; Chen, M. H. ; Hell, N. ; Osterheld, A. L. ; Vogel, D. A. ; ...

  13. Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides an overview summary of radiation doses from occupational exposures at the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration for the year 2013.

  14. Level monitoring system with pulsating sensor—Application to online level monitoring of dashpots in a fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malathi, N.; Sahoo, P. Ananthanarayanan, R.; Murali, N.

    2015-02-15

    An innovative continuous type liquid level monitoring system constructed by using a new class of sensor, viz., pulsating sensor, is presented. This device is of industrial grade and it is exclusively used for level monitoring of any non conducting liquid. This instrument of unique design is suitable for high resolution online monitoring of oil level in dashpots of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. The sensing probe is of capacitance type robust probe consisting of a number of rectangular mirror polished stainless steel (SS-304) plates separated with uniform gaps. The performance of this novel instrument has been thoroughly investigated. The precision, sensitivity, response time, and the lowest detection limit in measurement using this device are <0.01 mm, ∼100 Hz/mm, ∼1 s, and ∼0.03 mm, respectively. The influence of temperature on liquid level is studied and the temperature compensation is provided in the instrument. The instrument qualified all recommended tests, such as environmental, electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility, and seismic tests prior to its deployment in nuclear reactor. With the evolution of this level measurement approach, it is possible to provide dashpot oil level sensors in fast breeder reactor for the first time for continuous measurement of oil level in dashpots of Control and Safety Rod Drive Mechanism during reactor operation.

  15. Level-2 Milestone 4468: Lorenz Simulation Interface Beta Release (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Level-2 Milestone 4468: Lorenz Simulation Interface Beta Release Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Level-2 Milestone 4468: Lorenz Simulation Interface Beta Release Authors: Long, J W ; Martinez, J J Publication Date: 2012-01-23 OSTI Identifier: 1093932 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-525083 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of

  16. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- High and Intermediate Level Shielded

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells High and Intermediate Level Shielded Cells Working with SRNL Our Facilities - High and Intermediate Level Shielded Cells The SRNL Shielded Cells Facility is a special containment facility that provide the shielding and confinement necessary for the safe examination, analysis and testing of highly radioactive materials. Skilled operators stand safely outside of each cell and use manipulator arms to control delicate procedures inside of each cell. The facility consists of sixteen 6x6

  17. Spallation Neutron Source Power Level Exceeds 1 MW (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Spallation Neutron Source Power Level Exceeds 1 MW Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spallation Neutron Source Power Level Exceeds 1 MW No abstract prepared. Authors: Ekkebus, Allen E [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2010-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 985278 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Neutron News; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 1 Research Org: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  18. AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes

  19. Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Planning and Control, Final Report | Department of Energy Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control, Final Report Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control, Final Report May 15, 2013 Presenter: Stephen L. Domotor, Director, Office of Analysis, Office of Health, Safety and Security Topic: On August 28, 2012, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB or "Board") wrote to the Department of

  20. EDL: Discovering Electrochemistry at Atomic and Molecular Levels - Joint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Energy Storage Research June 18, 2014, Research Highlights EDL: Discovering Electrochemistry at Atomic and Molecular Levels Scientific Achievement Established in situ Electrochemical Discovery Lab (EDL) for systematic studies of wet and dry interfaces for materials-by-design and electrolytes-by-design at atomic and molecular levels Significance and Importance Systematic synthesis and characterization of high purity electrolytes, electrodes and interfaces under controlled

  1. Katharine Page: Atomic-level insights for better materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Katharine Page: Atomic-level insights for better materials Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Katharine Page: Atomic-level insights for better materials Page's research supports materials' advances that could have wide-ranging impact, investigating, manipulating and manufacturing nano-particles. May 1, 2014 Katherine Page Katherine Page Contact Linda Anderman Email A Love for Science Impassioned by

  2. Accredited Certifications Bring a Higher Level of Quality to the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherization Industry | Department of Energy Accredited Certifications Bring a Higher Level of Quality to the Weatherization Industry Accredited Certifications Bring a Higher Level of Quality to the Weatherization Industry October 28, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis With the announcement of the newly accredited Home Energy Professional certifications, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to reaffirm its commitment to supporting an effective and highly skilled weatherization workforce.On

  3. Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment This summary report describes data management and visualization activities in the Advanced Simulation and

  4. Developing County-level Water Footprints of Biofuel Produced from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switchgrass and Miscanthus x Giganteus in the United States (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Developing County-level Water Footprints of Biofuel Produced from Switchgrass and Miscanthus x Giganteus in the United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Developing County-level Water Footprints of Biofuel Produced from Switchgrass and Miscanthus x Giganteus in the United States Authors: Wu, May M. [1] ; Chiu, Yi-Wen [1] + Show Author Affiliations Argonne National

  5. ARM - What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels? Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans What About Melting Polar Ice Caps and Sea Levels? As the northern polar zone warms up, sea ice could melt (very probable) and the sea/ice interface could retreat to the north. This is likely to

  6. An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts Print Copper-based catalysts are widely used in chemical industries to convert water and carbon monoxide to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methanol. There are theoretical models used to explain this reaction, but a complete understanding of the process has been lacking. However, recent research at the ALS has shed light on the process, giving scientists key data about how copper-based catalysts function at the atomic level. These catalysts

  7. Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2012-10-01

    This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

  8. Interface-Induced Renormalization of Electrolyte Energy Levels in Magnesium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research February 17, 2016, Research Highlights Interface-Induced Renormalization of Electrolyte Energy Levels in Magnesium Batteries Renormalization of solvent HOMO (green lines) and LUMO (red lines) levels due to interactions with Mg (0001) and MgO (001). The shaded region in the center of the figure represents the electrochemical window of a hypothetical 4V magnesium battery Scientific Achievement Interface-induced changes to the stability of

  9. Entry-Level Positions | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Entry-Level Positions If you are just starting your career as an engineer, you can use your technical knowledge and enhance your project management skills as you help oversee NNSA facilities or essential technical projects. If you are entering your career in business management, you may find yourself supporting the oversight of major contracts or assisting budget and financial management personnel in tracking million-dollar contracts. Are you interested in an entry-level, permanent position at

  10. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 28, 2016 Title: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission

  11. Treatment of External Levels in Neutron Resonance Fitting: Application to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Nonfissile Nuclide {sup 52}Cr (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Treatment of External Levels in Neutron Resonance Fitting: Application to the Nonfissile Nuclide {sup 52}Cr Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Treatment of External Levels in Neutron Resonance Fitting: Application to the Nonfissile Nuclide {sup 52}Cr Measured neutron resonance cross sections are usually analyzed and parametrized by fitting theoretical curves to high-resolution point data. Theoretically, the cross

  12. An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts Print Copper-based catalysts are widely used in chemical industries to convert water and carbon monoxide to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methanol. There are theoretical models used to explain this reaction, but a complete understanding of the process has been lacking. However, recent research at the ALS has shed light on the process, giving scientists key data about how copper-based catalysts function at the atomic level. These catalysts

  13. Gamma-ray decay of levels in /sup 53/Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickens, J.K.; Larson, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Gamma-ray decay of levels in the stable isotope /sup 53/Cr has been studied using /sup 53/Cr(n,n'..gamma..) reactions for incident neutron energies between threshold and 10 MeV. Of the 65 gamma rays or gamma-ray groups observed for neutron interactions with /sup 53/Cr, 50 have been placed or tentatively placed among 34 levels in /sup 53/Cr up to an excitation energy of 4.36 MeV. Deduced branching ratios are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements except for decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level. For the decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level we are unable to explain variations in the branching ratios of the transition gamma rays as a function of incident neutron energy within the framework of the presently known level structure of /sup 53/Cr and suggest the possibility of a second energy level at E/sub x/ = 1537 keV. 59 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

  15. Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2010-10-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  16. Operational considerations for high level blast furnace fuel injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poveromo, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Injection levels of over 400 lbs/NTHM for coal, over 250 lbs/NTHM for natural gas and over 200 lbs/NTHM for oil have been achieved. Such high levels of fuel injection has a major impact on many aspects of blast furnace operation. In this paper the author begins by reviewing the fundamentals of fuel injection with emphasis on raceway thermochemical phenomena. The operational impacts which are generic to high level injection of any injectant are then outlined. The author will then focus on the particular characteristics of each injectant, with major emphasis on coal and natural gas. Operational considerations for coping with these changes and methods of maximizing the benefits of fuel injection will be reviewed.

  17. Exposure assessment: Serum levels of TCDD in Seveso, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Needham, L.L.; Patterson, D.G. Jr.; Smith, S.J.; Sampson, E.J.; Gerthoux, P.M.; Brambilla, P.; Mocarelli, P.

    1999-02-01

    Accurate exposure assessment is an important step in both risk assessment and epidemiologic studies involving potential human exposure to environmental toxicants. Various methods have been used to assess human exposure. These methods include models based on one`s temporal and spatial nearness to the source, environmental levels of toxicant, and biological measures. The authors believe that the latter measure is the ``gold standard.`` In this article they present the serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin levels in residents of the contaminated zones in Seveso, Italy, in 1976, and delineate these data by age and gender. Some of these serum levels are among the highest ever reported and thus this population serves as a benchmark for comparison of human exposure and potential adverse health effects. One such potential population is that population consuming potentially contaminated fish.

  18. Maternal blood metal levels and fetal markers of metabolic function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E.; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Shapiro, Gabriel D.; Fisher, Mandy; Taback, Shayne; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renee; Fraser, William D.

    2015-01-15

    Exposure to metals commonly found in the environment has been hypothesized to be associated with measures of fetal growth but the epidemiological literature is limited. The Maternal–Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study recruited 2001 women during the first trimester of pregnancy from 10 Canadian sites. Our objective was to assess the association between prenatal exposure to metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury) and fetal metabolic function. Average maternal metal concentrations in 1st and 3rd trimester blood samples were used to represent prenatal metals exposure. Leptin and adiponectin were measured in 1363 cord blood samples and served as markers of fetal metabolic function. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between metals and both high (≥90%) and low (≤10%) fetal adiponectin and leptin levels. Leptin levels were significantly higher in female infants compared to males. A significant relationship between maternal blood cadmium and odds of high leptin was observed among males but not females in adjusted models. When adjusting for birth weight z-score, lead was associated with an increased odd of high leptin. No other significant associations were found at the top or bottom 10th percentile in either leptin or adiponectin models. This study supports the proposition that maternal levels of cadmium influence cord blood adipokine levels in a sex-dependent manner. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and to determine how such findings at birth will translate into childhood anthropometric measures. - Highlights: • We determined relationships between maternal metal levels and cord blood adipokines. • Cord blood leptin levels were higher among female than male infants. • Maternal cadmium was associated with elevated leptin in male, not female infants. • No significant associations were observed between metals and cord blood adiponectin. • Further work will elucidate the implications of these findings on childhood obesity.

  19. Modeling and low-level waste management: an interagency workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.A.; Stratton, L.E.

    1980-01-01

    The interagency workshop on Modeling and Low-Level Waste Management was held on December 1-4, 1980 in Denver, Colorado. Twenty papers were presented at this meeting which consisted of three sessions. First, each agency presented its point of view concerning modeling and the need for models in low-level radioactive waste applications. Second, a larger group of more technical papers was presented by persons actively involved in model development or applications. Last of all, four workshops were held to attempt to reach a consensus among participants regarding numerous waste modeling topics. Abstracts are provided for the papers presented at this workshop.

  20. Wind Development Found to Increase County-Level Personal Income |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Development Found to Increase County-Level Personal Income Wind Development Found to Increase County-Level Personal Income January 10, 2013 - 2:21pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) joined forces with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to complete a first-of-its-kind

  1. Stability testing of low-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Shea, C.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The NRC Technical Position on Waste Form identifies methods for thermal cycle testing and biodegradation testing of low-level waste forms. These tests were carried out on low-level waste forms to establish whether the tests are reasonable and can be achieved. The thermal-cycle test is believed adequate for demonstrating the thermal stability of solidified waste forms. The biodegradation tests are sufficient for distinguishing materials that are susceptible to biodegradation. However, failure of either of these tests should not be regarded of itself as an indication that the waste form will biodegrade to an extent that the form does not meet the stability requirements of 10 CFR Part 61.

  2. An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts An Atomic-Level Understanding of Copper-Based Catalysts Print Thursday, 05 May 2016 12:20 Copper-based catalysts are widely used in chemical industries to convert water and carbon monoxide to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methanol. There are theoretical models used to explain this reaction, but a complete understanding of the process has been lacking. However, recent research at the ALS has shed light on the process, giving scientists key

  3. Immobilized low-level waste disposal options configuration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    This report compiles information that supports the eventual conceptual and definitive design of a disposal facility for immobilized low-level waste. The report includes the results of a joint Westinghouse/Fluor Daniel Inc. evaluation of trade-offs for glass manufacturing and product (waste form) disposal. Though recommendations for the preferred manufacturing and disposal option for low-level waste are outside the scope of this document, relative ranking as applied to facility complexity, safety, remote operation concepts and ease of retrieval are addressed.

  4. A preliminary evaluation of alternatives for disposal of INEL low-level waste and low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.H.; Roesener, W.S.; Jorgenson-Waters, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility (MLLWDF) project was established in 1992 by the US Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to provide enhanced disposal capabilities for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed waste and low-level waste. This Preliminary Evaluation of Alternatives for Disposal of INEL Low-Level Waste and Low-Level Mixed Waste identifies and evaluates-on a preliminary, overview basis-the alternatives for disposal of that waste. Five disposal alternatives, ranging from of no-action`` to constructing and operating the MLLWDF, are identified and evaluated. Several subalternatives are formulated within the MLLWDF alternative. The subalternatives involve various disposal technologies as well as various scenarios related to the waste volumes and waste forms to be received for disposal. The evaluations include qualitative comparisons of the projected isolation performance for each alternative, and facility, health and safety, environmental, institutional, schedule, and rough order-of-magnitude life-cycle cost comparisons. The performance of each alternative is evaluated against lists of ``musts`` and ``wants.`` Also included is a discussion of other key considerations for decisionmaking. The analysis of results indicated further study is necessary to obtain the best estimate of long-term future waste volume and characteristics from the INEL Environmental Restoration activities and the expanded INEL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program.

  5. Coulomb excitation of multiphonon levels of the giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayman, B. F.; Zardi, F.

    2010-03-15

    A closed expression is obtained for the cross-section for Coulomb excitation of levels of the giant dipole resonance of given angular momentum and phonon number. Applications are made to the Goldhaber-Teller and Steinwedel-Jensen descriptions of the resonance at relativistic bombarding energies.

  6. Operating Experience Level 3, Injuries: Recent Trend in Musculoskeletal Disorders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3 2016-03: This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information that workers at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities can use to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and injuries. In addition, planners may find useful information for developing work packages that consider ergonomic principles.

  7. Activity-Level Work Planning and Control Implementation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1211-2014 April 2014 DOE HANDBOOK ACTIVITY-LEVEL WORK PLANNING AND CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION U.S. Department of Energy AREA HDBK Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1211-2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD .......................................................................................................................... v 1.0.

  8. Operating Experience Level 3, Losing Control: Material Handling Dangers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the dangers inherent in material handling and the role hazard analysis, work planning, and walkdowns can play in preventing injuries during heavy equipment moves. More than 200 material handling events reported to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) from January 1, 2010, through August 31, 2014.

  9. Low-level waste vitrification contact maintenance viability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, C.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This study investigates the economic viability of contact maintenance in the Low-Level Waste Vitrification Facility, which is part of the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. This document was prepared by Flour Daniel, Inc., and transmitted to Westinghouse Hanford Company in September 1995.

  10. Operating Experience Level 3, Danger! Equipment Hits Overhead Lines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3 2016-01: This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to workers and operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities where equipment has struck overhead communication cables and energized power lines.

  11. Decontamination and melting of low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, D.W.

    1997-03-01

    This article describes the decommissioning project of the Capenhurst Diffusion Plant in Europe. Over 99 percent of the low-level waste was successfully treated and recycled. Topics include the following: decommissioning philosophy; specialized techniques including plant pretreatment, plant dismantling, size reduction, decontamination, melting, and encapsulation of waste; recycled materials and waste stream; project safety; cost drivers and savings. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Secretarial Succession, Threat Level Notification and Successor Tracking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-01-28

    The Order establishes the Secretarial Order of Succession pursuant to section 202(a) of the Department of Energy Organization Act, 42 U.S.C. 7132(a) and establishes a mechanism for tracking the locations of successors at various threat levels. Cancels DOE O 100.1D.

  13. Secretarial Succession, Threat Level Notification, and Successor Tracking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-04-20

    This Order establishes the Secretarial Order of Succession pursuant to section 202(a) of the Department of Energy Organization Act and establishes a mechanism for tracking the locations of successors at various threat levels. Supersedes DOE O 100.1C. Superseded by DOE O 100.1E

  14. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Operating Experience Level 1, 2, and 3 Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operating Experience Level 1, 2, and 3 documents communicate required actions, information on safety issues or trends of concern, and lessons learned on operating experience to the DOE Complex to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices.

  16. Energy at the state and local level: allocating responsibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.

    1982-06-01

    This second volume involves a study of the relationship between the two major subfederal levels of government - the states and the cities and towns. This volume focuses on how states and local governments can work together more cooperatively and how they might divide responsibility for different energy-related functions.

  17. Design and testing of a thermal liquid level sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, A.E.; Schneider, A.; Harris, J.D.; Pfeifer, H.; Croft, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid level detection is of extreme importance in nuclear reactor systems. In the event of a loss of coolant, plant operators should be able to ascertain quickly whether there is danger of the core becoming uncovered. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Operating Experience Level 3, Industrial Equipment Impacts Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information on a safety concern related to heavy industrial equipment that contacts and damages structures and electrical, gas, and water lines. Although these contacts did not cause injuries, the events did impact mission and schedule, divert resources, and change momentum.

  19. Secretarial Succession, Threat Level Notification, and Successor Tracking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-01-28

    This order establishes the Secretarial Order of Succession in the Department of Energy pursuant to section 202(a) of the Department of Energy Organization Act, 42 U.S.C. 7132(a) and establish a mechanism for tracking the locations of successors at the various threat levels. Admin Chg 1, dated 9-13-2013, supersedes DOE O 100.1E.

  20. ORNL takes energy-efficient housing to a new level

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TVA and the Department of Energy are taking energy-saving research into a West Knox County neighborhood. In the Campbell Creek subdivision, ORNL researchers have helped builders to construct three homes with three different levels of energy-saving features.

  1. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss031_rask_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Advanced Technology Vehicle Benchmark and Assessment

  2. Low-Level Waste Disposal Alternatives Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Carlson; Kay Adler-Flitton; Roy Grant; Joan Connolly; Peggy Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz

    2006-09-01

    This report identifies and compares on-site and off-site disposal options for the disposal of contract-handled and remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Potential disposal options are screened for viability by waste type resulting in a short list of options for further consideration. The most crediable option are selected after systematic consideration of cost, schedule constraints, and risk. In order to holistically address the approach for low-level waste disposal, options are compiled into comprehensive disposal schemes, that is, alternative scenarios. Each alternative scenario addresses the disposal path for all low-level waste types over the period of interest. The alternative scenarios are compared and ranked using cost, risk and complexity to arrive at the recommended approach. Schedule alignment with disposal needs is addressed to ensure that all waste types are managed appropriately. The recommended alternative scenario for the disposal of low-level waste based on this analysis is to build a disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  3. High-level waste management technology program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Manufacturing Cost Levelization Model – A User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, William R.; Shehabi, Arman; Smith, Sarah Josephine

    2015-08-01

    The Manufacturing Cost Levelization Model is a cost-performance techno-economic model that estimates total large-scale manufacturing costs for necessary to produce a given product. It is designed to provide production cost estimates for technology researchers to help guide technology research and development towards an eventual cost-effective product. The model presented in this user’s guide is generic and can be tailored to the manufacturing of any product, including the generation of electricity (as a product). This flexibility, however, requires the user to develop the processes and process efficiencies that represents a full-scale manufacturing facility. The generic model is comprised of several modules that estimate variable costs (material, labor, and operating), fixed costs (capital & maintenance), financing structures (debt and equity financing), and tax implications (taxable income after equipment and building depreciation, debt interest payments, and expenses) of a notional manufacturing plant. A cash-flow method is used to estimate a selling price necessary for the manufacturing plant to recover its total cost of production. A levelized unit sales price ($ per unit of product) is determined by dividing the net-present value of the manufacturing plant’s expenses ($) by the net present value of its product output. A user defined production schedule drives the cash-flow method that determines the levelized unit price. In addition, an analyst can increase the levelized unit price to include a gross profit margin to estimate a product sales price. This model allows an analyst to understand the effect that any input variables could have on the cost of manufacturing a product. In addition, the tool is able to perform sensitivity analysis, which can be used to identify the key variables and assumptions that have the greatest influence on the levelized costs. This component is intended to help technology researchers focus their research attention on tasks that offer the greatest opportunities for cost reduction early in the research and development stages of technology invention.

  5. Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Augmentation at Very High Turbulence Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Forrest; Kingery, Joseph E.

    2015-06-17

    A database for stagnation region heat transfer has been extended to include heat transfer measurements acquired downstream from a new high intensity turbulence generator. This work was motivated by gas turbine industry heat transfer designers who deal with heat transfer environments with increasing Reynolds numbers and very high turbulence levels. The new mock aero-combustor turbulence generator produces turbulence levels which average 17.4%, which is 37% higher than the older turbulence generator. The increased level of turbulence is caused by the reduced contraction ratio from the liner to the exit. Heat transfer measurements were acquired on two large cylindrical leading edge test surfaces having a four to one range in leading edge diameter (40.64 cm and 10.16 cm). Gandvarapu and Ames [1] previously acquired heat transfer measurements for six turbulence conditions including three grid conditions, two lower turbulence aero-combustor conditions, and a low turbulence condition. The data are documented and tabulated for an eight to one range in Reynolds numbers for each test surface with Reynolds numbers ranging from 62,500 to 500,000 for the large leading edge and 15,625 to 125,000 for the smaller leading edge. The data show augmentation levels of up to 136% in the stagnation region for the large leading edge. This heat transfer rate is an increase over the previous aero-combustor turbulence generator which had augmentation levels up to 110%. Note, the rate of increase in heat transfer augmentation decreases for the large cylindrical leading edge inferring only a limited level of turbulence intensification in the stagnation region. The smaller cylindrical leading edge shows more consistency with earlier stagnation region heat transfer results correlated on the TRL (Turbulence, Reynolds number, Length scale) parameter. The downstream regions of both test surfaces continue to accelerate the flow but at a much lower rate than the leading edge. Bypass transition occurs in these regions providing a useful set of data to ground the prediction of transition onset and length over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and turbulence intensity and scales.

  6. Effect of reactor conditions on MSIV-ATWS power level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a boiling water reactor (BWR) when there is closure of the main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), the energy generated in the core will be transferred to the pressure suppression pool (PSP) via steam that flows out of the relief valves. The pool has limited capacity as a heat sink and hence, if there is no reactor trip (an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event), there is the possibility that the pool temperature may rise beyond acceptable limits. The present study was undertaken to determine how the initial reactor conditions affect the power level during an MSIV-ATWS event. The time of interest is the 20- to 30-min period when it is assumed that the reactor is in a quasi equilibrium condition with the water level and pressure fixed, natural circulation conditions and no control rod movement or significant boron in the core. The initial conditions of interest are the time of the cycle and the operating state.

  7. Levels of chlordane, oxychlordane, and nonachlor in human adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Yukio; Tomokuni, Katsumaro )

    1991-08-01

    Chlordane was used as a termiticide for more than twenty years in Japan. Chlordane is stable in the environment such as sediment and its bioaccumulation in some species of bacteria, freshwater invertebrates, and marine fish is large. Many researches were done to elucidate the levels of chlordane and/or its metabolite oxychlordane in human adipose tissues. A comprehensive review concerning chlordane was recently provided by USEPA. On the other hand, Japan authorities banned the use of chlordane in September 1986. In the last paper, the authors reported that both water and sediment of the rivers around Saga city were slightly contaminated with chlordane. In the present study, they investigated the levels of chlordane, oxychlordane and nonachlor in human adipose tissues.

  8. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  9. Multi-level Hybrid Cache: Impact and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhe; Kim, Youngjae; Ma, Xiaosong; Shipman, Galen M; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-02-01

    Storage class memories, including flash, has been attracting much attention as promising candidates fitting into in today's enterprise storage systems. In particular, since the cost and performance characteristics of flash are in-between those of DRAM and hard disks, it has been considered by many studies as an secondary caching layer underneath main memory cache. However, there has been a lack of studies of correlation and interdependency between DRAM and flash caching. This paper views this problem as a special form of multi-level caching, and tries to understand the benefits of this multi-level hybrid cache hierarchy. We reveal that significant costs could be saved by using Flash to reduce the size of DRAM cache, while maintaing the same performance. We also discuss design challenges of using flash in the caching hierarchy and present potential solutions.

  10. RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.

    2010-09-07

    High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

  11. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  12. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  13. Operating Experience Level 3, Fall Protection Can Prevent Serious Injuries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2015-05: This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to incidents at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in which fall protection requirements were not followed. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), falls from elevations, including into holes in floors, are the leading cause of worker fatalities in the U.S. construction industry.

  14. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling off in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 after five years of increase ORISE report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates leveling off in 2014 after five years of increase Decline seen in undergraduate and master degrees, while number of doctoral degrees awarded increased FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 31, 2015 FY15-38 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of college students graduating with majors in nuclear engineering has flattened and even declined somewhat after five straight years of continual increases, according to a report by

  15. AVTA: PLUGLESS Level 2 Wireless Charging Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing done on the wireless PLUGLESS Level 2 EV Charging System by Evatran Group Inc. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  16. Distinguished Speaker Lecture Series: Plasma Physics at the Atomic Level |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 10, 2015, 7:30pm to 9:00pm Research Seminar Princeton University, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Olden Avenue (between Nassau Street and Prospect Avenue) Room J-223 Distinguished Speaker Lecture Series: Plasma Physics at the Atomic Level Professor Paul Corkum Princeton University Abstract: File Corkum Press Release.docx Optical-field multi-photon ionization, generated by high- power short-pulse lasers, is used to probe the attosecond evolution of

  17. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Residual Fuel Oil(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Residual Fuel Oil(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts)

  19. Operating Experience Level 3, Safety Concern: Roll-up Doors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to roll-up doors that fail unexpectedly, endangering workers. Under normal operation, roll-up doors operate smoothly, and users may not realize the hazard a failed door can present. Industrial doors may weigh more than half of a ton, and uncontrolled gravitational movement is hazardous to personnel and equipment.

  20. Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooley, Carl R.; Lerch, Ronald E.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230.degree.-300.degree.C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue.

  1. Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when

  2. B Plant low level waste system integrity assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the report of the integrity assessment activities for the B Plant low level waste system. The assessment activities were in response to requirements of the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC), 173-303-640. This integrity assessment report supports compliance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order interim milestone target action M-32-07-T03.

  3. High-Octane Mid-Level Ethanol Blend Market Assessment

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    High-Octane Mid-Level Ethanol Blend Market Assessment Caley Johnson, Emily Newes, Aaron Brooker, and Robert McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Steve Peterson Lexidyne, LLC Paul Leiby, Rocio Uria Martinez, and Gbadebo Oladosu Oak Ridge National Laboratory Maxwell L. Brown Colorado School of Mines Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-63698 December 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance

  4. LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Technical Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 1 space control 2011 Technical Conference: Center for Atomic-level Catalyst Design Oct. 25-27, 2011 Note: Links available only on request to CALCD members. Contact Webmaster Presentations from the EFRC Technical Conference 2011 Mike Janik Mike Janik (Penn State): "Modeling and synthesis of rare earth oxides" Ulrike Diebold Ulrike Diebold (TU Vienna): "Designing Nanocatalysts via Atomically Controlled Metal Clusters and their Supports" Petra de Jongh Petra de Jongh

  5. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural

  6. Molecular sieve sensors for selective detection at the nanogram level

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bein, Thomas; Brown, Kelly D.; Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, Charles J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to a selective chemical sensor for selective detection of chemical entities even at the nanogram level. The invention further relates to methods of using the sensor. The sensor comprises: (a) a piezoelectric substrate capable of detecting mass changes resulting from adsorption of material thereon; and (b) a coating applied to the substrate, which selectively sorbs chemical entities of a size smaller than a preselected magnitude.

  7. Home refinishing, lead paint, and infant blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinowitz, M.; Leviton, A.; Bellinger, D.

    1985-04-01

    The blood lead levels of 249 infants were measured semi-annually from birth to two years of age; the home paint was sampled and any recent home refinishing activity recorded. Mean blood lead from birth to age 2 years did not vary systematically with age but did correlate significantly with the amount of lead in the indoor paint. Refinishing activity in homes with high lead paint was associated with elevations of blood lead averaging 69 per cent.

  8. [Corrosion testing of high level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Alloys under consideration as candidates for the high level nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain were exposed to a range of corrosion conditions and their performance measured. The alloys tested were Incoloy 825, 70/30 Copper-Nickel, Monel 400, Hastelloy C- 22, and low carbon steel. The test conditions varied were: temperature, concentration, agitation, and crevice simulation. Only in the case of carbon steel was significant attack noted. This attack appeared to be transport limited.

  9. Low-level radioactive waste technology: a selected, annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fore, C.S.; Vaughan, N.D.; Hyder, L.K.

    1980-10-01

    This annotated bibliography of 447 references contains scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information relevant to low-level radioactive waste technology. The bibliography focuses on environmental transport, disposal site, and waste treatment studies. The publication covers both domestic and foreign literature for the period 1952 to 1979. Major chapters selected are Chemical and Physical Aspects; Container Design and Performance; Disposal Site; Environmental Transport; General Studies and Reviews; Geology, Hydrology and Site Resources; Regulatory and Economic Aspects; Transportation Technology; Waste Production; and Waste Treatment. Specialized data fields have been incorporated into the data file to improve the ease and accuracy of locating pertinent references. Specific radionuclides for which data are presented are listed in the Measured Radionuclides field, and specific parameters which affect the migration of these radionuclides are presented in the Measured Parameters field. In addition, each document referenced in this bibliography has been assigned a relevance number to facilitate sorting the documents according to their pertinence to low-level radioactive waste technology. The documents are rated 1, 2, 3, or 4, with 1 indicating direct applicability to low-level radioactive waste technology and 4 indicating that a considerable amount of interpretation is required for the information presented to be applied. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. Indexes are provide for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) subject category, (4) title, (5) geographic location, (6) measured parameters, (7) measured radionuclides, and (8) publication description.

  10. Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1997-04-23

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

  11. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental Regulatory Planning Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL's waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

  12. Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Under DOE Contract No. DE-AR21-95MC32091, Steam Reforming of Low-Level Mixed Waste, ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 500- lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area published April 1997.1 The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfidly tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium- contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (>99.9999oA) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radlonuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Cost studies have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  13. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies.

  14. Wireless remote liquid level detector and indicator for well testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.; Evans, Donald M.; Ernest, John H.

    1985-01-01

    An acoustic system is provided for measuring the fluid level in oil, gas or water wells under pressure conditions that does not require an electrical link to the surface for level detection. A battery powered sound transmitter is integrated with a liquid sensor in the form of a conductivity probe, enclosed in a sealed housing which is lowered into a well by means of a wire line reel assembly. The sound transmitter generates an intense identifiable acoustic emission when the sensor contacts liquid in the well. The acoustic emissions propagate up the well which functions as a waveguide and are detected by an acoustic transducer. The output signal from the transducer is filtered to provide noise rejection outside of the acoustic signal spectrum. The filtered signal is used to indicate to an operator the liquid level in the well has been reached and the depth is read from a footage counter coupled with the wire line reel assembly at the instant the sound signal is received.

  15. JV Task 112-Optimal Ethanol Blend-Level Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Shockey; Ted Aulich; Bruce Jones; Gary Mead; Paul Steevens

    2008-01-31

    Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET) and Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) tests were conducted on four 2007 model vehicles; a Chevrolet Impala flex-fuel and three non-flex-fuel vehicles: a Ford Fusion, a Toyota Camry, and a Chevrolet Impala. This investigation utilized a range of undenatured ethanol/Tier II gasoline blend levels from 0% to 85%. HWFET testing on ethanol blend levels of E20 in the flex fuel Chevrolet Impala and E30 in the non-flex-fuel Ford Fusion and Toyota Camry resulted in miles-per-gallon (mpg) fuel economy greater than Tier 2 gasoline, while E40 in the non-flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala resulted in an optimum mpg based on per-gallon fuel Btu content. Exhaust emission values for non-methane organic gases (NMOG), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) obtained from both the FTP-75 and the HWFET driving cycles were at or below EPA Tier II, Light-Duty Vehicles, Bin 5 levels for all vehicles tested with one exception. The flex-fuel Chevrolet Impala exceeded the NMOG standard for the FTP-75 on E-20 and Tier II gasoline.

  16. Secondary Low-Level Waste Treatment Strategy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.M. LaRue

    1999-05-25

    The objective of this analysis is to identify and review potential options for processing and disposing of the secondary low-level waste (LLW) that will be generated through operation of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). An estimate of annual secondary LLW is generated utilizing the mechanism established in ''Secondary Waste Treatment Analysis'' (Reference 8.1) and ''Secondary Low-Level Waste Generation Rate Analysis'' (Reference 8.5). The secondary LLW quantities are based on the spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) arrival schedule as defined in the ''Controlled Design Assumptions Document'' (CDA) (Reference 8.6). This analysis presents estimates of the quantities of LLW in its various forms. A review of applicable laws, codes, and standards is discussed, and a synopsis of those applicable laws, codes, and standards and their impacts on potential processing and disposal options is presented. The analysis identifies viable processing/disposal options in light of the existing laws, codes, and standards, and then evaluates these options in regard to: (1) Process and equipment requirements; (2) LLW disposal volumes; and (3) Facility requirements.

  17. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure operations. Subsequent down selection was based on compressive strength and saturated hydraulic conductivity results. Fresh slurry property results were used as the first level of screening. A high range water reducing admixture and a viscosity modifying admixture were used to adjust slurry properties to achieve flowable grouts. Adiabatic calorimeter results were used as the second level screening. The third level of screening was used to design mixes that were consistent with the fill material parameters used in the F-Tank Farm Performance Assessment which was developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closures.

  18. A preliminary evaluation of alternatives for treatment of INEL Low-Level Waste and low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.H.; Roesener, W.S.; Jorgensen-Waters, M.J.; Edinborough, C.R.

    1992-06-01

    The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) project was established in 1991 by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office to provide treatment capabilities for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed waste and low-level waste. This report identifies and evaluates the alternatives for treating that waste. Twelve treatment alternatives, ranging from ``no-action`` to constructing and operating the MLLWTF, are identified and evaluated. Evaluations include facility performance, environmental, safety, institutional, schedule, and rough order-of-magnitude cost comparisons. The performance of each alternative is evaluated against lists of ``musts`` and ``wants.`` Also included is a discussion of other key considerations for decision making. Analysis of results indicated further study is necessary to obtain the best estimate of future waste volumes and characteristics from the expanded INEL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. It is also recommended that conceptual design begin as scheduled on the MLLWTF, maximum treatment alternative while re-evaluating the waste volume projections.

  19. Energy levels of double triangular graphene quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, F. X.; Jiang, Z. T. Zhang, H. Y.; Li, S.; Lv, Z. T.

    2014-09-28

    We investigate theoretically the energy levels of the coupled double triangular graphene quantum dots (GQDs) based on the tight-binding Hamiltonian model. The double GQDs including the ZZ-type, ZA-type, and AA-type GQDs with the two GQDs having the zigzag or armchair boundaries can be coupled together via different interdot connections, such as the direct coupling, the chains of benzene rings, and those of carbon atoms. It is shown that the energy spectrum of the coupled double GQDs is the amalgamation of those spectra of the corresponding two isolated GQDs with the modification triggered by the interdot connections. The interdot connection is inclined to lift up the degeneracies of the energy levels in different degree, and as the connection changes from the direct coupling to the long chains, the removal of energy degeneracies is suppressed in ZZ-type and AA-type double GQDs, which indicates that the two coupled GQDs are inclined to become decoupled. Then we consider the influences on the spectra of the coupled double GQDs induced by the electric fields applied on the GQDs or the connection, which manifests as the global spectrum redistribution or the local energy level shift. Finally, we study the symmetrical and asymmetrical energy spectra of the double GQDs caused by the substrates supporting the two GQDs, clearly demonstrating how the substrates affect the double GQDs' spectrum. This research elucidates the energy spectra of the coupled double GQDs, as well as the mechanics of manipulating them by the electric field and the substrates, which would be a significant reference for designing GQD-based devices.

  20. Estimating Price Elasticity using Market-Level Appliance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, K. Sydny

    2015-08-04

    This report provides and update to and expansion upon our 2008 LBNL report “An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Appliances,” in which we estimated an average relative price elasticity of -0.34 for major household appliances (Dale and Fujita 2008). Consumer responsiveness to price change is a key component of energy efficiency policy analysis; these policies influence consumer purchases through price both explicitly and implicitly. However, few studies address appliance demand elasticity in the U.S. market and public data sources are generally insufficient for rigorous estimation. Therefore, analysts have relied on a small set of outdated papers focused on limited appliance types, assuming long-term elasticities estimated for other durables (e.g., vehicles) decades ago are applicable to current and future appliance purchasing behavior. We aim to partially rectify this problem in the context of appliance efficiency standards by revisiting our previous analysis, utilizing data released over the last ten years and identifying additional estimates of durable goods price elasticities in the literature. Reviewing the literature, we find the following ranges of market-level price elasticities: -0.14 to -0.42 for appliances; -0.30 to -1.28 for automobiles; -0.47 to -2.55 for other durable goods. Brand price elasticities are substantially higher for these product groups, with most estimates -2.0 or more elastic. Using market-level shipments, sales value, and efficiency level data for 1989-2009, we run various iterations of a log-log regression model, arriving at a recommended range of short run appliance price elasticity between -0.4 and -0.5, with a default value of -0.45.

  1. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Tamura, T.

    1986-09-01

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 ..mu..g/g, 49 ..mu..g/g, and 272 ..mu..g/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel.

  2. Dependence of Kambersky damping on Fermi level and spin orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, T.; Victora, R. H.

    2014-05-07

    Kambersky damping represents the loss of magnetic energy from the electrons to the lattice through the spin orbit interaction. It is demonstrated that, for bcc Fe-based transition metal alloys, the logarithm of the energy loss is proportional to the density of states at the Fermi level. Both inter and intraband damping are calculated for spins at arbitrary angle to the previously examined [001] direction. Although the easy axis 〈100〉 shows isotropic relaxation and achieves the minimum damping value of 0.002, other directions, such as 〈110〉, show substantial anisotropic damping.

  3. ANL-78-XX-95 Energy Level Structure and Transition Probabilities

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    j ANL-78-XX-95 Energy Level Structure and Transition Probabilities in the Spectra of the Trivalent Lanthanides in LaF- W. T. Carnal! Chemistry Division Argonne National Laboratory Hannah Crosswhite and H. M. Crosswhite Department of Physics The Johns Hopkins University - N O T I C E - Thi* report w u prepared u an account of work sponsored by the United Slates Covemment. Neither the United State* nor ih* United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, nor *ny of their

  4. Mixing Processes in High-Level Waste Tanks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C. Berkeley Proposal to DOE/OER (1) Project ID: 54656 Mixing Processes in High-Level Waste Tanks Per F. Peterson Professor Department of Nuclear Engineering University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 DOE/EM Contract: FDDE-FG07-96ER14731-09/99 Annual Progress Report For the Period: Sept. 15, 1998 - Sept. 14, 1999 to: Mark Gilbertson, EM-52 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Science and Risk Policy 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585

  5. Computing NLTE Opacities -- Node Level Parallel Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holladay, Daniel

    2015-09-11

    Presentation. The goal: to produce a robust library capable of computing reasonably accurate opacities inline with the assumption of LTE relaxed (non-LTE). Near term: demonstrate acceleration of non-LTE opacity computation. Far term (if funded): connect to application codes with in-line capability and compute opacities. Study science problems. Use efficient algorithms that expose many levels of parallelism and utilize good memory access patterns for use on advanced architectures. Portability to multiple types of hardware including multicore processors, manycore processors such as KNL, GPUs, etc. Easily coupled to radiation hydrodynamics and thermal radiative transfer codes.

  6. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 562.6 4.7 2.4 50-99 673.1 5.1 2.4 100-249 1,072.8 6.5 3.0 250-499 1,564.3

  7. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Employment Size Under 50 625.5 3.3 1.7 50-99 882.3 5.8 2.5 100-249 1,114.9 5.8 2.5 250-499 2,250.4

  8. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Combustible NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 183 0 105 38 Q 0 W 8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 36 0 Q 13 W 0 0 6 311221 Wet Corn Milling W 0 0 0 0 0 0 W 31131 Sugar

  9. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 14,128 14,113 326 1,462 11,395 2,920 67 13 1,240 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 580 15 174 445 269 35 0 148 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 47 W 17

  10. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.4 Number of Establishments by Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any Combustible NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 592 W Q Q Q 0 0 345 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 85 0 W 15 Q 0 0 57 311221 Wet Corn Milling 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 31131 Sugar

  11. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.4 Number of Establishments by Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,416 10,373 4,039 64 7 1,538 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 204 489 268 30 0 140 311221 Wet Corn Milling 59 59 W 28

  12. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.4 Number of Establishments by Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Any NAICS Energy Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Source(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Natural Gas(e) NGL(f) Coal and Breeze Other(g) Total United States 311 Food 13,269 13,265 144 2,413 10,373 4,039 64 W 1,496 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 602 602 9 201 489 268 30 0 137 311221 Wet Corn

  13. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 67 21 49 W 19 10 W W W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 35 7 29 W 7 3 0 W W 311221 Wet Corn Milling 18 4 17 0 4 W 0 W

  14. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 2,920 325 1,945 171 174 25 W 0 0 15 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 269 36 152 Q Q W W 0 0 W

  15. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Natural Gas(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 11,395 1,830 6,388 484 499 245 Q 555 0 203 3112

  16. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Residual Fuel Oil(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 326 178 23 0 150 Q 0 Q 0 W 3112 Grain and

  17. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Receipts(d) Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 14,109 708 8,259 384 162 0 Q 105 0 84 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 27 472 3 Q 0 W W 0 W 311221 Wet

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Residual and Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,462 276 900 Q 217 8 0 25 0 16 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 174 10 131 W 4 W 0 W 0 W 311221

  19. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Coal(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 64 19 54 0 17 6 W W W 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 30 13 24 0 12 W 0 W W 311221 Wet

  20. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming LPG(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 4,039 600 2,860 356 221 Q W 0 0 16 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling

  1. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Natural Gas(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Natural Gas(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 10,373 1,667

  2. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry with Electricity Receipts(d Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 13,265 765 11,829 482 292 Q Q 51 Q Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed

  3. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Distillate Fuel Oil(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 2,416 221 2,115 82 160 Q 0 Q 0 30 3112 Grain and

  4. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 330.6 3.6 2.0 20-49 550.0 4.5 2.2

  5. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Economic Characteristic(b) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 405.4 4.0 2.1 20-49 631.3 4.7 2.2

  6. Low-Level Waste Overview of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. T. Carilli; M. G. Skougard; S. K. Krenzien; J.K Wrapp; C. Ramirez; V. Yucel; G.J. Shott; S.J. Gordon; K.C. Enockson; L.T. Desotell

    2008-02-01

    This paper provides an overview and the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the Nevada Test Site. Operational changes have been implemented, such as larger trench sizes and more efficient soil management as have administrative processes to address U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Code of Federal Regulation analyses. Some adverse conditions have prompted changes in transportation and mixed low-level waste polices, and a new funding mechanism was developed. This year has seen many changes to the Nevada Test Site disposal family.

  7. Systems and methods for displaying data in split dimension levels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2015-07-28

    Systems and methods for displaying data in split dimension levels are disclosed. In some implementations, a method includes: at a computer, obtaining a dimensional hierarchy associated with a dataset, wherein the dimensional hierarchy includes at least one dimension and a sub-dimension of the at least one dimension; and populating information representing data included in the dataset into a visual table having a first axis and a second axis, wherein the first axis corresponds to the at least one dimension and the second axis corresponds to the sub-dimension of the at least one dimension.

  8. A geometric level set model for ultrasounds analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarti, A.; Malladi, R.

    1999-10-01

    We propose a partial differential equation (PDE) for filtering and segmentation of echocardiographic images based on a geometric-driven scheme. The method allows edge-preserving image smoothing and a semi-automatic segmentation of the heart chambers, that regularizes the shapes and improves edge fidelity especially in presence of distinct gaps in the edge map as is common in ultrasound imagery. A numerical scheme for solving the proposed PDE is borrowed from level set methods. Results on human in vivo acquired 2D, 2D+time,3D, 3D+time echocardiographic images are shown.

  9. 2013 Technical Conference: Center for Atomic-level Catalyst Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Conference: Center for Atomic-level Catalyst Design Oct. 21-23, 2013 Louisiana State University, Lod Cook Alumni Center, Baton Rouge, LA Contact: Ellen Stevens; 1-225-578-0058; esteve2@lsu.edu Mon Oct. 21: arrive 6:00 pm: Dinner (provided in Abell room), set up posters Tues Oct 22: 8:00 am: (a) Breakfast (provided in hotel for those staying at the Lod Cook hotel; continental breakfast provided in Abell Room) (b) set up posters (c) speakers load presentations 8:45 am: Jerry Spivey

  10. Extreme nonlinear optics of two-level systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tritschler, T.; Muecke, O. D.; Wegener, M.

    2003-09-01

    For Rabi frequencies comparable to, or even larger than, the transition frequency of a two-level system, the regime of extreme nonlinear optics is reached. Here, we give an overview of the radiated light intensity as a function of carrier frequency of light, transition frequency, Rabi frequency, spectrometer frequency, as well as of the shape and duration of the exciting optical pulses. The graphical representations reveal an amazing complexity and beauty of the nonlinear optical response. Analytical results within the ''square-wave approximation'' qualitatively reproduce many of the intricate features of the exact numerical calculations.

  11. Market Designs for High Levels of Variable Generation: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Market Designs for High Levels of Variable Generation Preprint M. Milligan, 1 H. Holttinen, 2 J. Kiviluoma, 2 A. Orths, 3 M. Lynch, 4 and L. Söder 5 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland 3 Energinet 4 University College Dublin 5 KTH Presented at the IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting National Harbor, Maryland July 27-31, 2014 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5D00-62280 October 2014 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of

  12. Microsoft Word - FINAL news release EOC Level 1 activation - weather

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activated on Limited Basis CARLSBAD, N.M., 12/29/2015 1:26 PM (MT) - At approximately, 9 a.m. Mountain Time, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) announced a Level 1 activation to support coordination of resources needed to safely restore normal operations at WIPP due to the recent severe snow storm in southeast New Mexico. The icy and snow packed road conditions have made road conditions difficult for the workforce to commute to the WIPP site. Resources are

  13. Market Designs for High Levels of Variable Generation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Orths, A.; Lynch, M.; Soder, L.

    2014-10-01

    Variable renewable generation is increasing in penetration in modern power systems, leading to higher variability in the supply and price of electricity as well as lower average spot prices. This raises new challenges, particularly in ensuring sufficient capacity and flexibility from conventional technologies. Because the fixed costs and lifetimes of electricity generation investments are significant, designing markets and regulations that ensure the efficient integration of renewable generation is a significant challenge. This papers reviews the state of play of market designs for high levels of variable generation in the United States and Europe and considers new developments in both regions.

  14. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  15. System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, Richard G.; Blasewitz, Albert G.

    1982-01-01

    An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

  16. Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy C.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

  17. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcclure, Patrick Ray; Poston, David Irvin; Dasari, Venkateswara Rao; Reid, Robert Stowers

    2015-11-12

    An important niche for nuclear energy is the need for power at remote locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. Nuclear energy has potential applications at strategic defense locations, theaters of battle, remote communities, and emergency locations. With proper safeguards, a 1 to 10-MWe (megawatt electric) mobile reactor system could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term power in any environment. Heat pipe-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactors have been identified as a candidate for these applications. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than “traditional” reactors. The goal of this project was to develop a scalable conceptual design for a compact reactor and to identify scaling issues for compact heat pipe cooled reactors in general. Toward this goal two detailed concepts were developed, the first concept with more conventional materials and a power of about 2 MWe and a the second concept with less conventional materials and a power level of about 5 MWe. A series of more qualitative advanced designs were developed (with less detail) that show power levels can be pushed to approximately 30 MWe.

  18. Hyundai Avante LPi hybrid level 1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2012-02-07

    In collaboration with the Korea Automotive Technology Institute (KATECH), the Korean market only Hyundai Avante LPi Hybrid was purchased and imported to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for vehicle-level testing. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. To assess the impacts of more aggressive driving, the LA92 cycle and a UDDS scaled by a factor 1.2x cycles were also included in the testing plan. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the Avante LPi Hybrid and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design. Figure 1 shows the test vehicle in Argonne's soak room.

  19. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  20. Treatment options for low-level radiologically contaminated ORNL filtercake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hom-Ti; Bostick, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    Water softening sludge (>4000 stored low level contaminated drums; 600 drums per year) generated by the ORNL Process Waste Treatment Plant must be treated, stabilized, and placed in safe storage/disposal. The sludge is primarily CaCO{sub 3} and is contaminated by low levels of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs. In this study, microwave sintering and calcination were evaluated for treating the sludge. The microwave melting experiments showed promise: volume reductions were significant (3-5X), and the waste form was durable with glass additives (LiOH, fly ash). A commercial vendor using surrogate has demonstrated a melt mineralization process that yields a dense monolithic waste form with a volume reduction factor (VR) of 7.7. Calcination of the sludge at 850-900 C yielded a VR of 2.5. Compaction at 4500 psi increased the VR to 4.2, but the compressed form is not dimensionally stable. Addition of paraffin helped consolidate fines and yielded a VR of 3.5. In conclusion, microwave melting or another form of vitrification is likely to be the best method; however for immediate implementation, the calculation/compaction/waxing process is viable.

  1. Instruction-level performance modeling and characterization of multimedia applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Cameron, K.W.

    1999-06-01

    One of the challenges for characterizing and modeling realistic multimedia applications is the lack of access to source codes. On-chip performance counters effectively resolve this problem by monitoring run-time behaviors at the instruction-level. This paper presents a novel technique of characterizing and modeling workloads at the instruction level for realistic multimedia applications using hardware performance counters. A variety of instruction counts are collected from some multimedia applications, such as RealPlayer, GSM Vocoder, MPEG encoder/decoder, and speech synthesizer. These instruction counts can be used to form a set of abstract characteristic parameters directly related to a processor`s architectural features. Based on microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. The biggest advantage of this new characterization technique is a better understanding of processor utilization efficiency and architectural bottleneck for each application. This technique also provides predictive insight of future architectural enhancements and their affect on current codes. In this paper the authors also attempt to model architectural effect on processor utilization without memory influence. They derive formulas for calculating CPI{sub 0}, CPI without memory effect, and they quantify utilization of architectural parameters. These equations are architecturally diagnostic and predictive in nature. Results provide promise in code characterization, and empirical/analytical modeling.

  2. Steam reforming of low-level mixed waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    ThermoChem has successfully designed, fabricated and operated a nominal 90 pound per hour Process Development Unit (PDU) on various low-level mixed waste surrogates. The design, construction, and testing of the PDU as well as performance and economic projections for a 300-lb/hr demonstration and commercial system are described. The overall system offers an environmentally safe, non-incinerating, cost-effective, and publicly acceptable method of processing LLMW. The steam-reforming technology was ranked the No. 1 non-incineration technology for destruction of hazardous organic wastes in a study commissioned by the Mixed Waste Focus Area and published in April 1997. The ThermoChem steam-reforming system has been developed over the last 13 years culminating in this successful test campaign on LLMW surrogates. Six surrogates were successfully tested including a 750-hour test on material simulating a PCB- and Uranium-contaminated solid waste found at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The test results indicated essentially total (> 99.9999%) destruction of RCRA and TSCA hazardous halogenated organics, significant levels of volume reduction (> 400 to 1), and retention of radionuclides in the volume-reduced solids. Economic evaluations have shown the steam-reforming system to be very cost competitive with more conventional and other emerging technologies.

  3. Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2011-03-22

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  4. Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-23

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  5. Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Pacheco, James E.

    2014-08-08

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annualmore » thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.« less

  6. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Wong, P.B. (Bechtel National, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  7. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wong, P.B. [Bechtel National, Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 {times} 100 {times} 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10{sup {minus}8}, 10{sup {minus}12} and 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 2}/sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr{sup +6} to Cr{sup +3} and Tc{sup +7} to Tc{sup +4} and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site.

  8. Vulnerability of the US to future sea level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); White, T.W.; Cushman, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The differential vulnerability of the conterminous United States to future sea level rise from greenhouse climate warming is assessed, using a coastal hazards data base. This data contains information on seven variables relating to inundation and erosion risks. High risk shorelines are characterized by low relief, erodible substrate, subsidence, shoreline retreat, and high wave/tide energies. Very high risk shorelines on the Atlantic Coast (Coastal Vulnerability Index {ge}33.0) include the outer coast of the Delmarva Peninsula, northern Cape Hatteras, and segments of New Jersey, Georgia and South Carolina. Louisiana and sections of Texas are potentially the most vulnerable, due to anomalously high relative sea level rise and erosion, coupled with low elevation and mobile sediments. Although the Pacific Coast is generally the least vulnerable, because of its rugged relief and erosion-resistant substrate, the high geographic variability leads to several exceptions, such as the San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta area, the barrier beaches of Oregon and Washington, and parts of the Puget Sound Lowlands. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Multi-Level Bitmap Indexes for Flash Memory Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Madduri, Kamesh; Canon, Shane

    2010-07-23

    Due to their low access latency, high read speed, and power-efficient operation, flash memory storage devices are rapidly emerging as an attractive alternative to traditional magnetic storage devices. However, tests show that the most efficient indexing methods are not able to take advantage of the flash memory storage devices. In this paper, we present a set of multi-level bitmap indexes that can effectively take advantage of flash storage devices. These indexing methods use coarsely binned indexes to answer queries approximately, and then use finely binned indexes to refine the answers. Our new methods read significantly lower volumes of data at the expense of an increased disk access count, thus taking full advantage of the improved read speed and low access latency of flash devices. To demonstrate the advantage of these new indexes, we measure their performance on a number of storage systems using a standard data warehousing benchmark called the Set Query Benchmark. We observe that multi-level strategies on flash drives are up to 3 times faster than traditional indexing strategies on magnetic disk drives.

  10. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telisman, Spomenka Colak, Bozo; Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna; Cvitkovic, Petar

    2007-10-15

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  11. Final Report on HOLODEC 2 Technology Readiness Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, RA; Spuler, SM; Beals, M; Black, N; Fugal, JP; Lu, L

    2012-06-18

    During the period of this project, the Holographic Detector for Clouds 2 (HOLODEC 2) instrument has advanced from a laboratory-proven instrument with some initial field testing to a fully flight-tested instrument capable of providing useful cloud microphysics measurements. This can be summarized as 'Technology Readiness Level 8: Technology is proven to work - Actual technology completed and qualified through test and demonstration.' As part of this project, improvements and upgrades have been made to the optical system, the instrument power control system, the data acquisition computer, the instrument control software, the data reconstruction and analysis software, and some of the basic algorithms for estimating basic microphysical variables like droplet diameter. Near the end of the project, the instrument flew on several research flights as part of the IDEAS 2011 project, and a small sample of data from the project is included as an example. There is one caveat in the technology readiness level stated above: the upgrades to the instrument power system were made after the flight testing, so they are not fully field proven. We anticipate that there will be an opportunity to fly the instrument as part of the IDEAS project in fall 2012.

  12. Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by SSEB in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste Issues. In addition. this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  13. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages sew be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  14. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  15. Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Pacheco, James E.

    2014-08-08

    A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

  16. Seventh annual DOE LLWMP participants' information meeting. DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The following sessions were held: International Low-Level Waste Management Activities; Low-Level Waste Disposal; Characteristics and Treatment of Low-Level Waste; Environmental Monitoring and Performance; Greater Confinement and Alternative Disposal Methods; Low-Level Waste Management; Corrective Measures; Performance Prediction and Assessment; and Siting New Defense and Commercial Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities.

  17. AVTA: Blink AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Blink AC Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon Blink AC Level 2 - February 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Clipper Creek AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results

  18. Development of the Multi-Level Seismic Receiver (MLSR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleefe, G.E.; Engler, B.P.; Drozda, P.M.; Franco, R.J.; Morgan, J.

    1995-02-01

    The Advanced Geophysical Technology Department (6114) and the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in conjunction with the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership, developed a Multi-Level Seismic Receiver (MLSR) for use in crosswell seismic surveys. The MLSR was designed and evaluated with the significant support of many industry partners in the oil exploration industry. The unit was designed to record and process superior quality seismic data operating in severe borehole environments, including high temperature (up to 200{degrees}C) and static pressure (10,000 psi). This development has utilized state-of-the-art technology in transducers, data acquisition, and real-time data communication and data processing. The mechanical design of the receiver has been carefully modeled and evaluated to insure excellent signal coupling into the receiver.

  19. Likely social impacts of proposed national-level policy initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piernot, C.A.; Rothweiler, M.A.; Levine, A.; Crews, R.

    1981-03-01

    The results are described of an investigation of likely social effects of enacting nine proposed national-level policy initiatives to accelerate development and use of solar energy. This study is part of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems (TASE) project supported by the US Department of Energy. The report presents general social impact information about the variety of ways in which the American people could be affected by enactment of these initiatives. It identifies the effects of each initiative on individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and society as a whole. In addition, it provides a framework for organizing a myriad of impact information into a set of conceptually exclusive impact categories. It illustrates that social impacts means effects on people as individuals, groups, organizations, and communities as well as on the infrastructure of society. Finally, it demonstrates the importance of specifying an audience of impact with a case example from the residential rental market.

  20. Parametric Multi-Level Tiling of Imperfectly Nested Loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartono, Albert; Baskaran, Muthu M.; Bastoul, Cedric; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Norris, Boyana; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-05-18

    Tiling is a critical loop transformation for generating high-performance code on modern architectures. Efficient generation of multilevel tiled code is essential to exploit several levels of parallelism and/or to maximize data reuse in deep memory hierarchies. Tiled loops with parameterized tile sizes (not compile time constants) facilitate runtime feedback and dynamic optimizations used in iterative compilation and automatic tuning. The existing parametric multilevel tiling approach has focused on transformation for perfectly nested loops, where all assignment statements are contained inside the innermost loop of a loop nest. Previous solutions to tiling for imperfect loop nests are limited to the case where tile sizes are fixed. In this paper, we present an approach to parameterized multilevel tiling for imperfectly nested loops. Our tiling algorithm generates loops that iterate over full rectangular tiles that are amenable for potential compiler optimizations such as register tiling. Experimental results using a number of computational benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our tiling approach.

  1. Systems-Level Synthetic Biology for Advanced Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffing, Anne; Jensen, Travis J.; Strickland, Lucas Marshall; Meserole, Stephen; Tallant, David

    2015-03-01

    Cyanobacteria have been shown to be capable of producing a variety of advanced biofuels; however, product yields remain well below those necessary for large scale production. New genetic tools and high throughput metabolic engineering techniques are needed to optimize cyanobacterial metabolisms for enhanced biofuel production. Towards this goal, this project advances the development of a multiple promoter replacement technique for systems-level optimization of gene expression in a model cyanobacterial host: Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. To realize this multiple-target approach, key capabilities were developed, including a high throughput detection method for advanced biofuels, enhanced transformation efficiency, and genetic tools for Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Moreover, several additional obstacles were identified for realization of this multiple promoter replacement technique. The techniques and tools developed in this project will help to enable future efforts in the advancement of cyanobacterial biofuels.

  2. Calculates Neutron Production in Canisters of High-level Waste

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-15

    ALPHN calculates the (alpha,n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the (alpha,n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The (alpha,n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass andmore » do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister.« less

  3. Elevated tritium levels at the World Trade Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semkow, Thomas M.; Hafner, Ronald S.; Parekh, Pravin P.; Wozniak, Gordon J.; Haines, Douglas K.; Husain, Liaquat; Rabun, Robert L.; Williams, Philip G.

    2002-05-14

    Traces of tritiated water (HTO) were detected at [the]World Trade Center (WTC) ground zero after the 9/11/01 terrorist attack. A method of ultralow-background liquid scintillation counting was used after distilling HTO from the samples. A water sample from the WTC sewer, collected on 9/13/01, contained 0.174 plus or minus 0.074 (2s) nCi/L of HTO. A split water sample, collected on 9/21/01 from the basement of WTC Building 6, contained 3.53 plus or minus 0.17 and 2.83 plus or minus 0.15 nCi/L, respectively. Several water and vegetation samples were analyzed from areas outside the ground zero, located in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and Kensico Reservoir. No HTO above the background was found in those samples. All these results are well below the levels of concern to human exposure.

  4. FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES: SYSTEM-LEVEL AND CRITICALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L. McGregor

    2000-12-20

    The primary purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to identify and document the screening analyses for the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that do not easily fit into the existing Process Model Report (PMR) structure. These FEPs include the 3 1 FEPs designated as System-Level Primary FEPs and the 22 FEPs designated as Criticality Primary FEPs. A list of these FEPs is provided in Section 1.1. This AMR (AN-WIS-MD-000019) documents the Screening Decision and Regulatory Basis, Screening Argument, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Disposition for each of the subject Primary FEPs. This AMR provides screening information and decisions for the TSPA-SR report and provides the same information for incorporation into a project-specific FEPs database. This AMR may also assist reviewers during the licensing-review process.

  5. Application of decontamination and melting of low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, D.W.; Hall, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the range of plant, equipment, and techniques developed by British Nuclear Fuels plc at their Capenhurst site to minimize land burial, environmental impact, and recycling of metals. This large nuclear processing facility in the United Kingdom yielded more than 160000 t of suspect surface contaminated material. By the time the project is finally completed at the end of 1996, {approx}99.5% of the contaminated material will have been safely and cost-effectively treated so that it can be recycled for use in a nonnuclear environment. The remaining material as well as minimal quantities of secondary wastes arising from decontamination activities will have been size reduced and/or encapsulated to maximize the cost-effective use of the U.K. low-level-waste burial facility.

  6. Low-level radioactive waste form qualification testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohal, M.S.; Akers, D.W.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes activities that have already been completed as well as yet to be performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to develop a plan to quantify the behavior of radioactive low-level waste forms. It briefly describes the status of various tasks, including DOE approval of the proposed work, several regulatory and environmental related documents, tests to qualify the waste form, preliminary schedule, and approximate cost. It is anticipated that INEEL and Brookhaven National Laboratory will perform the majority of the tests. For some tests, services of other testing organizations may be used. It should take approximately nine months to provide the final report on the results of tests on a waste form prepared for qualification. It is anticipated that the overall cost of the waste quantifying service is approximately $150,000. The following tests are planned: compression, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation, leaching, immersion, free-standing liquid tests, and full-scale testing.

  7. Bi-level microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2004-01-06

    A package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The integral window is bonded directly to the package without having a separate layer of adhesive material disposed in-between the window and the package. The device can be a semiconductor chip, CCD chip, CMOS chip, VCSEL chip, laser diode, MEMS device, or IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a LTCC or HTCC cofired ceramic material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined to the package during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The package has at least two levels of circuits for making electrical interconnections to a pair of microelectronic devices. The result is a compact, low-profile package having an integral window that is hermetically sealed to the package prior to mounting and interconnecting the microelectronic device(s).

  8. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  9. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  10. High-level waste tank farm set point document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-15

    Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The setpoint document will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DPSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  11. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  12. Ontological leveling and elicitation for complex industrial transactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, L.R.; Goldsmith, S.Y.; Spires, S.V.

    1998-11-01

    The authors present an agent-oriented mechanism that uses a central ontology as a means to conduct complex distributed transactions. This is done by instantiating a template object motivated solely by the ontology, then automatically and explicitly linking each temple element to an independently constructed interface component. Validation information is attached directly to the links so that the agent need not know a priori the semantics of data validity, merely how to execute a general validation process to satisfy the conditions given in the link. Ontological leveling is critical: all terms presented to informants must be semantically coherent within the central ontology. To illustrate this approach in an industrial setting, they discuss an existing implementation that conducted international commercial transactions on the World-Wide Web. Agents operating within a federated architecture construct, populate by Web-based elicitation, and manipulate a distributed composite transaction object to effect transport of goods over the US/Mexico border.

  13. Determining the appropriate scope: Assessing at the ecosystem level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southerland, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Traditional approaches to determining the scope of environmental impact assessment have been based on an ad hoc selection of issues by the project proponent and other interested parties. Resulting in an inadequate consideration of both cumulative effects and impacts on biodiversity. Although public involvement in scoping the assessment must by resource-oriented, rather than activity-oriented, the appropriate scope of environmental impact assessment is the ecosystem. Drawing from the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) guidance on the consideration of biodiversity under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the growing consensus on principles of ecosystem management, scoping should begin with the large-scale ecosystem focusing on essential components potentially affected by the project to determine the appropriate bounds for the study. Although the science of analyzing ecosystems has many limitation, progress in improving environmental impact assessment can be made at any of the three increasingly difficult steps in assessing at the ecosystem level: (1) The first step involves bounding the assessment within the regional context to address cumulative effects and biodiversity. The adoption of a landscape scale has proven to be the most effective solution to the problems of setting boundaries for study units in time and space that do not omit important sources, endpoints (indicators), or processes. (2) The second step involves the use of higher-level indicators to characterize biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. Useful measures include community indices of biological integrity and landscape parameters such as habitat composition and fragmentation. (3) The third step involves identifying ecosystem thresholds (i.e., carrying capacities) to analyze the significance of cumulative impacts. Trends analysis can help identify potential threshold effects when process models are not available.

  14. The atomic level journey from aqueous polyoxometalate to metal oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Yu; Fast, Dylan B.; Ruther, Rose E.; Amador, Jenn M.; Fullmer, Lauren B.; Decker, Shawn R.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Dolgos, Michelle R. Nyman, May

    2015-01-15

    Aqueous precursors tailored for the deposition of thin film materials are desirable for sustainable, simple, low energy production of advanced materials. Yet the simple practice of using aqueous precursors is complicated by the multitude of interactions that occur between ions and water during dehydration. Here we use lithium polyoxoniobate salts to investigate the fundamental interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to oxide film. Small-angle X-ray scattering of solutions, total X-ray scattering of intermediate gels, and morphological and structural characterization of the lithium niobate thin films reveal the atomic level transitions between these states. The studies show that (1) lithium–[H{sub 2}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 6−} has drastically different solution behaviour than lithium–[Nb{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 8−}, linked to the precursor salt structure (2) in both compositions, the intermediate gel preserves the polyoxoniobate clusters and show similar local order and (3) the morphology and phases of deposited films reflect the ions behaviour throughout the journey from cluster solution to metal oxide. - Graphical abstract: Aqueous lithium polyoxoniobate salts were used to prepare lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) thin films. Fundamental studies were performed to investigate the interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to the oxide film. It was found that acid–base and ion-association chemistries of the aqueous and gel systems significantly affect the key processes in this atom-level journey. - Highlights: • Lithium polyoxoniobate clusters were synthesized with control over Li:Nb ratio as precursors for LiNbO{sub 3} films. • X-ray scattering studies in solution and the solid-state revealed differences controlled by Li:Nb ratio. • Film deposition studies revealed phase, composition and morphology is controlled by Li:Nb ratio. • Cluster to film transformation was revealed using total X-ray scattering and TGA.

  15. Optimising the Performance of the Low Level Waste Repository - 12144

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, Amy; Baker, Andrew; Cummings, Richard; Shevelan, John; Sumerling, Trevor

    2012-07-01

    The Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) is the United Kingdom's principal facility for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW). The LLWR made a major submission to its environmental regulator (the Environment Agency) on 1 May 2011, the LLWR's 2011 Environmental Safety Case (ESC). One of the key regulatory requirements is that all aspects of the construction, operation and closure of the disposal facility should be optimised. An optimised Site Development Plan for the repository was developed and produced as part of the ESC. The Site Development Plan covers all aspects of the construction, operation and closure of the disposal facility. This includes the management of past and future disposals, emplacement strategies, design of the disposal vaults, and the closure engineering for the site. The Site Development Plan also covers the period of active institutional control, when disposals at the site have ceased, but it is still under active management, and plans for the long-term sustainable use of the site. We have a practical approach to optimisation based on recorded judgements and realistic assessments of practicable options framed within the demands of UK policy for LLW management and the characteristics the LLWR site and existing elements of the facility. The final performance assessments undertaken for the ESC were based on the Site Development Plan. The ESC will be used as a tool to inform future decision-making concerning the repository design, operation and the acceptance of wastes, as set out in the evolving Site Development Plan. Maintaining the ESC is thus essential to ensure that the Site Development Plan takes account of an up-to-date understanding and analysis of environmental performance, and that the Plan continues to be optimised. (authors)

  16. Scandium resonant impurity level in PbTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skipetrov, E. P. Skipetrova, L. A.; Knotko, A. V.; Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E.

    2014-04-07

    We synthesize a scandium-doped PbTe single-crystal ingot and investigate the phase and the elemental composition as well as galvanomagnetic properties of Pb{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}Te alloys in weak magnetic fields (4.2?K???T???300?K, B???0.07?T) upon varying the scandium content (y???0.02). We find that all investigated samples are single-phase and n-type. The distribution of scandium impurities along the axis of the ingot is estimated to be exponential. An increase of scandium impurity content leads to a monotonous growth of the free electron concentration by four orders of magnitude (approximately from 10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?3} to 10{sup 20}?cm{sup ?3}). In heavily doped alloys (y?>?0.01), the free electron concentration at the liquid-helium temperature tends to saturation, indicating the pinning of the Fermi energy by the scandium resonant impurity level located on the background of the conduction band. Using the two-band Kane and six-band Dimmock dispersion relations for IV-VI semiconductors, dependences of the Fermi energy measured from the bottom of the conduction band E{sub c} on the scandium impurity content are calculated and the energy of the resonant scandium level is estimated to be E{sub Sc}???E{sub c}?+?280?meV. Diagrams of electronic structure rearrangement of Pb{sub 1-y}Sc{sub y}Te alloys upon doping are proposed.

  17. Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy High-Level Response to DOE ...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: New Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Certification Path, UL Meeting, and Mid-Level Blends Testing (August 2009) New Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Certification Path, UL Meeting, and Mid-Level Blends Testing (August 2009) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: New Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Certification Path, UL Meeting, and Mid-Level Blends Testing (August 2009) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: New Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Certification Path, UL Meeting, and

  19. Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses PDF icon Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility More Documents & Publications Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

  20. Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-12

    The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms (IPWF)) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as 'co-disposal'. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the disposal container inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be a barrier made of high-nickel alloy. The defense HLW disposal container interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and the internal waste by transferring heat from the canisters to the external environment and by protecting the canisters and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The disposal container also interfaces with the canisters by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents to the waste. A loaded and sealed disposal container (waste package) interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift waste package supports upon which the waste packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Canister Transfer System, Waste Emplacement /Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval for the disposal container/waste package.

  1. Level 1 Accident Report of the March 1, 2010 Bobcat Fatality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    at BPA's White Bluffs Substation Level 1 Accident Report of the March 1, 2010 Bobcat ... (BPA) Chief Safety Officer, a Level I Accident Investigation was convened to ...

  2. Energy level alignment of self-assembled linear chains of benzenediami...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy level alignment of self-assembled linear chains of benzenediamine on Au(111) from ... This content will become publicly available on March 24, 2017 Title: Energy level ...

  3. DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent ... level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a single repository or repositories. ...

  4. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at Landau Level Filling v=4/11...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at Landau Level Filling v411. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at Landau Level Filling v411. Abstract...

  5. Fault isolation through no-overhead link level CRC

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.

    2007-04-24

    A fault isolation technique for checking the accuracy of data packets transmitted between nodes of a parallel processor. An independent crc is kept of all data sent from one processor to another, and received from one processor to another. At the end of each checkpoint, the crcs are compared. If they do not match, there was an error. The crcs may be cleared and restarted at each checkpoint. In the preferred embodiment, the basic functionality is to calculate a CRC of all packet data that has been successfully transmitted across a given link. This CRC is done on both ends of the link, thereby allowing an independent check on all data believed to have been correctly transmitted. Preferably, all links have this CRC coverage, and the CRC used in this link level check is different from that used in the packet transfer protocol. This independent check, if successfully passed, virtually eliminates the possibility that any data errors were missed during the previous transfer period.

  6. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  7. Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, D.F.; Choi, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Slurry Fed Melters (SFM) are being developed in the United States, Europe and Japan for the conversion of high-level radioactive waste to borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The high transition metal, noble metal, nitrate, organic, and sulfate contents of these wastes lead to unique melter redox control requirements. Pilot waste-glass melter operations have indicated the possibility of nickel sulfide or noble-metal fission-product accumulation on melter floors, which can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, and decrease melter life. Sulfide formation is prevented by control of the redox chemistry of the melter feed. The redox state of waste-glass melters is determined by balance between the reducing potential of organic compounds in the feed, and the oxidizing potential of gases above the melt, and nitrates and polyvalent elements in the waste. Semiquantitative models predicting limitations of organic content have been developed based on crucible testing. Computerized thermodynamic computations are being developed to predict the sequence and products of redox reactions and is assessing process variations. Continuous melter test results have been compared to improved computer staged-thermodynamic-models of redox behavior. Feed chemistry control to prevent sulfide and moderate noble metal accumulations are discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Relationships Between Complex Core Level Spectra and Materials Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelin, Constance J.; Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Chambers, Scott A.; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-01

    The XPS of many oxides are quite complex and there may be several peaks of significant intensity for each subshell. These peaks arise from many-electron effects, which normally are treated with configuration interaction (CI) wavefunctions where static correlation effects are taken into account. It is common to use semiempirical methods to determine the matrix elements of the CI Hamiltonian and there are few rigorous CI calculations where parameters are not adjusted to fit experiment. In contrast, we present, in the present work, theoretical XPS spectra obtained with rigorous CI wavefunctions for CeO2 where the XPS are especially complex; several different core levels are studied. This study uses an embedded CeO8 cluster model to represent bulk CeO2 and the relativistic CI wavefunctions are determined using four-component spinors from Dirac-Fock calculations. In particular, we examine the importance of interatomic many-body effects where there is a transfer of electrons from occupied oxygen 2p orbitals into empty cation orbitals as it is common to ascribe the complex XPS to this effect. We also contrast the importance of many-body charge-transfer effects for the isoelectronic cations of Ce4+ and La3+. The long-range goal of this work is to relate the XPS features to the nature of the chemical bonding in CeO2 and we describe our progress toward this goal.

  9. Capacitance-level/density monitor for fluidized-bed combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.; Utt, Carroll E.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple segment three-terminal type capacitance probe with segment selection, capacitance detection and compensation circuitry and read-out control for level/density measurements in a fluidized-bed vessel is provided. The probe is driven at a high excitation frequency of up to 50 kHz to sense quadrature (capacitive) current related to probe/vessel capacitance while being relatively insensitive to the resistance current component. Compensation circuitry is provided for generating a negative current of equal magnitude to cancel out only the resistive component current. Clock-operated control circuitry separately selects the probe segments in a predetermined order for detecting and storing this capacitance measurement. The selected segment acts as a guarded electrode and is connected to the read-out circuitry while all unselected segments are connected to the probe body, which together form the probe guard electrode. The selected probe segment capacitance component signal is directed to a corresponding segment channel sample and hold circuit dedicated to that segment to store the signal derived from that segment. This provides parallel outputs for display, computer input, etc., for the detected capacitance values. The rate of segment sampling may be varied to either monitor the dynamic density profile of the bed (high sampling rate) or monitor average bed characteristics (slower sampling rate).

  10. Automatic Thread-Level Parallelization in the Chombo AMR Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christen, Matthias; Keen, Noel; Ligocki, Terry; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Van Straalen, Brian; Williams, Samuel

    2011-05-26

    The increasing on-chip parallelism has some substantial implications for HPC applications. Currently, hybrid programming models (typically MPI+OpenMP) are employed for mapping software to the hardware in order to leverage the hardware?s architectural features. In this paper, we present an approach that automatically introduces thread level parallelism into Chombo, a parallel adaptive mesh refinement framework for finite difference type PDE solvers. In Chombo, core algorithms are specified in the ChomboFortran, a macro language extension to F77 that is part of the Chombo framework. This domain-specific language forms an already used target language for an automatic migration of the large number of existing algorithms into a hybrid MPI+OpenMP implementation. It also provides access to the auto-tuning methodology that enables tuning certain aspects of an algorithm to hardware characteristics. Performance measurements are presented for a few of the most relevant kernels with respect to a specific application benchmark using this technique as well as benchmark results for the entire application. The kernel benchmarks show that, using auto-tuning, up to a factor of 11 in performance was gained with 4 threads with respect to the serial reference implementation.

  11. Hanford low-level waste process chemistry testing data package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.D.; Tracey, E.M.; Darab, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) among the State of Washington Department of Ecology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the cleanup of the Hanford Site was renegotiated. The revised agreement specifies vitrification as the encapsulation technology for low level waste (LLW). A demonstration, testing, and evaluation program underway at Westinghouse Hanford Company to identify the best overall melter-system technology available for vitrification of Hanford Site LLW to meet the TPA milestones. Phase I is a {open_quotes}proof of principle{close_quotes} test to demonstrate that a melter system can process a simulated highly alkaline, high nitrate/nitrite content aqueous LLW feed into a glass product of consistent quality. Seven melter vendors were selected for the Phase I evaluation: joule-heated melters from GTS Duratek, Incorporated (GDI); Envitco, Incorporated (EVI); Penberthy Electomelt, Incorporated (PEI); and Vectra Technologies, Incorporated (VTI); a gas-fired cyclone burner from Babcock & Wilcox (BCW); a plasma torch-fired, cupola furnace from Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC); and an electric arc furnace with top-entering vertical carbon electrodes from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM).

  12. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  13. Radionuclide release from low-level waste in field lysimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblath, S B

    1986-01-01

    A field program has been in operation for 8 years at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to determine the leaching/migration behavior of low-level radioactive waste using lysimeters. The lysimeters are soil-filled caissons containing well characterized wastes, with each lysimeter serving as a model of a shallow land burial trench. Sampling and analysis of percolate water and vegetation from the lysimeters provide a determination of the release rates of the radionuclides from the waste/soil system. Vegetative uptake appears to be a major pathway for migration. Fractional release rates from the waste/soil system are less than 0.01% per year. Waste-to-soil leach rates up to 10% per year have been determined by coring several of the lysimeters. The leaching of solidified wasteforms under unsaturated field conditions has agreed well with static, immersion leaching of the same type waste in the laboratory. However, releases from the waste/soil system in the lysimeter may be greater than predicted based on leaching alone, due to complexation of the radionuclides by other components leached from the wastes to form mobile, anionic species.

  14. Energy at the state and local level: an evolving perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the development and evolution of state and local energy programs during the 1970's. The origins of the federal government's relationship with state and local governments are traced and the implication of the new federal agenda for that relationship is explored. A major focus is on the disagreement between state and local officials over their respective roles and the effect of that disagreement on federal policy. The responsibilities of both state and local governments, if both choose to have an energy presence, are examined. Four energy functions are assessed: planning and implementation; transferring information; subsidized financial assistance; and regulation and standard-setting. The relative strengths and weaknesses of assigning responsibility for each to one level of government versus another are determined. Certain services are best handled by one government or the other. For certain functions, the potential societal benefits of increased cooperation and collaboration may be significant. Some of the existing models for such cooperation and collaboration are reviewed. Attempts to extract from these models those attributes which may be relevant to the design of future state and local programs are also reviewed. (MCW)

  15. Loss of pressurizer water level during station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to both the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed a requirement that all plants be capable of maintaining adequate core cooling during station blackout events lasting a specified duration. The NRC has also suggested acceptable specified durations of four or eight hours, depending on individual plant susceptibility to blackout events. In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the occurrence of a station blackout event results in the functional loss of many plant components, including main feedwater, reactor coolant pumps, the emergency core cooling system, and pressurizer heaters and spray. Nevertheless, PWRs have the capability of removing decay heat for some period of time using steam-driven auxiliary feedwater pumps and the natural-circulation capability of the primary system. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the early response of a PWR to station blackout conditions. In particular, the effect of primary coolant shrinkage and inventory loss on pressurizer level is examined to gain insight into the operational and analytical issues associated with the proposed station blackout coping requirement.

  16. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  17. Soil characterization methods for unsaturated low-level waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. . Dept. of Soil and Water Science); Gee, G.W.; Kincaid, C.T. ); Hills, R.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Nicholson, T.J.; Cady, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    To support a license application for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), applicants must characterize the unsaturated zone and demonstrate that waste will not migrate from the facility boundary. This document provides a strategy for developing this characterization plan. It describes principles of contaminant flow and transport, site characterization and monitoring strategies, and data management. It also discusses methods and practices that are currently used to monitor properties and conditions in the soil profile, how these properties influence water and waste migration, and why they are important to the license application. The methods part of the document is divided into sections on laboratory and field-based properties, then further subdivided into the description of methods for determining 18 physical, flow, and transport properties. Because of the availability of detailed procedures in many texts and journal articles, the reader is often directed for details to the available literature. References are made to experiments performed at the Las Cruces Trench site, New Mexico, that support LLW site characterization activities. A major contribution from the Las Cruces study is the experience gained in handling data sets for site characterization and the subsequent use of these data sets in modeling studies.

  18. Chronic exposure to environmental levels of tribromophenol impairs zebrafish reproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Jun [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Chunsheng; Yu Liqin [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhou Bingsheng, E-mail: bszhou@ihb.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP) is ubiquitously found in aquatic environments and biota. In this study, we exposed zebrafish embryos (F{sub 0}; 2'''' days post-fertilization, dpf) to environmental concentration (0.3 mug/L) and a higher concentration (3.0 mug/L) of TBP and assessed the impact of chronic exposure (120 dpf) on reproduction. TBP exposure did not cause a significant increase in the malformation and reduction in the survival in the F{sub 0}-generation fish. After TBP exposure, the plasma testosterone and estradiol levels significantly increased in males and decreased in females. The transcription of steroidogenic genes (3beta-HSD, 17beta-HSD, CYP17, CYP19A, CYP19B) was significantly upregulated in the brain and testes in males and downregulated in the brain and ovary in females. TBP exposure significantly downregulated and upregulated the expression of VTG in the liver of female and male fish, respectively. Meanwhile, TBP exposure altered the sex ratio toward a male-dominant state. The F{sub 1}-generation larvae exhibited increased malformation, reduced survival, and retarded growth, suggesting that TBP in the aquatic environment has significant adverse effects on fish population.

  19. Lighting system replacement brings energy costs down, light levels up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radmer, D.J.

    1984-11-08

    The R.J. Frisby Mfg. Co. operates on three shifts and produces precision screw machine products for a variety of industries, including automotive, marine, machine tool, hydraulics and pneumatics, business machines, electrical and electronics, photography, and precision instruments. The required degree of manufacturing precision demands high light levels in manufacturing areas. When the 100,000 sq ft plant was built in 1973, mercury vapor lighting was installed consistent with the current state of the art for lighting such facilities. In the ensuing years, it became apparent that the soaring electric bills that came in the wake of the Arab oil embargo of 1973-74 would have to be controlled. Estimates by the U.S. Department of Energy indicated that electric energy costs were likely to rise by 160 percent over the next 10 yr. Based on this estimate, and the fact that lighting accounted for $70,000, or half of the annual electric bill, it was estimated that $900,000 to $1,000,000 would be spent for lighting energy over the next decade. The concern over the probability of rapidly escalating electrical costs was soon justified when, in three steps over one 12 mo period, the electric energy rate increased from $0.0305/kwh to $0.0416/kwh -more than a 36 percent increase. During that same period, the demand charge was raised in two steps from $3.75/kw to $4.85/kw --more than a 29 percent increase.

  20. What futurecar MPG levels and technology will be necessary?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, P.; Steiner, E.; Singh, M.

    2002-03-04

    The potential peaking of world conventional oil production and the possible imperative to reduce carbon emissions will put great pressure on vehicle manufacturers to produce more efficient vehicles, on vehicle buyers to seek them out in the marketplace, and on energy suppliers to develop new fuels and delivery systems. Four cases for stabilizing or reducing light vehicle fuel use, oil use, and/or carbon emissions over the next 50 years are presented. Case 1--Improve mpg so that the fuel use in 2020 is stabilized for the next 30 years. Case 2--Improve mpg so that by 2030 the fuel use is reduced to the 2000 level and is reduced further in subsequent years. Case 3--Case 1 plus 50% ethanol use and 50% low-carbon fuel cell vehicles by 2050. Case 4--Case 2 plus 50% ethanol use and 50% low-carbon fuel cell vehicles by 2050. The mpg targets for new cars and light trucks require that significant advances be made in developing cost-effective and very efficient vehicle technologies. With the use of alternative fuels that are low in carbon, oil use and carbon emissions can be reduced even further.

  1. What future car MPG levels and technology will be necessary?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, P.; Steiner, E.; Singh, M.

    2002-03-04

    The potential peaking of world conventional oil production and the possible imperative to reduce carbon emissions will put great pressure on vehicle manufacturers to produce more efficient vehicles, on vehicle buyers to seek them out in the marketplace, and on energy suppliers to develop new fuels and delivery systems. Four cases for stabilizing or reducing light vehicle fuel use, oil use, and/or carbon emissions over the next 50 years are presented. Case 1--Improve mpg so that the fuel use in 2020 is stabilized for the next 30 years. Case 2--Improve mpg so that by 2030 the fuel use is reduced to the 2000 level and is reduced further in subsequent years. Case 3--Case 1 plus 50% ethanol use and 50% low-carbon fuel cell vehicles by 2050. Case 4--Case 2 plus 50% ethanol use and 50% low-carbon fuel cell vehicles by 2050. The mpg targets for new cars and light trucks require that significant advances be made in developing cost-effective and very efficient vehicle technologies. With the use of alternative fuels that are low in carbon, oil use and carbon emissions can be reduced even further.

  2. 324 Building radiochemical engineering cells, high-level vault, low-level vault, and associated areas closure plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J.M.

    1998-03-25

    The Hanford Site, located adjacent to and north of Richland, Washington, is operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The 324 Building is located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The 324 Building was constructed in the 1960s to support materials and chemical process research and development activities ranging from laboratory/bench-scale studies to full engineering-scale pilot plant demonstrations. In the mid-1990s, it was determined that dangerous waste and waste residues were being stored for greater than 90 days in the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and in the High-Level Vault/Low-Level Vault (HLV/LLV) tanks. [These areas are not Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) permitted portions of the 324 Building.] Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-89, agreement was reached to close the nonpermitted RCRA unit in the 324 Building. This closure plan, managed under TPA Milestone M-20-55, addresses the identified building areas targeted by the Tri-Party Agreement and provides commitments to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable, given the special technical difficulties of managing mixed waste that contains high-activity radioactive materials, and the physical limitations of working remotely in the areas within the subject closure unit. This closure plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1.0 provides the introduction, historical perspective, 324 Building history and current mission, and the regulatory basis and strategy for managing the closure unit. Chapters 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 discuss the detailed facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring respectively. Chapter 6.0 deals with the closure strategy and performance standard, including the closure activities for the B-Cell, D-Cell, HLV, LLV; piping and miscellaneous associated building areas. Chapter 7.0 addresses the closure activities identified in Chapter 6.0, and also adds information on closure activities for the soil directly beneath the unit, regulated material removed during closure, and the schedule for closure. Chapter 8.0 provides Surveillance, monitoring and post-closure information and Chapter 9.0 provides a list of references used throughout the document.

  3. Qualification of Innovative High Level Waste Pipeline Unplugging Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, D.; Gokaltun, S.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A.; Roelant, D.; Srivastava, R.

    2008-07-01

    In the past, some of the pipelines have plugged during high level waste (HLW) transfers resulting in schedule delays and increased costs. Furthermore, pipeline plugging has been cited by the 'best and brightest' technical review as one of the major issues that can result in unplanned outages at the Waste Treatment Plant causing inconsistent operation. As the DOE moves toward a more active high level waste retrieval, the site engineers will be faced with increasing cross-site pipeline waste slurry transfers that will result in increased probability of a pipeline getting plugged. Hence, availability of a pipeline unplugging tool/technology is crucial to ensure smooth operation of the waste transfers and in ensuring tank farm cleanup milestones are met. FIU had earlier tested and evaluated various unplugging technologies through an industry call. Based on mockup testing, two technologies were identified that could withstand the rigors of operation in a radioactive environment and with the ability to handle sharp 90 elbows. We present results of the second phase of detailed testing and evaluation of pipeline unplugging technologies and the objective is to qualify these pipeline unplugging technologies for subsequent deployment at a DOE facility. The current phase of testing and qualification comprises of a heavily instrumented 3-inch diameter (full-scale) pipeline facilitating extensive data acquisition for design optimization and performance evaluation, as it applies to three types of plugs atypical of the DOE HLW waste. Furthermore, the data from testing at three different lengths of pipe in conjunction with the physics of the process will assist in modeling the unplugging phenomenon that will then be used to scale-up process parameters and system variables for longer and site typical pipe lengths, which can extend as much as up to 19,000 ft. Detailed information resulting from the testing will provide the DOE end-user with sufficient data and understanding of the technology, and its limitations to aid in the benefit-cost analysis for management decision whether to deploy the technology or to abandon the pipeline as has been done in the past. In conclusion: The ultimate objective of this study is to qualify NuVision's unplugging technology for use at Hanford. Experimental testing has been conducted using three pipeline lengths and three types of blockages. Erosion rates have been obtained and pressure data is being analyzed. An amplification of the inlet pressure has been observed along the pipeline and is the key to determining up to what pipe lengths the technology can be used without surpassing the site pressure limit. In addition, we will attempt to establish what the expected unplugging rates will be at the longer pipe lengths for each of the three blockages tested. Detailed information resulting from the testing will provide the DOE end-user with sufficient data and understanding of the technology, and its limitations so that management decisions can be made whether the technology has a reasonable chance to successfully unplug a pipeline, such as a cross site transfer line or process transfer pipeline at the Waste Treatment Plant. (authors)

  4. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  5. HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2006-10-02

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

  6. Review of high-level waste form properties. [146 bibliographies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusin, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    This report is a review of waste form options for the immobilization of high-level-liquid wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. This review covers the status of international research and development on waste forms as of May 1979. Although the emphasis in this report is on waste form properties, process parameters are discussed where they may affect final waste form properties. A summary table is provided listing properties of various nuclear waste form options. It is concluded that proposed waste forms have properties falling within a relatively narrow range. In regard to crystalline versus glass waste forms, the conclusion is that either glass of crystalline materials can be shown to have some advantage when a single property is considered; however, at this date no single waste form offers optimum properties over the entire range of characteristics investigated. A long-term effort has been applied to the development of glass and calcine waste forms. Several additional waste forms have enough promise to warrant continued research and development to bring their state of development up to that of glass and calcine. Synthetic minerals, the multibarrier approach with coated particles in a metal matrix, and high pressure-high temperature ceramics offer potential advantages and need further study. Although this report discusses waste form properties, the total waste management system should be considered in the final selection of a waste form option. Canister design, canister materials, overpacks, engineered barriers, and repository characteristics, as well as the waste form, affect the overall performance of a waste management system. These parameters were not considered in this comparison.

  7. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  8. Application of EPA regulations to low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowerman, B.S.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    The survey reported here was conducted with the intent of identifying categories of low-level radioactive wastes which would be classified under EPA regulations 40 CFR Part 261 as hazardous due to the chemical properties of the waste. Three waste types are identified under these criteria as potential radioactive mixed wastes: wastes containing organic liquids; wastes containing lead metal; and wastes containing chromium. The survey also indicated that certain wastes, specific to particular generators, may also be radioactive mixed wastes. Ultimately, the responsibility for determining whether a facility's wastes are mixed wastes rest with the generator. However, the uncertainties as to which regulations are applicable, and the fact that no legal definition of mixed wastes exists, make such a determination difficult. In addition to identifying mixed wastes, appropriate methods for the management of mixed wastes must be defined. In an ongoing study, BNL is evaluating options for the management of mixed wastes. These options will include segregation, substitution, and treatments to reduce or eliminate chemical hazards associated with the wastes listed above. The impacts of the EPA regulations governing hazardous wastes on radioactive mixed waste cannot be assessed in detail until the applicability of these regulations is agreed upon. This issue is still being discussed by EPA and NRC and should be resolved in the near future. Areas of waste management which may affect generators of mixed wastes include: monitoring/tracking of wastes before shipment; chemical testing of wastes; permits for treatment of storage of wastes; and additional packaging requirements. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr

    1996-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented.

  10. Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

  11. International low level waste disposal practices and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, W.M.

    2011-12-19

    The safe management of nuclear waste arising from nuclear activities is an issue of great importance for the protection of human health and the environment now and in the future. The primary goal of this report is to identify the current situation and practices being utilized across the globe to manage and store low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The countries included in this report were selected based on their nuclear power capabilities and involvement in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report highlights the nuclear waste management laws and regulations, current disposal practices, and future plans for facilities of the selected international nuclear countries. For each country presented, background information and the history of nuclear facilities are also summarized to frame the country's nuclear activities and set stage for the management practices employed. The production of nuclear energy, including all the steps in the nuclear fuel cycle, results in the generation of radioactive waste. However, radioactive waste may also be generated by other activities such as medical, laboratory, research institution, or industrial use of radioisotopes and sealed radiation sources, defense and weapons programs, and processing (mostly large scale) of mineral ores or other materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides. Radioactive waste also arises from intervention activities, which are necessary after accidents or to remediate areas affected by past practices. The radioactive waste generated arises in a wide range of physical, chemical, and radiological forms. It may be solid, liquid, or gaseous. Levels of activity concentration can vary from extremely high, such as levels associated with spent fuel and residues from fuel reprocessing, to very low, for instance those associated with radioisotope applications. Equally broad is the spectrum of half-lives of the radionuclides contained in the waste. These differences result in an equally wide variety of options for the management of radioactive waste. There is a variety of alternatives for processing waste and for short term or long term storage prior to disposal. Likewise, there are various alternatives currently in use across the globe for the safe disposal of waste, ranging from near surface to geological disposal, depending on the specific classification of the waste. At present, there appears to be a clear and unequivocal understanding that each country is ethically and legally responsible for its own wastes, in accordance with the provisions of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Therefore the default position is that all nuclear wastes will be disposed of in each of the 40 or so countries concerned with nuclear power generation or part of the fuel cycle. To illustrate the global distribution of radioactive waste now and in the near future, Table 1 provides the regional breakdown, based on the UN classification of the world in regions illustrated in Figure 1, of nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction worldwide. In summary, 31 countries operate 433 plants, with a total capacity of more than 365 gigawatts of electrical energy (GW[e]). A further 65 units, totaling nearly 63 GW(e), are under construction across 15 of these nations. In addition, 65 countries are expressing new interest in, considering, or actively planning for nuclear power to help address growing energy demands to fuel economic growth and development, climate change concerns, and volatile fossil fuel prices. Of these 65 new countries, 21 are in Asia and the Pacific region, 21 are from the Africa region, 12 are in Europe (mostly Eastern Europe), and 11 in Central and South America. However, 31 of these 65 are not currently planning to build reactors, and 17 of those 31 have grids of less than 5 GW, which is said to be too small to accommodate most of the reactor designs available. For the remaining 34 countries actively planning reactors, as of September 2010: 14 indicate a strong intention to precede with introduction of nuclear power; 7 are preparing but haven't made a final decision, 10 have made a decision and are preparing infrastructure, 2 have ordered a new nuclear power plant, and 1 has a plant under construction. In all countries interested in pursuing nuclear power, it is necessary for the governments to create an environment for investment and advancement of nuclear power, including development of a professional and independent regulatory framework and regime, knowledge and refinement of skills in nuclear safety and control, definition of policies on nuclear waste management and decommissioning, and participation in international non-proliferation measures. Specifically related to radioactive waste management, nuclear facilities and industries that utilize radioactive material work to well-established safety standards for the management of their waste.

  12. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: Level density, level dynamics, thermal properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strnsk, Pavel; Macek, Michal; Cejnar, Pavel

    2014-06-15

    Quantum systems with a finite number of freedom degrees f develop robust singularities in the energy spectrum of excited states as the systems size increases to infinity. We analyze the general form of these singularities for low f, particularly f=2, clarifying the relation to classical stationary points of the corresponding potential. Signatures in the smoothed energy dependence of the quantum state density and in the flow of energy levels with an arbitrary control parameter are described along with the relevant thermodynamical consequences. The general analysis is illustrated with specific examples of excited-state singularities accompanying the first-order quantum phase transition. -- Highlights: ESQPTs found in infinite-size limit of systems with low numbers of freedom degrees f. ESQPTs related to non-analytical evolutions of classical phasespace properties. ESQPT signatures analyzed for general f, particularly f=2, extending known case f=1. ESQPT signatures identified in smoothened density and flow of energy spectrum. ESQPTs shown to induce a new type of thermodynamic anomalies.

  13. Fuel Performance Experiments on the Atomistic Level, Studying Fuel Through Engineered Single Crystal UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgett, Eric; Deo, Chaitanya; Phillpot, Simon

    2015-05-08

    Fuel Performance Experiments on the Atomistic Level, Studying Fuel Through Engineered Single Crystal UO2

  14. Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.; Rotunda, John R.

    1984-01-01

    An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

  15. Parallel Computation of the Topology of Level Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pascucci, V; Cole-McLaughlin, K

    2004-12-16

    This paper introduces two efficient algorithms that compute the Contour Tree of a 3D scalar field F and its augmented version with the Betti numbers of each isosurface. The Contour Tree is a fundamental data structure in scientific visualization that is used to preprocess the domain mesh to allow optimal computation of isosurfaces with minimal overhead storage. The Contour Tree can also be used to build user interfaces reporting the complete topological characterization of a scalar field, as shown in Figure 1. Data exploration time is reduced since the user understands the evolution of level set components with changing isovalue. The Augmented Contour Tree provides even more accurate information segmenting the range space of the scalar field in portion of invariant topology. The exploration time for a single isosurface is also improved since its genus is known in advance. Our first new algorithm augments any given Contour Tree with the Betti numbers of all possible corresponding isocontours in linear time with the size of the tree. Moreover we show how to extend the scheme introduced in [3] with the Betti number computation without increasing its complexity. Thus, we improve on the time complexity from our previous approach [10] from O(m log m) to O(n log n + m), where m is the number of cells and n is the number of vertices in the domain of F. Our second contribution is a new divide-and-conquer algorithm that computes the Augmented Contour Tree with improved efficiency. The approach computes the output Contour Tree by merging two intermediate Contour Trees and is independent of the interpolant. In this way we confine any knowledge regarding a specific interpolant to an independent function that computes the tree for a single cell. We have implemented this function for the trilinear interpolant and plan to replace it with higher order interpolants when needed. The time complexity is O(n + t log n), where t is the number of critical points of F. For the first time we can compute the Contour Tree in linear time in many practical cases where t = O(n{sup 1-{epsilon}}). We report the running times for a parallel implementation, showing good scalability with the number of processors.

  16. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

  17. New Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help Communities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assess Possible Impact of Sea Level Rise on Energy Assets | Department of Energy Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help Communities Assess Possible Impact of Sea Level Rise on Energy Assets New Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help Communities Assess Possible Impact of Sea Level Rise on Energy Assets October 10, 2014 - 5:09pm Addthis Alice Lippert Alice Lippert Senior Technical Advisor to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy Infrastructure

  18. AVTA: Leviton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy describes results from testing done on the Leviton Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon Leviton AC Level 2 - February 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results

  19. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2C 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here, the C 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm–1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, itmore » allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.« less

  20. Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gellman, Andrew John; Sholl, David S.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Zaera, Francisco

    2013-04-28

    Understanding and controlling selectivity is one of the key challenges in heterogeneous catalysis. Among problems in catalytic selectivity enantioselectivity is perhaps the most the most challenging. The primary goal of the project on Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts is to understand the origins of enantioselectivity on chiral heterogeneous surfaces and catalysts. The efforts of the project team include preparation of chiral surfaces, characterization of chiral surfaces, experimental detection of enantioselectivity on such surfaces and computational modeling of the interactions of chiral probe molecules with chiral surfaces. Over the course of the project period the team of PIs has made some of the most detailed and insightful studies of enantioselective chemistry on chiral surfaces. This includes the measurement of fundamental interactions and reaction mechanisms of chiral molecules on chiral surfaces and leads all the way to rationale design and synthesis of chiral surfaces and materials for enantioselective surface chemistry. The PIs have designed and prepared new materials for enantioselective adsorption and catalysis. Naturally Chiral Surfaces Completion of a systematic study of the enantiospecific desorption kinetics of R-3-methylcyclohexanone (R-3-MCHO) on 9 achiral and 7 enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces with orientations that span the stereographic triangle. Discovery of super-enantioselective tartaric acid (TA) and aspartic acid (Asp) decomposition as a result of a surface explosion mechanism on Cu(643)R&S. Systematic study of super-enantiospecific TA and Asp decomposition on five enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces. Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-propylene oxide (PO) from Cu(100) imprinted with {3,1,17} facets by L-lysine adsorption. Templated Chiral Surfaces Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-PO from Pt(111) and Pd(111) modified by a variety of chiral templates. Demonstrated enantioselective separation of racemic PO on chemically synthesized chiral gold nanoparticles. Discovery of zwitterionic adsorption states of amino acids on Pd(111). First structure determinations of adsorbed amino acids and identification of tetrameric chiral template structures. Exploration of the enantiospecific interaction of PO and R-3-MCHO adsorption on chirally modified Cu(100), Cu(110) and Cu(111). One-to-One Interactions Determination of cinchona orientation on Pt surfaces in situ at the solid-liquid interface using FT-IRAS. Systematic study of the influence of solution properties on the adsorption of modified cinchonas alkaloids onto Pt surfaces. Correlation of cinchona adsorption with catalytic activity, as affected by concentration, the nature of the solvent, and dissolved gases in the liquid phase. Measurement of enantioselective chemisorption on 1-(1-naphthyl) ethylamine (NEA) modified Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces. Imaging of chiral docking complexes between NEA and methyl pyruvate on Pd(111). Chiral Catalyst Synthesis Anchoring of cinchona alkaloid to surfaces Synthesis of chiral Au nanoparticles and demonstration of their enantiospecific interactions with R- and S-PO. Elucidation of the driving forces for chiral imprinting of Cu(100) by L- and D-lysine to form Cu(3,1,17)R&S facets.

  1. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Fox, Kevin M.

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced glass formulations will reduce the cost of Hanford tank waste management by reducing the schedule for tank waste treatment and reducing the amount of HLW glass for storage, transportation, and disposal. Additional benefits will be realized if advanced glasses are developed that demonstrate more tolerance for key components in the waste (such as Al2O3, Cr2O3, SO3 and Na2O) above the currently defined WTP constraints. Tolerating these higher concentrations of key waste loading limiters may reduce the burden on (or even eliminate the need for) leaching to remove Cr and Al and washing to remove excess S and Na from the HLW fraction. Advanced glass formulations may also make direct vitrification of the HLW fraction without significant pretreatment more cost effective. Finally, the advanced glass formulation efforts seek not only to increase waste loading in glass, but also to increase glass production rate. When coupled with higher waste loading, ensuring that all of the advanced glass formulations are processable at or above the current contract processing rate leads to significant improvements in waste throughput (the amount of waste being processed per unit time),which could significantly reduce the overall WTP mission life. The integration of increased waste loading, reduced leaching/washing requirements, and improved melting rates provides a system-wide approach to improve the effectiveness of the WTP process.

  2. Improved Alumina Loading in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.; Vienna, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Peeler, D.K.; Fox, K.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Aloy, A.; Trofimenko, A.V. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gerdes, K.D. [EM-21, Office of Waste Processing, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Recent tank retrieval, blending, and treatment strategies at both the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford have identified increased amounts of high-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} waste streams that are scheduled to be processed through their respective high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities. It is well known that the addition of small amounts of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses generally enhances the durability of the waste glasses. However, at higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) formation can result in a severe deterioration of the chemical durability of the slowly cooled glass near the center of the canister. Additionally, higher concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} generally increase the liquidus temperature of the melt and decrease the processing rate. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) are jointly performing laboratory and scaled-melter tests, through US Department of Energy, EM-21 Office of Waste Processing program, to develop glass formulations with increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. These glasses are formulated for specific DOE waste compositions at Hanford and Savannah River Site. The objectives are to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints such as viscosity, liquidus temperature, and glass durability. This paper summarizes the results of recent tests of simulated Hanford HLW glasses containing up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in glass. In summary: Glasses with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading ranging from 25 to 27 wt% were formulated and tested at a crucible scale. Successful glass formulations with up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} that do not precipitate nepheline during CCC treatment and had spinel crystals 1 vol% or less after 24 hr heat treatment at 950 deg. C were obtained. The selected glass, HAL-17 with 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, had viscosity and electrical conductivity within the boundaries for adequate processing in the Joule heated melters operated at 1150 deg. C. This HAL-17 glass was successfully processed using small-scale (SMK) and larger scale (EP-5) melters. There was no indication of spinel settling during processing. The product glass samples from these melter tests contained 1 to 4 vol% spinel crystals that are likely formed during cooling. The PCT tests on the product glasses are underway. The present study demonstrated that it is possible to formulate the glasses with up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} that satisfy the property requirements and is processable with Joule-heated melters operated at 1150 deg. C. The 'nepheline discriminator' for HAL-17 glass is 0.45, which supports that claim that the current rule ('nepheline discriminator' < 0.62) is too restrictive. Considering that the cost of HLW treatment is highly dependent on loading of waste in glass, this result provides a potential for significant cost saving for Hanford. The maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading that can be achieved will also depend on concentrations of other components in wastes. For example, the loading of waste used in this study was also limited by the spinel crystallization after 950 deg. C 24 hr heat treatment, which suggests that the concentrations of spinel-forming components such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, ZnO, and MnO would be critical in addition to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading achievable. The observed glass production rate per unit melter surface area of 0.75 MT/(d.m{sup 2}) for SMK test is comparable to the design capacity of WTP HLW melters at 0.8 MT/(d.m{sup 2}). However, the test with EP-5 melter achieved 0.38 MT/(d.m{sup 2}), which is roughly a half of the WTP design capacity. This result may imply that the glass with 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} may not achieve the WTP design production rate. However, this hypothesis is not conclusive because of unknown effects of melter size and operation

  3. Groundwater Level Status Report for Fiscal Year 2007 - Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon P. Allen, Richard J. Koch

    2008-03-17

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2007 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 166 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 25 intermediate wells, and 96 alluvial wells, and 11 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 133 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  4. A detection-level hazardous waste ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 200 areas low-level burial grounds and retrievable storage units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    This plan defines the actions needed to achieve detection-level monitoring compliance at the Hanford Site 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Compliance will be achieved through characterization of the hydrogeology and monitoring of the ground water beneath the LLBG located in the Hanford Site 200 Areas. 13 refs., 20 figs.

  5. Toward TW-Level, Hard X-Ray Pulses at LCLS (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward TW-Level, Hard X-Ray Pulses at LCLS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward TW-Level, Hard X-Ray Pulses at LCLS You are accessing a document from the Department ...

  6. Resonant Level Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Power of Bi2Te3...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resonant Level Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Power of Bi2Te3 with Tin Resonant Level Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Power of Bi2Te3 with Tin Application to practical p-type...

  7. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal July 20, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis ...

  8. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) A transuranic (TRU) waste shipment makes its way to the ...

  9. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Sea Grant has partnered with the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe and Adaptation International to develop local sea level rise projections and sea level scenario maps for the Jamestown S...

  10. EIS-0388: Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at the Los...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    88: Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico EIS-0388: Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at the Los Alamos National ...

  11. The demonstration of continuous stirred tank reactor operations with high level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, R.A.

    2000-07-19

    This report contains the results of testing performed at the request of High Level Waste Engineering. These tests involved the operation of two continuous stirred tank reactors with high level waste.

  12. EIS-0305: Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level at the Oak...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transuranic (TRU)Alpha Low-Level at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0305: Treating Transuranic (TRU)Alpha Low-Level at the Oak Ridge National ...

  13. Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear ...

  14. Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) ...

  15. Micro-level Practices to Adapt to Climate Change for African...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    level Practices to Adapt to Climate Change for African Small-scale Farmers Jump to: navigation, search Name Micro-level Practices to Adapt to Climate Change for African Small-scale...

  16. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and ...

  17. Taking Solar Training for Veterans to a New Level in 2016 | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Taking Solar Training for Veterans to a New Level in 2016 Taking Solar Training for Veterans to a New Level in 2016 January 6, 2016 - 12:30pm Addthis Taking Solar Training for...

  18. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since January 2011...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    level since January 2011 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level since January 2011 at 3.12 a gallon on Monday. That's down 8.7

  19. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since January 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    price falls to lowest level since January 2011 The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to its lowest level since January 2011 at 3.42 a gallon on Monday. ...

  20. AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Siemens-VersiCharge Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 - November

  1. Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste ...

  2. Operating Experience Level 3 2012-01: Control of Sealed Radioactive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operating Experience Level 3 2012-01: Control of Sealed Radioactive Sources Operating Experience Level 3 2012-01: Control of Sealed Radioactive Sources February 1, 2012 OE-3 ...

  3. Property:Geothermal/DoeFundingLevelToDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:GeothermalDoeFundingLevelToDate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeothermalDoeFundingLevelToDate Property Type Number...

  4. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- Ultra Low-Level Underground Counting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Ultra Low-Level Underground Counting Facility Working with SRNL Our Facilities - Ultra Low-Level Underground Counting Facility The Ultra Low-Level Underground Counting Facility is the only facility of its kind in the country. This facility is located 50 feet below ground level, and has four-inch thick walls of pre-nuclear weapons era steel. This allows highly sensitive measurements of ultra-low amounts of environmental radioactivity, free from interference by background radiatio

  5. Immobilization and Waste Form Product Acceptance for Low Level and TRU Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtzscheiter, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Harbour, J.R.

    1998-05-01

    The Tanks Focus Area is supporting technology development in immobilization of both High Level (HLW) and Low Level (LLW) radioactive wastes. The HLW process development at Hanford and Idaho is patterned closely after that of the Savannah River (Defense Waste Processing Facility) and West Valley Sites (West Valley Demonstration Project). However, the development and options open to addressing Low Level Waste are diverse and often site specific. To start, it is important to understand the breadth of Low Level Wastes categories.

  6. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans

  7. Report on Separate Disposal of Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a report on the separate disposal of defense high-level radioactive waste and commercial nuclear waste.

  8. 1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. CCSI Technology Readiness Levels Likelihood Model (TRL-LM) Users Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2013-03-26

    This is the manual for the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) Technology Readiness Level Likelihood model based on PNNL velo.

  10. Commercial low-level radioactive waste transportation liability and radiological risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.J.; Brown, O.F. II; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-08-01

    This report was prepared for States, compact regions, and other interested parties to address two subjects related to transporting low-level radioactive waste to disposal facilities. One is the potential liabilities associated with low-level radioactive waste transportation from the perspective of States as hosts to low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The other is the radiological risks of low-level radioactive waste transportation for drivers, the public, and disposal facility workers.

  11. The role of seniority-zero states in nuclear level densities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Åberg, S.; Carlsson, B. G.; Døssing, Th.; Möller, P.

    2015-06-01

    At low excitation energies seniority-zero states dominate the level density of K=0 bands in deformed even–even nuclei, while they play no role at higher excitation energies. We describe the level densities in a Fermi-gas model as well as in a combinatorial level-density model and compare to detailed experimental data for some rare-earth nuclei.

  12. The role of seniority-zero states in nuclear level densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    berg, S.; Carlsson, B. G.; Dssing, Th.; Mller, P.

    2015-06-01

    At low excitation energies seniority-zero states dominate the level density of K=0 bands in deformed eveneven nuclei, while they play no role at higher excitation energies. We describe the level densities in a Fermi-gas model as well as in a combinatorial level-density model and compare to detailed experimental data for some rare-earth nuclei.

  13. Elevated voltage level I.sub.DDQ failure testing of integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righter, Alan W.

    1996-01-01

    Burn in testing of static CMOS IC's is eliminated by I.sub.DDQ testing at elevated voltage levels. These voltage levels are at least 25% higher than the normal operating voltage for the IC but are below voltage levels that would cause damage to the chip.

  14. Elevated voltage level I{sub DDQ} failure testing of integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Righter, A.W.

    1996-05-21

    Burn in testing of static CMOS IC`s is eliminated by I{sub DDQ} testing at elevated voltage levels. These voltage levels are at least 25% higher than the normal operating voltage for the IC but are below voltage levels that would cause damage to the chip. 4 figs.

  15. AVTA: Clipper Creek AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy ClipperCreek AC Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon Clipper Creek AC Level 2 - February 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Eaton

  16. AVTA: Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Eaton AC Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory. PDF icon Eaton AC Level 2 - February 2012 More Documents & Publications AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Clipper Creek

  17. Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy | Department of Energy Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy: This document responds to DOE questions regarding smart grid policy. The approach followed herein is to write concise comments addressing the overall RFI document at a higher level. PDF icon High-Level Response to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy More Documents

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ 0.0 ± 25 a (1 - , 2 - ); 2 0.210 ± 40 b 1 + 100 ± 70 keV 0.470 ± 30 c 360 ± 20 keV 0.670 ± 200 d (2 - ) 0.1 ± 0.1 MeV 1.370 ± 80 b (2 - , 1 - ) 200 ± 70 keV ≈ 1.6 MeV e 2.330 ± 100 b (1 + , 3 + ) 1.2 ± 0.4 MeV 2.820 ± 70 b (1 - , 2 + ) 0.3 ± 0.2 MeV 4.160 ± 100 b 120 ± 80 keV 4.600 ± 100 b (3 - , 2 + ) 0.2 ± 0.1 MeV 5.2 ± 200 f ≈ 0.4 MeV 5.7 ± 100 b 200 ± 100 keV a Ground state is at E rel ( 9 Li + n) = 25 keV (2003AU03); %n =

  19. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. not observed p 0.84 ± 400 (1 + ) 2.3 ± 1.6

  20. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 O from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. 0 + ; 2 ≈ 0.40 ± 0.25 (p)